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Handel & Hendrix in London, London | Tourist Information


25 Brook Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 4HB

020 7495 1685

Separated by a wall & 200 years are the homes of two musicians who chose London & changed music. Welcome to Handel & Hendrix in London

Historical Place Near Handel & Hendrix in London

Madame Tussauds London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LR
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

0871 894 3000

Trafalgar Square
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 5

20-79301565

Trafalgar Square is a public square in the City of Westminster, Central London, built around the area formerly known as Charing Cross. Its name commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, a British naval victory in the Napoleonic Wars with France and Spain that took place on 21 October 1805 off the coast of Cape Trafalgar, Spain.The site of Trafalgar Square had been a significant landmark since the 13th century and originally contained the King's Mews. After George IV moved the mews to Buckingham Palace, the area was redeveloped by John Nash but progress was slow after his death and the square did not open until 1844. The 169ft Nelson's Column at its centre is guarded by four lion statues. A number of commemorative statues and sculptures occupy the square but the Fourth Plinth, left empty since 1840, has been host to contemporary art since 1999.The square has been used for community gatherings and political demonstrations including Bloody Sunday, the first Aldermaston March, anti-war protests, and campaigns against climate change. A Christmas tree has been donated to the square by Norway since 1947 and is erected for twelve days before and after Christmas Day. The square is a centre of annual celebrations on New Year's Eve. It was well known for its feral pigeons until their removal in the early 21st century.

Piccadilly Circus
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Picadilly Circus
London, United Kingdom W1V 9LB

Piccadilly Circus è una celebre piazza di Londra, nonché luogo di ritrovo, cuore morale della città, situata nella City of Westminster.Costruita nel 1819 per collegare Regent Street con l'omonima Piccadilly (importante strada dello shopping) è diventata col passare degli anni uno dei principali punti di snodo del traffico cittadino. La sua felice posizione, nel cuore del West End londinese, e la vicinanza con importanti luoghi di interesse come i teatri di Shaftesbury Avenue o strade come Coventry Street e The Haymarket ricchissime di negozi e locali alla moda, hanno reso Piccadilly Circus un affollato punto di ritrovo, nonché una vera e propria attrattiva turistica tanto da diventare uno dei simboli stessi di Londra.Famosa per i display luminosi e le insegne a LED posizionate su di un edificio posto al lato settentrionale della stessa e per la celebre Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain che rappresenta «l'Angelo della Carità Cristiana» (ma realizzata da Alfred Gilbert come "Anteros" anche se è nota ai più col nome di "Eros"), la piazza è circondata da imponenti edifici quali il London Pavilion (sede di numerosi negozi e del Trocadero) ed il Criterion Theatre. Inoltre direttamente sotto il perimetro della piazza c'è l'omonima stazione della metropolitana di Londra.le banane sono blu e bo poi il kebab fa schifo

Buckingham Palace London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1AA

020 7930 4832

Marble Arch
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1H 7

870-2427114

Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch and London landmark. The structure was designed by John Nash in 1827 to be the state entrance to the cour d'honneur of Buckingham Palace; it stood near the site of what is today the three bayed, central projection of the palace containing the well known balcony. In 1851 it was relocated and following the widening of Park Lane in the early 1960s is now sited, isolated and incongruously, on a large traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street, Park Lane, and Edgware Road.Historically, only members of the Royal Family and the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery are permitted to pass through the arch; this happens only in ceremonial processions.The arch gives its name to the vicinity of its site, particularly, the southern portion of Edgware Road and also to the nearby underground station.Design and constructionThe design of the arch is based on that of the Arch of Constantine in Rome and the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel in Paris. The arch is faced with Carrara marble with embellishments of marble extracted near Seravezza. John Flaxman was chosen to make the commemorative sculpture. After his death in 1826 the commission was divided between Sir Richard Westmacott, Edward Hodges Baily and J.C.F. Rossi. In 1829, a bronze equestrian statue of George IV was commissioned from Sir Francis Chantrey, with the intention of placing it on top of the arch.

Horse Guards
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Horse Guards Parade
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

020 7270 5000

Horse Guards is a large Grade I listed building in the Palladian style between Whitehall and Horse Guards Parade in London. The first Horse Guards building was built on the site of the former tiltyard of Westminster Palace in 1664. It was demolished in 1749 and was replaced by the current building which was built between 1750 and 1753 by John Vardy after the death of original architect in 1748 William Kent. Horse Guards Road runs north-south on the western boundary of the parade ground, while Horse Guards Avenue runs east from Whitehall on other side of the building, to Victoria Embankment.The building served as the offices of the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces until 1904 when the post was abolished and replaced by the Chief of the General Staff. The Chief of the General staff moved to the Old War Office Building in 1906 and Horse Guards subsequently became the headquarters of two major Army commands: the London District and the Household Cavalry. The building is the formal entrance to St James's Palace via St. James's Park (though this is now entirely symbolic). Only the monarch is allowed to drive through its central archway, or those given a pass (formerly made of ivory).

Methodist Central Hall Westminster
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Storeys Gate
London, United Kingdom SW1H 9NH

0044 20 7654 3809

Wellington Arch
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Constitution Hill
London, United Kingdom W1J 7JZ

0207 9302726

Set in the heart of Royal London at Hyde Park Corner, Wellington Arch is a landmark for Londoners and visitors alike and a great addition to a memorable day out in London. The balconies also offer unique views across London and of the Household Cavalry, passing beneath on their way to and from the Changing of the Guard at Horse Guards Parade every morning. It was originally commissioned as a grand outer entrance to Buckingham Palace and moved to its present site in 1882.

BT Tower
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
60 Cleveland Mews
London, United Kingdom W1T 6

020 7432 5050

The BT Tower is a communications tower located in Fitzrovia, London, owned by BT Group. It has been previously known as the GPO Tower, the Post Office Tower and the Telecom Tower. The main structure is 177m high, with a further section of aerial rigging bringing the total height to 191m. It should not be confused with the BT Centre (the global headquarters of BT). Its Post Office code was YTOW.Upon completion it overtook the Millbank Tower to become the tallest building in both London and the United Kingdom, titles it held until 1980, when it in turn was overtaken by the NatWest Tower.History20th centuryThe tower was commissioned by the General Post Office (GPO). Its primary purpose was to support the microwave aerials then used to carry telecommunications traffic from London to the rest of the country, as part of Britain's microwave network.It replaced a much shorter steel lattice tower which had been built on the roof of the neighbouring Museum telephone exchange in the late 1940s to provide a television link between London and Birmingham. The taller structure was required to protect the radio links' "line of sight" against some of the tall buildings in London then in the planning stage. These links were routed via other GPO microwave stations at Harrow Weald, Bagshot, Kelvedon Hatch and Fairseat, and to places like the London Air Traffic Control Centre at West Drayton.

Shakespeare's Head Pub
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Carnaby St
London, United Kingdom W1F 7

+4420 7734 2911

The Official Facebook Page for The Shakespeares Head, Oxford Circus, London.

Trafalgar Studios
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
14 Whitehall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

Trafalgar Studios, formerly the Whitehall Theatre until 2004, is a West End theatre in Whitehall, near Trafalgar Square, in the City of Westminster, London.Also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation, the building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. Studio 1, the larger of the two spaces with 380 seats, opened on 3 June 2004 with the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Othello. Studio 2, with 100 seats, opened in October 2005 with the play Cyprus.History1930 to 1996The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. It had 634 seats. The theatre opened on 29 September 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre's licensee. In November 1933 Henry Daniell appeared there as Portman in Afterwards. Hackett presented several other plays of his own before leaving in 1934, and the theatre built its reputation for modern comedies throughout the rest of the decade. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the West End. In 1942, The Whitehall Follies, featuring Phyllis Dixey, the first stripper to perform in the theatre district, opened with great fanfare and became an immediate success. Dixey leased the theatre and remained in it for the next five years.

