EuroZoid
Discover The Most Popular Places In Europe

Arc De Triomphe, Paris | Tourist Information


Place Charles de Gaulle
Paris, France 75008

01 55 37 73 77

Historical Place Near Arc De Triomphe

Rue De La Glaciere Paris 13
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Rue De La Glacière
Paris, 75013

Catacombs of Paris
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Rue Du Faubourg Saint-antoine
Paris, 75014

The Catacombs of Paris are underground ossuaries in Paris, France which hold the remains of over six million people in a small part of the ancient Mines of Paris tunnel network. Located south of the former city gate "Barrière d’Enfer" (Gate of Hell) beneath Rue de la Tombe-Issoire, the ossuary was founded when city officials were faced with two simultaneous problems: a series of cave-ins starting in 1774 and overflowing cemeteries, particularly Saint Innocents. Nightly processions of bones from 1786 to 1788 transferred remains from cemeteries to the reinforced tunnels, and more remains were added in later years. The underground cemetery became a tourist attraction on a small scale from the early 19th century, and has been open to the public on a regular basis since 1874 with surface access from a building at Place Denfert-Rochereau.The Catacombs are among the 14 City of Paris Museums managed by Paris Musées since January 1, 2013. The catacombs are formally known as l'Ossuaire Municipal or Catacombes officiels and have been called "The World's Largest Grave" due the number of individuals buried. Although the ossuary covers only a small section of the underground "les carrières de Paris" ("the quarries of Paris"), Parisians today often refer to the entire tunnel network as "the catacombs".HistoryBackgroundParis' CemeteriesParis' earliest burial grounds were to the southern outskirts of the Roman-era Left Bank city. In ruins after the Roman empire's 5th-century fall and the ensuing Frankish invasions, Parisians eventually abandoned this settlement for the marshy Right Bank: from the 4th century, the first known settlement there was on higher ground around a Saint-Etienne church and burial ground (behind today's Hôtel de Ville), and Right Bank urban expansion began in earnest after other ecclesiastical landowners filled in the marshlands from the late 10th century. Thus, instead of burying its dead away from inhabited areas as per usual human customs, the Paris Right Bank settlement began its life with cemeteries at its very centre.

Manufacture des Gobelins
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
42 avenue des Gobelins
Paris, 75013

01 44 08 53 49

Paris Grand Palais
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
3 Avenue du Général Eisenhower
Paris, 75008

Musée-Ssa Val de Grâce
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1, place Alphonse Laveran
Paris, 75005

0140515192

Torre Eiffell
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Champ de Mars, 5 Avenue Anatole France
Paris, 75007

0 892 70 12 39

Rue Mouffetard
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Rue Mouffetard
Paris, 75005

Eyfel Kulesi Paris
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Champ de Mars, 5 Avenue Anatole France
Paris, 75007

0 892 70 12 39

Arènes de Lutèce
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
49 Rue Monge 75005 Paris
Paris, 75005

The Arènes de Lutèce are among the most important remains from the Gallo-Roman era in Paris (known in antiquity as Lutetia, or Lutèce in French), together with the Thermes de Cluny. Lying in what is now the Quartier Latin, this amphitheater could once seat 15,000 people, and was used to present gladiatorial combats.Constructed in the 1st century AD, this amphitheater is considered the longest of its kind constructed by the Romans. The sunken arena of the amphitheater was surrounded by the wall of a podium 2.5 m (8.2 feet) high, surmounted by a parapet. The presence of a 41.2-m- (135-foot-) long stage allowed scenes to alternate between theatrical productions and combat. A series of nine niches aided in improving the acoustics. Five cubbyholes were situated beneath the lower terraces, of which there appear to have been animal cages that opened directly into the arena. Historians believe that the terraces, which surrounded more than half of the arena's circumference, could accommodate as many as 17,000 spectators.Slaves, the poor, and women were relegated to the higher tiers — while the lower seating areas were reserved for Roman male citizens. For comfort, a linen awning sheltered spectators from the hot sun. Circus acts showcased wild animals. From its vantage point, the amphitheater also afforded a spectacular view of the Bièvre and Seine rivers.When Lutèce was sacked during the barbarian invasions of 280 A.D., some of the structure's stone work was carted off to reinforce the city's defences around the Île de la Cité. Subsequently, the amphitheater became a cemetery, and then it was filled in completely following the construction of wall of Philippe Auguste (ca. 1210).

