EuroZoid
Discover The Most Popular Places In Europe

Church of Saint-Sulpice, Paris, Paris | Tourist Information


Place St. Sulpice
Paris, France 75006


Saint-Sulpice is a Roman Catholic church in Paris, France, on the east side of the Place Saint-Sulpice within the rue Bonaparte, in the Luxembourg Quarter of the 6th arrondissement. At 113 metres long, 58 metres in width and 34 metres tall, it is only slightly smaller than Notre-Dame and thus the second largest church in the city. It is dedicated to Sulpitius the Pious. Construction of the present building, the second church on the site, began in 1646. During the 18th century, an elaborate gnomon, the Gnomon of Saint-Sulpice, was constructed in the church.HistoryThe present church is the second building on the site, erected over a Romanesque church originally constructed during the 13th century. Additions were made over the centuries, up to 1631. The new building was founded in 1646 by parish priest Jean-Jacques Olier (1608–1657) who had established the Society of Saint-Sulpice, a clerical congregation, and a seminary attached to the church. Anne of Austria laid the first stone.Construction began in 1646 to designs which had been created in 1636 by Christophe Gamard, but the Fronde interfered, and only the Lady Chapel had been built by 1660, when Daniel Gittard provided a new general design for most of the church. Gittard completed the sanctuary, ambulatory, apsidal chapels, transept, and north portal (1670–1678), after which construction was halted for lack of funds.

Catholic Church Near Church of Saint-Sulpice, Paris

Notre-Dame Cathedral
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Place du Parvis Notre-Dame
Paris, 75004

01 42 34 56 10

Notre-Dame du Travail
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
36 rue Guilleminot
Paris, 75014

01 44 10 72 92

Eglise Notre Dame Du Travail
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
36 rue Guilleminot
Paris, 75014

Eglise Saint-Médard
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
141 Rue Mouffetard
Paris, 75005

01 44 08 87 00

파리한인성당
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
15 BOSSONADE 75014 PARIS
Paris, 75014

+33 1 43 20 37 94

Paroisse Saint Médard - Paris
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
141 rue Mouffetard
Paris, 75005

+33 (0)144088700

L'église construite entre le XIIIe siècle (clocher) et le XVIIIème siècle. Elle a été classée "monument historique" en 1906. http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89glise_Saint-M%C3%A9dard_de_Paris

Centre Catholique Japonais de Paris
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
4, Bld Edgar-Quinet
Paris, 75014

09 53 86 74 29

パリ日本人カトリックセンターは、パリのカトリック教会に属する機関です。1973年の創立以来、担当司祭またはシスターを置き、カトリック信者のみならず広く一般の皆様に、情報交換・親睦の場としてご利用いただいております。 お茶が飲みたいとき・本を借りに・日本語で話したい・暇なので・・・etc.、 どうぞご遠慮なくお立ち寄りください。意外な出会いや発見があるかも知れません。 また、当センターは以下のような活動も行っています。活動はすべてボランティアによる運営で、どなたでも無料で参加できますし申し込みの必要もありません。まずはちょっとのぞいてみませんか。 

Val-de-Grâce (church)
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
1 Place Alphonse Laveran
Paris, 75005

Notre-Dame du Val-de-Grâce, connue populairement comme l'église du Val-de-Grâce, est une église de style classique baroque français originellement destinée à être l'église de l'abbaye royale du Val-de-Grâce située dans le arrondissement de Paris, place Alphonse Laveran.Les bâtiments de l'ancienne abbaye accueillent aujourd'hui le musée du service de santé des armées, la bibliothèque centrale du Service de santé des armées, et l'École du Val-de-Grâce, anciennement École d'Application du Service de Santé des Armées (EASSA). Le même îlot militaire comprend l'hôpital d'instruction des armées du Val-de-Grâce, situé sur l'ancien potager de l'abbaye.

Paris International Seventh Day Adventist Church
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
24 rue Pierre Nicole
Paris, 75005

Eglise Notre Dame Des Champs
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
187 boul.iberville
Paris, 75006

Paroisse Notre-Dame des Champs, Église catholique
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
91 Boulevard du Montparnasse
Paris, 75006

01 40 64 19 64

Église Saint-Jacques-du-Haut-Pas
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
252 rue Saint-Jacques
Paris, 75005

The Église Saint-Jacques-du-Haut-Pas is a church in Paris, France in the 5th Arrondissement at the corner of Rue Saint-Jacques and the Rue de l'Abbé de l'Épée. The church has been registered as a historical monument since 4 June 1957.OriginsThe land on which the church is built was obtained oround 1180 by Hospitaller brothers originating from Altopascio, near Lucca, Italy. In 1360 the brothers built a simple chapel. Despite the suppression of their order by Pope Pius II in 1459, some brothers decided to remain. At that time the land around them was fields and meadows with a few low peasant houses and some religious institutions.In 1572 Catherine de' Medici decided to use the site as home for a group of Benedictine monks who had been expelled from their abbey of Saint-Magloire. The relics of St. Magloire of Dol and his disciples had been transported to Paris by Hugh Capet in 923, when the Normans attacked Brittany. The relics were transferred to the hospital, which became a monastery. In 1620, the seminary of the Oratorians under Pierre de Bérulle, the first seminar in France, replaced the Benedictines. It was known as the seminary of Saint-Magloire. Jean de La Fontaine stayed there as a novice.Initial constructionThe surrounding population increased and the faithful became accustomed to pray in the chapel of the Benedictines. The monks found themselves inconvenienced and demanded the departure of the lay people. In 1582 the bishop then gave permission for construction of a church adjoining the monastery of Saint-Magloire. A small church was built in 1584, serving the parishes of Saint-Hippolyte, Saint-Benoît and Saint-Médard. In this church the choir was oriented eastward, backing onto the rue Saint-Jacques. The church was entered through the monastery cemetery. A cemetery was opened in 1584 beside the original chapel, along today's rue de l’Abbé-de-l’Épée. It was closed in 1790. The original gallery organ was made by Vincent Coupeau, an organist of the parish, and was installed in 1628.

