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Mansion House, Dublin | Tourist Information


dublincity.ie/yourcouncil/lordmayordublin/pages/mansionhouse.aspx

Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

Landmark Near Mansion House

Trinity College, Dublin
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
College Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+35318961812

St Stephen's Green
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Saint Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

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St Stephen's Green is a city centre public park in Dublin, Ireland. The current landscape of the park was designed by William Sheppard, which officially opened to the public on Tuesday, 27 July 1880. The park is adjacent to one of Dublin's main shopping streets, Grafton Street, and to a shopping centre named for it, while on its surrounding streets are the offices of a number of public bodies and the city terminus of one of Dublin's Luas tram lines. It is often informally called Stephen's Green. At 22acre, it is the largest of the parks in Dublin's main Georgian garden squares. Others include nearby Merrion Square and Fitzwilliam Square.The park is rectangular, surrounded by streets that once formed major traffic arteries through Dublin city centre, although traffic management changes implemented in 2004 during the course of the Luas works have greatly reduced the volume of traffic. These four bordering streets are called, respectively, St Stephen's Green North, St Stephen's Green South, St Stephen's Green East and St Stephen's Green West.HistoryUntil 1663 St Stephen's Green was a marshy common on the edge of Dublin, used for grazing. In that year Dublin Corporation, seeing an opportunity to raise much needed revenue, decided to enclose the centre of the common and to sell land around the perimeter for building. The park was enclosed with a wall in 1664. The houses built around the Green were rapidly replaced by new buildings in the Georgian style and by the end of the eighteenth century the Green was a place of resort for the better-off of the city. Much of the present-day landscape of the square comprises modern buildings, some in a replica Georgian style, and relatively little survives from the 18th and 19th centuries.

St Stephen's Green
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Saint Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

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St Stephen's Green is a city centre public park in Dublin, Ireland. The current landscape of the park was designed by William Sheppard, which officially opened to the public on Tuesday, 27 July 1880. The park is adjacent to one of Dublin's main shopping streets, Grafton Street, and to a shopping centre named for it, while on its surrounding streets are the offices of a number of public bodies and the city terminus of one of Dublin's Luas tram lines. It is often informally called Stephen's Green. At 22acre, it is the largest of the parks in Dublin's main Georgian garden squares. Others include nearby Merrion Square and Fitzwilliam Square.The park is rectangular, surrounded by streets that once formed major traffic arteries through Dublin city centre, although traffic management changes implemented in 2004 during the course of the Luas works have greatly reduced the volume of traffic. These four bordering streets are called, respectively, St Stephen's Green North, St Stephen's Green South, St Stephen's Green East and St Stephen's Green West.HistoryUntil 1663 St Stephen's Green was a marshy common on the edge of Dublin, used for grazing. In that year Dublin Corporation, seeing an opportunity to raise much needed revenue, decided to enclose the centre of the common and to sell land around the perimeter for building. The park was enclosed with a wall in 1664. The houses built around the Green were rapidly replaced by new buildings in the Georgian style and by the end of the eighteenth century the Green was a place of resort for the better-off of the city. Much of the present-day landscape of the square comprises modern buildings, some in a replica Georgian style, and relatively little survives from the 18th and 19th centuries.

Trinity College, Dublin
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
College Green, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

01 896 1000

Trinity College is the sole constituent college of the University of Dublin, a research university in Ireland. The college was founded in 1592 as the "mother" of a new university, modelled after the collegiate universities of Oxford and of Cambridge, but, unlike these, only one college was ever established; as such, the designations "Trinity College" and "University of Dublin" are usually synonymous for practical purposes. It is one of the seven ancient universities of Britain and Ireland, as well as Ireland's oldest university.Originally it was established outside the city walls of Dublin in the buildings of the dissolved Augustinian Priory of All Hallows. Trinity College was set up in part to consolidate the rule of the Tudor monarchy in Ireland, and it was seen as the university of the Protestant Ascendancy for much of its history. Although Catholics and Dissenters had been permitted to enter as early as the end of the XVIII century, certain restrictions on their membership of the college remained until 1873 . From 1871 to 1970, the Catholic Church in Ireland forbade its adherents from attending Trinity College without permission. Women were first admitted to the college as full members in January 1904.

Merrion Square
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Square
Dublin, Ireland D2

Merrion Square is a Georgian garden square on the southside of Dublin city centre.HistoryThe square was laid out after 1762 and was largely complete by the beginning of the 19th century. The demand for such Georgian townhouse residences south of the River Liffey had been fueled by the decision of the then Earl of Kildare (later the Duke of Leinster) to build his Dublin home on the then undeveloped southside. He constructed the largest aristocratic residence in Dublin, Leinster House, second only to Dublin Castle. As a result of this construction, three new residential squares appeared on the Southside, Merrion Square (facing the garden front of Leinster House), St Stephen's Green and the smallest and last of Dublin's five Georgian squares to be built, Fitzwilliam Square.Aristocrats, bishops and the wealthy sold their northside townhouses and migrated to the new southside developments.LegacyMerrion Square is considered one of the city's finest surviving squares. Three sides are lined with Georgian redbrick townhouses; the West side abuts the grounds of Leinster House (seat of the Oireachtas), Government Buildings, the Natural History Museum and the National Gallery. The central railed-off garden is now a public park.

