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Handel & Hendrix in London, London | Tourist Information


25 Brook Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 4HB

020 7495 1685

Separated by a wall & 200 years are the homes of two musicians who chose London & changed music. Welcome to Handel & Hendrix in London

Historical Place Near Handel & Hendrix in London

Royal Mews
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace Road
London, SW1W 0SR

020 7766 7302

A Royal Mews is a mews (i.e. combined stables, carriage house and in recent times also the garage) of the British Royal Family. In London the Royal Mews has occupied two main sites, formerly at Charing Cross, and since the 1820s at Buckingham Palace. Many open days are held each year.Charing CrossThe first set of stables to be referred to as a mews was at Charing Cross at the western end of The Strand. The royal hawks were kept at this site from 1377 and the name derives from the fact that they were confined there at moulting (or "mew") time.The building was destroyed by fire in 1534 and rebuilt as a stables, keeping its former name when it acquired this new function. On old maps, such as the "Woodcut" map of London of the early 1560s, the Mews can be seen extending back towards the site of today's Leicester Square.This building was usually known as the King's Mews, but was also sometimes referred to as the Royal Mews, the Royal Stables, or as the Queen's Mews when there was a woman on the throne. It was rebuilt again in 1732 to the designs of William Kent, and in the early 19th century it was open to the public. It was an impressive classical building, and there was an open space in front of it which ranked among the larger ones in central London at a time when the Royal Parks were on the fringes of the city and the gardens of London's squares were open only to the residents of the surrounding houses.

Scotland Yard
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Broadway, Westminster
London, SW1H 0AZ

02072301212

New Scotland Yard , häufig kurz Scotland Yard oder auch nur The Yard genannt, ist ein Gebäude im Londoner Stadtteil City of Westminster. Zudem ist Scotland Yard eine übliche Bezeichnung für die in diesem Gebäude residierende Polizeibehörde Metropolitan Police Service .Diese ist zuständig für Greater London mit Ausnahme der City of London, die als selbstständige Stadt mit der City of London Police über eine eigene Polizeibehörde verfügt. Neben den allgemeinen Polizeiaufgaben führt der MPS auch eine Datenbank über alle Straftäter im Vereinigten Königreich, unterstützt auf Anforderung die regionalen Polizeikräfte bei den Ermittlungen und gibt Hilfestellung bei der Aus- und Weiterbildung aller Polizeikräfte des Commonwealth. Umgangssprachlich ist im deutschsprachigen Raum mit „Scotland Yard“ meist die Londoner Kriminalpolizei gemeint.Das als New Scotland Yard bezeichnete Hauptquartier liegt derzeit in Nr. 8-10 Broadway, einer Seitenstraße der Victoria Street, unweit der Tube-Station St. James’s Park. Ausschilderungen in Richtung Broadway führen in der der U-Bahn-Station direkt zum Eingang des Gebäudes und dem rotierenden New Scotland Yard-Zeichen.

Scotland Yard
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Broadway, Westminster
City of Westminster, SW1H 0AZ

02072301212

Scotland Yard is a metonym for the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Service, the territorial police force responsible for policing most of London.The name derives from the location of the original Metropolitan Police headquarters at 4 Whitehall Place, which had a rear entrance on a street called Great Scotland Yard. The Scotland Yard entrance became the public entrance to the police station, and over time the street and the Metropolitan Police became synonymous. The New York Times wrote in 1964 that just as Wall Street gave its name to New York's financial district, Scotland Yard became the name for police activity in London.The force moved away from Great Scotland Yard in 1890, and the name New Scotland Yard was adopted for the subsequent headquarters. The current New Scotland Yard is located on Broadway in Victoria and has been the Metropolitan Police's headquarters since 1967. In summer 2013, it was announced that the force would move back to the former site of Scotland Yard, the Curtis Green Building, which is located on the Victoria Embankment and the headquarters will be renamed Scotland Yard.