Lycée Notre Dame de Sion
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
61 Rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs
Paris, 75006

01 44 32 06 70

Paroisse Notre Dame du Liban à PARIS
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
15-17 rue d'Ulm
Paris, 75005

+33 1 43 29 47 60

Historique Le culte maronite a été autorisé en France par arrêté du 1e septembre 1892. Dès lors, la chapelle du petit Luxembourg est mise à la disposition de la communauté maronite en Île-de-France. Jusqu'en 1915, les autorités françaises et le représentant du patriarche recherchent de concert un lieu de culte adapté aux besoins de la communauté. Dans le sillage de la séparation de l'Église et de l'État arrêtée en 1905, les pères jésuites de l'école Sainte Geneviève à Paris ont dû abandonner la chapelle de leur école et toute leur structure éducative s'était ensuite établie à Versailles rue des postes (Ginette). En 1915, l'ancienne chapelle de l'école Sainte Geneviève des pères jésuites à Paris est affectée au culte maronite. Elle est inaugurée le 16 juillet de cette même année sous le patronage de Notre Dame du Liban. Construite par le célèbre architecte ASTRUC dans un style néogothique, la chapelle est dotée d'une série de vitraux œuvre du maître verrier Émile HIRSCH. Les huit verrières du fond et la rosace restent cependant en verre losangé. Elle est inaugurée le 13 mai 1894, veille de la Pentecôte. En 1937, le gouvernement français et le patriarcat créent autour de l'église la fondation du foyer franco-libanais. Le 8 décembre 1963, le patriarche MEOUCHI inaugure les nouveaux locaux du foyer franco-libanais. Le 25 octobre 1990, commencent la réfection de la toiture et le projet de rénovation de l'église dont la majeure partie sera réalisée entre octobre 1991 et mai 1993. Les huit verrières du fond et la rosace sont garnies de vitraux. Les verrières ont été exécutées par les maîtres verriers Christiane et Philippe ANDRIEUX et la rosace, inspirée de Notre-Dame de Kannoubine, est l'œuvre de Marie-Jo et Yves GUEYEL. Entre 2010 et 2011, la fondation met à neuf les quatre façades extérieures, les chéneaux, la charpente et les vitraux.

Église Notre Dame Du Liban À Paris
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
17 rue d'Ulm
Paris, 75005

Academia Christiana
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
14, rue Gay-Lussac
Paris, 75005

+33640389614

Nos valeurs : • Honnêteté intellectuelle • Recherche de la vérité • Combativité • Esthétique • Soucis d’être compris • Apostolat • Cohérence • Soucis de l’âme • Convivialité

Panthéon
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Place du Panthéon
Paris, 75005

01 44 32 18 00

The Panthéon is a building in the Latin Quarter in Paris. It was originally built as a church dedicated to St. Genevieve and to house the reliquary châsse containing her relics but, after many changes, now functions as a secular mausoleum containing the remains of distinguished French citizens. It is an early example of neoclassicism, with a façade modeled on the Pantheon in Rome, surmounted by a dome that owes some of its character to Bramante's Tempietto. Located in the 5th arrondissement on the Montagne Sainte-Geneviève, the Panthéon looks out over all of Paris. Designer Jacques-Germain Soufflot had the intention of combining the lightness and brightness of the Gothic cathedral with classical principles, but its role as a mausoleum required the great Gothic windows to be blocked.HistoryKing Louis XV vowed in 1744 that if he recovered from his illness he would replace the ruined church of the Abbey of St Genevieve with an edifice worthy of the patron saint of Paris. He did recover, and entrusted Abel-François Poisson, marquis de Marigny with the fulfillment of his vow. In 1755, Marigny commissioned Jacques-Germain Soufflot to design the church, with construction beginning two years later.

Saint-Étienne-du-Mont
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Place Sainte-Geneviève
Paris, 75005

Saint-Étienne-du-Mont is a church in Paris, France, located on the Montagne Sainte-Geneviève in the 5th arrondissement, near the Panthéon. It contains the shrine of St. Geneviève, the patron saint of Paris. The church also contains the tombs of Blaise Pascal and Jean Racine. Jean-Paul Marat is buried in the church's cemetery.The sculpted tympanum, the The Stoning of Saint Stephen, is the work of French sculptor Gabriel-Jules Thomas.Renowned organist, composer, and improviser Maurice Duruflé held the post of Titular Organist at Saint-Étienne-du-Mont from 1929 until his death in 1986.HistoryThe church of Saint-Etienne-du-Mont originated in the abbey of Sainte-Genevieve, where the eponymous saint had been buried in the 6th century. Devoted to the Virgin Mary, then to St. John the Apostle, the place was too small to accommodate all the faithful. In 1222, Pope Honorius III authorized the establishment of an autonomous church, which was devoted this time to St Etienne, then the patron saint of the old cathedral of Paris.

