EuroZoid
Discover The Most Popular Places In Europe

Clontarf Seafront, Dublin | Tourist Information


clontarfresidents.com/news/view/138-political-communications-on-the-clontarf-residents-website

Clontarf Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

<>

Community and Government Near Clontarf Seafront

3Arena
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
North Wall Quay
Dublin, Ireland 1

01-8198888

Welcome to 3Arena Facebook page! We do not moderate posts prior to posting however we do reserve the right to remove them. Some Resons for posts bring removed: -Posts containing profanity, offensive, vulgar or inappropriate language. -Posts containing illegal activity. -Posts involving the re-selling of tickets. -Posts containing the promotion of other businesses. (This posting policy is subject to change at the discretion of 3Arena.)

Dublin City
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Arran Quay
Dublin, Ireland

<>

Merrion Square
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Square
Dublin, Ireland D2

Merrion Square is a Georgian garden square on the southside of Dublin city centre.HistoryThe square was laid out after 1762 and was largely complete by the beginning of the 19th century. The demand for such Georgian townhouse residences south of the River Liffey had been fueled by the decision of the then Earl of Kildare (later the Duke of Leinster) to build his Dublin home on the then undeveloped southside. He constructed the largest aristocratic residence in Dublin, Leinster House, second only to Dublin Castle. As a result of this construction, three new residential squares appeared on the Southside, Merrion Square (facing the garden front of Leinster House), St Stephen's Green and the smallest and last of Dublin's five Georgian squares to be built, Fitzwilliam Square.Aristocrats, bishops and the wealthy sold their northside townhouses and migrated to the new southside developments.LegacyMerrion Square is considered one of the city's finest surviving squares. Three sides are lined with Georgian redbrick townhouses; the West side abuts the grounds of Leinster House (seat of the Oireachtas), Government Buildings, the Natural History Museum and the National Gallery. The central railed-off garden is now a public park.

Spire of Dublin
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

The Spire of Dublin, alternatively titled the Monument of Light, is a large, stainless steel, pin-like monument 121.2m in height, located on the site of the former Nelson's Pillar on O'Connell Street in Dublin, Ireland.DescriptionThe spire was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects, who sought an "Elegant and dynamic simplicity bridging art and technology". The contract was awarded to SIAC-Radley JV and it was manufactured by Radley Engineering of Dungarvan, County Waterford, and erected by SIAC Construction Ltd & GDW Engineering Ltd. The first section was installed on 18 December 2002. Five additional 20m sections were added with the last one installed on 21 January 2003. The spire is an elongated cone of diameter 3m at the base, narrowing to 15cm at the top. Construction of the world's tallest sculpture was delayed because of difficulty in obtaining planning permission and environmental regulations. It is constructed from eight hollow tubes of stainless steel and features a tuned mass damper, designed by engineers Arup, to counteract sway. The steel underwent shot peening to alter the quality of light reflected from it.The pattern around the base of the Spire is based on a core sample of earth and rock formation taken from the ground where the spire stands. The pattern was applied by bead blasting the steel through rubber stencil masks whose patterns were created by water jet cutting based on core sample drawings supplied by the contractor.

O'Connell Bridge
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Town
Dublin, Ireland 1

O'Connell Bridge is a road bridge spanning the River Liffey in Dublin, and joining O'Connell Street to D'Olier Street, Westmoreland Street and the south quays.HistoryThe original bridge was designed by James Gandon, and built between 1791 and 1794.Originally humped, and narrower, Carlisle bridge was a symmetrical, three semicircular arch structure constructed in granite with a Portland stone balustrade and obelisks on each of the four corners. A keystone head at the apex of the central span symbolises the River Liffey, corresponding to the heads on the Custom House which personify the other great rivers of Ireland.Since 1860,, to improve the streetscape and relieve traffic congestion on the bridge, it was intended to widen Carlisle Bridge to bring it to the same width as 70 metres wide Sackville Street which formed the north side carriageway connection to the Bridge. In 1877-1880 the bridge was reconstructed. As can be seen on orthophotography it spans now 45 m of the Liffey and is about 50 m wide. O'Connell Bridge is said to be unique in Europe as the only traffic bridge wider than it is long.

