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Tower Bridge, London | Tourist Information


towerbridge.org.uk

Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

+44 (0)20 7403 3761

An iconic London landmark and one of Britain's best loved historic sites, Tower Bridge is open to the public 363 days a year. Within the Bridge's iconic structure and magnificent Victorian Engine rooms, the Tower Bridge Exhibition is the best way of exploring the most famous bridge in the world! Come learn about this incredible feat of Victorian engineering, discover how the Bridge is raised and enjoy stunning panoramic views across London from our high-level walkways, 42 metres above the River Thames. Opening Times: 10:00 - 18:30 (last admission 17:30) Facebook is a public page. Please bear this in mind when posting your comments, especially regarding personal information. Further information on the City of London Corporation can be found at www.cityoflondon.gov.uk. The City of London Corporation is always happy to hear from you but please keep posts relevant. All comments will be monitored by Facebook and the City and any comments that are offensive or inappropriate will be removed. People who persistently cause conflict or offence to others will be removed and blocked from our social media pages.

Bridge Near Tower Bridge

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

Blackfriars Bridge
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Blackfriars Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9UD

020 7928 8998

Blackfriars Bridge is a road and foot traffic bridge over the River Thames in London, between Waterloo Bridge and Blackfriars Railway Bridge, carrying the A201 road. The north end is near the Inns of Court and Temple Church, along with Blackfriars station. The south end is near the Tate Modern art gallery and the Oxo Tower.HistoryThe first fixed crossing at Blackfriars was a 995ft long toll bridge designed in an Italianate style by Robert Mylne and constructed with nine semi-elliptical arches of Portland stone. Beating designs by John Gwynn and George Dance, it took nine years to build, opening to the public in 1769. It was the third bridge across the Thames in the then built-up area of London, supplementing the ancient London Bridge, which dated from several centuries earlier, and Westminster Bridge. It was originally named "William Pitt Bridge" (after the Prime Minister William Pitt the Elder) as a dedication, but its informal name relating to the precinct within the City named after the Blackfriars Monastery, a Dominican priory which once stood nearby, was generally adopted. It was later made toll free.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, United Kingdom

Official Facebook page of London Bridge railway station. In an emergency call 08457 11 41 41. Got a question? networkrail.co.uk/contactus

The London Bridge Experience & Tombs
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
2-4 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2S

0207 403 6333

Voted the UK's Best Year Round Scare Attraction for three years running, the London Bridge Experience and The London Tombs are two gruesome London tourist attractions not to be missed. Whether you are looking for somewhere scary to take the family, a despicable destination for a school trip, corporate event, celebrate Halloween or a treacherous tourist attraction, you've come to the right place! You'll be taken on a journey through the history of this exciting area of London, from the Roman invasion, right up to the present day with the exciting development of the London Bridge Quarter and the Shard! It is also the perfect place to celebrate Halloween with our 'Phobobophobia' extreme scares show - Halloween's most hellish event. The London Bridge Experience and London Tombs are two attractions for one price!

All Bar One Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
34 Shad Thames
London, United Kingdom SE1 2YG

20-79409771

Dim T
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 More London Place
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JP

02074037000

Hungerford Bridge and Golden Jubilee Bridges
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
River Thames
London, United Kingdom SE1 8

0870 500 0600

The Hungerford Bridge crosses the River Thames in London, and lies between Waterloo Bridge and Westminster Bridge. It is a steel truss railway bridge – sometimes known as the Charing Cross Bridge – flanked by two more recent, cable-stayed, pedestrian bridges that share the railway bridge's foundation piers, and which are named the Golden Jubilee Bridges.The north end of the bridge is Charing Cross railway station, and is near Embankment Pier and the Victoria Embankment. The south end is near Waterloo station, County Hall, the Royal Festival Hall, and the London Eye. Each pedestrian bridge has steps and lift access.

