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Tower Bridge, London | Tourist Information


Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

+44 (0)20 7403 3761

An iconic London landmark and one of Britain's best loved historic sites, Tower Bridge is open to the public 363 days a year. Within the Bridge's iconic structure and magnificent Victorian Engine rooms, the Tower Bridge Exhibition is the best way of exploring the most famous bridge in the world! Come learn about this incredible feat of Victorian engineering, discover how the Bridge is raised and enjoy stunning panoramic views across London from our high-level walkways, 42 metres above the River Thames. Opening Times: 10:00 - 18:30 (last admission 17:30) Facebook is a public page. Please bear this in mind when posting your comments, especially regarding personal information. Further information on the City of London Corporation can be found at www.cityoflondon.gov.uk. The City of London Corporation is always happy to hear from you but please keep posts relevant. All comments will be monitored by Facebook and the City and any comments that are offensive or inappropriate will be removed. People who persistently cause conflict or offence to others will be removed and blocked from our social media pages.

Bridge Near Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, SE1 2UP

All Bar One Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
34 Shad Thames
London, SE1 2YG

20-79409771

Dim T
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 More London Place
London, SE1 2DB

02074037000

Gauchos Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Gaucho Tower Bridge, 2 More London Riverside
London, E1W 1

020 7407 5222

Strada Italiana, Tower Bridge, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 More London Place, The Riverside
London, SE1 2JP

020 7403 8321

The London Bridge Experience & Tombs
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
2-4 Tooley Street
London, SE1 2S

0207 403 6333

Voted the UK's Best Year Round Scare Attraction for three years running, the London Bridge Experience and The London Tombs are two gruesome London tourist attractions not to be missed. Whether you are looking for somewhere scary to take the family, a despicable destination for a school trip, corporate event, celebrate Halloween or a treacherous tourist attraction, you've come to the right place! You'll be taken on a journey through the history of this exciting area of London, from the Roman invasion, right up to the present day with the exciting development of the London Bridge Quarter and the Shard! It is also the perfect place to celebrate Halloween with our 'Phobobophobia' extreme scares show - Halloween's most hellish event. The London Bridge Experience and London Tombs are two attractions for one price!

wagamama
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Borough Market, 1 Clink Street
London, SE1 9DG

020 7403 3659

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London,

Official Facebook page of London Bridge railway station. In an emergency call 08457 11 41 41. Got a question? networkrail.co.uk/contactus

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (A3)
London, EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (A3)
London, EC4R 3

ロンドン橋はロンドンを流れるテムズ川にかかる橋。タワーブリッジとキャノン・ストリート鉄道橋の間に位置する。市内のシティとサザークを結び、プール・オブ・ロンドンの西端に位置する。この橋の架かる位置には古くから、何度も橋が架けられては倒壊しており、その回数の多さから『ロンドン橋落ちた』という民謡が生まれた。1750年にウェストミンスター・ブリッジが架けられるまでロンドン市内でテムズ川に架かる橋としては唯一のものであった。 橋の南側にはとロンドン・ブリッジ駅が、北側にはロンドン大火記念碑とバンク・アンド・モニュメント駅がある。 現在の橋はロンドンとポーツマスとを結ぶ道路A3の一部であり、大ロンドン庁により維持管理されている。ロンドン橋はプレストレストコンクリート橋であって極めて地味であるのに対して、直下流にあるタワーブリッジは2つの塔を持つ跳開橋であり見栄えがよい。このため、タワーブリッジの方がロンドン橋であると、世界中で極めてしばしば勘違いされている。歴史現在のロンドン橋が架かる位置にはその近辺も含め、2000年近くにもわたって橋が存在してきた。ロンドン地域でテムズ川に架かった最古の橋はローマ人によるもので、西暦46年に架けられた木製のものであった。1013年、侵略してきたスヴェン1世率いるデーン人たちを分裂させるためにエゼルレッド2世によって焼き落とされた。架け直された橋は1091年に嵐で破壊され、1136年には火災に遭っている。

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, SE1 9RY

02074036996

런던교는 영국 런던 시내를 흐르는 템스 강 위에 세워진 다리이다.

The Middle Of London Bridge!
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
City of London
London, EC4R 9

Cannon Street Railway Bridge
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
103 Cannon St
London, EC4N 5AG

020 7929 0831

Cannon Street Railway Bridge is a bridge in central London, crossing the River Thames. Downstream, the next bridge is London Bridge, and upstream Southwark Bridge. It carries trains over the river to Cannon Street station on the north bank. It was originally named Alexandra Bridge after Alexandra of Denmark who was the wife of the future King Edward VII.The bridge was designed by John Hawkshaw and John Wolfe-Barry for the South Eastern Railway. It was opened in 1866 after three years of construction. In its original form, it carried the railway over the Thames on five spans standing on cast-iron Doric pillars. It was subsequently widened between 1886–93 by Francis Brady and extensively renovated by British Rail between 1979–82, which resulted in many of its ornamental features being removed and the structure taking on an even more utilitarian appearance than before.It was the scene of the Marchioness disaster in 1989.