Churchill War Rooms
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Clive Steps, King Charles Street
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2AQ

0207 930 6961

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St James's Palace
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

The Victoria Pub, Paddington
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
10A Strathearn Place
London, United Kingdom W2 2NH

020 7724 1191

About The Victoria was built at the same time as Paddington Station (Around 1838). It was always slightly grander than the surrounding pubs and was used by many of the butlers that served in the large houses in the area. Legend has it that Queen Victoria stopped off on her way to Paddington Station, and after that the pub was named in her honour and appointed in it's rather grand style. Charles Dickens spent time writing "Our Mutual Friend" in the pub, and it also appears in two clips from British Pathe news. After the Second World War it was taken over by some theatrical types that converted the upstairs rooms as you see today. In days gone by there have been many celebrities who have either been regulars, or who have just popped in for a drink. Most recently, we have had guests such as Liam Gallagher and his family, Claudio Ranieri, Ronnie Wood, and Damien Hirst. Keira Knightley used to be a regular, and you’d recognise plenty of other faces enjoying a discreet drink.

Scotland Yard
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Broadway, Westminster
City of Westminster, United Kingdom SW1H 0AZ

02072301212

Scotland Yard is a metonym for the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Service, the territorial police force responsible for policing most of London.The name derives from the location of the original Metropolitan Police headquarters at 4 Whitehall Place, which had a rear entrance on a street called Great Scotland Yard. The Scotland Yard entrance became the public entrance to the police station, and over time the street and the Metropolitan Police became synonymous. The New York Times wrote in 1964 that just as Wall Street gave its name to New York's financial district, Scotland Yard became the name for police activity in London.The force moved away from Great Scotland Yard in 1890, and the name New Scotland Yard was adopted for the subsequent headquarters. The current New Scotland Yard is located on Broadway in Victoria and has been the Metropolitan Police's headquarters since 1967. In summer 2013, it was announced that the force would move back to the former site of Scotland Yard, the Curtis Green Building, which is located on the Victoria Embankment and the headquarters will be renamed Scotland Yard.

The Banqueting House
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Whitehall House, 41 Whitehall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2ER

+44 (0) 844 482 7777

This revolutionary building, the first in England to be designed in a Palladian style by Inigo Jones, was finished in 1622 for James I. Intended for the splendour and exuberance of court masques, the Banqueting House is probably most famous for one real life drama: the execution of Charles I which took place here in 1649 to the ‘dismal, universal groan’ of the crowd. One of Charles’ last sights was he walked through the Banqueting House to his death was the magnificent ceiling, painted by Peter Paul Rubens in 1630-4.

Downing Street
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
st. Downing
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

020 7270 3000

Downing Street in London, United Kingdom, has for more than three hundred years housed the official residences of two of the most senior British Cabinet ministers: the First Lord of the Treasury, an office now synonymous with that of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom; and the Second Lord of the Treasury, an office held by the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The Prime Minister's official residence is 10 Downing Street; the Chancellor's official residence is next door at Number 11. The government's Chief Whip has an official residence at Number 12, although the current Chief Whip's residence is at Number 9.Downing Street is in Whitehall in central London, a few minutes' walk from the Houses of Parliament and a little further from Buckingham Palace. The street was built in the 1680s by Sir George Downing on the site of a mansion, Hampden House. The houses on the south side of the street were demolished in the 19th century to make way for government offices now occupied by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. "Downing Street" is used as a metonym for the Government of the United Kingdom.

Inside Buckingham Palace
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace, London SW1A 1AA
London, United Kingdom

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Royal Mews
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace Road
London, United Kingdom SW1W 0SR

020 7766 7302

A Royal Mews is a mews (i.e. combined stables, carriage house and in recent times also the garage) of the British Royal Family. In London the Royal Mews has occupied two main sites, formerly at Charing Cross, and since the 1820s at Buckingham Palace. Many open days are held each year.Charing CrossThe first set of stables to be referred to as a mews was at Charing Cross at the western end of The Strand. The royal hawks were kept at this site from 1377 and the name derives from the fact that they were confined there at moulting (or "mew") time.The building was destroyed by fire in 1534 and rebuilt as a stables, keeping its former name when it acquired this new function. On old maps, such as the "Woodcut" map of London of the early 1560s, the Mews can be seen extending back towards the site of today's Leicester Square.This building was usually known as the King's Mews, but was also sometimes referred to as the Royal Mews, the Royal Stables, or as the Queen's Mews when there was a woman on the throne. It was rebuilt again in 1732 to the designs of William Kent, and in the early 19th century it was open to the public. It was an impressive classical building, and there was an open space in front of it which ranked among the larger ones in central London at a time when the Royal Parks were on the fringes of the city and the gardens of London's squares were open only to the residents of the surrounding houses.

Marble Arch
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
63-79 SEYMOUR STREET
London, United Kingdom W2 2HF

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History Museum Near Handel & Hendrix in London

Natural History Museum, London
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
Cromwell Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 5BD

+44 (0)20 7942 5000

The Natural History Museum in London is a treasure in every way. Join us for updates on our science, collections and all our activities. Read our blogs: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/blogs Get help from our ID experts: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/identification Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NHM_London Watch our films on YouTube: http://youtube.com/naturalhistorymuseum

Imperial War Museum London
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Lambeth Road, London SE1 6HZ
London, United Kingdom SE1 6

020 7416 5000

IWM London tells the stories of those whose lives have been shaped by war from the First World War to the present day. Follow us on Facebook and join our growing community of fans. Discover in-depth information about IWM London, special content, and discuss and share with others.

National Portrait Gallery
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
St Martin’s Place
London, United Kingdom WC2H 0

+44(0)20 7306 0055

London Transport Museum
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Covent Garden Piazza
London, United Kingdom WC2E 8

020 7379 6344

Broadcasting House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
BBC Broadcasting House Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AA

020 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

Imperial War Museum
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Lambeth Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 6HZ

Imperial War Museums is a British national museum organisation with branches at five locations in England, three of which are in London. Founded as the Imperial War Museum in 1917, the museum was intended to record the civil and military war effort and sacrifice of Britain and its Empire during the First World War. The museum's remit has since expanded to include all conflicts in which British or Commonwealth forces have been involved since 1914. As of 2012, the museum aims 'to provide for, and to encourage, the study and understanding of the history of modern war and "wartime experience"'.Originally housed in the Crystal Palace at Sydenham Hill, the museum opened to the public in 1920. In 1924 the museum moved to space in the Imperial Institute in South Kensington, and finally in 1936 the museum acquired a permanent home which was previously the Bethlem Royal Hospital in Southwark. The outbreak of the Second World War saw the museum expand both its collections and its terms of reference, but in the post-war period the museum entered a period of decline. The 1960s saw the museum redevelop its Southwark building, now referred to as Imperial War Museum London, which serves as the organisation's corporate headquarters. During the 1970s the museum began to expand onto other sites. The first, in 1976, was a historic airfield in Cambridgeshire now referred to as IWM Duxford. In 1978 the Royal Navy cruiser became a branch of the museum, having previously been preserved for the nation by a private trust. In 1984 the Cabinet War Rooms, an underground wartime command centre, was opened to the public. From the 1980s onwards the museum's Bethlem building underwent a series of multimillion-pound redevelopments, completed in 2000. Finally, 2002 saw the opening of IWM North in Trafford, Greater Manchester, the fifth branch of the museum and the first in the north of England. In 2011 the museum rebranded itself as IWM, standing for 'Imperial War Museums'.