Lambeth Bridge
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
Lambeth Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

020 7234 5800

Lambeth Bridge is a road traffic and footbridge crossing the River Thames in an east-west direction in central London, the river flows north at the crossing point. Downstream, the next bridge is Westminster Bridge; upstream the next is Vauxhall Bridge.The most conspicuous colour in the bridge's paint scheme is red, the same colour as the leather benches in the House of Lords which is at the southern end of the Palace of Westminster nearest the bridge. This is in contrast to Westminster Bridge which is predominantly green, the same colour as the benches in the House of Commons at the northern end of the Houses of Parliament.On the east side, in Lambeth are Lambeth Palace, the Albert Embankment, St. Thomas' Hospital, and the International Maritime Organization. On the west side, in Westminster, are Thames House (the headquarters of MI5), behind which is Horseferry House (the National Probation Service headquarters), and Clelland House and Abell House (the headquarters of HM Prison Service), and the Millbank Tower and Tate Britain. The Palace of Westminster is a short walk downstream to the north through the Victoria Tower Garden.

BFI IMAX
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
1 Charlie Chaplin Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 8XR

The BFI IMAX is an IMAX cinema in the South Bank district of London, just north of Waterloo Station. It is owned by the British Film Institute and since July 2012 has been operated by Odeon Cinemas.The cinema is located in the centre of a roundabout junction with Waterloo Road to the south-east, Stamford Street to the north-east, York Road to the south-west and Waterloo Bridge to the north-west.HistoryThe BFI IMAX was designed by Bryan Avery of Avery Associates Architects and completed in May 1999. The screen is the largest in Britain (20m high and 26m wide). It has a seating capacity of just under 500 and a 12,000 Watt digital surround sound system. Although the site is surrounded by traffic and has an underground line just four metres below, the architects and engineers accounted for this in their design and the entire upper structure sits on anti vibration bearings to prevent noise propagation.The cinema won several awards at the time of opening, including a Design Council Millennium Product Award in 1999 and a Civic Trust Award in 2000.In 2009, the screen was replaced and a digital IMAX projector was installed alongside the existing 70mm projector. In July 2012, the BFI announced that Odeon Cinemas had been selected to operate it for the next five years, with the option of termination after three years. Odeon will maintain the film programmes, and booking of tickets online and per telephone. This also gives customers the opportunity to watch Operas on the giant screen. The BFI will retain a great deal of power over the cinema's operation however, including parts of the film schedule and the technical operation. The name will remain the same.

Strada Italiana, Tower Bridge, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 More London Place, The Riverside
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JP

020 7403 8321

Nandos - London Bridge
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
225-227 Clink Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DG

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Gauchos Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Gaucho Tower Bridge, 2 More London Riverside
London, United Kingdom E1W 1

020 7407 5222

wagamama
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1 Clink Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DG

020 7403 3659

Golden Jubilee Bridges
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment, London
London, United Kingdom

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Azzurro - London Bridge
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
35 Tooley St
London, United Kingdom SE1 2QJ

020 7407 5267

Millennium Bridge House / Old Mutual Place
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
2 Lambeth Hill
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4GG

020 7002 7000

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

Cannon Street Railway Bridge
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
103 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5AG

020 7929 0831

Cannon Street Railway Bridge is a bridge in central London, crossing the River Thames. Downstream, the next bridge is London Bridge, and upstream Southwark Bridge. It carries trains over the river to Cannon Street station on the north bank. It was originally named Alexandra Bridge after Alexandra of Denmark who was the wife of the future King Edward VII.The bridge was designed by John Hawkshaw and John Wolfe-Barry for the South Eastern Railway. It was opened in 1866 after three years of construction. In its original form, it carried the railway over the Thames on five spans standing on cast-iron Doric pillars. It was subsequently widened between 1886–93 by Francis Brady and extensively renovated by British Rail between 1979–82, which resulted in many of its ornamental features being removed and the structure taking on an even more utilitarian appearance than before.It was the scene of the Marchioness disaster in 1989.