Saint-Étienne-du-Mont
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Place Sainte-Geneviève
Paris, 75005

L'église Saint-Étienne-du-Mont est une église située sur la montagne Sainte-Geneviève, dans le 5e arrondissement de Paris de Paris, à proximité du lycée Henri-IV et du Panthéon.Remplaçant un édifice du XIIIe siècle, elle est construite à partir de la fin du XVe siècle, et sert de paroisse aux habitants du quartier situé autour de l'abbaye Sainte-Geneviève. Le chantier, commencé par le chevet et le clocher en 1491, est achevé par la façade en 1624.Après avoir été brièvement transformée en temple de la Piété filiale sous la Révolution française, elle est rendue à ses fonctions d'église paroissiale en 1801 et n'a pas changé d'affectation depuis.La châsse de sainte Geneviève, vide de ses reliques depuis la Révolution française, y est conservée. L'église abrite également un orgue dont les origines et le buffet remontent aux années 1630. Elle est la dernière église parisienne où l'on peut encore voir un jubé.

Paroisse Saint-Etienne-du-Mont
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Rue de la Montagne Sainte-Geneviève
Paris, 75005

Eglise Saint-Ephrem Concerts musique classique Paris
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
17 rue des Carmes
Paris, 75005

0142509618

Située dans le Centre Historique de Paris, l'église Catholique Syriaque Saint-Ephrem (Chrétiens d'Orient) dont l'acoustique est remarquable, accueille régulièrement des concerts dans le but de promouvoir de jeunes musiciens talentueux en début de carrière. Tous ces artistes sont diplômés du Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris ou de grandes écoles européennes. Parmi eux, nombreux sont lauréats de concours nationaux ou internationaux. Réservations : http://www.ampconcerts.com/concerts/index.php English : Church St-Ephrem Between the Boulevard Saint Germain and the Pantheon. Located in the historical heart of Paris, the Church of saint Ephrem with its outstanding acoustics is a regular venue for concerts of classical music. Recitals are given by talented young musicians, all from the National Conservatory of Music of Paris. Concerts by Candlelight. Booking : http://www.ampconcerts.com/concerts/index.php Deutsch : Kirche St-Ephrem Zwischen Boulevard Saint Germain und Pantheon. Die im historischen Stadtzentrum von Paris gelegene, Kirche Saint-Ephrem mit ihrer hervorragenden Akustik, veranstaltet regelmässig Konzerte klassischer Musik. Diese werden von jungen Talenten der Pariser Musikhochschule gegeben. Konzerte bei Kerzenlicht. Reservierung : http://www.ampconcerts.com/concerts/index.php Español : Iglesia St-Ephrem Entre el Bulevar Saint Germain y el Pantheon. Situada en el Casco Historico de Paris, la iglesia St Ephrem cuya acustica llama la atencion, acoge regularmente conciertos de musica clasica. Los recitales los dan Jovenes Talentos que provienen todos del Conservatorio Nacional Superior de Musica de Paris. Conciertos a las candelas. Reservas : http://www.ampconcerts.com/concerts/index.php Italiano : Chiesa St-Ephrem Tra il Boulevard Saint Germain ed il Pantheon. Situata nel Centro Storico di Parigi la Chiesa Saint Ephrem dotata di un’ eccelente acustica accoglie regolarmente concerti di musica classica. I recital sono eseguiti da Giovani Talenti tutti provenienti dal Conservatorio Nazionale Superiore di Musica di Parigi. Concerti alle candele. Prenotazioni : http://www.ampconcerts.com/concerts/index.php

Eglise Saint Ephrem Le Syriaque
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
17 Rue des Carmes
Paris, 75005

Chapelle Saint Vincent De Paul
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
95 Rue des Sevres
Paris, 75006

Chapel of Miraculous Medal, Rue de Bac, Paris
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
140 rue de Bac, 7e
Paris,

01 49 54 78 88

Eglise Saint Ignace
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
33 rue de Sèvres, 75006 PARIS
Paris,

Chapelle Notre-Dame De La Médaille Miraculeuse
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
140 Rue du Bac 75007 Paris
Paris, 75007

06616926967

Capela Da Medalha Milagrosa
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
140 Rue du Bac
Paris, 75007

Catherine Labouré
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
basilique médaille miraculeuse
Paris,

Saint Catherine Labouré, D.C.. (May 2, 1806 - December 31, 1876) (born Zoé Labouré) was a member of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul and a Marian visionary who relayed the request from the Blessed Virgin Mary to create the Miraculous Medal worn by millions of Christians, both Roman Catholic and Protestant.LifeShe was born in the Burgundy region of France to Pierre Labouré, a farmer, and Louise Madeleine Gontard, the ninth of 11 living children. Catherine's mother died on October 9, 1815, when Catherine was just nine years old. It is said that after her mother's funeral, Catherine picked up a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary and kissed it saying, "Now you will be my mother." Her father's sister offered to care for his two youngest children, Catherine and Tonine. After he agreed, the sisters moved to their aunt's house at Saint-Rémy, a village nine kilometers from their home.She was extremely devout, of a somewhat romantic nature, given to visions and intuitive insights. As a young woman, she became a member of the nursing order founded by Saint Vincent de Paul. She chose the Daughters of Charity after a dream about St. Vincent De Paul.VisionsVincent de PaulIn April 1830, the remains of St. Vincent de Paul were translated to the Vincentian church in Paris. The solemnities included a novena. On three successive evenings, upon returning from the church to the Rue du Bac, Catherine reportedly experienced in the convent chapel, a vision of what she took to be the heart of St. Vincent above a shrine containing a relic of bone from his right arm. Each time the heart appeared a different color, white, red, and crimson. She interpreted this to mean that the Vincentian communities would prosper, and that there would be a change of government. The convent chaplain advised her to forget the matter.