Natural History Museum Ice Rink
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
Cromwell Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 5BD

+44 (0)20 7942 5000

National History Muesem
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
Exhibition Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 2

020 7942 5000

Churchill War Rooms
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Clive Steps, King Charles Street
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2AQ

0207 930 6961

Follow us on Facebook and join our growing community of fans. Discover in-depth information about Churchill War Rooms, special content, and discuss and share with others.

Bond in Motion, Film Museum
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
45 Wellington Street
London, United Kingdom WC2E 7BN

020 3617 3010

The Charles Dickens Museum
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
48 Doughty Street
London, United Kingdom WC1N 2LX

0207 405 2127

The Egyptian Room, the British Museum
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Great Russell Street
London, United Kingdom WC1B 5

020 7323 8299

Florence Nightingale Museum
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
2 Lambeth Palace Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 7EW

+44 (0) 20 7620 0374

The Cartoon Museum
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
35 Little Russell Street
London, United Kingdom WC1A 2HH

02075808155

The Household Cavalry Museum and Shop
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Horse Guards, Whitehall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2AX

0207 930 3070

Visit the Household Cavalry Museum to learn about the British Army's two senior regiments, The Life Guards and The Blues and Royals, and see their working stables through a large glass screen. Visit our website for opening times and our online shop.

Sir John Soane's Museum
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
13 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, United Kingdom WC2A 3BP

Sir John Soane's Museum was formerly the home of the neo-classical architect John Soane. It holds many drawings and models of Soane's projects and the collections of paintings, drawings and antiquities that he assembled.The museum is located in Holborn, London, adjacent to Lincoln's Inn Fields. It is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.HistoryHousesSoane demolished and rebuilt three houses in succession on the north side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. He began with No. 12 (between 1792 and 1794), externally a plain brick house. After becoming Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy in 1806, Soane purchased No. 13, the house next door, today the Museum, and rebuilt it in two phases in 1808–09 and 1812.In 1808–09 he constructed his drawing office and "museum" on the site of the former stable block at the back, using primarily top lighting. In 1812 he rebuilt the front part of the site, adding a projecting Portland Stone facade to the basement, ground and first floor levels and the centre bay of the second floor. Originally this formed three open loggias, but Soane glazed the arches during his lifetime. Once he had moved into No. 13, Soane rented out his former home at No. 12 (on his death it was left to the nation along with No. 13, the intention being that the rental income would fund the running of the Museum).

The Foundling Museum
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
40 Brunswick Square
London, United Kingdom WC1N 1AX

020 7841 3600

Museum of the Order of St John
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Museum of the Order of St John, St John's Gate, St John's Lane, Clerkenwell
London, United Kingdom EC1M 4DA

020 7324 4005

The Museum of the Order of St John tells a unique and fascinating story — the story of the Order of St John — from its origins in eleventh century Jerusalem, through to its role today with St John Ambulance and the St John Eye Hospital in Jerusalem. This story highlights how, from founding a hospital to care for sick pilgrims in eleventh century Jerusalem, St John has maintained its caring role to the present day, working on numerous humanitarian projects worldwide. The Museum occupies two sites in Clerkenwell: St John’s Gate, which dates from 1504; and the Priory Church of St John with its surviving Twelfth Century Crypt. You can find us on Twitter too! @StJohnsGate (https://twitter.com/StJohnsGate)

Dr Johnson's House
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
17 Gough Square
London, United Kingdom EC4A 3DE

020 7353 3745

Museum of Comedy
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
The Undercroft, St Georges Church, Bloomsbury Way
London, United Kingdom WC1A 2SR

020 7534 1744

Founded by Leicester Square Theatre director Martin Witts, the Museum of Comedy is a brand new, immersive museum and performance venue, featuring iconic props and artefacts from our rich comedic history and housing one of the most comprehensive collections of Comedy memorabilia ever to be amassed in one place. The museum has been lovingly put together by Martin from his collection of over six thousand artefacts and print from some the most iconic comedians and comedy shows both past and present, amassed during his career spanning over three decades in the comedy industry. See comic artefacts from Tommy Cooper’s handmade magic props to Steptoe and Son’s stuffed bear! Plus Leicester Square Theatre favourite Bill Bailey’s iconic 6-neck guitar. Accompanying the collection will be revolving exhibitions, currently Steve Ullathorne’s stylish and contemporary images of current comedy stars The Comic Collection. Museum facilities include The Cooper Room, a state of the art traditional performance space hosting all kinds of comedy performance, from theatre and stand up to silent film. The Museum is also home to The Comedy Academy, an educational facility for comedy writing performance and production. The Museum of Comedy. Shining a light on the stars of British comedy. See What's On: http://bit.ly/25WAU79 @museumofcomedy www.museumofcomedy.com

Performance Venue Near Handel & Hendrix in London

Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
47 Frith Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 4

020 7439 0747

Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club is a prominent jazz club which has operated in London, England since 1959.The club opened on 30 October 1959 in a basement at 39 Gerrard Street in London's Soho district. It was set up and managed by musicians Ronnie Scott and Pete King. In 1965 it moved to a larger venue nearby at 47 Frith Street. The original venue continued in operation as the "Old Place" until the lease ran out in 1967, and was used for performances by the up-and-coming generation of musicians.Zoot Sims was the club's first transatlantic visitor in 1962, and was succeeded by many others (often saxophonists whom Scott and King, tenor saxophonists themselves, admired, such as Johnny Griffin, Lee Konitz, Sonny Rollins and Sonny Stitt) in the years that followed. Many UK jazz musicians were also regularly featured, including Tubby Hayes and Dick Morrissey who would both drop in for jam sessions with the visiting stars. In the mid-1960s, Ernest Ranglin was the house guitarist. The club's house pianist until 1967 was Stan Tracey. For nearly 30 years it was home of a Christmas residency to George Melly and John Chilton's Feetwarmers. In 1978, the club established the label Ronnie Scott's Jazz House, which issued both live performances from the club and new recordings.

Jersey Boys UK
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly Theatre, 16 Denman St
London, United Kingdom W1D 7DY

0844 8717630 Calls cost 7p per minute, plus your phone company's access charge.

WINNER of 57 major awards worldwide, including the Olivier Award for BEST NEW MUSICAL. JERSEY BOYS, the internationally acclaimed hit musical, tells the remarkable rise to stardom of one of the most successful bands in pop music history. Discover how four New Jersey boys from the wrong side of the tracks invented their own unique sound, were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and sold 100 million records worldwide. With spectacular performances of all their hits, JERSEY BOYS is the electrifying true life story of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons; the mob, the heartaches, the triumphs and the music. This sensational production features many of the bands worldwide hits, including: BEGGIN', CAN'T TAKE MY EYES OFF YOU, DECEMBER 1963 (OH WHAT A NIGHT), WALK LIKE A MAN, BYE BYE BABY (BABY GOODBYE), SHERRY, BIG GIRLS DON'T CRY and many more. Jersey Boys is playing 8 times a week at the Piccadilly Theatre in London.

Piccadilly Theatre
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly Theatre, 16 Denman Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 7DY

02089692308

This breathtaking musical staging of one of the most popular films of all time promises to be a gripping roller-coaster ride of romance, drama and excitement.