Scotland Yard
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Broadway, Westminster
London, SW1H 0AZ

02072301212

Scotland Yard est le quartier général du Metropolitan Police Service (police) de Londres, se trouvant dans la cité de Westminster. C'est en 1829, date de création de cette force de police par Sir Robert Peel, que celle-ci établissait ses bureaux à Scotland Yard, au 4 Whitehall Place.HistoireSon nom dérive de, une rue du quartier St. James's reliant Northumberland Avenue et Whitehall, qui abritait des bâtiments utilisés pour accueillir les représentants diplomatiques du royaume d'Écosse, voire des souverains écossais eux-mêmes, lors de leurs visites dans la capitale anglaise...New Scotland YardDepuis son premier déménagement, en 1890, dans les sur Victoria Embankment, à plus au sud, il porte le nom de « New Scotland Yard ».En 1967, ses quartiers généraux ont été installés sur la, soit à 1 km au sud-ouest de ses locaux d'origine, dans un bâtiment de vingt-deux étages, 151 m de long et faisant, néanmoins ils portent toujours le nom de « New Scotland Yard ». Mais dans le langage courant, on continue à dire le plus souvent « Scotland Yard ». Ce bâtiment mis en vente depuis le 2 septembre 2014 pour 250 millions de livres sterling, a été acquis par un fonds d’investissement de l'émirat d'Abou Dhabi pour 370 millions de livres en décembre de la même année. L’immeuble doit devenir un complexe résidentiel et hôtelier.

Portsmouth Harbour
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
guwharf quays
Portsmouth, PO1 3

New Scotland Yard London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Broadway
London,

Historic Houses Association
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
2 Chester Street
London, SW1X 7BB

020 7259 5688

Welcome to the official Facebook page for the Historic Houses Association (HHA) We represent 1600 privately-owned historic houses, castles and gardens throughout the UK. These are listed buildings or gardens, usually Grade I or II*, with many being iconic symbols of Britain's unique heritage. And, did you know that there are more privately-owned houses open to the public than those in the care of the National Trust, English Heritage and their equivalents in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland put together. So, enjoy a great day by discovering properties that have been in the same family for generations and are still a much-loved private home. Explore fabulous settings for weddings, conferences and events. Or book your stay and experience a night in a real stately home! Search for properties using our online map or download our free app from the AppStore or on Android. You don't have to join us to enjoy visiting these beautiful places but, for a small annual fee, you can visit as many as you like for free! For more information see our website: www.hha.org.uk

Westminster Abbey
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, SW1P 3PA

020 7222 5152

Methodist Central Hall Westminster
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Storeys Gate
London, SW1H 9NH

0044 20 7654 3809

St Margaret's, Westminster
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, SW1P 3

+44(0)20 7222 5152

The Church of St Margaret, Westminster Abbey, is situated in the grounds of Westminster Abbey on Parliament Square, and is the Anglican parish church of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom in London. It is dedicated to Margaret of Antioch.History and descriptionOriginally founded in the twelfth century by Benedictine monks, so that local people who lived in the area around the Abbey could worship separately at their own simpler parish church, and historically part of the hundred of Ossulstone in the county of Middlesex, St Margaret's was rebuilt from 1486 to 1523. It became the parish church of the Palace of Westminster in 1614, when the Puritans of the seventeenth century, unhappy with the highly liturgical Abbey, chose to hold Parliamentary services in the more "suitable" St Margaret's: a practice that has continued since that time.The Rector of St Margaret's is a canon of Westminster Abbey.The north-west tower was rebuilt by John James from 1734 to 1738; at the same time, the whole structure was encased in Portland stone. Both the eastern and the western porch were added later by J. L. Pearson. The church's interior was greatly restored and altered to its current appearance by Sir George Gilbert Scott in 1877, although many of the Tudor features were retained.

Inside Buckingham Palace
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace, London SW1A 1AA
London,

Wesminster Abbey, Big Ben, Houses of Parliament
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, SW1P 3PA

+44(0)20 7222 5152

Winston Churchill Room, Treasury
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
100 Parliament Street
London, SW1A 2BQ

Victoria Memorial, London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, SW1A 1