Eglise de St Sulpice
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Chemin du Crêt
Paris,

Landmark Near Church of Saint-Sulpice, Paris

Hôtel PLM Saint-Jacques
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
75 rue la santé
Paris, France

Le Paris Marriott Rive Gauche Hotel & Conference Center, situé 17 boulevard Saint-Jacques, dans le arrondissement de Paris, est un hôtel propriété de Marriott International. Il a été construit entre 1969 et 1972 et rénové en 2006.Dessiné par l'architecte Pierre Giudicelli, ouvert en 1972 sous le nom de PLM Saint Jacques il faisait figure à l'époque d'hôtel le plus moderne du monde. Vendu en 2006 par Accor à Mariott, il a pris le nom de Paris Marriott Rive Gauche Hotel & Conference Center après sa rénovation par l'agence Mackenzie Wheeler.Le ''PLM Saint-Jacques''À la place de l'une des deux fabriques de lits Pardon, débutent en 1969 les travaux de ce qui doit être le symbole de l'hôtellerie moderne en France, PLM et la Banque Rothschild s'associent pour sortir de terre ce projet pharaonique. Depuis les années 1930, aucun hôtel de luxe de plus de 500 chambres n'avait été construit au cœur de Paris.À l’époque de sa construction, le PLM Saint-Jacques est un véritable évènement : l’hôtel bénéficie en effet d’un système informatique IBM pour la réservation des chambres unique au monde et d'ascenseurs ultra rapides. Dès son ouverture, il devient le lieu de rendez-vous des artistes, écrivains, acteurs et personnalités du spectacle, comme Samuel Beckett, Serge Gainsbourg ou Jacques Dutronc.L’hôtel abrite également un Centre de convention de places, compte de nombreuses boutiques de luxe, ainsi qu'un cinéma de 180 places portant le nom de son parrain, l’acteur Jerry Lewis – il a fermé en 1987. Se trouvait aussi l’un des tout premiers restaurants japonais de Paris, le « Jun » avec en cuisine le chef japonais Sasaki (il office désormais au restaurant Kagayaki).

La Santé Prison
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
42 rue de la Santé
Paris, France 75014

La Santé Prison is a prison operated by the Ministry of Justice located in the east of the Montparnasse district of the 14th arrondissement in Paris, France at 42 Rue de la Santé. It is one of the most famous prisons in France, with both VIP and high security wings.Along with the Fleury-Mérogis Prison and the Fresnes Prison, both located in the southern suburbs, La Santé is one of the three main prisons of the Paris area.HistoryThe architect Joseph Auguste Émile Vaudremer built the prison, which was inaugurated on 20 August 1867.The prison is located on the site of a former "Coal market" and replaced the Madelonnettes Convent in the 3rd Arrondissement which had been used as a prison since the Revolution. Previously, on the same site, was a "maison de la santé" (House of health), built on the orders' of Anne of Austria and transferred in 1651 to what is now the Sainte-Anne Hospital (in the south).Initially, there were 500 cells which was increased to 1,000 in 1900 following the closure of the Paris Grande Roquette prison in 1899. The cells are 4 metres long, 2.5m wide and 3m high. The prison has a total capacity of up to 2,000 prisoners divided into 14 divisions.In 1899, following the closure and demolition of the Grande Roquette prison the convicts were transferred to La Santé to await transfer to prison in Guyana or execution.

Avenue du Maine
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Avenue du Maine
Paris, France 75014

L'avenue du Maine est une voie située dans les quartiers Necker, Montparnasse, Plaisance et Petit Montrouge, des 14 et arrondissement de Paris (France).HistoriqueL'avenue du Maine doit son nom à la présence du château du Maine, qui constituait un ancien rendez-vous de chasse du duc du Maine à la pointe nord du domaine de Sceaux.Le 12 mai 1902, victime d'un incendie en vol, le ballon dirigeable Pax s'est abattu avenue du Maine, entrainant dans la mort le pionnier brésilien de l'aérostation et le mécanicien français Georges Saché. Tous deux ont une rue proche de l'accident nommées en leur honneur : la rue Severo et la rue Georges-Saché.Le photographe Jules Beau a pris ce jour-là trois photos des restes du ballon dirigeable tombé avenue du Maine :L'avenue est large et à double sens ; dans les années 2000, ses couloirs de circulation ont été réaménagés afin de laisser la place à de larges couloirs de bus.

Paris Observatory
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
61 avenue de l'Observatoire
Paris, France 75014

01 40 51 22 21

The Paris Observatory is the foremost astronomical observatory of France, and one of the largest astronomical centers in the world. Its historic building is to be found on the Left Bank of the Seine in central Paris, but most of the staff works on a satellite campus in the Meudon suburb of Paris.ConstitutionAdministratively, it is a grand établissement of the French Ministry of National Education, with a status close to that of a public university. Its missions include: research in astronomy and astrophysics; education (four graduate programs, Ph.D. studies); diffusion of knowledge to the public. It maintains a solar observatory at Meudon and a radio astronomy observatory at Nançay. It was also the home to the International Time Bureau until its dissolution in 1987.HistoryIts foundation lies in the ambitions of Jean-Baptiste Colbert to extend France's maritime power and international trade in the 17th century. Louis XIV promoted its construction, which was started in 1667 and completed in 1671. It thus predates by a few years the Royal Greenwich Observatory in England, which was founded in 1675. The architect of the Paris Observatory was Claude Perrault whose brother, Charles, was secretary to Colbert and superintendent of public works. Optical instruments were supplied by Giuseppe Campani. The buildings were extended in 1730, 1810, 1834, 1850, and 1951. The last extension incorporates the spectacular Meridian Room designed by Jean Prouvé.