Saint Anne's Park
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
All Saints Road
Dublin, Ireland D5

+353 1 833 1859

St Anne's Park is a public park within Dublin City Council, situated between Raheny and Clontarf, both suburbs on the northside of Dublin, Ireland.The park, the second largest municipal park in Dublin, is part of a former 202ha estate assembled by members of the Guinness family, descendants of Sir Arthur Guinness, founder of the famous brewery, beginning with Benjamin Lee Guinness in 1835 . Features include an artificial pond and a number of follies, a fine collection of trees, a playground, parklands walks and recreational facilities including golf.HistoryThe estate was named after the Holy Well of the same name on the lands. Lands were purchased over time to build up an extensive property, and a large Italianate-style mansion house was commissioned and modified over several generations. The Italianate influence included references in the garden follies to ancient Roman sites and the import of actual antiquities.Sir Arthur Edward Guinness (Lord Ardilaun), who inherited the estate in 1868, and purchased Manresa House next door, was the person most responsible for expanding and developing the estate and gardens and planted wind-breaking evergreen (holm) oaks and pines along the main avenue and estate boundaries, where they remain. Lady (Olive) Ardilaun, originally of Bantry House, County Cork, developed the gardens based on her interest in French chateau gardens, but also with eclectic influences of the Victorian era and the horticultural expertise of her Scottish gardener. Lord Ardilaun was also prominent in the Royal Horticultural Society.

Hill 16
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Croke Park
Dublin, Ireland

Hill 16 officially called Dineen/Hill 16 is a terrace on the railway end of Croke Park, the show-piece stadium of the Gaelic Athletic Association in Dublin City, Ireland. It is considered a national icon.When Croke Park was first used for the Railway End of the park was little more than a mound of earth. Its name was originally called Hill 60. That original name came from a hill in Gallipoli on which the Connaught Rangers suffered heavy casualties in late August 1915. Contrary to common belief, the Royal Dublin Fusiliers did not participate in this battle, although the latter regiment did lose heavily during the wider Gallipoli campaign (most notoriously at 'V' Beach, Cape Helles, the previous April). That original name stuck throughout the 1920s and 1930s until senior figures in the GAA decided that it was inappropriate to have a section of Croke Park named after a battle involving the British Army. So Hill 60 became Hill 16, a name that would link it to 1916, and the story began to circulate that it had been built from the ruins of O'Connell Street. The Hill has always lagged behind the rest of the stadium in terms of comfort. It was only in 1936, when the Cusack Stand was redeveloped, that the turf and mud of Hill 16 was replaced with concrete terracing.It was after the 1983 All-Ireland Football Final between Dublin GAA and Galway GAA, where overcrowding on Hill 16 caused a few supporters to suffer injuries, that the GAA decided to rebuild the Hill. This work was completed in 1988, allowing a capacity of 10,000 spectators. In the mid-1990s the GAA came up with a masterplan to rebuild the whole stadium. It was envisaged that Hill 16 would be replaced with an all-seated stand, however, this met with opposition from Dublin supporters. There were also the problems of the nearby railway line and the fact that the GAA doesn't own any of the land behind Croke Park. The plans were redrawn and a new, terraced area was built at a cost of €25 million with rubble believed to of come from Agnes Browns back garden, to replace the old Nally Stand, named after Pat Nally, and Hill 16. The new Railway End, which includes Hill 16 and the Nally terrace, is capable of holding more than 13,000 spectators.

