EuroZoid
Discover The Most Popular Places In Europe

Church of Saint-Sulpice, Paris, Paris | Tourist Information


Place St. Sulpice
Paris, France 75006


Saint-Sulpice is a Roman Catholic church in Paris, France, on the east side of the Place Saint-Sulpice within the rue Bonaparte, in the Luxembourg Quarter of the 6th arrondissement. At 113 metres long, 58 metres in width and 34 metres tall, it is only slightly smaller than Notre-Dame and thus the second largest church in the city. It is dedicated to Sulpitius the Pious. Construction of the present building, the second church on the site, began in 1646. During the 18th century, an elaborate gnomon, the Gnomon of Saint-Sulpice, was constructed in the church.HistoryThe present church is the second building on the site, erected over a Romanesque church originally constructed during the 13th century. Additions were made over the centuries, up to 1631. The new building was founded in 1646 by parish priest Jean-Jacques Olier (1608–1657) who had established the Society of Saint-Sulpice, a clerical congregation, and a seminary attached to the church. Anne of Austria laid the first stone.Construction began in 1646 to designs which had been created in 1636 by Christophe Gamard, but the Fronde interfered, and only the Lady Chapel had been built by 1660, when Daniel Gittard provided a new general design for most of the church. Gittard completed the sanctuary, ambulatory, apsidal chapels, transept, and north portal (1670–1678), after which construction was halted for lack of funds.

Catholic Church Near Church of Saint-Sulpice, Paris

Notre-Dame Cathedral
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Place du Parvis Notre-Dame
Paris, 75004

01 42 34 56 10

Notre-Dame du Travail
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
36 rue Guilleminot
Paris, 75014

01 44 10 72 92

Eglise Notre Dame Du Travail
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
36 rue Guilleminot
Paris, 75014

Eglise Saint-Médard
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
141 Rue Mouffetard
Paris, 75005

01 44 08 87 00

파리한인성당
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
15 BOSSONADE 75014 PARIS
Paris, 75014

+33 1 43 20 37 94

Paroisse Saint Médard - Paris
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
141 rue Mouffetard
Paris, 75005

+33 (0)144088700

L'église construite entre le XIIIe siècle (clocher) et le XVIIIème siècle. Elle a été classée "monument historique" en 1906. http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89glise_Saint-M%C3%A9dard_de_Paris

Centre Catholique Japonais de Paris
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
4, Bld Edgar-Quinet
Paris, 75014

09 53 86 74 29

パリ日本人カトリックセンターは、パリのカトリック教会に属する機関です。1973年の創立以来、担当司祭またはシスターを置き、カトリック信者のみならず広く一般の皆様に、情報交換・親睦の場としてご利用いただいております。 お茶が飲みたいとき・本を借りに・日本語で話したい・暇なので・・・etc.、 どうぞご遠慮なくお立ち寄りください。意外な出会いや発見があるかも知れません。 また、当センターは以下のような活動も行っています。活動はすべてボランティアによる運営で、どなたでも無料で参加できますし申し込みの必要もありません。まずはちょっとのぞいてみませんか。 

Val-de-Grâce (church)
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
1 Place Alphonse Laveran
Paris, 75005

Notre-Dame du Val-de-Grâce, connue populairement comme l'église du Val-de-Grâce, est une église de style classique baroque français originellement destinée à être l'église de l'abbaye royale du Val-de-Grâce située dans le arrondissement de Paris, place Alphonse Laveran.Les bâtiments de l'ancienne abbaye accueillent aujourd'hui le musée du service de santé des armées, la bibliothèque centrale du Service de santé des armées, et l'École du Val-de-Grâce, anciennement École d'Application du Service de Santé des Armées (EASSA). Le même îlot militaire comprend l'hôpital d'instruction des armées du Val-de-Grâce, situé sur l'ancien potager de l'abbaye.

Paris International Seventh Day Adventist Church
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
24 rue Pierre Nicole
Paris, 75005

Eglise Notre Dame Des Champs
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
187 boul.iberville
Paris, 75006

Paroisse Notre-Dame des Champs, Église catholique
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
91 Boulevard du Montparnasse
Paris, 75006

01 40 64 19 64

Église Saint-Jacques-du-Haut-Pas
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
252 rue Saint-Jacques
Paris, 75005