Iveagh Gardens
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Clonmel Street, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

The Iveagh Gardens is a public park located between Clonmel Street and Upper Hatch Street, near the National Concert Hall in Dublin, Ireland. It is designated as a National Historic Property.HistoryThe site of the gardens was shown in 1756 as Leeson's Fields after Joseph Leeson, 1st Earl of Milltown.Clonmell LawnsIn the late 18th century Lord Milltown leased the land to John Hatch, the principal developer of Harcourt and Hatch Streets. Hatch sold it to The 1st Earl of Clonmell (also known as "Copper-Faced Jack") as his private gardens. The gardens then became known as "Clonmell Lawns" Located on Harcourt Street is Clonmell House that faces on to Clonmell Street which leads into the Iveagh Gardens. A subterranean passage brought the Earl from his house to the gardens without him having to walk over the street. The Wide Streets Commission had planned for Clonmell Street to run through what is now the gardens thereby linking Harcourt Street to the then newly constructed Earlsfort Terrace. However, this passage was not located during archaeological monitoring conducted during the construction of the LUAS.Coburg GardensWhen the 1st Earl died in 1798, his son the 2nd Earl inherited the estate including Clonmell Gardens. The estate was sold in 1810 and the gardens were opened for public use around 1817 and renamed "Coburg Gardens" after the royal family of Saxe-Coburg. Entrance to the park was from the South Side of St Stephen's Green, the "Royal Horse Bazaar".

Iveagh Gardens
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Clonmel Street, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

The Iveagh Gardens is a public park located between Clonmel Street and Upper Hatch Street, near the National Concert Hall in Dublin, Ireland. It is designated as a National Historic Property.HistoryThe site of the gardens was shown in 1756 as Leeson's Fields after Joseph Leeson, 1st Earl of Milltown.Clonmell LawnsIn the late 18th century Lord Milltown leased the land to John Hatch, the principal developer of Harcourt and Hatch Streets. Hatch sold it to The 1st Earl of Clonmell (also known as "Copper-Faced Jack") as his private gardens. The gardens then became known as "Clonmell Lawns" Located on Harcourt Street is Clonmell House that faces on to Clonmell Street which leads into the Iveagh Gardens. A subterranean passage brought the Earl from his house to the gardens without him having to walk over the street. The Wide Streets Commission had planned for Clonmell Street to run through what is now the gardens thereby linking Harcourt Street to the then newly constructed Earlsfort Terrace. However, this passage was not located during archaeological monitoring conducted during the construction of the LUAS.Coburg GardensWhen the 1st Earl died in 1798, his son the 2nd Earl inherited the estate including Clonmell Gardens. The estate was sold in 1810 and the gardens were opened for public use around 1817 and renamed "Coburg Gardens" after the royal family of Saxe-Coburg. Entrance to the park was from the South Side of St Stephen's Green, the "Royal Horse Bazaar".

O'Connell Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Town
Dublin, Ireland 1

O'Connell Bridge is a road bridge spanning the River Liffey in Dublin, and joining O'Connell Street to D'Olier Street, Westmoreland Street and the south quays.HistoryThe original bridge was designed by James Gandon, and built between 1791 and 1794.Originally humped, and narrower, Carlisle bridge was a symmetrical, three semicircular arch structure constructed in granite with a Portland stone balustrade and obelisks on each of the four corners. A keystone head at the apex of the central span symbolises the River Liffey, corresponding to the heads on the Custom House which personify the other great rivers of Ireland.Since 1860,, to improve the streetscape and relieve traffic congestion on the bridge, it was intended to widen Carlisle Bridge to bring it to the same width as 70 metres wide Sackville Street which formed the north side carriageway connection to the Bridge. In 1877-1880 the bridge was reconstructed. As can be seen on orthophotography it spans now 45 m of the Liffey and is about 50 m wide. O'Connell Bridge is said to be unique in Europe as the only traffic bridge wider than it is long.

Mansion House, Dublin
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
2, Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

The Mansion House on Dawson Street, Dublin, has been the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin since 1715.FeaturesThe Mansion House's most famous features include the "Round Room", where the First Dáil assembled on 21 January 1919 to proclaim the Irish Declaration of Independence. On 21 January 1969 a special fiftieth anniversary joint session of Dáil Éireann and Seanad Éireann assembled there and was addressed by the then President of Ireland, Éamon de Valera.Externally, the distinctive metal portico over the main door was erected for the visit of Queen Victoria in 1900.Visitors and occupantsIts most famous occupants included Lord Mayors: Daniel O'Connell, nineteenth century nationalist leader Alfie Byrne (1930s), longest serving Lord Mayor in the 800-year history of the office Jim Mitchell (1976–77), the youngest Lord Mayor of Dublin, aged 29, in the history of the office Famous visitors to the mayoral residence include: Prince Rainier III and Princess Grace of Monaco Pope John Paul II Queen Victoria Mother Teresa Nelson Mandela