Tower Bridge London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge
London, SE1 2UP

Landmark and Historical Place Near Tower Bridge

Bermondsey Market
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Bermondsey Square, London, SE1 3UN
London, United Kingdom SE1 3

020 7234 0805

Bermondsey Market is an antiques market located at Bermondsey Square on Tower Bridge Road in Bermondsey, part of the London Borough of Southwark, in South London, England. The location was formerly the site of Bermondsey Abbey. The site underwent redevelopment in 2006 and the market remained open during this period.HistoryThe Caledonian Market moved to its current location in 1950 after the old Caledonian Market site in Islington was designated for redevelopment in the late 1940s.Marché ouvertThe opening hours of the Bermondsey Market from 6am until noon reflect the ancient law of market ouvert, which was abolished in 1995. Under this law, in number of designated markets, including Bermondsey Market, if an item was sold between sunset and sunrise then its provenance could not be questioned, so stolen goods could be traded and good title would pass to the purchaser. To quote Minister for the Arts Estelle Morris in July 2003 during the Second Reading of the Dealing In Cultural Objects Bill: I did not have information about marché ouvert in the deep recesses of my mind, but experts reliably inform me that it no longer exists. The hon. Member for Uxbridge will be surprised to learn that it has been abolished only recently. It used to exist in designated markets, including Bermondsey. I am sure that the promoter will be interested in telling the hon. Member for Southwark, North and Bermondsey about that. In it, items could be sold before sunrise. Believe it or not, in this land of ours, people could sell stolen—my officials put "dodgy" in brackets, but we do not use that term—objects. I assure hon. Members that it has been abolished. I hope that that deals with the fears of the hon. Member for Uxbridge.

City Hall, London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
110 The Queens Walk, LONDON, SE1 2AA
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

20-79834100

City Hall is the headquarters of the Greater London Authority (GLA), which comprises the Mayor of London and the London Assembly. It is located in Southwark, on the south bank of the River Thames near Tower Bridge. It was designed by Norman Foster and opened in July 2002, two years after the Greater London Authority was created.BackgroundFor the first two years of its existence, the Greater London Authority was based at Romney House, Marsham Street in Westminster. Meetings of the London Assembly took place at Emmanuel Centre, also on Marsham Street.City Hall was constructed at a cost of £43 million on a site formerly occupied by wharves serving the Pool of London. The building does not belong to the GLA but is leased under a 25-year rent. Despite its name, City Hall is not in and does not serve a city (as recognised by English constitutional law), which often adds to the confusion of Greater London with the City of London, which has its headquarters at Guildhall. In June 2011, Mayor Boris Johnson announced that for the duration of the London 2012 Olympic Games, the building would be called London House.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Unit 22, Hays Galleria, Tooley Street,
London, United Kingdom SE1 2HD

020 7407 4301

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property – then a brewhouse – in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7940 6300

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HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Morgan's Lane
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

HMS „Belfast” – krążownik lekki brytyjskiej marynarki Royal Navy z okresu II wojny światowej.BudowaWraz z siostrzanym HMS „Edinburgh”, krążownik należał do typu Edinburgh, określanego też jako trzecia seria typu Town. Oba krążowniki zamówione przez Admiralicję w roku 1936 miały być brytyjską odpowiedzią na zwodowanie dwóch włoskich krążowników typu Giuseppe Garibaldi o wyporności 9591 ton. Do służby w Royal Navy HMS „Belfast” wcielony w sierpniu 1939 roku.Okres II wojny światowej„Belfast” rozpoczął wojnę w składzie 18 Eskadry Krążowników Home Fleet pod dowództwem kapitana J. Scotta. 9 października 1939 HMS „Belfast” przechwycił na północ od Orkadów niemiecki liniowiec „Cap Norte” o pojemności 13 615 BRT. Wkrótce potem przeniesiony został do bazy w Rosyth, gdzie 21 listopada 1939 podczas wychodzenia z portu krążownik wszedł na niemiecką minę magnetyczną postawioną przez U-21. Eksplodująca pod dnem mina spowodowała na tyle poważne uszkodzenia kadłuba, że HMS „Belfast” został wyłączony z działań na okres 3 lat.Po remoncie okręt ponownie został wcielony do służby 8 grudnia 1942, zostając w styczniu następnego roku okrętem flagowym 10 Eskadry Krążowników Home Fleet pod komendą kontradmirała Burnetta. Pierwszą operacją HMS „Belfast” na Morzu Arktycznym była osłona konwoju JW-53 w lutym 1943 roku. Również kolejny konwój JW-54 płynący w dwóch częściach w listopadzie 1943 roku był osłaniany przez 10 Eskadrę Krążowników.

