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London Canal Museum, London | Tourist Information


12-13 New Wharf Road
London, United Kingdom N1 9

02077130836

We are open on bank holiday Mondays and have a late opening on the first Thursday of each month to 1930.

Historical Place Near London Canal Museum

Old Bailey Central Criminal Court
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Central Criminal Court, Old Bailey, London, EC4M 7EH
London, EC4M 7EH

020 7248 3277

Magpie & Stump
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
18 Old Bailey
London, EC4M 7EP

0207 248 5085

One Great George Street
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Great George Street
London, SW1P 3AA

+44 (0)20 7665 2323

One Great George Street is a four-domed grade II listed Edwardian building used as a conference and wedding venue just off Parliament Square in Westminster, London, England. The building is also the global headquarters of the Institution of Civil Engineers ; it was originally a venue for ICE members to relax, meet and have conferences, and became available for public events in 1989. It is near the Houses of Parliament, Westminster Abbey, and St James's Park.Building and historyFrom 1839 until 1913, ICE occupied numbers 24–26 Great George Street. In the mid-1880s the government proposed re-development of the area around Great George Street to provide more office space for government departments. This meant the demolition of ICE's first location and led ICE to move its headquarters across the road to numbers 1-7.One Great George Street was built for the ICE between 1910 and 1913 and was the result of an architectural competition won by James Miller, RSA (1860–1947). His winning design was priced at £77,126, with the other architects involved in the design competition including Brigg, Wolstenholme & Thornely, John Belcher, William Emerson, Charles Edward Barry and Thomas Collcutt. The contractor who built the building was Mowlem.

Sir John Soane's Museum
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
13 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, WC2A 3BP

Sir John Soane's Museum was formerly the home of the neo-classical architect John Soane. It holds many drawings and models of Soane's projects and the collections of paintings, drawings and antiquities that he assembled.The museum is located in Holborn, London, adjacent to Lincoln's Inn Fields. It is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.HistoryHousesSoane demolished and rebuilt three houses in succession on the north side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. He began with No. 12 (between 1792 and 1794), externally a plain brick house. After becoming Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy in 1806, Soane purchased No. 13, the house next door, today the Museum, and rebuilt it in two phases in 1808–09 and 1812.In 1808–09 he constructed his drawing office and "museum" on the site of the former stable block at the back, using primarily top lighting. In 1812 he rebuilt the front part of the site, adding a projecting Portland Stone facade to the basement, ground and first floor levels and the centre bay of the second floor. Originally this formed three open loggias, but Soane glazed the arches during his lifetime. Once he had moved into No. 13, Soane rented out his former home at No. 12 (on his death it was left to the nation along with No. 13, the intention being that the rental income would fund the running of the Museum).

Staple Inn
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
11Staples Yard
London, WC1V 7

Staple Inn is a Tudor building on the south side of High Holborn street in the City of London, London, England. Located near Chancery Lane tube station, it is used as the London venue for meetings of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, and is the last surviving Inn of Chancery. It was designated a grade I listed building in 1974.HistoryIt was originally attached to Gray's Inn, which is one of the four Inns of Court. The Inns of Chancery fell into decay in the 19th century. All of them were dissolved, and most were demolished. Staple Inn is the only one which survives largely intact. It was an extra-parochial area until 1858 and then a civil parish. It became part of the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn in 1900 and was abolished in 1930.On 1 April 1994 boundary changes meant that the Inn was transferred from the London Borough of Camden to the City of London (and the City ward of Farringdon Without).It was the model for the fictitious Inn of Court "Bacon's Inn" in Arthur Moore's 1904 novel 'Archers of the Long Bow'. The ancient switch-tailed double pump referred to was replaced in 1937 by a mock single pump, to mark the site.

Smithfield, London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
31-32 Watling St
London, EC1A 2

020 7248 3151

Smithfield is a locality in the ward of Farringdon Without situated at the City of London's northwest in central London, England. The principal street of the area is West Smithfield.A number of valued City institutions are located in the area, such as St Bartholomew's Hospital, the Charterhouse, and Livery Halls notably those of the Butchers' and Haberdashers' Companies, but Smithfield is best known for its ancient meat market, dating from the 10th century, which is now London's only remaining wholesale market in continuous operation since medieval times. The area also contains London's oldest surviving church, St Bartholomew-the-Great, founded in 1123 AD.Smithfield has borne witness to many bloody executions of heretics and political rebels over the centuries, including major historical figures such as Scottish patriot Sir William Wallace and Wat Tyler, leader of the Peasants' Revolt, among many other religious reformers and dissenters.

The British Museum Friends
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Great Russell Street
London, WC1B 3DG

0207 323 8195

BT Tower
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
60 Cleveland Mews
London, W1T 6

020 7432 5050

The BT Tower is a communications tower located in Fitzrovia, London, owned by BT Group. It has been previously known as the GPO Tower, the Post Office Tower and the Telecom Tower. The main structure is 177m high, with a further section of aerial rigging bringing the total height to 191m. It should not be confused with the BT Centre (the global headquarters of BT). Its Post Office code was YTOW.Upon completion it overtook the Millbank Tower to become the tallest building in both London and the United Kingdom, titles it held until 1980, when it in turn was overtaken by the NatWest Tower.History20th centuryThe tower was commissioned by the General Post Office (GPO). Its primary purpose was to support the microwave aerials then used to carry telecommunications traffic from London to the rest of the country, as part of Britain's microwave network.It replaced a much shorter steel lattice tower which had been built on the roof of the neighbouring Museum telephone exchange in the late 1940s to provide a television link between London and Birmingham. The taller structure was required to protect the radio links' "line of sight" against some of the tall buildings in London then in the planning stage. These links were routed via other GPO microwave stations at Harrow Weald, Bagshot, Kelvedon Hatch and Fairseat, and to places like the London Air Traffic Control Centre at West Drayton.