The Victoria Memorial is a monument to Queen Victoria, located at the end of The Mall in London, and designed and executed by the sculptor Sir Thomas Brock. Designed in 1901, it was unveiled on 16 May 1911, though it was not completed until 1924. It was the centrepiece of an ambitious urban planning scheme, which included the creation of the Queen’s Gardens to a design by Sir Aston Webb, and the refacing of Buckingham Palace (which stands behind the memorial) by the same architect.Like the earlier Albert Memorial in Kensington Gardens, commemorating Victoria's consort, the Victoria Memorial has an elaborate scheme of iconographic sculpture. The central pylon of the memorial is of Pentelic marble, and individual statues are in Carrara marble and gilt bronze. The memorial weighs 2,300 tonnes and is 104 ft wide. In 1970 it was listed at Grade I.HistoryProposal and announcementsKing Edward VII suggested that a joint Parliamentary committee should be formed to develop plans for a Memorial to Queen Victoria following her death. The first meeting took place on 19 February 1901 at the Foreign Office, Whitehall. The first secretary of the committee was Arthur Bigge, 1st Baron Stamfordham. Initially these meetings were behind closed doors, and the proceedings were not revealed to the public. However the Lord Mayor of London, Sir Joseph Dimsdale, publicly announced that the committee had decided that the Memorial should be "monumental".

Victoria Memorial, London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, SW1A 1

Il Victoria Memorial è una scultura della città di Londra, collocata di fronte alla residenza reale di Buckingham Palace.Fu costruita dallo scultore Sir Thomas Brock, nel 1911. Contribuì nella progettazione e nella realizzazione l'architetto e Presidente della Royal Academy Sir Aston Webb; per la costruzione furono utilizzate all'incirca 2300 tonnellate di marmo bianco.Verso nord est sorge una grande statua della regina Vittoria. Gli altri lati del monumento rappresentano statue di angeli. L'Angelo della Giustizia, l'Angelo della Verità e quello della Carità, quest'ultimo dirimpetto a Buckingham Palace. Sul pinnacolo, è raffigurata la Vittoria attorniata da due figure sedute. Queste due figure "sussidiarie" furono donate dagli abitanti della Nuova Zelanda.Galleria d'immaginiVoci correlate Albert Memorial Vittoria del Regno Unito Buckingham Palace

Churchill War Rooms
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Clive Steps, King Charles Street
London, SW1A 2AQ

0207 930 6961

Follow us on Facebook and join our growing community of fans. Discover in-depth information about Churchill War Rooms, special content, and discuss and share with others.

Picadilly Circus
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
London, picadilly circus
London,

Wellington Arch
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Constitution Hill
London, W1J 7JZ

0207 9302726

Set in the heart of Royal London at Hyde Park Corner, Wellington Arch is a landmark for Londoners and visitors alike and a great addition to a memorable day out in London. The balconies also offer unique views across London and of the Household Cavalry, passing beneath on their way to and from the Changing of the Guard at Horse Guards Parade every morning. It was originally commissioned as a grand outer entrance to Buckingham Palace and moved to its present site in 1882.

The Cenotaph, Whitehall
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Whitehall
London, SW1A 2BX

The Cenotaph is a war memorial on Whitehall in London, England. Its origin is in a temporary structure erected for a peace parade following the end of the First World War and after an outpouring of national sentiment it was replaced in 1920 by a permanent structure and designated the United Kingdom's primary national war memorial.Designed by Edwin Lutyens, the permanent structure was built from Portland stone between 1919 and 1920 by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts, replacing Lutyens' earlier wood-and-plaster cenotaph in the same location. An annual Service of Remembrance is held at the site on Remembrance Sunday, the closest Sunday to 11 November (Armistice Day) each year. Lutyens' cenotaph design has been reproduced elsewhere in the UK and in other countries including Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Bermuda and Hong Kong.OriginsThe first cenotaph was a wood-and-plaster structure designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and erected in 1919. It was one of a number of temporary structures erected for the London Victory Parade (also called the Peace Day Parade) on 19 July 1919. It marked the formal end of the First World War that had taken place with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on 28 June 1919. As one of a series of temporary wooden monuments constructed along the route of the parade, Whitehall's was not proposed until two weeks before the event. Following deliberations by the Peace Celebrations Committee, Lutyens was invited to Downing Street. There, the British Prime Minister, David Lloyd George, proposed that the monument should be a catafalque, like the one intended for the Arc de Triomphe in Paris for the corresponding Victory Parade in France, but Lutyens proposed instead that the design be based on a cenotaph.