Soho Theatre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
21 Dean Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 3NE

020 7478 0100

'Its cool blue neon lights, front-of-house café and late-night shows may blend it into the Soho landscape, but since taking up residence on Dean Street in 2000 Soho Theatre has made quite a name for itself.' Time Out Bang in the creative heart of London, Soho Theatre is a major new writing theatre and a writers’ development organisation of national significance. With a programme spanning theatre, comedy, cabaret and writers’ events and home to a lively bar, Soho Theatre is one of the most vibrant venues on London’s cultural scene. Soho Theatre owns its own Central London venue housing the intimate 150-seat Soho Theatre, our 90-seat Soho Upstairs and our cabaret space, Soho Downstairs. Under the joint leadership of Soho’s Artistic Director Steve Marmion and Executive Director Mark Godfrey, Soho Theatre now welcomes 167,000 people a year.

Rah Rah Room London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
215-217 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 9HN

+44 (0) 203 588 1100

Rah Rah Room London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
215-217 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 9HN

+44 (0) 203 588 1100

The 100 Club
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
100 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 1LL

020 7636 0933

The Jazz Era Live music began at 100 Oxford Street on 24th October 1942. It was first played at Mack's restaurant (as it was then known) when British jazz drummer Victor Feldman's father hired the venue on a regular Sunday night to showcase the talents of his jazz loving sons and their band. The band consisted of Victor and his two brothers Robert on clarinet and Monty on accordion. They were joined by legendary British saxophonist Jimmy Skidmore for the opening night. News of the venue spread and American servicemen and Britons who wanted to dance and listen to jazz began to arrive. Some of the GIs were well known as jazz musicians in their own right. An early visitor to the club in those days was big band legend Glen Miller, who appeared at the Club around this time accompanied by several members of his famous band including Ray McKinley, Mel Powell and Peanuts Hucko. This was during World War 2 and quite often as people enjoyed their night out, bombs were falling, but the crowd carried on regardless - safe in the knowledge that the club's location in the basement made it a very effective shelter. In fact the Feldman's advertising at the time read 'Forget the Doodle bug-Come and Jitterbug-At the Feldman Club'. Soon the likes of Jack Parnell and George Webb were performing on a regular basis and the club started to enjoy its first period of success. By 1948 the club's name had changed to the London Jazz Club and reintroduced the dance music of the era - Jitterbug and Swing. In the 1950s when Lyn Dutton became the new leaseholder - Lyn was Humphrey Lyttelton's agent and decided to name the club after his hugely popular client. The Humphrey Lyttelton Club scored a major coup in 1956 when the legendary New Orleans band leader and trumpeter Louis Armstrong played with his band during a break on his British tour with the Lyttelton. Other visitors to the club around that time included the great Billie Holliday who came to listen to The Alex Welsh Band. In 1958 the Humphrey Lyttelton Band had a Top Twenty hit with 'Bad Penny Blues'. Unwittingly for Humph, this became one of the records to kick start the 'Trad Jazz' boom over the next few years. 'Trad' was to become absolutely huge in Britain from 1959 into the early 1960's with the club at its epicentre. Bands such as Humph's and the Chris Barber Jazz and Blues Band had been playing at the club on a regular basis but became so big that they were now concert hall outfits. So in came the Trad Jazz scene - the likes of Acker Bilk, Kenny Ball and Terry Lightfoot all played the club. The Blues comes to the 100 Club The 100 Club as we know it today was born in the mid 1960s. Chris Barber had been bringing some of the finest American Blues artists to Britain and soon they were treading the boards and wooing the crowds at the 100 Club. Huge names like: Muddy Waters, Little Brother Montgomery, Cousin Joe Pleasant, Albert King, Sunnyland Slim, Otis Span, Jimmy Rushing, Louisiana Red, Bo Diddley and B.B. King, alongside their American soul cousins Jackie Wilson and George Jackson. The British Blues and Beat scene was also well represented in this period with Steam Packet featuring Rod Stewart, Long John Baldry and Julie Driscoll appearing, along with Alexis Korner, John Mayall's Bluesbreakers and The Animals. Many bands who went on to become world famous also played the club at this time including The Who, The Kinks, The Pretty Things and The Spencer Davis Group. The Seventies The '70s saw some of the toughest times in the club's history. The unions' work to rule policy and the subsequent three day week reduced the public's spending money. Electricity was automatically switched off between 6 and 9pm. This meant either closure on these nights or later opening hours. There were bright spots, noticeably the appearance of Maynard Ferguson and the success of the live pirate radio broadcasts by Radio London (the first time DJs learnt their trade at the Club), but it was becoming increasingly difficult to attract customers to the Club. Punk! The mood of the nation eventually manifested itself in the biggest music phenomenon since Mersey Beat, and the 100 Club was the home of its dissidents! On Monday 20th and Tuesday 21st September 1976 it was host to the first ever Punk festival. On the 100 Club stage the Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Damned, Siouxsie & The Banshees, the Buzzcocks, the Vibrators and Subway Sect were seen for the first time in London. All of them were unsigned. The Melody Maker's opening line of its review stated "The 600 strong line that stretched across two blocks was indisputable evidence that a new decade in rock is about to begin." It was to be one of the most famous events in the club's history. The Punk festival of '76 also had an enormous effect on music in general. It changed the club's fortunes and its image for good. No other venue wanted to put on Punk at all so it stayed at the club on and off for the next eight or nine years incorporating its second wave with bands like UK Subs, G.B.H., Peter & the Test Tube Babies, The Exploited and Discharge. The 100 Club is still the spiritual home of the Punk movement. The Reggae Sessions Around this time another the Saturday lunchtime Reggae sessions were becoming the place in London to listen to reggae and acts that played the Club included the Equals with Eddie Grant, The Mighty Diamonds and Steel Pulse. There was also the Saturday soul club which was a big success and was hosted by Capital Radio's Greg Edwards. The famous 6T's Northern Soul All Nighter also made its 100 Club debut at this time, in May 1980 to be precise. Organised and Promoted by Northern Soul DJ and Record Collector Ady Croasdell, it is still going today and has included live sets from Soul luminaries such as Doris Troy, Ray Pollard, Barbara Acklan, Tommy Hunt, The Flirtations, Terry Callier, Lou Ragland and Tony Middleton and has had famous Northern DJ's like Ian Levene spinning the decks frequently. South African Jazz As the eighties began, yet another form of music arrived at the 100 Club. South African township music was first initiated by Chris McGregor, leader of the highly acclaimed The Blue Notes and The Brotherhood of Breath, championed the scene. Julian Bahula, the distinguished African drummer, ran a regular Friday night featuring many musicians who were political refugees isolated from their South African homeland because of the apartheid laws and who were members of the outlawed A.N.C. The weekly Friday nights became a whole movement for change. Great African musicians like Fela Kuti, Marion Makeba and Hugh Masekela appeared on the Friday night bill as did Youssou N'Dour, Thomas Mapfumo, Dudu Pukwana and Spirits Rejoice. They ran for almost ten very successful years until the release of Nelson Mandela. The Indie scene A chance phone call from concert promoter Chris York enquiring whether the club would be interested in showcasing one of his new bands started it all. The band were called Suede and in September 1992 they kicked off the club's successful period in Indie music. Over the next four years Oasis, Kula Shaker, Echobelly, Catatonia, Travis, Embrace, Cornershop, The Aloof, Heavy Stereo and Baby Bird would be just a few of the names to play the club and right up to the present day, the club has seen gigs from Semisonic, Toploader, Muse, Shack, Doves, JJ72, Jo Strummer, Squarepusher, Ocean Colour Scene and The Webb Brothers. Other highlights Over the years there have been many weekly nights dedicated to particular kinds of music. The Speakeasy Sunday evening ran for over ten years and showcased the best of British and American Blues and R'n'B. The London Swing Dance Society have been teaching people how to Jitterbug and Jive since 1988 and are still going strong. The Comedy nights have seen Al Murray, Arthur Smith, Rich Hall, Harry Hill, Bill Bailey and Mark Lamarr appear here. Mark has often DJ'd on other nights too. Jazz has continued to run through these decades of course: Humphrey Lyttelton and Chris Barber have returned frequently along with many of the British jazz names mentioned earlier. Teddy Edwards, Ruby Braff, Eddie 'Lockjaw' Davis, Lee Konitz, Al Casey, Stephane Grappelli, Barney Kessell, Herb Ellis, Charlie Byrd and Teddy Wilson to name but a few. Even 'Wild' Bill Davison has returned to play the club as a very old man. The club has remained special to many people over the years and a lot of well known bands and musicians have come back long after they met with fame and fortune. Paul Weller, who played here with The Jam during the early Punk days and is a good friend of the club, has returned on numerous occasions to showcase new material. The Rolling Stones and Metallica have used the club for secret warm up shows before world tours and festivals. We hope you'll come and experience the magic of the club - see you soon!