Londer Tower Brigde
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Rd,London SE1 2UP
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

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Atlantics
Distance: 3.4 mi Tourist Information
82 Atlantic Rd
London, United Kingdom SW9 8PX

+44 (0) 20 7274 6899

Landmark Near Tower Bridge

The Shard London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

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The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group. HOUSE RULES Welcome to The Shard, in the heart of London Bridge. We hope our Facebook page can be a place where our community can feel free to express their feelings and opinions about The Shard or share their experiences with our building, our businesses or our neighbourhood. We welcome feedback, both positive and negative, and we aim to respond to comments that necessitate an answer promptly. Our Facebook house rules are designed to serve as a guideline to ensure our online community can enjoy our Facebook page in a pleasant environment. Guidelines First of all, we ask that you please use polite language and tone at all times. Please be mindful that our page attracts a wide audience and we ask that your comments are respectful and on-topic. It’s the policy of The Shard’s Facebook team that we don’t normally moderate Facebook posts, but we won’t tolerate abusive language, disruptive behaviour or illegal or objectionable content. This includes any material which might be defamatory, offensive, infringing, obscene, lewd, pornographic, violent, abusive, insulting, threatening, harassing, discriminatory, blasphemous, indecent or otherwise unlawful or objectionable. It also includes any material which is aggressive, argumentative or likely to be construed as bullying. No spamming or repetition, please, nor off-topic material in subject-specific threads or areas. We also will not tolerate language, content, postings or links that we consider racist, sexist, homophobic or grossly off-topic. If we consider a posting to fit any of these categories, it will be removed from our Facebook page. Get in Touch There’s a chance we might miss something, so if you are concerned that a user is breaking these rules on our Facebook page, please do let us know. Or if you feel we’ve hidden your post unnecessarily, we’re happy to provide an explanation. You can message us directly via this Facebook page or you can email us via [email protected] And do please keep in mind that the comments expressed within our Facebook page, unless an official post from The Shard, come from you – our community of fans – and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Shard.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (King William Street)
London, United Kingdom SE1

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

Darwin Brasserie - Sky Garden, the Walkie Talkie Building
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6

0333 772 0020

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

Monument to the Great Fire of London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Monument Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8AH

0207 626 2717

The Monument to the Great Fire of London, more commonly known simply as the Monument, is a Doric column in the City of London, near the northern end of London Bridge, that commemorates the Great Fire of London.It stands at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill, 202 ft (62 m) tall and 202 ft (62 m) from the spot in Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started on 2 September 1666. Another monument, the Golden Boy of Pye Corner, marks the point near Smithfield where the fire was stopped. Constructed between 1671 and 1677, it was built on the site of St. Margaret's, Fish Street, the first church to be burnt down by the Great Fire.The Monument comprises a fluted Doric column built of Portland stone topped with a gilded urn of fire. It was designed by Christopher Wren and Robert Hooke. Its height marks its distance from the site of the shop of Thomas Farynor, the king's baker, where the Great Fire began.The top of the Monument is reached by a narrow winding staircase of 311 steps. A mesh cage was added in the mid-19th century at the top to prevent people jumping off, after six people had committed suicide from the structure between 1788 and 1842.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 Battlebridge Lane, Southwark
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

20 Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 6

20 Fenchurch Street is a commercial skyscraper in London that takes its name from its address on Fenchurch Street, in the historic City of London financial district. It has been nicknamed 'The Walkie-Talkie' because of its distinctive shape. Construction was completed in spring 2014, and the top-floor 'sky garden' was opened in January 2015. The 34-storey building is 160m tall, making it the sixth-tallest building in the City of London and the 12th tallest in London.Designed by architect Rafael Viñoly and costing over £200 million, 20 Fenchurch Street features a highly distinctive top-heavy form which appears to burst upward and outward. A large viewing deck, bar and restaurants are included on the top three floors; these are, with restrictions, open to the public.The tower was originally proposed at nearly 200m tall but its design was scaled down after concerns about its visual impact on the nearby St Paul's Cathedral and Tower of London. It was subsequently approved in 2006 with the revised height. Even after the height reduction there were continued concerns from heritage groups about its impact on the surrounding area. The project was consequently the subject of a public inquiry; in 2007 this ruled in the developers' favour and the building was granted full planning permission. In 2015 it was awarded the Carbuncle Cup for the worst new building in the UK in the previous 12 months.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

City Hall
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
110 The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2AA

+44 (0) 20 7983 4000

Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Tower of London
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4AB