Coram's Fields
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
93 Guilford Street
London, WC1N 1DN

020 7837 6138

Coram's Fields is a unique seven acre playground and park for children and young people living in or visiting London. It includes a Youth Centre, Children's Centre, Community Nursery, Sports Programme, play areas and animals. Coram's Fields is a registered charity (#302963) established in 1936.

Coram's Fields
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
93 Guildford Street
London, WC1N 1D

Coram's Fields is a large urban open space in the London borough of Camden in central London. It occupies seven acres in Bloomsbury and includes a children's playground, sand pits, a duck pond, a pets corner, café and nursery. Adults (defined as anyone over the age of 16) are only permitted to enter if accompanied by children (under 16).It is situated on the former site of the Foundling Hospital, established by Thomas Coram in what was then named Lamb's Conduit Field in 1739. The Foundling Hospital was relocated outside London in the 1920s, and the site was earmarked for redevelopment. However, campaigning and fundraising by local residents and a donation from the Harmsworth family of newspaper proprietors, led to the creation of the current park that opened in 1936. Coram's Fields is a Grade II listed site and is owned and run by an independent registered charity, officially named Coram's Fields and the Harmsworth Memorial Playground.Coram's Fields also offers three eight-a-side football pitches, two tennis courts, a stickball field and a basketball court.

Mecklenburg Square
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
WC1N 2AN
London,

Houses Of Parliment London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Houses of Parliament, Westminster
London,

Sadler's Wells
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Rosebery Ave
London, EC1R 4

20-77136000

Did you know that Sadler's Wells takes its name from the underground spring found by Dick Sadler in 1683? He opened a music and variety house, inviting people to taste the waters. There has been a theatre on this site ever since. And we're still pumping the water!

Saddlers Wells Theathre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Rosebery Avenue
London, EC1R 4TN

020 7863 8000

Sant Pancras
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
euston road
London, n1c 4qp

St Pancras Old Church
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Pancras Road
London, NW1 1UL

020 7424 0724

St Pancras Old Church is a Church of England parish church in Somers Town, central London. It is dedicated to the Roman martyr Saint Pancras, and is believed by many to be one of the oldest sites of Christian worship in England. The church is situated on Pancras Road in the London Borough of Camden, with the surrounding area and its international railway station taking its name. St Pancras Old Church, which was largely rebuilt in the Victorian era, should not be confused with St Pancras New Church about a kilometre away, on the Euston Road.HistoryParishOriginally, the parish of St Pancras stretched from close to Oxford Street almost to Highgate. In the early Middle Ages there was a centre of population in the vicinity of what is now known as the old church. However, in the 14th century the population abandoned the site and moved to what is now Kentish Town. The reasons for this were probably the vulnerability of the plain around the church to flooding (the River Fleet, which is now underground, runs through it) and the availability of better wells at Kentish Town, where there is less clay in the soil. The church subsequently fell into disrepair. Towards the end of the 18th century, services were only held in the church on one Sunday each month; on other weeks, the same congregation would use a chapel in Kentish Town. It lost its status as the parish church when the New Church on what was to become the Euston Road was consecrated in 1822, and became a chapel of ease.

Union Chapel, Islington
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Compton Terrace
London, N1 2UN

+44 20 7226 1686

Union Chapel is a working church, live entertainment venue and charity drop-in centre for the homeless in Islington, London, England. Built in the late 19th century in the Gothic revival style, the church is Grade I-listed. It is at the top end of Upper Street, near Highbury Fields.The VenueThe church hosts live music and comedy events, and was voted London's Best Live Music Venue by readers of Time Out magazine in 2012.Margins Homelessness ProjectThe Margins Project, based in the Union Chapel, provides a range of support services to people facing homelessness, crisis and isolation. It operates a Sunday drop-in that provides meals, showers and laundry facilities. It also offers help with accessing housing, employment and health services and weekly art classes.Church in the ChapelUnion Chapel is a Congregational church, which describes itself as "liberal, inclusive, non-hierarchical, and non-conformist" and meets every Sunday for worship. The church is also open on Wednesday mornings for private prayer, and a Bible study group meets Wednesday lunchtime.HistoryThe congregation first met in 1799 in a house in Highbury Grove as a union of evangelical Anglicans and non-conformists, and moved to a previous building on the present site in Compton Terrace, just off Upper Street, in 1806. The current building is in the Victorian gothic style of architecture. It was designed by James Cubitt of Loughton, and built between 1874 and 1877, with further additions from 1877 to 1890, while Henry Allon was pastor. The chapel was used for a major scene in the 1982 film, Who Dares Wins. Since 1982, the charity Friends of Union Chapel has helped restore and preserve the church and organise activities. Behind the church is the large Sunday School, built on the Akron Plan.