The 100 Club
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
100 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 1LL

020 7636 0933

The Jazz Era Live music began at 100 Oxford Street on 24th October 1942. It was first played at Mack's restaurant (as it was then known) when British jazz drummer Victor Feldman's father hired the venue on a regular Sunday night to showcase the talents of his jazz loving sons and their band. The band consisted of Victor and his two brothers Robert on clarinet and Monty on accordion. They were joined by legendary British saxophonist Jimmy Skidmore for the opening night. News of the venue spread and American servicemen and Britons who wanted to dance and listen to jazz began to arrive. Some of the GIs were well known as jazz musicians in their own right. An early visitor to the club in those days was big band legend Glen Miller, who appeared at the Club around this time accompanied by several members of his famous band including Ray McKinley, Mel Powell and Peanuts Hucko. This was during World War 2 and quite often as people enjoyed their night out, bombs were falling, but the crowd carried on regardless - safe in the knowledge that the club's location in the basement made it a very effective shelter. In fact the Feldman's advertising at the time read 'Forget the Doodle bug-Come and Jitterbug-At the Feldman Club'. Soon the likes of Jack Parnell and George Webb were performing on a regular basis and the club started to enjoy its first period of success. By 1948 the club's name had changed to the London Jazz Club and reintroduced the dance music of the era - Jitterbug and Swing. In the 1950s when Lyn Dutton became the new leaseholder - Lyn was Humphrey Lyttelton's agent and decided to name the club after his hugely popular client. The Humphrey Lyttelton Club scored a major coup in 1956 when the legendary New Orleans band leader and trumpeter Louis Armstrong played with his band during a break on his British tour with the Lyttelton. Other visitors to the club around that time included the great Billie Holliday who came to listen to The Alex Welsh Band. In 1958 the Humphrey Lyttelton Band had a Top Twenty hit with 'Bad Penny Blues'. Unwittingly for Humph, this became one of the records to kick start the 'Trad Jazz' boom over the next few years. 'Trad' was to become absolutely huge in Britain from 1959 into the early 1960's with the club at its epicentre. Bands such as Humph's and the Chris Barber Jazz and Blues Band had been playing at the club on a regular basis but became so big that they were now concert hall outfits. So in came the Trad Jazz scene - the likes of Acker Bilk, Kenny Ball and Terry Lightfoot all played the club. The Blues comes to the 100 Club The 100 Club as we know it today was born in the mid 1960s. Chris Barber had been bringing some of the finest American Blues artists to Britain and soon they were treading the boards and wooing the crowds at the 100 Club. Huge names like: Muddy Waters, Little Brother Montgomery, Cousin Joe Pleasant, Albert King, Sunnyland Slim, Otis Span, Jimmy Rushing, Louisiana Red, Bo Diddley and B.B. King, alongside their American soul cousins Jackie Wilson and George Jackson. The British Blues and Beat scene was also well represented in this period with Steam Packet featuring Rod Stewart, Long John Baldry and Julie Driscoll appearing, along with Alexis Korner, John Mayall's Bluesbreakers and The Animals. Many bands who went on to become world famous also played the club at this time including The Who, The Kinks, The Pretty Things and The Spencer Davis Group. The Seventies The '70s saw some of the toughest times in the club's history. The unions' work to rule policy and the subsequent three day week reduced the public's spending money. Electricity was automatically switched off between 6 and 9pm. This meant either closure on these nights or later opening hours. There were bright spots, noticeably the appearance of Maynard Ferguson and the success of the live pirate radio broadcasts by Radio London (the first time DJs learnt their trade at the Club), but it was becoming increasingly difficult to attract customers to the Club. Punk! The mood of the nation eventually manifested itself in the biggest music phenomenon since Mersey Beat, and the 100 Club was the home of its dissidents! On Monday 20th and Tuesday 21st September 1976 it was host to the first ever Punk festival. On the 100 Club stage the Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Damned, Siouxsie & The Banshees, the Buzzcocks, the Vibrators and Subway Sect were seen for the first time in London. All of them were unsigned. The Melody Maker's opening line of its review stated "The 600 strong line that stretched across two blocks was indisputable evidence that a new decade in rock is about to begin." It was to be one of the most famous events in the club's history. The Punk festival of '76 also had an enormous effect on music in general. It changed the club's fortunes and its image for good. No other venue wanted to put on Punk at all so it stayed at the club on and off for the next eight or nine years incorporating its second wave with bands like UK Subs, G.B.H., Peter & the Test Tube Babies, The Exploited and Discharge. The 100 Club is still the spiritual home of the Punk movement. The Reggae Sessions Around this time another the Saturday lunchtime Reggae sessions were becoming the place in London to listen to reggae and acts that played the Club included the Equals with Eddie Grant, The Mighty Diamonds and Steel Pulse. There was also the Saturday soul club which was a big success and was hosted by Capital Radio's Greg Edwards. The famous 6T's Northern Soul All Nighter also made its 100 Club debut at this time, in May 1980 to be precise. Organised and Promoted by Northern Soul DJ and Record Collector Ady Croasdell, it is still going today and has included live sets from Soul luminaries such as Doris Troy, Ray Pollard, Barbara Acklan, Tommy Hunt, The Flirtations, Terry Callier, Lou Ragland and Tony Middleton and has had famous Northern DJ's like Ian Levene spinning the decks frequently. South African Jazz As the eighties began, yet another form of music arrived at the 100 Club. South African township music was first initiated by Chris McGregor, leader of the highly acclaimed The Blue Notes and The Brotherhood of Breath, championed the scene. Julian Bahula, the distinguished African drummer, ran a regular Friday night featuring many musicians who were political refugees isolated from their South African homeland because of the apartheid laws and who were members of the outlawed A.N.C. The weekly Friday nights became a whole movement for change. Great African musicians like Fela Kuti, Marion Makeba and Hugh Masekela appeared on the Friday night bill as did Youssou N'Dour, Thomas Mapfumo, Dudu Pukwana and Spirits Rejoice. They ran for almost ten very successful years until the release of Nelson Mandela. The Indie scene A chance phone call from concert promoter Chris York enquiring whether the club would be interested in showcasing one of his new bands started it all. The band were called Suede and in September 1992 they kicked off the club's successful period in Indie music. Over the next four years Oasis, Kula Shaker, Echobelly, Catatonia, Travis, Embrace, Cornershop, The Aloof, Heavy Stereo and Baby Bird would be just a few of the names to play the club and right up to the present day, the club has seen gigs from Semisonic, Toploader, Muse, Shack, Doves, JJ72, Jo Strummer, Squarepusher, Ocean Colour Scene and The Webb Brothers. Other highlights Over the years there have been many weekly nights dedicated to particular kinds of music. The Speakeasy Sunday evening ran for over ten years and showcased the best of British and American Blues and R'n'B. The London Swing Dance Society have been teaching people how to Jitterbug and Jive since 1988 and are still going strong. The Comedy nights have seen Al Murray, Arthur Smith, Rich Hall, Harry Hill, Bill Bailey and Mark Lamarr appear here. Mark has often DJ'd on other nights too. Jazz has continued to run through these decades of course: Humphrey Lyttelton and Chris Barber have returned frequently along with many of the British jazz names mentioned earlier. Teddy Edwards, Ruby Braff, Eddie 'Lockjaw' Davis, Lee Konitz, Al Casey, Stephane Grappelli, Barney Kessell, Herb Ellis, Charlie Byrd and Teddy Wilson to name but a few. Even 'Wild' Bill Davison has returned to play the club as a very old man. The club has remained special to many people over the years and a lot of well known bands and musicians have come back long after they met with fame and fortune. Paul Weller, who played here with The Jam during the early Punk days and is a good friend of the club, has returned on numerous occasions to showcase new material. The Rolling Stones and Metallica have used the club for secret warm up shows before world tours and festivals. We hope you'll come and experience the magic of the club - see you soon!