0870 756 6060

The Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom are 141 historic ceremonial objects, including the regalia and vestments worn by kings and queens of the country at their coronations, as well as processional and anointing objects, plate, and christening fonts.A symbol of 1,000 years of monarchy, the sovereign's coronation regalia is the only working collection in Europe – other present-day monarchies have abandoned coronations in favour of inauguration or enthronement ceremonies – and is the largest set of regalia in the world. Objects used to invest and crown the monarch variously denote his or her roles as Head of State, Supreme Governor of the Church of England, and Commander-in-Chief of the British Armed Forces. Wives of kings are crowned as queen consort with a plainer set of regalia. Since 1831, a new crown has been made specially for each queen consort.The use of regalia by monarchs in Britain can be traced back to its early history. Most of the present collection as a whole dates from around 350 years ago when King Charles II acceded to the throne. The medieval coronation regalia and Tudor state regalia had been either sold or melted down by Oliver Cromwell, a republican who overthrew the monarchy in 1649, during the English Civil War. Notable among the precious stones which adorn the regalia are Cullinan I (the largest clear cut diamond in the world), Cullinan II (second-largest of the Cullinan diamonds), the Koh-i-Noor diamond with a history going back to the 13th century, the Stuart Sapphire, St Edward's Sapphire, and the Black Prince's Ruby – a large spinel worn by King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt.

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
SE1 2UP
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

Butler's Wharf
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Butlers Wharf West 40 Shad Thames Flat 9
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3403

Butler's Wharf is an English historic building on the south bank of the River Thames, just east of London's Tower Bridge, now housing luxury flats and restaurants. Lying between the picturesque street Shad Thames and the Thames Path, it overlooks both the bridge and St Katharine Docks on the other side of the river. Butler's Wharf is also used as a term for the surrounding area.HistoryButler's Wharf was built between 1871-73 as a shipping wharf and warehouse complex, accommodating goods unloaded from ships using the port of London. It contained what was reputedly the largest tea warehouse in the world. During the 20th century, Butler's Wharf and other warehouses in the area fell into disuse.From 1975-78, the artists' space at 2B Butler's Wharf was a key venue for early UK video art and performance art, used among others by Derek Jarman and the artists and dancers of X6 Dance Collective who published a magazine called New Dance for a number of years. Some of these people subsequently founded Chisenhale Studios and Chisenhale Dance Space, including Philip Jeck.In 1984, Butler's Wharf and the portion of Shad Thames running behind it featured prominently in the Doctor Who serial Resurrection of the Daleks.

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

Minories
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
64-73 Minories
London, United Kingdom EC3N 1

Minories is the name of both a former civil parish, also known as Minories Holy Trinity, and a street in the City of London, close to the Tower of London.HistoryToponymyThe name is derived from the abbey of the Minoresses of St. Mary of the Order of St. Clare, founded in 1294, which stood on such sites; a "minoress" was a nun in the Second Order of the Order of Friars Minor (or Franciscans). (A small side-road off Minories is named St. Clare Street.) The name can also be found in other English towns including Birmingham, Colchester, Newcastle upon Tyne and Stratford-upon-Avon.RomansIn September 2013, an extremely well preserved Roman statue of an eagle, was discovered on a building site on the street. The statue is considered to be one of the best examples of Romano-British sculpture in existence.GovernanceMinories was part of the ancient parish of St Botolph without Aldgate until 1557, when it became extra-parochial.The area was a papal peculiar outside the jurisdiction of the English bishops. The abbey was dissolved in 1539, the property passing to the Crown. The chapel of the former abbey was used as the Church of Holy Trinity, Minories, and other buildings became an armoury and later workhouse. In 1686, the area became part of the Liberties of the Tower of London. The Minories area also historically hosted a large Jewish community.