The Église Saint-Jacques-du-Haut-Pas is a church in Paris, France in the 5th Arrondissement at the corner of Rue Saint-Jacques and the Rue de l'Abbé de l'Épée. The church has been registered as a historical monument since 4 June 1957.OriginsThe land on which the church is built was obtained oround 1180 by Hospitaller brothers originating from Altopascio, near Lucca, Italy. In 1360 the brothers built a simple chapel. Despite the suppression of their order by Pope Pius II in 1459, some brothers decided to remain. At that time the land around them was fields and meadows with a few low peasant houses and some religious institutions.In 1572 Catherine de' Medici decided to use the site as home for a group of Benedictine monks who had been expelled from their abbey of Saint-Magloire. The relics of St. Magloire of Dol and his disciples had been transported to Paris by Hugh Capet in 923, when the Normans attacked Brittany. The relics were transferred to the hospital, which became a monastery. In 1620, the seminary of the Oratorians under Pierre de Bérulle, the first seminar in France, replaced the Benedictines. It was known as the seminary of Saint-Magloire. Jean de La Fontaine stayed there as a novice.Initial constructionThe surrounding population increased and the faithful became accustomed to pray in the chapel of the Benedictines. The monks found themselves inconvenienced and demanded the departure of the lay people. In 1582 the bishop then gave permission for construction of a church adjoining the monastery of Saint-Magloire. A small church was built in 1584, serving the parishes of Saint-Hippolyte, Saint-Benoît and Saint-Médard. In this church the choir was oriented eastward, backing onto the rue Saint-Jacques. The church was entered through the monastery cemetery. A cemetery was opened in 1584 beside the original chapel, along today's rue de l’Abbé-de-l’Épée. It was closed in 1790. The original gallery organ was made by Vincent Coupeau, an organist of the parish, and was installed in 1628.

Lycée Notre Dame de Sion
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
61 Rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs
Paris, 75006

01 44 32 06 70

Paroisse Notre Dame du Liban à PARIS
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
15-17 rue d'Ulm
Paris, 75005

+33 1 43 29 47 60

Historique Le culte maronite a été autorisé en France par arrêté du 1e septembre 1892. Dès lors, la chapelle du petit Luxembourg est mise à la disposition de la communauté maronite en Île-de-France. Jusqu'en 1915, les autorités françaises et le représentant du patriarche recherchent de concert un lieu de culte adapté aux besoins de la communauté. Dans le sillage de la séparation de l'Église et de l'État arrêtée en 1905, les pères jésuites de l'école Sainte Geneviève à Paris ont dû abandonner la chapelle de leur école et toute leur structure éducative s'était ensuite établie à Versailles rue des postes (Ginette). En 1915, l'ancienne chapelle de l'école Sainte Geneviève des pères jésuites à Paris est affectée au culte maronite. Elle est inaugurée le 16 juillet de cette même année sous le patronage de Notre Dame du Liban. Construite par le célèbre architecte ASTRUC dans un style néogothique, la chapelle est dotée d'une série de vitraux œuvre du maître verrier Émile HIRSCH. Les huit verrières du fond et la rosace restent cependant en verre losangé. Elle est inaugurée le 13 mai 1894, veille de la Pentecôte. En 1937, le gouvernement français et le patriarcat créent autour de l'église la fondation du foyer franco-libanais. Le 8 décembre 1963, le patriarche MEOUCHI inaugure les nouveaux locaux du foyer franco-libanais. Le 25 octobre 1990, commencent la réfection de la toiture et le projet de rénovation de l'église dont la majeure partie sera réalisée entre octobre 1991 et mai 1993. Les huit verrières du fond et la rosace sont garnies de vitraux. Les verrières ont été exécutées par les maîtres verriers Christiane et Philippe ANDRIEUX et la rosace, inspirée de Notre-Dame de Kannoubine, est l'œuvre de Marie-Jo et Yves GUEYEL. Entre 2010 et 2011, la fondation met à neuf les quatre façades extérieures, les chéneaux, la charpente et les vitraux.

Église Notre Dame Du Liban À Paris
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
17 rue d'Ulm
Paris, 75005

Academia Christiana
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
14, rue Gay-Lussac
Paris, 75005

+33640389614

Nos valeurs : • Honnêteté intellectuelle • Recherche de la vérité • Combativité • Esthétique • Soucis d’être compris • Apostolat • Cohérence • Soucis de l’âme • Convivialité

Panthéon
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Place du Panthéon
Paris, 75005

01 44 32 18 00

The Panthéon is a building in the Latin Quarter in Paris. It was originally built as a church dedicated to St. Genevieve and to house the reliquary châsse containing her relics but, after many changes, now functions as a secular mausoleum containing the remains of distinguished French citizens. It is an early example of neoclassicism, with a façade modeled on the Pantheon in Rome, surmounted by a dome that owes some of its character to Bramante's Tempietto. Located in the 5th arrondissement on the Montagne Sainte-Geneviève, the Panthéon looks out over all of Paris. Designer Jacques-Germain Soufflot had the intention of combining the lightness and brightness of the Gothic cathedral with classical principles, but its role as a mausoleum required the great Gothic windows to be blocked.HistoryKing Louis XV vowed in 1744 that if he recovered from his illness he would replace the ruined church of the Abbey of St Genevieve with an edifice worthy of the patron saint of Paris. He did recover, and entrusted Abel-François Poisson, marquis de Marigny with the fulfillment of his vow. In 1755, Marigny commissioned Jacques-Germain Soufflot to design the church, with construction beginning two years later.