London Palladium
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1-4 Argyll St
London, United Kingdom W1F 7

0844 412 4648

The Comedy Store - London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
1A Oxendon Street
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4EE

0844 871 7699

Pizza Express Jazz Club
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
10 Dean Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 3RW

020 7439 4962

We'll keep you up-to-date with information about the incredible Artists performing at one of London's finest Jazz clubs. www.pizzaexpresslive.co.uk

Thriller Live Musical at Lyric Theatre
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7ES

+44 207 7492 1618

Thriller Live Musical at Lyric Theatre
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7ES

+44 207 7492 1618

Apollo Theatre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
31 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 7

020 7494 5070

The Apollo Theatre is a Grade II listed West End theatre, on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster, in central London. Designed by the architect Lewin Sharp for owner Henry Lowenfeld, it became the fourth legitimate theatre to be constructed on the street when it opened its doors on 21 February 1901, with the American musical comedy The Belle of Bohemia.HistoryConstructionBecause Henry Lowenfeld had bought land on the newly created Shaftesbury Avenue at the turn of the 20th century – next door to the Lyric Theatre which opened in 1888 – the Apollo is one of the few theatres in London to be freehold.The only complete theatre design of architect Lewin Sharp, the Apollo was specifically designed for musical theatre and named after the Greek god of the arts and leader of the muses. Constructed by builder Walter Wallis of plain London brick in keeping with the neighbouring streets, the front piece is in the Renaissance style with sculpted stone fascia by T. Simpson. The structure encloses a four-level auditorium, with three cantilevered balconies and a first floor central loggia, decorated in the Louis XIV Style by Hubert van Hooydonk. In keeping with then European style, each level has its own foyer and promenade.

Lyric Theatre - Michael Jackson Thriller
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7ES

Mamounia Lounge Mayfair
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
37A Curzon Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 7TX

+44 (0) 20 7629 2211

Open since 2004, Mamounia Lounge offers the best in Lebanese & Moroccan cuisine with Live Music, DJ's, Belly Dancers and other live entertainment. With an impressive Middle Eastern menu, you can explore the heart of Moroccan and Lebanese cuisine right here in London. Our new menus make it easier than ever to find your favourite gluten free and vegan options.

The Lyric Theatre
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
29 Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7ES

+44 (0) 20 7494 5841

Wigmore Hall
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
36 Wigmore Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 2BP

+44 (0)20 7935 2141

Europe’s leading venue for chamber music and song – presenting over 400 classical music concerts a year in the heart of London’s West End.

BBC Broadcasting House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1B 3

BBC Broadcasting House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1B 3

Tourist Attraction Near Handel & Hendrix in London

Madame Tussauds London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LR
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

0871 894 3000

Trafalgar Square
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 5

20-79301565

Trafalgar Square is a public square in the City of Westminster, Central London, built around the area formerly known as Charing Cross. Its name commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, a British naval victory in the Napoleonic Wars with France and Spain that took place on 21 October 1805 off the coast of Cape Trafalgar, Spain.The site of Trafalgar Square had been a significant landmark since the 13th century and originally contained the King's Mews. After George IV moved the mews to Buckingham Palace, the area was redeveloped by John Nash but progress was slow after his death and the square did not open until 1844. The 169ft Nelson's Column at its centre is guarded by four lion statues. A number of commemorative statues and sculptures occupy the square but the Fourth Plinth, left empty since 1840, has been host to contemporary art since 1999.The square has been used for community gatherings and political demonstrations including Bloody Sunday, the first Aldermaston March, anti-war protests, and campaigns against climate change. A Christmas tree has been donated to the square by Norway since 1947 and is erected for twelve days before and after Christmas Day. The square is a centre of annual celebrations on New Year's Eve. It was well known for its feral pigeons until their removal in the early 21st century.

Leicester Square
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Leicester Square
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2H 7DE

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Leicester Square) is a pedestrianised square in the West End of London, England. It was laid out in 1670 and is named after the contemporary Leicester House, itself named after Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester.The square was originally a gentrified residential area, with tenants including Frederick, Prince of Wales and artists William Hogarth and Joshua Reynolds. It became more down-market in the late 18th century as Leicester House was demolished and retail developments took place, becoming a centre for entertainment. Several major theatres were established in the 19th century, which were converted to cinemas towards the middle of the next. Leicester Square holds a number of nationally important cinemas such as the Odeon Leicester Square, Empire, Leicester Square and the now closed Odeon West End, which are frequently used for film premières, The nearby Prince Charles Cinema is popular for showing cult films and marathon film runs. The square remains a popular tourist attraction, including hosting events for the Chinese New Year.The square has always had a park in its centre, which was originally Lammas land. The park's fortunes have varied over the centuries, reaching near dilapidation in the mid-19th century after changing ownership several times. It was restored under the direction of St Martin in the Fields parish of their right to use the previously common land. The parishioners appealed to King Charles I, and he appointed three members of the privy council to arbitrate. Lord Leicester was ordered to keep part of his land (thereafter known as Leicester Fields and later as Leicester Square)(1713–1788

Oxford Circus
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Circus
London, United Kingdom London W1C 2

Chinatown
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
17 Whitcomb Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7

Piccadilly Circus
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Picadilly Circus
London, United Kingdom W1V 9LB

Piccadilly Circus è una celebre piazza di Londra, nonché luogo di ritrovo, cuore morale della città, situata nella City of Westminster.Costruita nel 1819 per collegare Regent Street con l'omonima Piccadilly (importante strada dello shopping) è diventata col passare degli anni uno dei principali punti di snodo del traffico cittadino. La sua felice posizione, nel cuore del West End londinese, e la vicinanza con importanti luoghi di interesse come i teatri di Shaftesbury Avenue o strade come Coventry Street e The Haymarket ricchissime di negozi e locali alla moda, hanno reso Piccadilly Circus un affollato punto di ritrovo, nonché una vera e propria attrattiva turistica tanto da diventare uno dei simboli stessi di Londra.Famosa per i display luminosi e le insegne a LED posizionate su di un edificio posto al lato settentrionale della stessa e per la celebre Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain che rappresenta «l'Angelo della Carità Cristiana» (ma realizzata da Alfred Gilbert come "Anteros" anche se è nota ai più col nome di "Eros"), la piazza è circondata da imponenti edifici quali il London Pavilion (sede di numerosi negozi e del Trocadero) ed il Criterion Theatre. Inoltre direttamente sotto il perimetro della piazza c'è l'omonima stazione della metropolitana di Londra.le banane sono blu e bo poi il kebab fa schifo