Tower Hill tube station
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
24-25 Great Tower St
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7222 1234

Tower Hill is a London Underground station at Tower Hill in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It is on the Circle line between Monument and Aldgate, and on the District line between Monument and Aldgate East. The station is in fare zone 1. It is a short distance from Tower Gateway DLR station and Fenchurch Street railway station.The entrance to Tower Hill station is a few metres from one of the largest remaining segments of the Roman London Wall which formerly surrounded the historic City of London. The station was built on the site of the former Tower of London tube station that closed in 1884. The present Tower Hill station opened in 1967 and replaced a nearby station with the same name but which was originally called Mark Lane, that was slightly farther west.ServicesTrain frequencies vary throughout the day, but the typical off-peak service pattern is:District line:Eastbound:12 tph to Upminster6 tph terminate at Tower Hill6 tph to Ealing Broadway6 tph to Richmond6 tph to WimbledonEastbound:6 tph to Hammersmith via Aldgate6 tph to Edgware Road via Embankment

Fishmongers Hall
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9EL

0207 626 3531

Tower Hill Memorial
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2 St Mary at Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7283 9504

The Tower Hill Memorial is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission war memorial on the south side of Trinity Square Gardens, in London, England. The memorial commemorates those from the Merchant Navy and fishing fleets who died during both world wars and have "no grave but the sea". The memorial was designed by Edwin Lutyens with sculpture work by William Reid Dick, the Second World War extension was designed by Edward Maufe with sculpture work by Charles Wheeler.The First World War memorial takes the form of a vaulted corridor, long, wide and high. Inside are 12 bronze plaques engraved with 12,000 names. Those commemorated include Victoria Cross recipient, Archibald Bisset Smith.The Second World War memorial takes the form of a semi-circular sunken garden located behind the corridor, to its north. It contains the names of 24,000 British seamen and 50 Australian seamen, listed on the walls of the sunken garden. In the centre of the garden is a pool of bronze, engraved with a compass pointing north. Between the two memorials are two columns with statues representing an officer (western column) and a seaman (eastern).

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

Tourist Attraction Near Tower Bridge

Brick Lane Market
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Brick Lane
London, United Kingdom E1 6SB

Shakespeare's Globe
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
21 New Globe Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DT

020 7401 9919 (Box Office)

Please note: This page is monitored Monday - Friday 10am-6pm. If you have an urgent enquiry outside of these hours please call our General Information line on +44 (0)20 7902 1400. Thanks for dropping by our Facebook page. We love to hear from our friends and visitors and we encourage you to engage with information we post about the Globe. Tell us what you thought of our shows, or what you have discovered about Shakespeare. If you ask us a questions we will try our best to answer it. Our page is not the place to advertise your own productions or comments and events that are not related to Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre. Likewise if you post spam or abusive messages, your post will be removed. If you're unhappy at anytime with the service or experience you have at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre you can email us directly at [email protected] Shakespeare's Globe

The View from The Shard
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9EX

+44(0)844 499 7111

The View from The Shard is situated at the top of The Shard – the tallest building in Western Europe, and is London’s newest visitor attraction. At almost twice the height of any other viewing platform in London, The View from The Shard offers visitors a 360 degree view of London for up to 40 miles. Advanced tickets are £25.95 for adults and £19.95 for children. Visits are queue and crowd free, and visitors are allowed to stay and enjoy the view for as long as they like. www.theviewfromtheshard.com

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

London Dungeon
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
28-34 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

The London Dungeon is a tourist attraction in London, England, which recreates various gory and macabre historical events in a gallows humour style. It uses a mixture of live actors, special effects and rides.OverviewOpening in 1974, the attraction was initially designed as a museum of macabre history, but the Dungeon has evolved to become an actor-led, interactive experience. The Dungeon is operated by Merlin Entertainments. In 2013, the London Dungeon moved from its premises on Tooley Street to a new location in County Hall next to the London Eye.FormatThe London Dungeon features 18 shows, 20 actors and 3 rides. Visitors are taken on a journey through 1000 years of London’s history where they meet actors performing as some of London’s most infamous characters, including Jack the Ripper and Sweeney Todd. The Dungeon’s shows are staged on theatrical sets with special effects. The show incorporates events such as the Black Death and the Gunpowder Plot, and includes characters such as "The Torturer", "The Plague Doctor", and "The Judge". Guests are encouraged to participate in the shows. The experience also includes a "drop ride to doom", a free-fall ride staged as a public hanging.