Montparnasse Cemetery
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Cimetière de Montparnasse
Paris, France 75014

Le cimetière du Montparnasse est un cimetière parisien situé dans le arrondissement.VoirieLe cimetière du Montparnasse est délimité par la rue Froidevaux au Sud, la rue Victor-Schœlcher à l'Est, le boulevard Edgar-Quinet au Nord, le boulevard Raspail au Nord-Est, et la rue de la Gaîté à l'Ouest. Le cimetière est en outre traversé du Nord au Sud, dans la partie Est, par la rue Émile-Richard.HistoireLe cimetière du Montparnasse a été créé au début du, dans le sud de la capitale, en même temps que plusieurs autres cimetières situés à l'époque en dehors des limites de la ville : le cimetière de Passy, à l'ouest de la ville, le cimetière de Montmartre au nord et le cimetière du Père-Lachaise à l'est.L'emplacement était autrefois occupé par trois anciennes fermes, mais au, ce terrain devint la nécropole privée des religieux de Saint-Jean-de-Dieu. Au début du Nicolas Frochot, préfet de la Seine, fit acheter les terrains de la ville pour y ouvrir l'un des trois cimetières extra-muros de Paris. La première inhumation eut lieu le.

Bobino
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
14-20 rue de la gaîté
Paris, France 75014

Bobino est une célèbre salle de music-hall située dans le quartier du Montparnasse, au 20, rue de la Gaîté, dans le 14e arrondissement de Paris de Paris. À son emplacement, depuis 1873, s’établit d’abord une guinguette, un café-concert, puis cette salle devient un music-hall au lendemain de la Première Guerre mondiale. Le lieu historique est détruit en 1985.HistoireThéâtre du Luxembourg, dit Bobino (1816-1868)Le théâtre du Luxembourg a été créé en 1816 au coin des rues Madame et de Fleurus, pour héberger la troupe foraine de l'amuseur paradiste Bobino. Le succès de ses spectacles, qui mélangeaient acrobaties, jongleries et pantomimes, a fait que les Parisiens appelaient la salle le théâtre de Bobino, et familièrement, Bobinche.Après 1830, le théâtre se consacre à un répertoire de vaudevilles et mélodrames, et rassemble un public populaire où l'on trouve de nombreux étudiants de la Rive gauche.En 1866, le théâtre du Luxembourg, dit Bobino, étant devenu vétuste, son directeur, Auguste Gaspari, et sa troupe déménagent au nouveau théâtre des Menus-Plaisirs sur le boulevard de Strasbourg. Le bâtiment est démoli début 1868 pour être remplacé par un immeuble (aujourd'hui, 61, rue Madame).

Cabinet D'hypnose Ericksonienne
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
131-133, rue Mouffetard
Paris, France 75005

0613505828

Bonjour, J'ai le plaisir de vous annoncer l'ouverture de mon cabinet d'Hypnose Eriksonienne début septembre, au 131-133, rue Mouffetard PARIS 5ème, sur rendez-vous uniquement. Je suis Diplômé PRATICIEN en HYPNOSE ERICKSONIENNE et PRATICIEN en Programmation Neuro-Linguistique de L'IFHE, Institut Français d'Hypnose Ericksonienne à Paris. Chaque individu est unique. Durant une séance d'hypnose le patient reste le principal acteur de son changement. Le nombre de séance varie d'une personne à l'autre, pour certains une à deux séances suffisent pour d'autres plus. Chaque séance dure entre une heure et une heure trente. L'hypnose permet de développer la confiance en soi, retrouver ses valeurs profondes et vivre avec elles, affirmer sa personnalité dans toute son authenticité. C'est un outil efficace qui permet avant tout de donner à votre vie une dynamique positive, dans la direction que vous souhaitez prendre. L'hypnose est une source infinie de changements et de transformations. Afin d'optimiser ses ressources, changer certains comportements (arrêt du tabac) développer ses capacités, reprendre de l'énergie, améliorer son sommeil, développer sa concentration, augmenter ses performances sportives, mieux gérer le stress, diminuer la douleur, être plus épanoui, perdre du poids, vous libérer de vos blessures, être totalement vous même et avancer dans la vie avec plus de liberté, de confort et de maitrise. Je me ferai un plaisir de vous accompagner. Alexandre Boussat Bolla / 06 13 50 58 28

Val-de-Grâce (church)
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
1 Place Alphonse Laveran
Paris, France 75005

Notre-Dame du Val-de-Grâce, connue populairement comme l'église du Val-de-Grâce, est une église de style classique baroque français originellement destinée à être l'église de l'abbaye royale du Val-de-Grâce située dans le arrondissement de Paris, place Alphonse Laveran.Les bâtiments de l'ancienne abbaye accueillent aujourd'hui le musée du service de santé des armées, la bibliothèque centrale du Service de santé des armées, et l'École du Val-de-Grâce, anciennement École d'Application du Service de Santé des Armées (EASSA). Le même îlot militaire comprend l'hôpital d'instruction des armées du Val-de-Grâce, situé sur l'ancien potager de l'abbaye.