Video365
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Edgware Road
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2AA

National Portrait Gallery
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
St Martin’s Place
London, United Kingdom WC2H 0

+44(0)20 7306 0055

Ripley's Believe It or Not! London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
The London Pavilion, 1 Piccadilly Circus
London, United Kingdom W1J 0DA

+44(0)20 3238 0022

With more than 700 amazing artefacts, the attraction celebrates the weird, wonderful and bizarre in all its forms. With everything you can imagine (and plenty more you can’t), Ripley’s Believe It or Not! London is a family day out that’s definitely out of the ordinary

Buckingham Palace
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1AA

Buckingham Palace est la résidence officielle de la monarchie britannique à Londres. Le palais est à la fois le lieu où se produisent les événements en relation avec la famille royale, le point de chute de beaucoup de chefs d’État en visite, et une attraction touristique importante. C’est le point de convergence du peuple britannique lors des moments de joie, de crise et de peine. « Buckingham Palace », ou tout simplement « le Palais », désigne la source des déclarations de presse émanant des bureaux royaux. Buckingham Palace a été construit par John Sheffield à l'origine du duc de Buckingham en 1703, c'est le lieu de résidence de la monarchie britannique. Buckingham Palace a été reconstruit au cours des siècles par John Nash pour George IV.Au Moyen Âge, le site du palais de Buckingham formait une partie du manoir d’Ebury. Il y eut plusieurs occupants royaux depuis Édouard le Confesseur, et a été l’objet de nombreuses spéculations à propos de son propriétaire : une faille dans le bail de Charles d’Angleterre permit au terrain de revenir dans le giron royal au. Les précurseurs de Buckingham Palace sont Blake House, Goring House et Arlington House.D’abord connu sous le nom de Buckingham House, le bâtiment formant le cœur du palais d’aujourd’hui était auparavant un grand hôtel particulier construit en 1703 par le duc de Buckingham John Sheffield et acquis par le roi George III en 1762 pour en faire sa résidence privée. Il a été agrandi au cours des 75 années suivantes, principalement par les architectes John Nash et Edward Blore, qui ajoutèrent trois ailes autour d’une cour carrée. Buckingham Palace devint finalement la résidence officielle de la monarchie britannique lors de l’accession au trône de la reine Victoria en 1837. Les derniers ajouts structurels d’importance datent de la fin du et du début du : l’imposante aile est qui fait face au Mall a été ajoutée, et l’ancienne entrée officielle, Marble Arch, a été déplacée près du Speaker’s Corner à Hyde Park, où elle se trouve toujours. La façade côté est a été refaite en 1913 avec des blocs de calcaire de Portland, en arrière plan du Victoria Memorial, créant la « façade publique » de Buckingham, avec le fameux balcon en son centre.

Buckingham Palace London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1AA

020 7930 4832

Leicester Square Theatre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
6 Leicester Place
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7BX

020 7734 2222

LST is a magnificently restored theatre located in the heart of the West End with two exceptional spaces running a healthy programme of comedy, cabaret, dance, music and theatre. The 400 seat theatre boasts 2 bars perfectly positioned in the auditorium with newly-installed cinema style seating and a second intimate Lounge Theatre with a capacity of up to 70 with its own bar and cabaret-style seating.

The Moon Under Water - JD Wetherspoons, Leicester Square, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
28 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7LE

020 7839 2837

St James's Palace
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

Piccadilly
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 8

Piccadilly is a road in the City of Westminster, London to the south of Mayfair, between Hyde Park Corner in the west and Piccadilly Circus in the east. It is part of the A4 road that connects central London to Hammersmith, Earl's Court, Heathrow Airport and the M4 motorway westward. St James's is to the south of the eastern section, while the western section is built up only on the northern side. At just under in length, Piccadilly is one of the widest and straightest streets in central London.Piccadilly has been a main road since at least medieval times, and in the middle ages was known as "the road to Reading" or "the way from Colnbrook". Around 1611 or 1612, a Robert Baker acquired land in the area and prospered by making and selling piccadills. Shortly after purchasing the land, he enclosed it and erected several dwellings, including his home, Pikadilly Hall. What is now Piccadilly was named Portugal Street in 1663 after Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, and grew in importance after the road from Charing Cross to Hyde Park Corner was closed to allow the creation of Green Park in 1668. Some of the most notable stately homes in London were built on the northern side of the street during this period, including Clarendon House and Burlington House in 1664. Berkeley House, constructed around the same time as Clarendon House, was destroyed by a fire in 1733 and rebuilt as Devonshire House in 1737 by William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire. It was later used as the main headquarters for the Whig party. Burlington House has since been home to several noted societies, including the Royal Academy of Arts, the Geological Society of London and the Royal Astronomical Society. Several members of the Rothschild family had mansions at the western end of the street. St James's Church was consecrated in 1684 and the surrounding area became St James Parish.

Burger King Leicester Square
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
63-65 NORTH STREET
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7LE

020 7930 0158

Marble Arch
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
63-79 SEYMOUR STREET
London, United Kingdom W2 2HF

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Abbey Road Studios
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
3 Abbey Road
London, United Kingdom NW8 9AY

020 7266 7000

Maddame Tausads
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5

+44 (0) 871 894 3000

The Original London Sightseeing Tour
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
17-19 Cockspur St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 5BL

+44 (0) 20 8877 1722

With a history dating back to the early 1900s, The Original London Sightseeing Tour is the first sightseeing tour of its kind. It was formally introduced by London Transport as ‘Service J’ for the Festival of Britain in 1951. The thousands of visitors descending on the capital were invited to take the tour “around the town for half a crown!”. At the time it was described as a non-stop circular tour of London operating with double-decker buses from Buckingham Palace Road in Victoria. As part of the tour, visitors were given a free London Transport Guide Book from which they had to identify the major sights of London. It was the first incarnation of the open-top sightseeing tours that are now a familiar sight in cities across the world.

Museum/Art Gallery Near Handel & Hendrix in London

The Devil to Pay on Brook Street
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
25 Brook Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 4HB

020 7399 1953

"It is Midnight on the 13 April, 1759. Former Royal Academy of Music sensation, the imposing Italian diva, Faustina Bordoni, has returned to England for the first time in decades to reignite her London career, with Handel’s assistance. But the maestro’s health is fast failing. It’s late. The house is quiet. As Handel’s servants tend his bedside, Faustina, tired and tetchy after an arduous journey, faces an anxious wait to see the ailing genius – with only a lowly maidservant for company. What follows is both unexpected and disquieting…" Performance dates and times Friday 20 February 6pm and 7.30pm Saturday 21 February 2pm Sunday 22 February 2pm Tuesday 24 February 6pm and 7.30pm Wednesday 25 February 6pm and 7.30pm Thursday 26 February 6pm and 7.30pm Friday 27 February 6pm and 7.30pm Saturday 28 February 2pm and 6pm Sunday 1 March 2pm and 6pm Tickets: £15 – early booking advised

Miniature Painting India
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
915 New Bond Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 1DN

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Hendrix in Britain at Handel House
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
25 Brook Street (entrance via Lancashire Court)
London, United Kingdom W1K 4 HB

+44 (0)20 7495 1685

In 1968-69 Jimi Hendrix moved into the flat at 23 Brook Street with his English girlfriend Kathy Etchingham. The flat is now the office of Handel House Museum. To mark the 40th anniversary of Hendrix’s death, Handel House presented the exhibition 'Hendrix in Britain' in 25 August - 7 November 2010.