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

Blackfriars Bridge
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Blackfriars Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9UD

020 7928 8998

Blackfriars Bridge is a road and foot traffic bridge over the River Thames in London, between Waterloo Bridge and Blackfriars Railway Bridge, carrying the A201 road. The north end is near the Inns of Court and Temple Church, along with Blackfriars station. The south end is near the Tate Modern art gallery and the Oxo Tower.HistoryThe first fixed crossing at Blackfriars was a 995ft long toll bridge designed in an Italianate style by Robert Mylne and constructed with nine semi-elliptical arches of Portland stone. Beating designs by John Gwynn and George Dance, it took nine years to build, opening to the public in 1769. It was the third bridge across the Thames in the then built-up area of London, supplementing the ancient London Bridge, which dated from several centuries earlier, and Westminster Bridge. It was originally named "William Pitt Bridge" (after the Prime Minister William Pitt the Elder) as a dedication, but its informal name relating to the precinct within the City named after the Blackfriars Monastery, a Dominican priory which once stood nearby, was generally adopted. It was later made toll free.

The London Bridge Experience & Tombs
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
2-4 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2S

0207 403 6333

Voted the UK's Best Year Round Scare Attraction for three years running, the London Bridge Experience and The London Tombs are two gruesome London tourist attractions not to be missed. Whether you are looking for somewhere scary to take the family, a despicable destination for a school trip, corporate event, celebrate Halloween or a treacherous tourist attraction, you've come to the right place! You'll be taken on a journey through the history of this exciting area of London, from the Roman invasion, right up to the present day with the exciting development of the London Bridge Quarter and the Shard! It is also the perfect place to celebrate Halloween with our 'Phobobophobia' extreme scares show - Halloween's most hellish event. The London Bridge Experience and London Tombs are two attractions for one price!

Whitechapel Gallery
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
77-82 Whitechapel High Street
London, United Kingdom E1 7

+44 (0)207 522 7888

For over a century the Whitechapel Gallery has premiered world-class artists from modern masters such as Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and Frida Kahlo to contemporaries such as Sophie Calle, Lucian Freud, Gilbert & George and Mark Wallinger. With beautiful galleries, exhibitions, artist commissions, collection displays, historic archives, education resources, inspiring art courses, dining room and bookshop, the Gallery is open all year round, so there is always something free to see. The Gallery is a touchstone for contemporary art internationally, plays a central role in London’s cultural landscape and is pivotal to the continued growth of the world’s most vibrant contemporary art quarter.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

The Medieval Banquet, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Ivory House, St Katharine Docks
London, United Kingdom E1W 1BP

020 7480 5353

Centrally located in the beautiful and historic setting of St Katharine Docks alongside the River Thames, just a two minute walk from Tower Bridge and the Tower of London, join Henry VIII and his court of knights, troubadours, contortionists, magicians, jugglers, minstrels and medieval tumblers at this most royal of banquets and enjoy a four course feast with beer and red wine brought to your table throughout the meal by our dancing wenches.

Smithfield, London
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
31-32 Watling St
London, United Kingdom EC1A 2

020 7248 3151

Smithfield is a locality in the ward of Farringdon Without situated at the City of London's northwest in central London, England. The principal street of the area is West Smithfield.A number of valued City institutions are located in the area, such as St Bartholomew's Hospital, the Charterhouse, and Livery Halls notably those of the Butchers' and Haberdashers' Companies, but Smithfield is best known for its ancient meat market, dating from the 10th century, which is now London's only remaining wholesale market in continuous operation since medieval times. The area also contains London's oldest surviving church, St Bartholomew-the-Great, founded in 1123 AD.Smithfield has borne witness to many bloody executions of heretics and political rebels over the centuries, including major historical figures such as Scottish patriot Sir William Wallace and Wat Tyler, leader of the Peasants' Revolt, among many other religious reformers and dissenters.

Jack The Ripper Tours
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Aldgate East Underground Station
London, United Kingdom E1

020 8530-8443

The Jack the Ripper Tour that is led by published authors and experts on the case. Founded in 1982 by Blue Badge Guide Richard Jones this is the original Aldgate East Jack the Ripper Walk that features genuine Victorian photographs that show the streets are walking through as they were in 1888.