St Katharine Docks
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St Katharine Docks
London, United Kingdom E1W 1

020 7264 5312

St Katharine Docks, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, were one of the commercial docks serving London, on the north side of the river Thames just east (downstream) of the Tower of London and Tower Bridge. They were part of the Port of London, in the area now known as the Docklands, and are now a popular housing and leisure complex.HistorySt Katharine Docks took their name from the former hospital of St Katharine's by the Tower, built in the 12th century, which stood on the site. An intensely built-up 23 acre (9.5 hectares) site was earmarked for redevelopment by an Act of Parliament in 1825, with construction commencing in May 1827. Some 1250 houses were demolished, together with the medieval hospital of St. Katharine. Around 11,300 inhabitants, mostly port workers crammed into unsanitary slums, lost their homes; only the property owners received compensation. The scheme was designed by engineer Thomas Telford and was his only major project in London. To create as much quayside as possible, the docks were designed in the form of two linked basins (East and West), both accessed via an entrance lock from the Thames. Steam engines designed by James Watt and Matthew Boulton kept the water level in the basins about four feet above that of the tidal river. By 1830, the docks had cost over £2 million to build.

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 5

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 4

Fenchurch Street is a street in London linking Aldgate at its eastern end with Lombard Street and Gracechurch Street in the west. It is a well-known thoroughfare in the City of London financial district and is the site of a large number of corporate offices and headquartersTo the south of Fenchurch Street and towards its eastern end is Fenchurch Street railway station, a mainline terminus with services towards east London and Essex. Other notable sites include the commercial buildings at 20 Fenchurch Street and Plantation Place.StreetscapeFenchurch Street is home to a large number of shops, pubs and offices, including 20 Fenchurch Street, a 525 ft tall skyscraper completed in 2014.Located at No. 71 is Lloyd's Register, where the annual journal Lloyd's Registry was previously published. The frontage on Fenchurch Street was built in 1901 by Thomas Edward Collcutt and is a Grade II* listed building. The more modern building behind was designed by Richard Rogers and towers above it. This was completed in 1999 and was shortlisted for the RIBA Stirling prize in 2002.At the street's eastern end and junction with Aldgate is the Aldgate Pump, a historic water pump which has been designated a Grade II listed structure. Further west, Fenchurch Street's junction with Lime Street was formerly the location of a Christopher Wren church, St Dionis Backchurch. First built in the 13th century dedicated to the patron saint of France, it was destroyed during the Great Fire in 1666, later rebuilt by Wren, and then demolished in 1878.

Aldgate
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Aldgate High Street
London, United Kingdom

020 7636 8309

Aldgate was the eastern-most gateway through the London Wall leading from the City of London to Whitechapel and the East End of London. It gives its name to a City ward bounded by White Kennet Street in the north and Crutched Friars in the south, taking in Leadenhall and Fenchurch Streets, which remain principal thoroughfares through the City, each splitting from the short street named Aldgate that connects to Aldgate High Street. The road is situated 2.3mi east north-east of Charing Cross.John Cass's school, where a plaque records the former placement of London Wall, is sited on the north side of Aldgate (the street).EtymologyThe etymology of the name "Aldgate" is disputed. It is first recorded in 1052 as Æst geat ("east gate") but had become Alegate by 1108. Writing in the 16th century, John Stow derived the name from "Old Gate" (Aeld Gate). However, Henry Harben, writing in 1918, contended that this was wrong and that documents show that the "d" is missing in documents written before 1486–7. Alternative meanings include "Ale Gate" in connection with a putative ale-house or "All Gate" meaning the gate was free to all. Other possibilities canvassed by Harben include reference to a Saxon named "Ealh," or reference to foreigners ("el") or oil ("ele") or "awl". Gillian Bebbington, writing in 1972, suggests Alegate, Aelgate ("public gate") or Aeldgate" (Old Gate") as equally viable alternatives whilst Weinreb and Hibbert, writing in 1983, revert to Stow's theory that the name means "Old Gate".

The Gerkin
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
30 St Mary Axe
London, United Kingdom EC3A 8

020 7071 5029