Maddox Arts
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
52 Brook's Mews
London, United Kingdom W1K 4

+44 (0)20 7495 3101

Sarah Myerscough Gallery
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
15-16 Brooks Mews
London, United Kingdom W1K4DS

+44(0)2074950069

Sarah Myerscough Gallery was established in 1998 in Mayfair as a contemporary art gallery to give young, up and coming British artists an opportunity to showcase their art work in London’s West End. The gallery initially exhibited fine art painting and photography and has recently developed it’s contemporary craft programme through it’s involvement in COLLECT, the International Applied Art Fair held each year at the Saatchi Gallery. Before Sarah Myerscough MA opened the gallery, she worked in London for twenty years as a corporate art consultant and is able to offer this specialist advisory service to corporate and private collectors on contemporary painting, photography and sculpture and the applied arts including ceramics, glass and wood. If you have budgetary considerations, in situ commissions opportunities, need investment advice or have a request for management of an arts project, including on site presentations, deliveries and installations please do call the gallery to arrange an appointment. The gallery currently represents Internationally known artists but still with an eye on art graduates and young talent. The gallery also exhibits at Art Fairs Internationally and its gallery artists include: Andrew MacKenzie, James Lumsden, Jenny Pockley, Nick Archer, Andy Stewart, Anthony Francis, Nick Jolly, Michael Corkrey, Maisie Broadhead, Philip Moulthrop, John Jordan, Christian Burchard, Marc Ricourt, Liam Flynn, Friedemann Buehler.

Contini Art Uk
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
105 New Bond Street
London, United Kingdom

+44 (0) 2074955101

Ronchini Gallery
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
22 Dering Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 1AN

020 7629 9188

Ronchini Gallery is a contemporary art gallery founded by Lorenzo Ronchini in 1992, in Umbria, Italy, which expanded in February 2012 with a space in Mayfair, London. Its exhibitions have explored pioneering movements within Italy; the gallery aesthetic is defined by Minimalism, Spatialism, Conceptualism and Arte Povera and it retains an unblinking future-focus on progressive movements. Ronchini Gallery evolved from 20 years of private collecting. Paterfamilias Adriano Ronchini was an early supporter of artists such as Alighiero Boetti, Daniel Buren, Joseph Kosuth, and Michelangelo Pistoletto and collected their work throughout the seventies. Subscribing to the highest standards of curatorship and scholarship, the gallery provides a rigorous context in which its artists can be viewed. Ronchini Gallery also maintains a successful publishing arm which produces exhibition catalogues, monographs, critical texts and artist’s books.

Vigo Gallery
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
21 Dering Street
London, United Kingdom w1S1AL

+ 44 (0) 2074933492

Vigo represents emerging and established international artists, conceiving and curating shows in both public and commercial arenas. We enjoy good relations with many Museums, Residencies and Foundations from the TATE to the British Museum and advise the Levett Collection / MACM.

Gimpel Fils
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
30 Davies Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 4NB

020 7493 2488

Ancient & Modern
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
33 St George Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 2FL

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Halcyon Gallery
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
144-146 New Bond Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 2PF

0207 100 7144

Gallery Locations: Halcyon Gallery (Flagship), 144-146 New Bond Street, W1S 2PF Halcyon Gallery, 29 New Bond Street, W1S 2RL Halcyon Gallery, Harrods, 2nd Floor, 87-135 Brompton Road, SW1X 7XL

The Fine Art Society
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
148 New Bond Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 2JT

+44 (0) 20 7629 5116

The Fine Art Society was founded in 1876 by a group of knowledgeable art collectors. Comprising of a five storey town house in Mayfair, it is the oldest gallery in London. Since its inception the gallery has always championed and worked directly with living artists, giving The Camden Town Group their first show and holding historic shows that have since entered the canon of art history. It is at this location that Whistler invented the concept of a solo exhibition and introduced evenly spaced installations against pale walls – a precursor for every contemporary gallery today. In recent years the gallery has embraced the contemporary arts along side it's twentieth and nineteenth century heritage and increased cross-cultural links, particularly in Asia and Australia. Exciting artists have joined the gallery’s core stable and these are complimented by internationally recognized artists who participate in critically engaged survey shows.

Repetto Gallery
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
23 Bruton Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 6QF

+44 (0)20 74954320

Creative, contemporaneity and modernity are the characteristics that distinguish the selection of the artists of the Repetto Gallery. Many are the works of art on display, realized by great and innovative artists such as Lucio Fontana, Christo, Fausto Melotti, Pier Paolo Calzolari, Giulio Paolini and many others. An international stage of uniqueness and creativity, this is the Repetto Gallery. Endless and revolutionary lines and timeless objects take shape at the famous gallery to fascinate and amaze visitors, lovers of luxury and contemporary art. Detachment from the real world and the obvious and immersion in the creative genius of great artists offer a unique experience that finds in the works of art exhibited the highest expression of contemporary art, dictating trends and fashions. For those who want only the best and a unique experience, the Repetto Gallery is a valuable point of reference to visit.

The Maas Gallery
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
15A Clifford Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 4JZ

+44 (0) 20 7734 2302

Rossi & Rossi Gallery
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
27 Dover Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 4LZ

+44 020 76296888

Medici Gallery
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
5 Cork St
London, United Kingdom W1S 3LQ

(+44) 020 7833 1653

Medici Gallery has been established in the heart of London's Mayfair for over one hundred years. The Gallery exhibits figurative and representational contemporary painting and sculpture and has approximately ten exhibitions a year. We exhibit International and UK based established and emerging artists.

Messum's - Start a Collection
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8 Cork Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 3LJ

0207 437 5545

“Start a collection was conceived by us in 2000 to provide a platform on which a first-time buyer could make a purchase with confidence. That defining moment proved to be a building block for many now established collections and numerous new friendships. For that reason more than any other, Start a Collection remains an eagerly awaited event in our exhibition calendar both for our clients and for ourselves.” Johnny Messum Works may be reserved ahead of time, but priority is given to buyers in the gallery for the first hour of the opening day.

Messum's
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
28 Cork Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 3NG

+44 (0)20 7437 5545

Founded by David Messum in 1963, Messum's specialises in British art from the 19th century to the present day, and has established key markets for British Impressionism and paintings by artists from the Newlyn and St Ives Schools. The gallery presents an annual programme of over 20 exhibitions and events in addition to participating in leading international art fairs. We also engage actively with museums and public institutions - including Tate Britain, Tate St Ives, the National Maritime Museum, Birmingham Art Museum and Penlee House and Galleries - to promote British art. Equally, Messum's advise private clients on collection management, research, conservation, framing and valuation. Messum's is a member of BADA and SLAD.

Cork Street Open Exhibition
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
28 Cork Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 3NG

01981 540597

The Cork Street Open exhibition held in Mayfair, in the centre of London's prestigious art district, has launched many emerging artists. The final Cork Street Open Exhibition will take place in August 2013. The purpose of the exhibition is to provide an opportunity for both emerging and establish artists from around the world to gain exposure and sell their work while benefiting a selected charity.

Grimaldi Gavin
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
27 Albemarle Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 4DW

+442036370637

Representing: Miles Aldridge Roy Arden Martina Bacigalupo Joachim Brohm Emma Critchley Peter Fraser Goldschmied & Chiari Karen Knorr Karine Laval Sinaida Michalskaja Domingo Milella Sophy Rickett Jem Southam Heidi Specker Clare Strand Massimo Vitali Tomoko Yoneda Fabio Zonta