Old Kent Road
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
3 Listford Street Sumner Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 - SE15

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Southwark Tavern, London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
22 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1TU

+44 (0)20 7403 0257

The Old Operating Theatre Museum
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
9A St Thomas Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9RY

+4420 7 188 2679

HMS President
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom EC4Y 0HJ

HMS Saxifrage was launched in 1918 as a Flower-class anti-submarine Q-ship. She was renamed HMS President in 1922 and moored permanently on the Thames as a Royal Navy Reserve drill ship. In 1982 she was sold to private owners, and having changed hands twice, now serves as a venue for conferences and functions, and serves as the offices for a number of media companies. Technically, she is now called HMS President (1918) to distinguish her from HMS President, the Royal Naval Reserve base in St Katharine Docks. She is one of the last three surviving Royal Navy warships of the First World War. She is also the sole representative of the first type of purpose built anti-submarine vessels, and is the ancestor of WW2 convoy escort sloops, which evolved into modern anti-submarine frigates.Design and constructionThe original Flower-class sloops (the Acacia, Azalea and Arabis classes) were all built in 1915 as fleet minesweeping vessels, with triple hulls at the bow to give extra protection against loss from mine damage. When submarine attacks on British merchant ships became a serious menace after 1916, the existing Flowers were transferred to convoy escort duty, and fitted with depth charges as well as 4.7-inch naval guns.

The Shard
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2TH

The London Stone
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5AD

020 7626 8246

Southwark Brewing Company
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
46 Druid Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2EZ

02033024190

Attractions/Things to Do Near Tower Bridge

The Medieval Banquet, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Ivory House, St Katharine Docks
London, United Kingdom E1W 1BP

020 7480 5353

Centrally located in the beautiful and historic setting of St Katharine Docks alongside the River Thames, just a two minute walk from Tower Bridge and the Tower of London, join Henry VIII and his court of knights, troubadours, contortionists, magicians, jugglers, minstrels and medieval tumblers at this most royal of banquets and enjoy a four course feast with beer and red wine brought to your table throughout the meal by our dancing wenches.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7940 6300

Follow us on Facebook and join our growing community of fans. Discover in-depth information about HMS Belfast, special content, and discuss and share with others.

Honeymoon & μήνας του μέλιτος & Balayı
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
London & Partners, 2 More London Riverside,
London, United Kingdom SE1 2RR

+44 (0) 3330 146268

Tanner Street Vintage Market
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Tanner Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 3PL

07825586780

Billingsgate Roman Bathhouse
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
101 Lower Thames Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6DL

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Since its discovery in 1848 the Billingsgate bath house has never officially been opened to the public. After urgent conservation work on the site in 2011, the site was finally re-opened to the public during special public events. During summer 2012, Billingsgate Roman Bath House will be opened to the public. This event has been made possible with thanks to the Museum of London, Corporation of London and the Institute of Archaeology, UCL. Join the group to find out more about the 2012 summer events at Billingsgate!

The View from The Shard
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9EX

+44(0)844 499 7111

The View from The Shard is situated at the top of The Shard – the tallest building in Western Europe, and is London’s newest visitor attraction. At almost twice the height of any other viewing platform in London, The View from The Shard offers visitors a 360 degree view of London for up to 40 miles. Advanced tickets are £25.95 for adults and £19.95 for children. Visits are queue and crowd free, and visitors are allowed to stay and enjoy the view for as long as they like. www.theviewfromtheshard.com

Wilton's Music Hall
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
1 Graces Alley
London, United Kingdom E1 8JB

02077022789

Wilton's is the world's oldest surviving Grand Music Hall and London's best kept secret. This stunning and atmospheric building is led by Frances Mayhew and produces an exciting programme of imaginative, diverse and distinct entertainment including theatre, music, comedy, cinema and cabaret.

The London Bridge Experience & Tombs
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
2-4 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2S

0207 403 6333

Voted the UK's Best Year Round Scare Attraction for three years running, the London Bridge Experience and The London Tombs are two gruesome London tourist attractions not to be missed. Whether you are looking for somewhere scary to take the family, a despicable destination for a school trip, corporate event, celebrate Halloween or a treacherous tourist attraction, you've come to the right place! You'll be taken on a journey through the history of this exciting area of London, from the Roman invasion, right up to the present day with the exciting development of the London Bridge Quarter and the Shard! It is also the perfect place to celebrate Halloween with our 'Phobobophobia' extreme scares show - Halloween's most hellish event. The London Bridge Experience and London Tombs are two attractions for one price!