Downing Street
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
st. Downing
London, SW1A 2

020 7270 3000

Downing Street in London, United Kingdom, has for more than three hundred years housed the official residences of two of the most senior British Cabinet ministers: the First Lord of the Treasury, an office now synonymous with that of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom; and the Second Lord of the Treasury, an office held by the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The Prime Minister's official residence is 10 Downing Street; the Chancellor's official residence is next door at Number 11. The government's Chief Whip has an official residence at Number 12, although the current Chief Whip's residence is at Number 9.Downing Street is in Whitehall in central London, a few minutes' walk from the Houses of Parliament and a little further from Buckingham Palace. The street was built in the 1680s by Sir George Downing on the site of a mansion, Hampden House. The houses on the south side of the street were demolished in the 19th century to make way for government offices now occupied by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. "Downing Street" is used as a metonym for the Government of the United Kingdom.

Apsley House
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner
London, W1J 7NT

0207 499 5676

ABOUT Addresses don’t come much grander than 'Number One London', the popular name for Apsley House, one of the most interesting visitor attractions in London. Home to the Duke of Wellington after his victory over Napoleon at Waterloo, the interior of the house has changed very little since the days of the Iron Duke. It boasts one of the finest art collections in London, with paintings by Velazquez and Rubens as well as a wonderful collection of silver and porcelain. Pride of place goes to a massive nude statue of Napoleon. Why not include a stroll through nearby Hyde Park, and a visit to nearby Wellington Arch for a great value family day out in London. This page is for visitors and fans of Apsley House to share photos, thoughts and recommendations. If you have any questions about Apsley House or English Heritage please email [email protected] or 'like' us at: http://www.facebook.com/pages/English-Heritage/173240995747 and post your question there, where we will be happy to get back to you as soon as we can. HOUSE RULES This page is designed as a place to discuss Apsley House: The Wellington Collection - to share tips for a great day out at the house, upcoming events and news from the property. We love hearing the ideas and opinions of our social community, and encourage you to leave comments, photos, videos and links here on our page. However, in the interests of our whole community, by using this site you accept our House Rules and agree that any content posted by you on our page will follow these rules. Content posted on our page must not: • be threatening, violent, attacking or harassing towards other users • contain or promote discrimination based on race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, disability or medical conditions • be defamatory of any other person • constitute trolling, repeat off-topic discussions or repeatedly contain similar comments • be obscene, offensive or inflammatory • constitute unlawful activity, or be deemed to support unlawful activity • disclose the name, address, telephone, mobile or fax number, email address or any other personal data in respect of any individual • contain links to files which contain malicious software • infringe any copyright, database right, trademark or other intellectual property rights of any other person • impersonate any person, or misrepresent your identity or affiliation with any person • advertise any products or personal projects which are unrelated to the discussion, Apsley House, or the work of English Heritage If we consider that any of our house rules have been broken, we will take whatever action we feel is appropriate, including deleting any content. We support Facebook’s community standards, and ask that you do, too: www.facebook.com/communitystandards If you have any questions about the house rules, Apsley House, the work of English Heritage, membership or queries that need a more in depth answer our Customer Services team would be happy to help. Please email us at [email protected]

Apsley House
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner, 149 Piccadilly
London, W1J 7

020 7499 5676

Apsley House, also known as Number One, London, is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner, on the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south towards the busy traffic roundabout in the centre of which stands the Wellington Arch. It is a Grade I listed building.It is sometimes referred to as the Wellington Museum. The house is now run by English Heritage and is open to the public as a museum and art gallery, exhibiting 83 paintings from the Spanish royal collection. The 9th Duke of Wellington retains the use of part of the buildings. It is perhaps the only preserved example of an English aristocratic town house from its period. The practice has been to maintain the rooms as far as possible in the original style and decor. It contains the 1st Duke's collection of paintings, porcelain, the silver centrepiece made for the Duke in Portugal, c. 1815, sculpture and furniture. Antonio Canova's heroic marble nude of Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker made 1802–10, holding a gilded Nike in the palm of his right hand, and standing to the raised left hand holding a staff. It was set up for a time in the Louvre and was bought by the Government for Wellington in 1816 (according to Nikolaus Pevsner) and stands in Adam's Stairwell.