Tour Montparnasse
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Avenue du Maine 33
Paris, France 75015

Tour Maine-Montparnasse, also commonly named Tour Montparnasse, is a 210m office skyscraper located in the Montparnasse area of Paris, France. Constructed from 1969 to 1973, it was the tallest skyscraper in France until 2011, when it was surpassed by the 231m Tour First., it is the 17th tallest building in the European Union. The tower was designed by architects Eugène Beaudouin, Urbain Cassan and Louis Hoym de Marien and built by Campenon Bernard.LocationBuilt on top of the Montparnasse – Bienvenüe Paris Métro station, the 59 floors of the tower are mainly occupied by offices. The 56th floor, with a restaurant called le Ciel de Paris, and the terrace on the top floor, are open to the public for viewing the city. The view covers a radius of 40km; aircraft can be seen taking off from Orly Airport. The guard rail, to which various antennae are attached, can be pneumatically lowered.CriticismThe tower's simple architecture, large proportions and monolithic appearance have been often criticised for being out of place in Paris's urban landscape. As a result, two years after its completion the construction of buildings over seven stories high in the city centre was banned.

Rue Mouffetard
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Rue Mouffetard
Paris, France 75005

Rue Mouffetard is a street in the 5th arrondissement of Paris, France.Situated in the fifth (cinquième) arrondissement of Paris, Rue Mouffetard is one of Paris's oldest and liveliest neighbourhoods. These days the area has many restaurants, shops, and cafés, and a regular open market. It is centered on the Place de la Contrescarpe, at the junction of the rue Mouffetard and the rue de Lacepede. Its southern terminus is at the Square Saint-Médard where there is a permanent open-air market. At its northern terminus, it becomes the rue Descartes at the crossing of the rue Thouin. It is closed to normal motor traffic much of the week, and is predominantly a pedestrian avenue.Origin of the nameThe rue Mouffetard runs along a flank of the mont Sainte-Geneviève hill that was called "mont Cétarius" or "mont Cetardus" from Roman times; many historians consider "Mouffetard" to be a derivation of this early name. Over the centuries the rue Mouffetard has appeared as rue Montfétard, Maufetard, Mofetard, Moufetard, Mouflard, Moufetard, Moftard, Mostard, and also rue Saint-Marcel, rue du Faubourg Saint-Marceau ("street of the suburb Saint-Marceau") and rue de la Vieille Ville Saint-Marcel ("street of the Old Village Saint-Marcel").HistoryThe origins of this thoroughfare are ancient, dating back to Neolithic times. As with today's rue Galande, rue Lagrange, rue de la Montagne Sainte-Geneviève and rue Descartes, it was a Roman road running from the Roman Rive Gauche city south to Italy.

Théâtre Mouffetard
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
73 rue Mouffetard
Paris, France 75005

01 43 31 11 99

Le Théâtre Mouffetard, situé au 73 rue Mouffetard dans le 5e arrondissement de Paris de Paris, était un théâtre municipal subventionné par la Ville de Paris. Depuis novembre 2013, il héberge le théâtre de la marionnette à Paris, devenant ainsi la première salle à être consacrée exclusivement à cette discipline, dans la capitale française. Il se nomme désormais Le Mouffetard - Théâtre des arts de la marionnette.Dirigé par Isabelle Bertola, le Mouffetard-Théâtre des arts de la marionnette a pour enjeu de défendre et promouvoir 'les formes contemporaines de théâtre de marionnettes auprès du plus large public possible. Il pense et porte ce théâtre comme un art exigeant, tout à la fois singulier et éclectique du point de vue des techniques : ombres, objets, images, marionnettes à gaine, à fil, anthropomorphes ou formes abstraites, symboliques... Il soutient également l’idée que cette discipline concerne tant les adultes que les plus jeunes.'De la Maison pour tous au Théâtre Mouffetard 1906-1919 : naissance de l'"Université populaire" au 76 rue Mouffetard (emplacement de l'actuelle bibliothèque Mouffetard). 1919 : naissance de la "Maison pour Tous" (même endroit). Lieu de quartier, son champ d'action est l'éducation populaire et culturelle. 1930 : la "Maison pour Tous" est reconnue d'utilité publique. 1950-1978 : la salle polyvalente Mouffetard prend le nom de « Théâtre Mouffetard »" sous la direction de Georges Bilbille. 1980 : ouverture du « Nouveau Théâtre Mouffetard » au 73 rue Mouffetard (emplacement actuel du théâtre). Il est inauguré en 1984. 1983-1992 : direction Anny Murvil 1992-1997 : direction Jean-José Grammond 1997-2003 : direction Armand Blondeau 2003-2012 : avec l'arrivée de Pierre Santini à sa direction, le « Nouveau Théâtre Mouffetard » redevient le « Théâtre Mouffetard ». Novembre 2013 : en partie remis à neuf, il accueille le Théâtre de la marionnette à Paris et devient Le Mouffetard - Théâtre des arts de la marionnettes.

Rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs
Paris, France 75006

Die Rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs ist eine 1.010 Meter lange und 11,70 Meter breite Straße im 6. Arrondissement von Paris. Sie beginnt bei Nummer 125 der Rue de Rennes und endet bei Nummer 18 der Avenue de l’Observatoire.GeschichteDie Straße wurde ursprünglich als Weg zur Kapelle Notre-Dame des Champs angelegt und bezieht hieraus ihren heutigen Namen. Der Weg existierte nachweislich bereits im 14. Jahrhundert und war ursprünglich unter der Bezeichnung Chemin Herbu bekannt. Später firmierte die Straße als Rue du Barc, Chemin de Coupe Gorge (1670), Rue Neuve Notre-Dame des Champs und während der Revolution als Rue de la Montagne des Champs.VerkehrsanbindungIn unmittelbarer Nähe ihres Anfangs befindet sich die Station Saint-Placide, die von der Linie 4 der Pariser Métro bedient wird. Gut 200 Meter nach dem Beginn der Straße befindet sich an der Kreuzung zum Boulevard Raspail die zur Linie 12 der Pariser Métro gehörende Station Notre-Dame-des-Champs und in unmittelbarer Nähe ihres Endes die zur Linie B des Pariser Schnellbahnnetzes RER gehörende Station Port Royal.

Église Saint-Jacques-du-Haut-Pas
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
252 rue Saint-Jacques
Paris, France 75005

The Église Saint-Jacques-du-Haut-Pas is a church in Paris, France in the 5th Arrondissement at the corner of Rue Saint-Jacques and the Rue de l'Abbé de l'Épée. The church has been registered as a historical monument since 4 June 1957.OriginsThe land on which the church is built was obtained oround 1180 by Hospitaller brothers originating from Altopascio, near Lucca, Italy. In 1360 the brothers built a simple chapel. Despite the suppression of their order by Pope Pius II in 1459, some brothers decided to remain. At that time the land around them was fields and meadows with a few low peasant houses and some religious institutions.In 1572 Catherine de' Medici decided to use the site as home for a group of Benedictine monks who had been expelled from their abbey of Saint-Magloire. The relics of St. Magloire of Dol and his disciples had been transported to Paris by Hugh Capet in 923, when the Normans attacked Brittany. The relics were transferred to the hospital, which became a monastery. In 1620, the seminary of the Oratorians under Pierre de Bérulle, the first seminar in France, replaced the Benedictines. It was known as the seminary of Saint-Magloire. Jean de La Fontaine stayed there as a novice.Initial constructionThe surrounding population increased and the faithful became accustomed to pray in the chapel of the Benedictines. The monks found themselves inconvenienced and demanded the departure of the lay people. In 1582 the bishop then gave permission for construction of a church adjoining the monastery of Saint-Magloire. A small church was built in 1584, serving the parishes of Saint-Hippolyte, Saint-Benoît and Saint-Médard. In this church the choir was oriented eastward, backing onto the rue Saint-Jacques. The church was entered through the monastery cemetery. A cemetery was opened in 1584 beside the original chapel, along today's rue de l’Abbé-de-l’Épée. It was closed in 1790. The original gallery organ was made by Vincent Coupeau, an organist of the parish, and was installed in 1628.

Chimie ParisTech
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie
Paris, France 75005

01 44 27 67 12

Chimie ParisTech is an elite chemical science and engineering college founded in 1896, located in the 5th arrondissement of Paris. It is one of the founding members of ParisTech, and Paris Sciences et Lettres – Quartier latin. The students enter the school after highly competitive exams known as the Concours Communs Polytechniques, following at least two years of classes préparatoires. The school is known as France's most selective chemical engineering collegeThe school is a research center hosting nine laboratories which conduct high level research in various fields of chemistry.HistoryThe École nationale supérieure de chimie de Paris was founded in 1896 by Charles Friedel, a chemist and mineralogist who headed the school until 1899. At the time, the school was called the Laboratoire de chimie pratique et industrielle. It was located in the 6th arrondissement (rue Michelet), where it stayed until 1923.After the death of Friedel, Henri Moissan took the reins of the school. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1906, while he was director. Moissan made student admission subject to competitive exams and renamed the school Institut de chimie appliquée (Institute of Applied Chemistry).

Institut océanographique de Paris
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
195 Rue Saint Jacques
Paris, France 75005

+33 1 44 32 10 80

L’Institut océanographique de Paris, rebaptisé Maison des océans et de la biodiversité en 2011, est une institution fondée en 1906 par Albert , prince de Monaco, qui comprend également le Musée océanographique de Monaco.HistoireLe siège de l’Institut océanographique à Paris fut officiellement inauguré le, par le prince Albert et par le président de la république française, Armand Fallières. Le bâtiment de l’Institut est inscrit aux monuments historiques depuis un arrêté du.Il se situe dans le arrondissement de Paris, aux abords du Quartier latin, au croisement des rues Saint-Jacques et rue Gay-Lussac, dans le « Campus Curie » qui regroupe d’autres institutions scientifiques, ancien domaine du couvent des Dames de Saint Michel, acquis par l’université de Paris avec le concours de l’État, de la ville de Paris et de SAS le prince Albert de Monaco, à qui l’université en l’inscrivant en tant que membre bienfaiteur lui céda un terrain de pour y bâtir le siège de la Fondation « Institut océanographique ».Pionnier de l’océanographie, Albert, veut, selon ses propres termes, en être le « propagateur ». Au retour de chacune de ses campagnes, le Prince Albert en présente les principaux résultats aux auditoires les plus qualifiés : Académie des sciences de Paris, dont il est élu membre, Société de biologie, Société zoologique de France, sociétés de géographie qui connaissent alors leur âge d’or dans toute l’Europe… et les universités populaires l’accueillent à plusieurs reprises.