Opéra
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Place de l'Opéra
Paris,

Rue Saint-Jacques, Paris
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Rue Saint-Jacques
Paris, 75005

0601020304

The Rue Saint-Jacques is a street in the Latin Quarter of Paris which lies along the cardo of Roman Lutetia. The Boulevard Saint-Michel, driven through this old quarter of Paris by Baron Haussmann, relegated the roughly parallel rue Saint-Jacques to a backstreet, but it was a main axial road of medieval Paris, as the buildings that still front it attest. It was the starting point for pilgrims leaving Paris to make their way along the chemin de St-Jacques that led eventually to Santiago de Compostela. The Paris base of the Dominican Order was established in 1218 under the leadership of Pierre Seila in the Chapelle Saint-Jacques, close to the Porte Saint-Jacques, on this street; this is why the Dominicans were called Jacobins in Paris. Johann Heynlin and Guillaume Fichet established the first printing press in France, briefly at the Sorbonne and then on this street, in the 1470s. The second printers in Paris were Peter Kayser and Johann Stohl at the sign of the Soleil d'Or in the Rue Saint-Jacques, from 1473. The proximity of the Sorbonne led many later booksellers and printers to set up shop here also.

Luxembourg Palace
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
15 rue de Vaugirard
Paris, 75006

The Luxembourg Palace is located at 15 rue de Vaugirard in the 6th arrondissement of Paris. It was originally built (1615–1645) to the designs of the French architect Salomon de Brosse to be the royal residence of the regent Marie de Médicis, mother of Louis XIII of France. After the Revolution it was refashioned (1799–1805) by Jean Chalgrin into a legislative building and subsequently greatly enlarged and remodeled (1835–1856) by Alphonse de Gisors. Since 1958 it has been the seat of the French Senate of the Fifth Republic.Immediately west of the palace on the rue de Vaugirard is the Petit Luxembourg, now the residence of the Senate President; and slightly further west, the Musée du Luxembourg, in the former orangery. On the south side of the palace, the formal Luxembourg Garden presents a 25-hectare green parterre of gravel and lawn populated with statues and large basins of water where children sail model boats.Early historyAfter the death of Henry IV in 1610, his widow, Marie de Médicis, became regent to her son, Louis XIII. Having acceded to a much more powerful position, she decided to erect a new palace for herself, adjacent to an old hôtel particulier owned by François de Luxembourg, Duc de Piney, which is now called the Petit Luxembourg and is the residence of the president of the French Senate.

Luxembourg Palace
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
15 rue de Vaugirard
Paris, 75006

+33 (0)1 43 54 54 54

Le palais du Luxembourg, situé dans le de Paris dans le nord du jardin du Luxembourg, est le siège du Sénat français, qui fut installé en 1799 dans le palais construit au début du, à la suite de la régence de la reine Marie de Medicis. Il appartient au domaine de cette assemblée qui comprend également, à proximité du palais, l'hôtel du Petit Luxembourg, résidence du président du Sénat, le musée du Luxembourg, et l'ensemble du jardin.HistoireLe palais du Luxembourg doit son nom à l'hôtel bâti au milieu du et qui appartenait à François de Piney, duc de Luxembourg.La régente Marie de Médicis, veuve de Henri IV, achète l'hôtel et le domaine dits « de Luxembourg » en 1612 et commande en 1615 la construction d'un palais à l'architecte Salomon de Brosse. Après avoir fait raser maisons et une partie du Petit Luxembourg, elle pose elle-même la première pierre le 2 avril 1615. Le marché de construction est retiré à Salomon de Brosse en 1624 et rétrocédé au maître maçon Marin de la Vallée le 26 juin 1624. Elle s'y installe en 1625 au premier étage de l'aile ouest, avant la fin des travaux. La partie ouest du palais Médicis était réservée à la reine mère et celle de gauche à son fils, le roi Louis XIII.

Collège des Bernardins
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
20 rue de Poissy
Paris, 75005

01 53 10 74 44

Le collège des Bernardins, ou collège Saint-Bernard, situé rue de Poissy dans le 5e arrondissement de Paris de Paris, est un ancien collège cistercien de l'historique Université de Paris. Fondé par Étienne de Lexington, abbé de Clairvaux, et construit à partir de 1248 avec les encouragements du pape Innocent IV, il servit jusqu'à la révolution française de résidence pour les moines cisterciens étudiants à l'Université de Paris.Après une rénovation complète achevée en septembre 2008, c'est aujourd’hui un lieu de rencontres, de dialogues, de formation et de culture proposant une programmation riche de conférences et colloques, d’expositions, de concerts, d’activités pour le jeune public ainsi qu’un centre de formation théologique et biblique. Depuis 2009, il abrite l'Académie catholique de France.Il fait l’objet d’un classement au titre des monuments historiques depuis le.Histoire du CollègeLe Collège des Bernardins, commencé à l’époque du règne de Saint Louis, est situé rue de Poissy, une petite rue qui donne dans le boulevard Saint-Germain en direction de l’Île Saint-Louis. Chef-d’œuvre de l’architecture médiévale, c'est par la volonté de Monseigneur Lustiger alors archevêque de Paris qu'il a retrouvé sa place éminente de haut-lieu de la spiritualité, célèbre et reconnu dans toute l’Europe médiévale, d’où l’on venait étudier les textes savants des religieux de renom.