Saint-Étienne-du-Mont
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Place Sainte-Geneviève
Paris, 75005

Saint-Étienne-du-Mont is a church in Paris, France, located on the Montagne Sainte-Geneviève in the 5th arrondissement, near the Panthéon. It contains the shrine of St. Geneviève, the patron saint of Paris. The church also contains the tombs of Blaise Pascal and Jean Racine. Jean-Paul Marat is buried in the church's cemetery.The sculpted tympanum, the The Stoning of Saint Stephen, is the work of French sculptor Gabriel-Jules Thomas.Renowned organist, composer, and improviser Maurice Duruflé held the post of Titular Organist at Saint-Étienne-du-Mont from 1929 until his death in 1986.HistoryThe church of Saint-Etienne-du-Mont originated in the abbey of Sainte-Genevieve, where the eponymous saint had been buried in the 6th century. Devoted to the Virgin Mary, then to St. John the Apostle, the place was too small to accommodate all the faithful. In 1222, Pope Honorius III authorized the establishment of an autonomous church, which was devoted this time to St Etienne, then the patron saint of the old cathedral of Paris.

Saint-Étienne-du-Mont
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Place Sainte-Geneviève
Paris, 75005

L'église Saint-Étienne-du-Mont est une église située sur la montagne Sainte-Geneviève, dans le 5e arrondissement de Paris de Paris, à proximité du lycée Henri-IV et du Panthéon.Remplaçant un édifice du XIIIe siècle, elle est construite à partir de la fin du XVe siècle, et sert de paroisse aux habitants du quartier situé autour de l'abbaye Sainte-Geneviève. Le chantier, commencé par le chevet et le clocher en 1491, est achevé par la façade en 1624.Après avoir été brièvement transformée en temple de la Piété filiale sous la Révolution française, elle est rendue à ses fonctions d'église paroissiale en 1801 et n'a pas changé d'affectation depuis.La châsse de sainte Geneviève, vide de ses reliques depuis la Révolution française, y est conservée. L'église abrite également un orgue dont les origines et le buffet remontent aux années 1630. Elle est la dernière église parisienne où l'on peut encore voir un jubé.

Paroisse Saint-Etienne-du-Mont
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Rue de la Montagne Sainte-Geneviève
Paris, 75005

Eglise Saint-Ephrem Concerts musique classique Paris
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
17 rue des Carmes
Paris, 75005

0142509618

Située dans le Centre Historique de Paris, l'église Catholique Syriaque Saint-Ephrem (Chrétiens d'Orient) dont l'acoustique est remarquable, accueille régulièrement des concerts dans le but de promouvoir de jeunes musiciens talentueux en début de carrière. Tous ces artistes sont diplômés du Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris ou de grandes écoles européennes. Parmi eux, nombreux sont lauréats de concours nationaux ou internationaux. Réservations : http://www.ampconcerts.com/concerts/index.php English : Church St-Ephrem Between the Boulevard Saint Germain and the Pantheon. Located in the historical heart of Paris, the Church of saint Ephrem with its outstanding acoustics is a regular venue for concerts of classical music. Recitals are given by talented young musicians, all from the National Conservatory of Music of Paris. Concerts by Candlelight. Booking : http://www.ampconcerts.com/concerts/index.php Deutsch : Kirche St-Ephrem Zwischen Boulevard Saint Germain und Pantheon. Die im historischen Stadtzentrum von Paris gelegene, Kirche Saint-Ephrem mit ihrer hervorragenden Akustik, veranstaltet regelmässig Konzerte klassischer Musik. Diese werden von jungen Talenten der Pariser Musikhochschule gegeben. Konzerte bei Kerzenlicht. Reservierung : http://www.ampconcerts.com/concerts/index.php Español : Iglesia St-Ephrem Entre el Bulevar Saint Germain y el Pantheon. Situada en el Casco Historico de Paris, la iglesia St Ephrem cuya acustica llama la atencion, acoge regularmente conciertos de musica clasica. Los recitales los dan Jovenes Talentos que provienen todos del Conservatorio Nacional Superior de Musica de Paris. Conciertos a las candelas. Reservas : http://www.ampconcerts.com/concerts/index.php Italiano : Chiesa St-Ephrem Tra il Boulevard Saint Germain ed il Pantheon. Situata nel Centro Storico di Parigi la Chiesa Saint Ephrem dotata di un’ eccelente acustica accoglie regolarmente concerti di musica classica. I recital sono eseguiti da Giovani Talenti tutti provenienti dal Conservatorio Nazionale Superiore di Musica di Parigi. Concerti alle candele. Prenotazioni : http://www.ampconcerts.com/concerts/index.php

Eglise Saint Ephrem Le Syriaque
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
17 Rue des Carmes
Paris, 75005

Chapelle Saint Vincent De Paul
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
95 Rue des Sevres
Paris, 75006

Chapel of Miraculous Medal, Rue de Bac, Paris
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
140 rue de Bac, 7e
Paris,

01 49 54 78 88

Eglise Saint Ignace
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
33 rue de Sèvres, 75006 PARIS
Paris,