Shelbourne Park
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
South Lotts Road
Dublin, Ireland

Shelbourne Park is a greyhound racing stadium in the south Dublin inner city suburb of Ringsend.Greyhound RacingOpeningThe plans to open a greyhound track in Dublin were drawn up by Paddy O’Donoghue, Jerry Collins, Patsy McAlinden and Jim Clarke. Shelbourne Park opened on 14 May 1927 hot on the heels of Celtic Park (Belfast). The stadium located in the docklands in Ringsend was Dublin’s answer to the Belfast track and the pair became the two most greyhound prestigious tracks in Irish racing. When opening in 1927 the track employed four resident trainers in Mick Horan, Paddy Quigley, Billy Donoghue and Ben Scally.HistoryOne year later it was decided to introduce the Easter Cup which commemorated the 1916 Easter Monday Rising in Dublin. However the race soon became known for its own fame rather than its naming origins. The first winner was a greyhound called Odd Blade and the brindle dog went on to successfully defend his title the following year. Famously Mick the Miller equalled the world record time for 500 yards when recording 28.80 in 1928 but he only managed runner up spot to Odd Blade in that previously mentioned 1929 Easter Cup final. Mick went on to win the English Greyhound Derby that year for Shelbourne trainer Horan.Shelbourne Park hosted the first official Irish Greyhound Derby which had been run on four previous occasions from 1928 to 1931 at rival track Harold's Cross Stadium. The first winner of the Irish Derby at Shelbourne was Guideless Joe owned by champion Irish jockey Jack Moyland and trained by local trainer Mick Horan.

Dublin Connolly railway station
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Amiens Street 1
Dublin, Ireland

Dublin Connolly is one of the main railway stations in Dublin, Ireland, and is a focal point in the Irish route network. Opened in 1844 as Amiens Street Station, the ornate facade has a distinctive Italianate tower at its centre. On the North side of the River Liffey, it provides intercity and commuter services to the north, north-west and south-east. The North-South Dublin Area Rapid Transit service also passes through the station. The station offices are the headquarters of Irish Rail, Iarnród Éireann.

Samuel Beckett Bridge
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Samuel Beckett Bridge
Dublin, Ireland

Samuel Beckett Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge in Dublin that joins Sir John Rogerson's Quay on the south side of the River Liffey to Guild Street and North Wall Quay in the Docklands area.Design and constructionThe architect is Santiago Calatrava, a designer of a number of innovative bridges and buildings. This is the second bridge in the area designed by Calatrava, the first being the James Joyce Bridge, which is further upstream.Constructed by a "Graham Hollandia Joint Venture", the main span of the Samuel Beckett Bridge is supported by 31 cable stays from a doubly back-stayed single forward arc tubular tapered spar, with decking provided for four traffic and two pedestrian lanes. It is also capable of opening through an angle of 90 degrees allowing ships to pass through. This is achieved through a rotational mechanism housed in the base of the pylon.The shape of the spar and its cables is said to evoke an image of a harp lying on its edge. (The harp being the national symbol for Ireland from as early as the thirteenth century).The steel structure of the bridge was constructed in Rotterdam by Hollandia, a Dutch company also responsible for the steel fabrication of the London Eye. The steel span of the bridge was transferred from the Hollandia wharf in Krimpen aan den IJssel on 3 May 2009, with support from specialist transport company ALE Heavylift.

O2 Dublin
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
N Wall Quay
Dublin, Ireland 1

+353 1 819 8888

Westwood Gym, Clontarf
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Clontarf Road
Dublin, Ireland

1 853 0353

Custom House Harbour
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Custom House Harbour
Dublin, Ireland

<>

Google Docks
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
Barrow Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 4

<>

Malahide Road
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Malahide Road
Dublin, Ireland

North Great Georges Street
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
North Great Georges Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

<>

A BRIEF ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY Composed of grandly scaled brick terraces and overlooked by the imposing elevation of Belvedere House, North Great George’s Street remains one of the handsomest streets in north Dublin’s ever-diminishing Georgian streetscape. While its eighteenth-century reputation as an enclave of ‘polite’ living is confirmed by property leases which record the names of distinguished former residents – including Emilia, Dowager Viscountess Powerscourt and Valentine Browne, 1st Earl of Kenmare – the history of its development also provides an instructive précis of late eighteenth-century building and decorative practices. Conor Lucey University College Dublin April 200

St Vincents GAA
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Malahide Road
Dublin, Ireland