FR.trovite
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
[email protected]
Paris, 75006

Cordeliers Convent
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
15 rue de l'Ecole-de-Médecine
Paris, 75006

01 40 51 10 00

The Cordeliers Convent was a convent in Paris, France.It gave its name to the Club of the Cordeliers, which held its first meetings there during the French Revolution.Cordeliers was the name given in France to the Franciscan Observantists.The building now houses the Dupuytren Museum of anatomy in connection with the school of medicine.Burials at the conventMarie of Brabant, Queen of FranceArthur II, Duke of BrittanyBlanche of France, Infanta of Castile

Réfectoire des Cordeliers
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
15 rue de l'école de médecine
Paris, 75006

Place Saint-Sulpice
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Place Saint-Sulpice
Paris, 75006

La place Saint-Sulpice est une place du arrondissement de Paris.HistoireLors de la construction de la façade actuelle de l'église Saint-Sulpice au, l'architecte Giovanni Niccolo Servandoni prévoit la création d'une place monumentale en demi-cercle, de de large sur de long. Ce projet n'est pas réalisé mais un espace prolongeant le parvis est débuté en 1757. En 1767, un emprunt est souscrit par la ville après autorisation du roi pour entreprendre les expropriations et les travaux d'aménagement.Au, plusieurs plans sont proposés pour achever la place. Un plan adopté par le ministre de l'Intérieur le 26 thermidor An VIII (14 août 1800), confirmé par un arrêté des consuls du 16 vendémiaire an IX (8 octobre 1800) prévoit une place semi-circulaire qui doit être réalisé dans un délai de six ans. Un arrêté du 25 juin 1806 annule ce plan et prévoit cette fois une place rectangulaire dont le plan est approuvé par le ministre de l'intérieur le 19 octobre 1806. Un nouveau plan, prévoyant une place rectangulaire aux dimensions plus importantes, est adopté le 19 juillet 1808. Une décision ministérielle du 20 décembre 1810 prévoit que la place Saint-Sulpice soit portée jusqu'à la rue du Pot-de-Fer (actuelle rue Bonaparte). Un décret du 24 février 1811 ordonne l'achèvement de cette place dans le courant de la même année. Les dispositions arrêtées en 1810 ont été confirmées par une décision ministérielle du 9 mai 1812. La place est en partie aménagée à l'emplacement de l'ancien séminaire Saint-Sulpice, construit au.En 1838, la place est nivelée et plantée d'arbres. De 1843 à 1848, la fontaine Saint-Sulpice est érigée au centre de la place par l'architecte Louis Visconti.

Le Tastevin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
46 Rue Saint-Louis en l'Île
Paris, 75004

0143541731

À FLEUR DE SEINE - En plein cœur de l'île Saint-Louis, à quelques encablures de Notre-Dame, retrouvez l'ambiance d'antan dans un cadre historique préservé (poutres anciennes, objets en cuivre, etc). Le Tastevin assume son classicisme et tout le monde s'en réjouit. BISTROT DE CHARME - Le Tastevin propose avant tout une cuisine traditionnelle, parfois régionale et toujours de saison. On ne cuisine que du frais au 46 rue Saint-Louis en Île ! Parmi les classiques, la pièce de bœuf flambée au thym (viande de Salers) avec sa moelle et ses petites pommes de terre sautées. BELLE CARTE DES VINS - La direction fait très attention à la qualité de sa cave. Vous pourrez trouver quelques jolies bouteilles issues de propriétaires minutieusement sélectionnés

Aux Anysetiers Du Roy - Au Petit Bacchus
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
61 Rue Saint Louis En Ile
Paris, 75004

0156248458

Notre restaurant vous accueille dans un cadre historique datant du XVIIe siècle. Agrémenté d'un décor d'époque, vous y dégusterez une cuisine française traditionnelle, préparée par notre chef, et bénéficierez d'un accueil personnalisé, en plein coeur de de Paris et de l'Ile Saint-Louis, joyau esthétique de notre capitale.