Chapelle Notre-Dame De La Médaille Miraculeuse
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
140 Rue du Bac 75007 Paris
Paris, 75007

06616926967

Capela Da Medalha Milagrosa
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
140 Rue du Bac
Paris, 75007

Catherine Labouré
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
basilique médaille miraculeuse
Paris,

Saint Catherine Labouré, D.C.. (May 2, 1806 - December 31, 1876) (born Zoé Labouré) was a member of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul and a Marian visionary who relayed the request from the Blessed Virgin Mary to create the Miraculous Medal worn by millions of Christians, both Roman Catholic and Protestant.LifeShe was born in the Burgundy region of France to Pierre Labouré, a farmer, and Louise Madeleine Gontard, the ninth of 11 living children. Catherine's mother died on October 9, 1815, when Catherine was just nine years old. It is said that after her mother's funeral, Catherine picked up a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary and kissed it saying, "Now you will be my mother." Her father's sister offered to care for his two youngest children, Catherine and Tonine. After he agreed, the sisters moved to their aunt's house at Saint-Rémy, a village nine kilometers from their home.She was extremely devout, of a somewhat romantic nature, given to visions and intuitive insights. As a young woman, she became a member of the nursing order founded by Saint Vincent de Paul. She chose the Daughters of Charity after a dream about St. Vincent De Paul.VisionsVincent de PaulIn April 1830, the remains of St. Vincent de Paul were translated to the Vincentian church in Paris. The solemnities included a novena. On three successive evenings, upon returning from the church to the Rue du Bac, Catherine reportedly experienced in the convent chapel, a vision of what she took to be the heart of St. Vincent above a shrine containing a relic of bone from his right arm. Each time the heart appeared a different color, white, red, and crimson. She interpreted this to mean that the Vincentian communities would prosper, and that there would be a change of government. The convent chaplain advised her to forget the matter.

Eglise de St Sulpice
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Chemin du Crêt
Paris,

Landmark Near Church of Saint-Sulpice, Paris

Rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs
Paris, France 75006

Die Rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs ist eine 1.010 Meter lange und 11,70 Meter breite Straße im 6. Arrondissement von Paris. Sie beginnt bei Nummer 125 der Rue de Rennes und endet bei Nummer 18 der Avenue de l’Observatoire.GeschichteDie Straße wurde ursprünglich als Weg zur Kapelle Notre-Dame des Champs angelegt und bezieht hieraus ihren heutigen Namen. Der Weg existierte nachweislich bereits im 14. Jahrhundert und war ursprünglich unter der Bezeichnung Chemin Herbu bekannt. Später firmierte die Straße als Rue du Barc, Chemin de Coupe Gorge (1670), Rue Neuve Notre-Dame des Champs und während der Revolution als Rue de la Montagne des Champs.VerkehrsanbindungIn unmittelbarer Nähe ihres Anfangs befindet sich die Station Saint-Placide, die von der Linie 4 der Pariser Métro bedient wird. Gut 200 Meter nach dem Beginn der Straße befindet sich an der Kreuzung zum Boulevard Raspail die zur Linie 12 der Pariser Métro gehörende Station Notre-Dame-des-Champs und in unmittelbarer Nähe ihres Endes die zur Linie B des Pariser Schnellbahnnetzes RER gehörende Station Port Royal.

Église Saint-Jacques-du-Haut-Pas
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
252 rue Saint-Jacques
Paris, France 75005

The Église Saint-Jacques-du-Haut-Pas is a church in Paris, France in the 5th Arrondissement at the corner of Rue Saint-Jacques and the Rue de l'Abbé de l'Épée. The church has been registered as a historical monument since 4 June 1957.OriginsThe land on which the church is built was obtained oround 1180 by Hospitaller brothers originating from Altopascio, near Lucca, Italy. In 1360 the brothers built a simple chapel. Despite the suppression of their order by Pope Pius II in 1459, some brothers decided to remain. At that time the land around them was fields and meadows with a few low peasant houses and some religious institutions.In 1572 Catherine de' Medici decided to use the site as home for a group of Benedictine monks who had been expelled from their abbey of Saint-Magloire. The relics of St. Magloire of Dol and his disciples had been transported to Paris by Hugh Capet in 923, when the Normans attacked Brittany. The relics were transferred to the hospital, which became a monastery. In 1620, the seminary of the Oratorians under Pierre de Bérulle, the first seminar in France, replaced the Benedictines. It was known as the seminary of Saint-Magloire. Jean de La Fontaine stayed there as a novice.Initial constructionThe surrounding population increased and the faithful became accustomed to pray in the chapel of the Benedictines. The monks found themselves inconvenienced and demanded the departure of the lay people. In 1582 the bishop then gave permission for construction of a church adjoining the monastery of Saint-Magloire. A small church was built in 1584, serving the parishes of Saint-Hippolyte, Saint-Benoît and Saint-Médard. In this church the choir was oriented eastward, backing onto the rue Saint-Jacques. The church was entered through the monastery cemetery. A cemetery was opened in 1584 beside the original chapel, along today's rue de l’Abbé-de-l’Épée. It was closed in 1790. The original gallery organ was made by Vincent Coupeau, an organist of the parish, and was installed in 1628.