St James's Palace
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

St James's Palace
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Marlborough Rd, St James's SW1A 1DD
London, SW1A 1BS

The Banqueting House
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Whitehall House, 41 Whitehall
London, SW1A 2ER

+44 (0) 844 482 7777

This revolutionary building, the first in England to be designed in a Palladian style by Inigo Jones, was finished in 1622 for James I. Intended for the splendour and exuberance of court masques, the Banqueting House is probably most famous for one real life drama: the execution of Charles I which took place here in 1649 to the ‘dismal, universal groan’ of the crowd. One of Charles’ last sights was he walked through the Banqueting House to his death was the magnificent ceiling, painted by Peter Paul Rubens in 1630-4.

Horse Guards
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Horse Guards Parade
London, SW1A 2

020 7930 4832

Horse Guards is a large Grade I listed building in the Palladian style between Whitehall and Horse Guards Parade in London. The first Horse Guards building was built on the site of the former tiltyard of Westminster Palace in 1664. It was demolished in 1749 and was replaced by the current building which was built between 1750 and 1753 by John Vardy after the death of original architect in 1748 William Kent. Horse Guards Road runs north-south on the western boundary of the parade ground, while Horse Guards Avenue runs east from Whitehall on other side of the building, to Victoria Embankment.The building served as the offices of the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces until 1904 when the post was abolished and replaced by the Chief of the General Staff. The Chief of the General staff moved to the Old War Office Building in 1906 and Horse Guards subsequently became the headquarters of two major Army commands: the London District and the Household Cavalry. The building is the formal entrance to St James's Palace via St. James's Park (though this is now entirely symbolic). Only the monarch is allowed to drive through its central archway, or those given a pass (formerly made of ivory).

Queen's Chapel
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Savoy Hill
London,

+44 20 7836 7221

The Queen's Chapel is a chapel in central London, England, that was designed by Inigo Jones and built between 1623 and 1625 as an external adjunct to St. James's Palace for Roman Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. It is one of the facilities of the British monarch's personal religious establishment, the Chapel Royal, and should not be confused with the 1540 building known as the Chapel Royal within the palace and just across Marlborough road.HistoryIt was built as a Roman Catholic chapel at a time when the construction of Catholic churches was prohibited in England, and was used by Charles I's Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. From the 1690s it was used by Continental Protestant courtiers. It was built as an integral part of St James's Palace, but when the adjacent private apartments burned down in 1809 they were not replaced and in 1856-57 Marlborough Road was built between the palace and the Queen's Chapel. The result is that physically the chapel now appears to be more part of the Marlborough House complex than of St James's Palace. It became a Chapel Royal again in 1938.Having been taken from the Royal Chapel of All Saints in Windsor Great Park, the body of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother lay at the Queen's Chapel for several days during the preparations for her lying-in-state in Westminster Hall before her ceremonial funeral.

Marlborough House
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, SW1Y 5

+44 (0) 20 7747 6491

Marlborough House is a Grade I listed mansion in the City of Westminster, in The Mall, London, east of St James's Palace. It was built for Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, the favourite and confidante of Queen Anne. For over a century it served as the London residence of the Dukes of Marlborough. It is now the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat.ConstructionThe Duchess wanted her new house to be "strong, plain and convenient and good". The architect Christopher Wren and his son of the same name designed a brick building with rusticated stone quoins (cornerstones) that was completed in 1711.The house was taken up by the Crown in 1817. In the 1820s plans were drawn up to demolish Marlborough House and replace it with a terrace of similar dimensions to the two in neighbouring Carlton House Terrace, and this idea even featured on some contemporary maps, including Christopher and John Greenwood's large-scale London map of 1830, but the proposal was not implemented.

Museum/Art Gallery Near Handel & Hendrix in London

Imitate Modern
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
We are a pop up gallery, follow for our next location
London, United Kingdom W1J 7NE

+44 (0)207 289 4532

Imitate Modern is an art gallery in the heart of London which exhibits works by the most inspiring and exciting emerging artists, together with arts most established stars. We have been serious collectors of contemporary art for over twenty years and use this gallery as a way of passing the pleasure of owning art to our friends, associates and the world. Our private views are fast becoming infamous for being the most talked about and entertaining nights on the art calendar. Exhibitions range from serious paintings and sculpture, to pop silkscreens and contemporary photography, but our intention remains the same – to help our clients build interesting and enriching collections, and most of all enjoy art in the most engaging way possible.