Île Saint-Louis
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Ile St. louis
Paris, Paris

Fontaine Saint-Michel
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Place St Michel
Paris, 75006

The Fontaine Saint-Michel is a monumental fountain located in Place Saint-Michel in the 5th arrondissement in Paris. It was constructed in 1858–1860 during the French Second Empire by the architect Gabriel Davioud.HistoryThe fontaine Saint-Michel was part of the great project for the reconstruction of Paris overseen by Baron Haussmann during the French Second Empire. In 1855 Haussmann completed an enormous new boulevard, originally called boulevard de Sébastopol-rive-gauche, now called Boulevard Saint-Michel, which opened up the small place Pont-Saint-Michel into a much larger space. Haussmann asked the architect of the service of promenades and plantations of the prefecture, Gabriel Davioud, to design a fountain which would be appropriate in scale to the new square. As the architect of the prefecture, he was able to design not only the fountain but also the facades of the new buildings around it, giving coherence to the square, but he also had to deal with the demands of the prefet and city administration, which was paying for the project.Davioud's original project was for a fountain dedicated to peace, located in the center of the square. The prefect authorities rejected this idea and asked him instead to build a fountain to hide the end wall of the building at the corner of boulevard Saint-Michel and Saint-André des Arts. This forced Davioud to adapt his plan to the proportions of that building.

Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
6 Parvis Notre-Dame - Place Jean-Paul II
Paris, 75004

+33 1 42 34 56 10

Fondée en 1163, la cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris se dresse au coeur de l'île de la Cité et de Paris et est le témoin vivant de 850 ans d'histoire ! Page Facebook des 850 ans : http://www.facebook.com/notredamedeparis2013

Place Saint-Michel
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Place Saint-Michel
Paris, 75005

La place Saint-Michel est une voie située dans le quartier de la Sorbonne et le quartier de la Monnaie des 5 et arrondissements à Paris, en France.HistoireLa place a été créée lors de la percée du boulevard Saint-Michel, en 1855 sous Napoléon III. Le pont Saint-Michel construit au, a été refait à la même période que la place.En août 1944, de vifs combats y opposèrent les étudiants de la Résistance aux Allemands.

Fontaine Saint-Michel
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Place St Michel
Paris, 75006

Sainte-Chapelle
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
4 boulevard du Palais
Paris, 75001

01 53 73 58 51

Monmarte Sacre Coeur
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
35 Rue du Chevalier de la Barre
Paris, 75018

01 53 41 89 00

Palais de Justice de Paris
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
4, boulevard du Palais
Paris, 37100

0644783382

Local Business Near Arc De Triomphe

Siam-Orchidée
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
12 Rue Broca
Paris, France 75005

0952998888

Restaurant L'agrume
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
15 rue des Fossés st-marcel 75005
Kremlin-Bicêtre, France

0143318648

Le Bayon
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
121, rue monge, 75005
Paris, France 75005

Institut Coeur Effort Santé
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
38 boulevard Saint Macrel
Paris, France 75005

Ordre Maçonnique Mixte International Le Droit Humain
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
9 rue Pinel
Paris, France 75013

Le Studio Rouchon,75005,Paris
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
36 rue du fer à moulin
Paris, France 75005

01 55 43 31 00

La Table D'Orphée
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
5. rue de bazeilles
Paris, France 75005

01 43 36 48 10

Notre boutique vous accueille pour la vente à emporter du Lundi au Dimanche de 10h à 20h. Nous avons également aménagé un "espace bistrot" qui est ouvert tous les jours de 12h à 15h. (24 places assises + 12 en terrasse orientée sud ouest) Notre espace "caviste" s'étoffe aussi sur une trentaine de références rigoureusement sélectionnées.

Le Refuge du Passé
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
32, rue du Fer a Moulin
Paris, France 75005

01 47 07 29 91

Hotel Seven Paris
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
20 rue Berthollet
Paris, France 75005

Restaurant l'Agrume
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
15 rue des Fossés st-marcel 75005
Paris, France 75005

0143318648

Chez Pascaline
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
118 Rue Monge
Paris, France 75005

Fun Sushi
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
118 rue Monge paris
Paris, France 75005

Starbucks France
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
118,rue Monge Paris
Paris, France 75005

"01 45 35 15 33"

Clinique du Sport
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
36 bd st Marcel 75005 Paris
Paris, France 75005

Paris Habitat - Oph
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
21 bis rue Claude Bernard
Paris, France 75005

0171370000

Au Coco De Mer
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
34, Bd Saint Marcel
Paris, France 75005

0620267767

Cave La Bourgogne
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
144 Rue Mouffetard
Paris, France 75005

+33147078280

AGEPS
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
7 rue du Fer à Moulin
Paris, France 75005

01 46 69 13 13

École De Chirurgie
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
7 rue du fer à moulin
Paris, France 75005

01 46 69 15 20

I.N.A.P.G Administration Institut National Agronomique Paris Grignon
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
16 R. Claude Bernard
Paris, France 75005