Chimie ParisTech
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie
Paris, France 75005

01 44 27 67 12

Chimie ParisTech is an elite chemical science and engineering college founded in 1896, located in the 5th arrondissement of Paris. It is one of the founding members of ParisTech, and Paris Sciences et Lettres – Quartier latin. The students enter the school after highly competitive exams known as the Concours Communs Polytechniques, following at least two years of classes préparatoires. The school is known as France's most selective chemical engineering collegeThe school is a research center hosting nine laboratories which conduct high level research in various fields of chemistry.HistoryThe École nationale supérieure de chimie de Paris was founded in 1896 by Charles Friedel, a chemist and mineralogist who headed the school until 1899. At the time, the school was called the Laboratoire de chimie pratique et industrielle. It was located in the 6th arrondissement (rue Michelet), where it stayed until 1923.After the death of Friedel, Henri Moissan took the reins of the school. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1906, while he was director. Moissan made student admission subject to competitive exams and renamed the school Institut de chimie appliquée (Institute of Applied Chemistry).

Institut océanographique de Paris
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
195 Rue Saint Jacques
Paris, France 75005

+33 1 44 32 10 80

L’Institut océanographique de Paris, rebaptisé Maison des océans et de la biodiversité en 2011, est une institution fondée en 1906 par Albert , prince de Monaco, qui comprend également le Musée océanographique de Monaco.HistoireLe siège de l’Institut océanographique à Paris fut officiellement inauguré le, par le prince Albert et par le président de la république française, Armand Fallières. Le bâtiment de l’Institut est inscrit aux monuments historiques depuis un arrêté du.Il se situe dans le arrondissement de Paris, aux abords du Quartier latin, au croisement des rues Saint-Jacques et rue Gay-Lussac, dans le « Campus Curie » qui regroupe d’autres institutions scientifiques, ancien domaine du couvent des Dames de Saint Michel, acquis par l’université de Paris avec le concours de l’État, de la ville de Paris et de SAS le prince Albert de Monaco, à qui l’université en l’inscrivant en tant que membre bienfaiteur lui céda un terrain de pour y bâtir le siège de la Fondation « Institut océanographique ».Pionnier de l’océanographie, Albert, veut, selon ses propres termes, en être le « propagateur ». Au retour de chacune de ses campagnes, le Prince Albert en présente les principaux résultats aux auditoires les plus qualifiés : Académie des sciences de Paris, dont il est élu membre, Société de biologie, Société zoologique de France, sociétés de géographie qui connaissent alors leur âge d’or dans toute l’Europe… et les universités populaires l’accueillent à plusieurs reprises.

Rue Saint-Jacques, Paris
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Rue Saint-Jacques
Paris, France 75005

0601020304

The Rue Saint-Jacques is a street in the Latin Quarter of Paris which lies along the cardo of Roman Lutetia. The Boulevard Saint-Michel, driven through this old quarter of Paris by Baron Haussmann, relegated the roughly parallel rue Saint-Jacques to a backstreet, but it was a main axial road of medieval Paris, as the buildings that still front it attest. It was the starting point for pilgrims leaving Paris to make their way along the chemin de St-Jacques that led eventually to Santiago de Compostela. The Paris base of the Dominican Order was established in 1218 under the leadership of Pierre Seila in the Chapelle Saint-Jacques, close to the Porte Saint-Jacques, on this street; this is why the Dominicans were called Jacobins in Paris. Johann Heynlin and Guillaume Fichet established the first printing press in France, briefly at the Sorbonne and then on this street, in the 1470s. The second printers in Paris were Peter Kayser and Johann Stohl at the sign of the Soleil d'Or in the Rue Saint-Jacques, from 1473. The proximity of the Sorbonne led many later booksellers and printers to set up shop here also.

Colorova
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
47 rue de l'Abbé-Grégoire
Paris, France 75006

0145446756

En quête de sensations visuelles et culinaires ? Colorova Néo- Salon de thé, pâtisserie, restaurant, lieu multi-couleur, multi-culturel, vous propose du mardi au vendredi ses formules incontournables: Petit déjeuner 9h-11h30 Déjeuner 12h15 jusqu'à 16h Tea time jusqu'à 18h Les Samedi et Dimanche : Brunch (réservation préférable) 11h jusqu'à 17h00 Tous les jours : Nos boissons chaudes (café MALANGO, sélection de Thés THEODOR Bio, chocolat maison..) et Fraîches (Thé glacé Maison, Jus frais, Citronnade, Limonade, lattés et frappés..) Notre signature : Les pâtisseries fines à consommer sur place ou à emporter La nouveauté : La formule à emporter Meatball Sandwich (A partir de septembre) Aux manettes du laboratoire de la rue de l’Abbé Grégoire le créatif Guillaume Gil, ancien pâtissier au Plaza Athénée sous la houlette de Christophe Michalak et à la Maison Blanche des frères Pourcel et son associée Charlotte Siles au service. Tous deux formés dans la prestigieuse école hôtelière Ferrandi, leur passion commune est de satisfaire vos papilles avec des produits frais, de qualité supérieure et de vous offrir un agréable moment dans leur univers atypique et chaleureux. Une invitation au voyage sensoriel..