The Shard
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2TH

Cora Brazier
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Borough High Street London, SE1 1JX UK
London, United Kingdom SE1 1JX

02073780411

Wine Pantry
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
8 Devonshire Row
London, United Kingdom EC2M 4RH

0207 4033003

Welcome to Wine Pantry We have a tasting room in Borough Market. We are the only exclusively English wine shop, where you can sample the finest quality wines, beers, spirits, cheeses and cured meats the UK has to offer. Why English? Because it's good. Surprisingly good and people shouldn't be surprised at how good some of our produce is. They should be able to taste it, match it and enjoy it. The first of its kind, we are able to provide more than 20 different wines to sample and enjoy as a taster, by the glass or to take away, using specialised wine dispensing machines. We also cater to events, provide private tastings and can help you plan tours to the vineyards or farms from where our produce is sourced.

The Clink Prison Museum
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1 Clink Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DG

02074030900

The Clink Prison Museum is built upon the original site of the Clink Prison. The Prison dates back to 1144 making it one of England’s oldest, if not the oldest prison. Visitors will experience a hands on educational experience allowing them to handle original artefacts, including torture devices, as well as the opportunity to view and hear the amazing stories of the inmates and the notorious Southbank. Owned by the Bishop of Winchester, The Clink Prison was used to control the Southbank of London known as “The Liberty of The Clink”. This area housed much of London’s entertainment establishments including four theatres, bull-baiting, bear-baiting, inns and many other darker entertainments. The Clink Prison was only a small part of a vast complex on the Bankside that the Bishop owned called Winchester House. At one point in history Henry VIII planned toake control of the palace and use it as his own. Parts of the Great Hall still stand even today including the world famous Rose Arch Window preserved by English Heritage. Visitors to the area included individuals such as William Shakespeare, King Henry VIII, Sir Francis Drake, Geoffrey Chaucer and many more. Why not explore the prison that gave its name to all others? The clink Prison.

Neil King
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
200 Borough High Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1JX

+44 20 7378 0415

Jake Green
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Address200 Borough High Street London, SE1 1JX UK Telephone
London, United Kingdom SE1 1JX

02073780415

Lucas Hodgson
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Address200 Borough High Street London, SE1 1JX
London, United Kingdom SE1 1JX

02073780415

Re-Creation London
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
82 Redcross Way
London, United Kingdom SE1 1HA

02074074423

Re-Creation Studio is an open access creative makers space in SE1 for adults and children. Re-Creation Studio is an explosion of colour, materials and resources all related to the wonderful world of craft and fine art. Re-Creation is stacked wall to wall with glitter, paint, paint brushes, paper, canvas', ceramics, beads, fabric, felt, buttons, pom-poms, stickers for sticker bombing, yarns, knitting needles, thread, sewing machines, t-shirt vinyl for customizing, puppet making and much much more! We are open for advanced bookings only.

Diamonds Vip Nites
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
151-153 GREYHOUND LANE
London, United Kingdom SW16 5NJ

07961256165

Heritage Tours
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
15 Alma Grove
London, United Kingdom EA1

01843234 345

Moroccan food
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
messanger street
London, United Kingdom sE171TE

07479308699

Trispace Gallery
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
5 market place, Bermondsey
London, United Kingdom SE16 4DG

07947816789

A Universal Space dedicated to developing an union between art and people Moving to new premises We are here to provide an alternative venue for what's FRESH & NEW, thus being a forefront stage for various forms of artistic passion in modern and classical styles. Gallery is open for any ideas, no matter whether you paint, write or even swallow swords please feel free to contact us to allow us to assist in you visibility by providing you performing & exhibition space and promotion. We also rent space for events, workshops and just about anything you can think of. So make sure to bring yourself down to one of our regular events for a wonderful day/evening, or just pop in for a social during our regular opening hours... Coming soon We now have a Fully Licensed Bar We are also licensed for music, film, theatre and performance event