Rountree Tryon Galleries
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
7 Bury Street
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6AL

+44 (0)20 7839 8083

Stephen Ongpin Fine Art (SOFA)
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
6 Mason's Yard, Duke Street, St. James's
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6BU

+44 (0)20 7930 8813

Bernard Jacobson Gallery
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
28 Duke Street, St. James's
London, United Kingdom sw1y 6ag

+44 (0)20 7734 3431

Gallery of African Art
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
45 Albemarle Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 4JL

0207 287 7400

Raaccess Programme
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Burlington House, Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J OBD

020 7300 8000

The Royal Academy aims, wherever possible, to remove or reduce physical, sensory, attitudinal or intellectual barriers to access, to ensure that all aspects of our galleries, exhibitions and activities are as accessible as possible for all visitors. RA Access comprises the following programmes: InMotion: Wheelchair Users and Visitors with Mobility Impairments. InTouch: Blind and Visually Impaired Visitors. InteRAct: Deaf, Deafened and Hard of Hearing Visitors. InMind: Visitors living with Dementia and Alzheimer’s. SEN Schools: Tailored workshops for SEN schools. InPerson: An Arts Club for Everyone. InPractice: A space for artists to share and celebrate their art practice. For more detailed info on each programme and on Access resources, visit our website: http://www.royalacademy.org.uk/learning/access-and-communities/

William Weston Gallery
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
7 Royal Arcade, Albemarle Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 4SG

020 7493 0722

Specialising in Modern European and British Master Prints, the gallery was founded in 1968 by William Weston and is owned and personally directed by him. William Weston's approach to art dealing reflects his academic background in art history at Cambridge University as well as his long experience as a dealer. During more than four decades the gallery has built a worldwide reputation for its expertise and the exceptional quality of works exhibited and offered for private sale. Private collectors, corporate clients and more than fifty museums and public galleries across the world have acquired works from the gallery. The gallery displays a wide range of Modern artists throughout the year at our Albemarle Street premises as well as exhibiting at international art fairs in London, New York, Maastricht. William Weston Gallery has always been based in Albemarle Street, close to Bond Street and the Royal Academy, at the heart of the fine art district in London's West End. For more than twenty five years the gallery has occupied a corner site on Albemarle Street and the Royal Arcade, the historic 19th century covered arcade of shops leading to Bond Street which was first made famous by Queen Victoria in the 1890's.

Royal Academy of Arts
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Burlington House, Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0BD

02073008000

Katrin Bellinger at Colnaghi
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
15 Old Bond Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 4AX

00 44 207 491 7408

Beetles + Huxley
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
3 - 5 SWALLOW STREET
London, United Kingdom W1B 4DE

020 7434 4319

The gallery is known for both its friendly, welcoming atmosphere but also for it's engaging, academic approach to promoting photography. From the erudite exhibition catalogues that accompany each exhibition to regular curator-led museum tours and artist interviews the gallery is devoted to encouraging the wider appreciation of photographic history.

Waterhouse & Dodd Gallery
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
47 Albemarle Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 4JW

+44 (0)20 7734 7800

Locations: 47 Albemarle Street London W1S 4JW [email protected] Telephone +44 (0) 20 7734 7800 Fax +44 (0) 20 7734 7805 Monday-Friday 9.30am-6pm Saturdays 11-4pm 960 Madison Avenue, 2FL New York, NY 10021 [email protected] Telephone + 1 212 717 9100 Monday-Friday 10am-6pm Saturdays 11-5pm

Messum's - Start a Collection
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8 Cork Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 3LJ

0207 437 5545

“Start a collection was conceived by us in 2000 to provide a platform on which a first-time buyer could make a purchase with confidence. That defining moment proved to be a building block for many now established collections and numerous new friendships. For that reason more than any other, Start a Collection remains an eagerly awaited event in our exhibition calendar both for our clients and for ourselves.” Johnny Messum Works may be reserved ahead of time, but priority is given to buyers in the gallery for the first hour of the opening day.

Messum's
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
28 Cork Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 3NG

+44 (0)20 7437 5545

Founded by David Messum in 1963, Messum's specialises in British art from the 19th century to the present day, and has established key markets for British Impressionism and paintings by artists from the Newlyn and St Ives Schools. The gallery presents an annual programme of over 20 exhibitions and events in addition to participating in leading international art fairs. We also engage actively with museums and public institutions - including Tate Britain, Tate St Ives, the National Maritime Museum, Birmingham Art Museum and Penlee House and Galleries - to promote British art. Equally, Messum's advise private clients on collection management, research, conservation, framing and valuation. Messum's is a member of BADA and SLAD.