Rue de Fleurus
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
27 Rue De Fleurus
Paris, France 75006

La rue de Fleurus est une voie située dans les quartiers Notre-Dame-des-Champs et de l'Odéon dans le arrondissement de Paris. La rue débouche sur le jardin du Luxembourg.HistoireLa rue figure sur un projet dressé par Chalgrin en 1779, avec les rues Madame et Jean-Bart. Le lotissement du quartier était donc déjà prévu sous l'Ancien Régime. Une impasse existait dès cette époque, s'étendant sur 104 mètres et se nommant cul-de-sac Notre-Dame-des-Champs. En 1790, elle est prolongée sur des terrains du jardin du Luxembourg, alors propriété de « Monsieur », futur Louis XVIII, sur le tracé de ce qui était jusqu'alors l'allée centrale du jardin. En 1795, à la suite d'une pétition lancée auprès de la population locale par le conseil municipal de l'arrondissement, elle prend le nom de Fleurus en souvenir de la victoire remportée contre les troupes autrichiennes le 26 juin 1794 à la bataille de Fleurus par le général Jourdan. C'est à partir de 1797 que des immeubles y sont bâtis.

Medici Fountain
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Jardin du Luxembourg
Paris, France 75006

The Medici Fountain is a monumental fountain in the Jardin du Luxembourg in the 6th arrondissement in Paris. It was built in about 1630 by Marie de' Medici, the widow of King Henry IV of France and regent of King Louis XIII of France. It was moved to its present location and extensively rebuilt in 1864-66.The Italian Influence in Paris in the 17th centuryThe period between the regency of Catherine de' Medici in France (1559–1589) and that of Marie de' Medici (1610–1642) saw a great flourishing of the Italian mannerist style in France, A community of artists from Florence, including the sculptor Francesco Bordoni, who helped design the statue of King Henry IV of France built on the Pont Neuf, and fountain technician Thomas Francini, who had worked on fountains in the new gardens of the Medici villas in Florence and Rome, found eager royal patrons in France. Soon features of the Italian Renaissance garden, such as elaborate fountains and the grotto, a simulated cave decorated with sculpture, appeared in the first Gardens of the French Renaissance at Fontainebleau and other royal residences.

Luxembourg Palace
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
15 rue de Vaugirard
Paris, France 75006

The Luxembourg Palace is located at 15 rue de Vaugirard in the 6th arrondissement of Paris. It was originally built (1615–1645) to the designs of the French architect Salomon de Brosse to be the royal residence of the regent Marie de Médicis, mother of Louis XIII of France. After the Revolution it was refashioned (1799–1805) by Jean Chalgrin into a legislative building and subsequently greatly enlarged and remodeled (1835–1856) by Alphonse de Gisors. Since 1958 it has been the seat of the French Senate of the Fifth Republic.Immediately west of the palace on the rue de Vaugirard is the Petit Luxembourg, now the residence of the Senate President; and slightly further west, the Musée du Luxembourg, in the former orangery. On the south side of the palace, the formal Luxembourg Garden presents a 25-hectare green parterre of gravel and lawn populated with statues and large basins of water where children sail model boats.Early historyAfter the death of Henry IV in 1610, his widow, Marie de Médicis, became regent to her son, Louis XIII. Having acceded to a much more powerful position, she decided to erect a new palace for herself, adjacent to an old hôtel particulier owned by François de Luxembourg, Duc de Piney, which is now called the Petit Luxembourg and is the residence of the president of the French Senate.

École Nationale des Chartes
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
65 rue de Richelieu
Paris, France 75005

01 55 42 75 00

The École nationale des chartes is a French grande école which specializes in historical sciences. It was founded in 1821 and was located first at the National Archives, then at the Palais de la Sorbonne (5th arrondissement). In October 2014, it moved to 65 rue de Richelieu (University of Paris II), opposite to the Richelieu-Louvois Site of the National Library of France. The school is administered by the Ministry of National Education, Higher Education and Research. It holds the status of grand établissement. Its students, who are recruited by competitive examination and hold the status of trainee civil servant2, receive the qualification of archivist-paleographer after completing a thesis. They generally go on to follow a career as heritage curators in the archive and visual fields, as library curators or as lecturers and researchers in the human and social sciences. In 2005, the school also introduced Master’s degrees, for which students were recruited based on an application file, and, in 2011, doctorates.