St Vincents is a Gaelic Athletic Association club based in Marino, on the northside of Dublin, Ireland. The club was founded in 1931 in Marino, although its club grounds were in Raheny for a number of years, but it moved to its home back into Marino in 1987. St Vincents merged with Marino Camogie Club in 1997 to form the St Vincents Hurling, Football and Camogie Club. They have won the All-Ireland Senior Club Football Championship on three occasions, most recently in 2014. They are the most successful side in the Dublin Senior Football championship having won the title 27 times.HonoursFootballVincents have won the Dublin Senior Football Championship 27 times. Their nearest rivals are O'Tooles who have won the Dublin Championship on 11 occasions. St Vincents won in the years: 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1967, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1981, 1984, 2007, 2013 and 2014. The team were narrowly defeated by UCD in the 2006 Dublin final. St Vincents eventually won the Dublin championships in 2007 for their first title since 1984. They won the 2013 championship by defeating Ballymun Kickhams after a replay,and retained their title with a one-point win over St. Oliver Plunkett Eoghan Rua. A 7 in a row and a 6 in a row in the Dublin Senior Championship Two 3 in a rows A remarkable 7 in a row which would have led to 14 in a row was stopped by Erins Hope in 1956 and yet another 7 in a row was stopped in 1963 by UCD.

Larkin Community College
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Cathal Brugha Street
Dublin, Ireland

01-874 1913

Civil Registration Office
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Lr. Grand canal st, Dublin 2, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland +098

Dublin Port Tunnel
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
M50 motorway
Dublin, Ireland

The Dublin Tunnel is a road traffic tunnel in Dublin, Ireland, that forms part of the M50 motorway.The twin tunnels form a two-lane dual carriageway connecting Dublin Port, which lies to the east of central Dublin, and the M1 motorway close to Dublin Airport. The tunnels are 4.5km in length and total project length of 5.6km. It had final cost of approximately €752 million.The tunnel was officially opened on 20 December 2006 by then Taoiseach Bertie Ahern; it was initially only open to HGVs. It was opened to all traffic on 28 January 2007.PurposeTraffic congestion in central Dublin became severe at the turn of the century, with thousands of heavy goods vehicles travelling to and from Dublin port via the city centre. The tunnel relieves surface road congestion in Dublin city centre by diverting heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) from Dublin Port directly onto the motorway network. This has positive knock-on effects for bus users, pedestrians and cyclists travelling along the city quays, including better air quality and safer travel.To discourage commuters from using the tunnel, vehicles other than HGVs are heavily tolled. HGVs travelling north and west benefit from the expected six-minute journey time through the tunnel. A tunnel was chosen as it was decided that a surface relief road was not feasible.Dublin Bus routes 142, 33x and 41x use the tunnel to get to the port area of the city from the northern suburbs.

Public Places and Attractions Near Clontarf Seafront

Temple Bar
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland 2

O'Connell Street
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland

O'Connell Street is Dublin's main thoroughfare. It measures 49 m (54 yds) in width at its southern end, 46 m (50 yds) at the north, and is 500 m (547 yds) in length. During the 17th century it was a narrow street known as Drogheda Street (named after Henry Moore, Earl of Drogheda). It was widened, and renamed 'Sackville Street' (named after Lionel Sackville, 1st Duke of Dorset) in the late 1700s until 1924, when it was renamed in honour of Daniel O'Connell, a nationalist leader of the early 19th century, whose statue stands at the lower end of the street, facing O'Connell Bridge.IntroductionLocated in the heart of Dublin city, O'Connell Street forms part of a grand thoroughfare created in the 18th century that runs through the centre of the capital, O'Connell Bridge, Westmoreland Street, College Green and Dame Street, terminating at City Hall and Dublin Castle. Situated just north of the River Liffey, the street has a fine axial positioning, running close to a north-south orientation. Lined with many handsome buildings, O'Connell Street is the most monumental of Dublin's commercial streets, having been largely rebuilt in the early 20th century following extensive destruction in the struggle for Irish independence and subsequent civil war. It has the air of an imposing 1920s boulevard, with signature stone-faced neoclassical buildings such as Clerys department store complemented by the more subtle grain of elegant bank and retail premises. O'Connell Street Upper by contrast retains something of its original 18th century character, with the western side conforming to original plot widths and some original fabric still intact.