Arènes de Lutèce
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
49 Rue Monge 75005 Paris
Paris, France 75005

The Arènes de Lutèce are among the most important remains from the Gallo-Roman era in Paris (known in antiquity as Lutetia, or Lutèce in French), together with the Thermes de Cluny. Lying in what is now the Quartier Latin, this amphitheater could once seat 15,000 people, and was used to present gladiatorial combats.Constructed in the 1st century AD, this amphitheater is considered the longest of its kind constructed by the Romans. The sunken arena of the amphitheater was surrounded by the wall of a podium 2.5 m (8.2 feet) high, surmounted by a parapet. The presence of a 41.2-m- (135-foot-) long stage allowed scenes to alternate between theatrical productions and combat. A series of nine niches aided in improving the acoustics. Five cubbyholes were situated beneath the lower terraces, of which there appear to have been animal cages that opened directly into the arena. Historians believe that the terraces, which surrounded more than half of the arena's circumference, could accommodate as many as 17,000 spectators.Slaves, the poor, and women were relegated to the higher tiers — while the lower seating areas were reserved for Roman male citizens. For comfort, a linen awning sheltered spectators from the hot sun. Circus acts showcased wild animals. From its vantage point, the amphitheater also afforded a spectacular view of the Bièvre and Seine rivers.When Lutèce was sacked during the barbarian invasions of 280 A.D., some of the structure's stone work was carted off to reinforce the city's defences around the Île de la Cité. Subsequently, the amphitheater became a cemetery, and then it was filled in completely following the construction of wall of Philippe Auguste (ca. 1210).

Saint-Étienne-du-Mont
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Place Sainte-Geneviève
Paris, France 75005

Saint-Étienne-du-Mont is a church in Paris, France, located on the Montagne Sainte-Geneviève in the 5th arrondissement, near the Panthéon. It contains the shrine of St. Geneviève, the patron saint of Paris. The church also contains the tombs of Blaise Pascal and Jean Racine. Jean-Paul Marat is buried in the church's cemetery.The sculpted tympanum, the The Stoning of Saint Stephen, is the work of French sculptor Gabriel-Jules Thomas.Renowned organist, composer, and improviser Maurice Duruflé held the post of Titular Organist at Saint-Étienne-du-Mont from 1929 until his death in 1986.HistoryThe church of Saint-Etienne-du-Mont originated in the abbey of Sainte-Genevieve, where the eponymous saint had been buried in the 6th century. Devoted to the Virgin Mary, then to St. John the Apostle, the place was too small to accommodate all the faithful. In 1222, Pope Honorius III authorized the establishment of an autonomous church, which was devoted this time to St Etienne, then the patron saint of the old cathedral of Paris.

Rue Saint-Jacques, Paris
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Rue Saint-Jacques
Paris, France 75005

0601020304

The Rue Saint-Jacques is a street in the Latin Quarter of Paris which lies along the cardo of Roman Lutetia. The Boulevard Saint-Michel, driven through this old quarter of Paris by Baron Haussmann, relegated the roughly parallel rue Saint-Jacques to a backstreet, but it was a main axial road of medieval Paris, as the buildings that still front it attest. It was the starting point for pilgrims leaving Paris to make their way along the chemin de St-Jacques that led eventually to Santiago de Compostela. The Paris base of the Dominican Order was established in 1218 under the leadership of Pierre Seila in the Chapelle Saint-Jacques, close to the Porte Saint-Jacques, on this street; this is why the Dominicans were called Jacobins in Paris. Johann Heynlin and Guillaume Fichet established the first printing press in France, briefly at the Sorbonne and then on this street, in the 1470s. The second printers in Paris were Peter Kayser and Johann Stohl at the sign of the Soleil d'Or in the Rue Saint-Jacques, from 1473. The proximity of the Sorbonne led many later booksellers and printers to set up shop here also.

THE GAME - Escape if you can
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
51 Rue du Cardinal Lemoine
Paris, France 75005

01 43 29 26 21

Des décors saisissants, des énigmes, des passages secrets et une mission à réaliser en équipe en moins d'une heure ! Enfin, si vous êtes à la hauteur !

Colorova
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
47 rue de l'Abbé-Grégoire
Paris, France 75006

0145446756

En quête de sensations visuelles et culinaires ? Colorova Néo- Salon de thé, pâtisserie, restaurant, lieu multi-couleur, multi-culturel, vous propose du mardi au vendredi ses formules incontournables: Petit déjeuner 9h-11h30 Déjeuner 12h15 jusqu'à 16h Tea time jusqu'à 18h Les Samedi et Dimanche : Brunch (réservation préférable) 11h jusqu'à 17h00 Tous les jours : Nos boissons chaudes (café MALANGO, sélection de Thés THEODOR Bio, chocolat maison..) et Fraîches (Thé glacé Maison, Jus frais, Citronnade, Limonade, lattés et frappés..) Notre signature : Les pâtisseries fines à consommer sur place ou à emporter La nouveauté : La formule à emporter Meatball Sandwich (A partir de septembre) Aux manettes du laboratoire de la rue de l’Abbé Grégoire le créatif Guillaume Gil, ancien pâtissier au Plaza Athénée sous la houlette de Christophe Michalak et à la Maison Blanche des frères Pourcel et son associée Charlotte Siles au service. Tous deux formés dans la prestigieuse école hôtelière Ferrandi, leur passion commune est de satisfaire vos papilles avec des produits frais, de qualité supérieure et de vous offrir un agréable moment dans leur univers atypique et chaleureux. Une invitation au voyage sensoriel..