Hôtel de Cluny
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
6, place Paul Painlevé
Paris, France

L'Hôtel de Cluny, situé dans le V arrondissement de Paris (France), au cœur du Quartier latin, est dès le le lieu de résidence des abbés de l'ordre de Cluny enseignant au Collège de Cluny. À partir du, et jusqu'à la Révolution française, il abrite des nonces apostoliques ainsi que des particuliers. En 1843, l'État en fait un musée devenu aujourd'hui le Musée national du Moyen Âge, ou Musée de Cluny.Histoire de l'hôtelL'hôtel des Abbés de ClunyLes bâtiments accueillaient les abbés de l'ordre de Cluny en Bourgogne dès le. À la fin du, le bâtiment construit par Jean III de Bourbon et a été agrandi par Jacques d'Amboise, abbé de Cluny (1485-1510). Les armes d'Amboise, « trois pals alternés d'or et de gueules », ornent les lucarnes ouvragées de la façade ainsi que les gâbles des fenêtres hautes.L'hôtel accueille régulièrement les abbés de Cluny et certains dignitaires importants.La jeune Marie d'Angleterre y est enfermée pendant 40 jours en janvier 1515 pour s'assurer qu'elle ne porte pas d'héritier à la mort de son mari le roi Louis XII de France, ainsi la couronne passe à son cousin, le futur roi François . Le 3 mars 1515, Marie y épouse secrètement et sans le consentement de son frère le roi Henri VIII, son favori, Charles Brandon, duc de Suffolk.

Cordeliers Convent
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
15 rue de l'Ecole-de-Médecine
Paris, France 75006

01 40 51 10 00

The Cordeliers Convent was a convent in Paris, France.It gave its name to the Club of the Cordeliers, which held its first meetings there during the French Revolution.Cordeliers was the name given in France to the Franciscan Observantists.The building now houses the Dupuytren Museum of anatomy in connection with the school of medicine.Burials at the conventMarie of Brabant, Queen of FranceArthur II, Duke of BrittanyBlanche of France, Infanta of Castile

Musée National du Moyen Âge
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
6 place Paul Painlevé
Paris, France 75005

Place Saint-Sulpice
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Place Saint-Sulpice
Paris, France 75006

La place Saint-Sulpice est une place du arrondissement de Paris.HistoireLors de la construction de la façade actuelle de l'église Saint-Sulpice au, l'architecte Giovanni Niccolo Servandoni prévoit la création d'une place monumentale en demi-cercle, de de large sur de long. Ce projet n'est pas réalisé mais un espace prolongeant le parvis est débuté en 1757. En 1767, un emprunt est souscrit par la ville après autorisation du roi pour entreprendre les expropriations et les travaux d'aménagement.Au, plusieurs plans sont proposés pour achever la place. Un plan adopté par le ministre de l'Intérieur le 26 thermidor An VIII (14 août 1800), confirmé par un arrêté des consuls du 16 vendémiaire an IX (8 octobre 1800) prévoit une place semi-circulaire qui doit être réalisé dans un délai de six ans. Un arrêté du 25 juin 1806 annule ce plan et prévoit cette fois une place rectangulaire dont le plan est approuvé par le ministre de l'intérieur le 19 octobre 1806. Un nouveau plan, prévoyant une place rectangulaire aux dimensions plus importantes, est adopté le 19 juillet 1808. Une décision ministérielle du 20 décembre 1810 prévoit que la place Saint-Sulpice soit portée jusqu'à la rue du Pot-de-Fer (actuelle rue Bonaparte). Un décret du 24 février 1811 ordonne l'achèvement de cette place dans le courant de la même année. Les dispositions arrêtées en 1810 ont été confirmées par une décision ministérielle du 9 mai 1812. La place est en partie aménagée à l'emplacement de l'ancien séminaire Saint-Sulpice, construit au.En 1838, la place est nivelée et plantée d'arbres. De 1843 à 1848, la fontaine Saint-Sulpice est érigée au centre de la place par l'architecte Louis Visconti.

I have a dream
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
q.latino 17
Paris, France 05012

5346789012

Brasserie Lipp
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
151, boulevard Saint-Germain
Paris, France 75006

Lipp est une brasserie située au 151, boulevard Saint-Germain, dans le arrondissement de Paris, en France. Elle décerne chaque année un prix littéraire, le Prix Cazes, du nom d'un de ses anciens propriétaires.HistoireC'est le 27 octobre 1880, que Léonard Lipp et son épouse Pétronille ouvrent leur brasserie boulevard Saint-Germain. Alsacien d'origine, Léonard Lipp a fui sa terre natale, devenue allemande, et se consacre à la préparation de cervelas rémoulade en entrée et de la choucroute en plat de résistance, arrosée des meilleures bières. Sa convivialité et des prix modestes lui font connaître un franc succès. La germanophobie lors de la Première Guerre mondiale l'oblige à prendre comme nouveau nom la Brasserie des Bords pendant quelques années.En juillet 1920, le bougnat Marcellin Cazes reprend l'établissement, qui était déjà fréquenté par quelques poètes comme Verlaine ou Apollinaire. Il le fait décorer avec des céramiques murales de Léon Fargues, les plafonds peints de Charly Garrey, les banquettes en moleskine marron. C'est en 1935 que Marcelin crééra le Prix Cazes, qui était originellement attribué chaque année à un auteur n'ayant jamais eu d'autre distinction littéraire, ce qui n'est plus le cas aujourd'hui. En 1955, Marcelin passe le flambeau à son fils Roger Cazes.