Jervis Shopping Centre
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
24-29 Mary Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

+353 1 878 1323

Cliff Of Moher
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Co. Clare
Galway, Ireland

Parnells GAA Club An Cumann Parnell C.L.G
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Coolock Village, CoolockTerri
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 5

018481283

Trinity College
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
College Green
Dublin, Ireland

<>

Butlers Chocolates
Distance: 2.9 mi Tourist Information
Clonshaugh
Coolock, Ireland Dublin 17

0035316710599

Science Gallery Dublin
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Trinity College, Pearse Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

+353-18964091

In 2008, a car park in a forgotten corner of Dublin was transformed into an experimental space that would bridge art and science, unleashing their combined creative potential. Over 1.9 million visitors to Science Gallery Dublin have experienced exhibitions ranging from living art experiments to materials science, to the future of the human race to the future of play. We develop an ever-changing programme of exhibitions and events fuelled by the expertise of scientists, researchers, students, artists, designers, inventors, creative thinkers and entrepreneurs.

Natural History Museum
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Street, Dubin 2
Dublin, Ireland

Ireland's Natural History Museum (Músaem Stair an Dúlra), sometimes called the Dead Zoo a branch of the National Museum of Ireland, is housed on Merrion Street in Dublin, Ireland. The museum was built in 1856 for parts of the collection of the Royal Dublin Society and building and collection were later passed to the Irish State.The Museum's collection and building have changed little since Victorian times, and it is sometimes described as a "museum of a museum".CollectionThe building is a ‘cabinet-style’ museum designed to showcase a wide-ranging and comprehensive zoological collection, and has changed little in over a century. Often described as a ‘museum of a museum’, its 10,000 exhibits provide a glimpse of the natural world that has delighted generations of visitors since the doors opened in 1857.As the collection is unique in range and vintage, the exhibits are a product of their age, with faded and worn pelts and visible marks from bullets and rough taxidermy. Larger specimens are displayed in large, wood-framed glass cases while smaller ones are kept under glass, protected from sunlight by moveable leather panels. The main room is heated by an underfloor system similar to a Roman hypocaust.The Irish Room, the ground floor of the museum, displays Irish animals, notably several mounted skeletons of giant Irish deer. Numerous skulls of those and other deer line the walls. Stuffed and mounted mammals, birds, fish — and insects and other animals native to or found in Ireland — comprise the rest of the ground floor. Many of the specimens of currently extant animals, such as badgers, hares, and foxes, are over a century old. A basking shark hangs from this ceiling.

The Quays, Dublin
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
12 Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland Dublin2

01 6713922

Mansion House
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

Temple Bar District, Dublin
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland 2

<>

Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Charlemont House, Parnell Square North
Dublin, Ireland D01 F2X9

+353 (0)1 222 5550

North Circular Road
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
North Circular Road
Dublin, Ireland D1

<>

Custom House Harbour
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Custom House Harbour
Dublin, Ireland

<>

EPIC Ireland CHQ
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
The chq Building, Custom House Quay
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

+353 (0)1 531 3688

Housed in the iconic chq Building, a historic stone and iron warehouse, built in 1820, this state-of-the-art visitor attraction tells the epic story of the Irish people’s dispersal throughout the world over the ages. Visitors will be taken on a journey that starts on the island of Ireland and ends with the global presence of the Irish today. The exhibition is spread across 20 immersive and interactive galleries, and the aim is to bring to life the story of Ireland’s communities overseas - past, present and future – in a way that is highly entertaining, engaging and educational. The story is told using innovative techniques and cutting-edge interactive technologies in combination with more traditional photographic, film, sound recordings and historic objects. EPIC Ireland also offers a state-of-the-art genealogy centre. The Irish Family History Centre is operated by Eneclann, Ireland’s leading genealogical services provider, in conjunction with international partners. In addition to extensive, easy-to-use research facilities, the genealogy centre offers the latest DNA testing that will enable visitors to learn about their Irish roots.