Medici Gallery
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
5 Cork St
London, United Kingdom W1S 3LQ

(+44) 020 7833 1653

Medici Gallery has been established in the heart of London's Mayfair for over one hundred years. The Gallery exhibits figurative and representational contemporary painting and sculpture and has approximately ten exhibitions a year. We exhibit International and UK based established and emerging artists.

Cork Street Open Exhibition
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
28 Cork Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 3NG

01981 540597

The Cork Street Open exhibition held in Mayfair, in the centre of London's prestigious art district, has launched many emerging artists. The final Cork Street Open Exhibition will take place in August 2013. The purpose of the exhibition is to provide an opportunity for both emerging and establish artists from around the world to gain exposure and sell their work while benefiting a selected charity.

Grimaldi Gavin
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
27 Albemarle Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 4DW

+442036370637

Representing: Miles Aldridge Roy Arden Martina Bacigalupo Joachim Brohm Emma Critchley Peter Fraser Goldschmied & Chiari Karen Knorr Karine Laval Sinaida Michalskaja Domingo Milella Sophy Rickett Jem Southam Heidi Specker Clare Strand Massimo Vitali Tomoko Yoneda Fabio Zonta

Sprovieri Gallery
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
23 Heddon Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 4BQ

+44 (0)20 7734 2066

Sprovieri Gallery presents an international programme, focusing on installation and including audio work, drawing, painting, performance, photography, sculpture and video by leading and emerging artists. The artists represented by the gallery are Jimmie Durham, Mario Dellavedova, Chelpa Ferro, Nan Goldin, Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, Avish Khebrehzadeh, Jannis Kounellis, Cinthia Marcelle, Boris Mikhailov, Pavel Pepperstein, Jorge Peris, Matheus Rocha Pitta and Sandra Vasquez de La Horra. www.sprovieri.com

Pippy Houldsworth Gallery
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
6 Heddon Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 4BT

+44 (0)20 7734 7760

Elisabetta Cipriani Jewellery by Contemporary Artists
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
23 Heddon Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 4BQ

0207 7342066

Elisabetta Cipriani – Jewellery by Contemporary Artists is an invite to the most innovative and challenging living international sculptors and painters to create wearable sculptures with the use of precious metals and stones. It is the first time that these artists have approached jewellery establishing parallels with their artistic disciplines and poetics. The design of each project starts from a sketch created by the artist, whilst specialised goldsmiths based in Europe or the artists themselves take care of the production. The final result is a portable small sculpture, revealing the most intimate level of the artist: this is Art in Jewellery. The jewels created are unique or in a limited edition of 12 and are always addressed to art lovers but also to people who desire to wear something unique. Since 2009 the gallery is collaborating with: Atelier van Lieshout, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Enrico Castellani, Giorgio Vigna, Giuseppe Penone, Ilya & Emilia Kabakov, Jannis Kounellis, Kendell Geers, Rebecca Horn, Tatsuo Miyajima, Tom Sachs and Wim Delvoye. A selection of the gallery projects is included in worldwide Museum’s collections and exhibitions. The gallery participates at PAD London (October), Design Miami (December) and Design Miami/Basel (June). Since May 2011 the jewellery is permanently displayed in a room designed specifically to host these special sculptures at Sprovieri Gallery, London.

The Fine Art Society
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
148 New Bond Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 2JT

+44 (0) 20 7629 5116

The Fine Art Society was founded in 1876 by a group of knowledgeable art collectors. Comprising of a five storey town house in Mayfair, it is the oldest gallery in London. Since its inception the gallery has always championed and worked directly with living artists, giving The Camden Town Group their first show and holding historic shows that have since entered the canon of art history. It is at this location that Whistler invented the concept of a solo exhibition and introduced evenly spaced installations against pale walls – a precursor for every contemporary gallery today. In recent years the gallery has embraced the contemporary arts along side it's twentieth and nineteenth century heritage and increased cross-cultural links, particularly in Asia and Australia. Exciting artists have joined the gallery’s core stable and these are complimented by internationally recognized artists who participate in critically engaged survey shows.