Pont Saint-Michel
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Pont Saint-Michel
Paris, France 75005

Le pont Saint-Michel relie la place Saint-Michel (sur la rive gauche) au boulevard du Palais sur l'île de la Cité, à Paris. Il doit son nom au voisinage d'une chapelle consacrée à Saint-Michel qui existait dans le Palais royal.L'autre pont situé dans son prolongement vers le nord, reliant le boulevard du Palais au Châtelet sur la rive droite est le pont au Change.HistoireCe pont construit initialement en 1378 fut reconstruit plusieurs fois, en dernier lieu en 1857.Le pont en pierre de 1378La construction du pont en pierre fut décidée en 1353 par le parlement de Paris après accord avec le chapitre de la cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris, le prévôt de Paris, ainsi que les bourgeois de la ville. Son emplacement fut fixé en aval du Petit-Pont, dans l'axe de la rue Saint-Denis, du Grand-Pont sur la rive droite et de la rue de la Harpe sur la rive gauche, ceci permettant une traversée directe de l'île de la Cité.

Étoile Saint-Germain-des-Prés
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
22 rue Guillaume Apollinaire
Paris, France 75006

01 42 22 87 23

L'Étoile Saint-Germain-des-Prés, précédemment Le Saint-Germain-des-Prés, est une salle de cinéma indépendante, classée Art et Essai, située dans le 6 arrondissement de Paris au 22, rue Guillaume-Apollinaire près de la place Saint-Germain-des-Prés.HistoriqueLe cinéma est ouvert le, dans les locaux restructurés d'un ancien cabaret, sous le nom de Le Bilboquet avec la programmation du film Z de Costa-Gavras.En 1979, le cinéma est racheté par le groupe Olympic de Frédéric Mitterrand, qui le renomme Olympic Saint-Germain puis Le Saint-Germain-des-Prés.En 1988, à l'occasion de sa réfection, le cinéma est dédié au producteur français attitré de la Nouvelle Vague en prenant la dénomination « Salle Georges de Beauregard ».Dernière salle de cinéma du quartier de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, le Saint-Germain-des-Prés est aujourd'hui la propriété du groupe Etoile-Cinémas, géré par la famille Henochsberg.En sus de sa programmation exigeante de films en VO, le cinéma développe une offre d'animations variée. Tous les mois, le Ciné Quin accueille un artiste qui vient présenter son film culte. Le cinéma accueille aussi Cinémime, un rendez-vous familial articulé autour de la rencontre entre spectacle vivant et films courts des débuts de l'histoire du cinéma.

Direction Régionale de Police Judiciaire de Paris
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
36, quai des Orfèvres
Paris, France 75001

The Direction Régionale de Police Judiciaire de Paris, often called the 36, quai des Orfèvres or simply the 36 by the address of its headquarters, is the division of the Police judiciaire in Paris. Its 2,200 officers investigate about 15,000 crimes and offences a year.The Police judiciaire, abbreviated PJ, is the criminal investigation division of the Police nationale.36, quai des Orfèvres is often erroneously believed to be the address of the Direction Centrale de la Police Judiciaire, the national authority of the criminal police, which is actually located at the 11, rue des Saussaies, in the buildings of the Ministry of the Interior.HistoryThe PJ is the direct successor of the Sûreté, which was founded in 1812 by Eugène François Vidocq as the criminal investigative bureau of the Paris police. The Sûreté served later as an inspiration for Scotland Yard, the FBI and other departments of criminal investigation throughout the world.In its modern form, the Parisian PJ was created by a decree by Celestin Hennion, the then préfet de police and father of the elite mobile police units called Brigades du Tigre. Unique for their time, they were created with the support of Georges Clémenceau, who was nicknamed "le tigre" (the Tiger). It explains why the PJ emblem consists of a stylized tiger's head.

Nabrzeże Złotników 36 w Paryżu
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
36, quai des Orfèvres
Paris, France 75001

36, quai des Orfèvres – paryski adres mający swoje miejsce w kulturze francuskiej.W miejscu tym nad Sekwaną na wyspie Cité, stoi budynek Komendy regionalnej Policji Sądowej (kryminalnej) Paryskiej Prefektury Policji.Pod adresem tym znajdują się wydziały kryminalny i dowództwo sił interwencyjnych (do walki z przestępczością zorganizowaną) Policji paryskiej.Miejsce w [[Kultura popularna|popkulturze]]Budynek był wielokrotnie miejscem akcji umieszczanym w dziełach francuskiej popkultury, m.in. w filmach: Quai des Orfèvres Henri-Georges Clouzota z 1947 r. i 36 Quai des Orfèvres Oliviera Marchala z 2004 r., czy też w książkach o komisarzu Maigret.