Raheny Gaa Club
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
All Saints Drive
Dublin, Ireland

(01)8313530

Guinness Storehouse, St James Gate, Dublin
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
St James Gate, Dublin
Dublin, Ireland

Malahide Road
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Malahide Road
Dublin, Ireland

Summerhill Street
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
80,Summerhill Street
Dublin, Ireland

<>

Local Business Near Clontarf Seafront

Mark Nixon Studio
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
62 Clontarf Road
Dublin, Ireland D3

01 818 6630

One of Ireland's leading photographers, specialising in photographing people. Advertising, commercial, fashion, editorial and family portrait photography.

Suppers Ready
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
58 Clontarf Road
Dublin, Ireland

Pace Boutiques
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
53 Clontarf Rd/ Brighton Road Foxrock
Dublin, Ireland

012897658/ 018062797

Pace was set up in Mar 2002 and continues to offer customers the latest trends in footwear clothing and accessories to meet women's fashion needs.Pace offers women exclusive designs for day into evening wear at high street prices. Clontarf & Foxrock

Clontarf Garda Station
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Clontarf Road
Dublin, Ireland 3

016664800

Yacht
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
73 Clontarf Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 3

01 833 6364

The Yacht Bar and Restaurant
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
73 Clontarf Road, Dublin 3
Dublin, Ireland

Rory McDyer Travel
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
49 Clontarf Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 3

(01)8335100

Clontarf Wines
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
48 Clontarf Road
Dublin, Ireland D3

018533088

Food Room Clontarf
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
46 Clontarf Rd.
Dublin, Ireland 3

01 - 8332259

D Coakley L.T.D
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
118 St Lawrence's Road,
Clontarf, Ireland 3

01 8439979

D. Coakley Ltd. is a family run business with over 40 years experience. Under the leadership of Dermot Coakley the team of highly trained roofing specialists conduct work in complete compliance with building, training, health and safety regulations. The company is in current possession of Public & Employers Liability Insurance Safety certification Tax Clearance Certificate VAT registration ROS registered

Aisling Foley Marketing
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Clontarf
Dublin, Ireland 3

+353 87 918 2986

I can help with all technology marketing communications projects including: Brochures Website redesign Copywriting Digital marketing including email marketing Social media Blogs Events PR Analyst relations

Antiques & Collectables Ireland
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Clontarf
Dublin, Ireland 3

0861654763

Fran Draper Fitness
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Unit B4 Airside Retail Estate
Swords, Ireland n/a

0872116517

My own personal experience is what made me find my true passion in fitness. I have always wanted to help people and my goal is to help mental health through physical exercise and good nutrition. Exercise helps the mind, good nutrition keeps you healthy on the inside and the body follows !! I want to help you feel good about yourself :)

Clontarf Gardens
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Haddon Rd
Clontarf, Ireland 3

0894910523

Clontarf Orthodontics
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
9, Clontarf Road
Dublin, Ireland 3

+353 (1) 8186571

Clontarf Orthodontics is situated across from Clontarf Road Dart station. Dr Shona Leydon the principle orthodontist and founder has 20 years experience in specialist orthodontic treatment and has personally treated thousands of orthodontic cases. Dr Leydon is a FULL-TIME orthodontic specialist on the Northside of Dublin which means she is here all day every day to answer your orthodontic queries, before during or after your treatment. At Clontarf Orthodontics multiple treatment options are available from fixed metal braces to clear and invisible braces. Dr.Leydon has several years experience in the innovative INVISALIGN® invisible braces.

Harry Byrnes Pub
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
107 Howth Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 3

(01)8332650

Pure Beauty Rooms
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
10C Kincora Avenue
Dublin, Ireland

Turf n logs
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Howth
Dublin, Ireland dublin 13

0863371919

Howth Bouncy Castles
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Howth
Dublin, Ireland 13

085 218 8076

Catering all areas of Dublin! Perfect for kids birthday partys, communions and conformations Castles from only €50 per day!

Scoil Ui Chonaill Gaa Club
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Clontarf Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 3