M.J.O'Neill's
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2 Suffolk Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

(01) 679-3656

M.J.O'Neill's is a notable bar and restaurant in central Dublin. It has occupied 2 Suffolk Street and adjacent buildings, continuing round the corner into Church Lane. It is claimed there has been a tavern on the site for some three hundred years. From 1875 it was owned by the Hogan Brothers, until M.J. O’Neill bought and renamed the premises in August 1927.The part in Church Lane was the site of a printing house, where William Butler published The Volunteers Journal and the Irish Herald in 1783, and in 1789 Arthur O’Connor published The Press, supporting Wolfe Tone’s republican views.The corner structure is an impressive four-storey, vaguely of the Arts and Crafts Movement, red-brick and early twentieth century, with prominent Tudor-style projecting bay windows. There is a fine decorated iron three-dials clock on the Suffolk Street frontage. The building is protected and in a conservation area. Now, opposite the Dublin Tourist Centre, it is a fixture on the tourist trail and pub crawls.The house has a mixed clientele. It is directly opposite Andrew Street Post Office, and near the shopping centre of Grafton Street. The discreet Church Lane door is convenient for the Bank of Ireland and other financial establishments in College Green. It is also the pub nearest to the Front Gate of Trinity College, Dublin and therefore attracting Arts undergraduates and academics. The original structure was divided into definite areas: a “cocktail bar” in the corner for the gentry, a public bar off Suffolk Street, and a back bar. In recent years the next-door premises in Church Lane have been added, as a carvery, and the interior has been opened up. A small snug, immediately inside the Church Lane entrance, was the significant venue for the “Fabians” of the early 1960s and for later left-wing students from Trinity College, Dublin.

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (01) 4780888

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre is a large indoor shopping centre located at the top of Grafton Street in the Southside of Dublin City. It is named after St. Stephen's Green, a nearby park (its street address is Stephens Green West).HistoryThe Dandelion Market, well known as the site of U2's earliest gigs and its array of stalls selling punk badges, clothes and posters was situated in the area the shopping centre now resides in. The site had been assembled over the years by the Slazanger family.The market, which closed in 1981, is commemorated with a plaque, while Sinnotts Bar on South King Street is the only part of the original site that remains. Work began on the St. Stephen's Green Shopping Centre in 1985, with the whole project taking three years to complete. The centre officially opened its doors on 8 November 1988.ShopsThe centre has over 100 outlets. Major franchises include Dunnes Stores, Boots, Gamestop and TK Maxx. Examples of other, more independent shops include the gothic and alternative clothes shop Asha, leading Irish men's branded fashion clothing store 'Counterpropaganda' and the wrestling devoted shop Wrestling Mania. It also houses a 'Big & Tall' mans shop called Kingsize Menswear and has a large food court.

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (01) 4780888

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre is a large indoor shopping centre located at the top of Grafton Street in the Southside of Dublin City. It is named after St. Stephen's Green, a nearby park (its street address is Stephens Green West).HistoryThe Dandelion Market, well known as the site of U2's earliest gigs and its array of stalls selling punk badges, clothes and posters was situated in the area the shopping centre now resides in. The site had been assembled over the years by the Slazanger family.The market, which closed in 1981, is commemorated with a plaque, while Sinnotts Bar on South King Street is the only part of the original site that remains. Work began on the St. Stephen's Green Shopping Centre in 1985, with the whole project taking three years to complete. The centre officially opened its doors on 8 November 1988.ShopsThe centre has over 100 outlets. Major franchises include Dunnes Stores, Boots, Gamestop and TK Maxx. Examples of other, more independent shops include the gothic and alternative clothes shop Asha, leading Irish men's branded fashion clothing store 'Counterpropaganda' and the wrestling devoted shop Wrestling Mania. It also houses a 'Big & Tall' mans shop called Kingsize Menswear and has a large food court.

City Hall, Dublin
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D

The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.OverviewLocated at the top of Parliament Street on the city's southern side, it stands next to Dublin Castle, the centre of the British government in Ireland until 1922. The street had been built in 1753, providing a continuation of Capel Street on the north bank of the Liffey, across the newly widened Essex Bridge, and so the exchange ended (and still ends) a long streetscape.The external structure is primarily made out of white Portland stone from a quarry in Dorset. The large size and fine fittings of the Royal exchange, with carved capitals by Simon Vierpyl, and plasterwork by the leading stuccodore Charles Thorpe, reflect the standing and prestige of Dublin in the 18th Century. The neo-classical building contains a central entrance hall or Rotunda, with a large dome supported by twelve columns which are surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants strolled and discussed business meetings.The function of the building was to provide a meeting place for Dublin's businessmen, where they could buy and sell goods and trade bills of exchange. It was also close to the then Customs House that stood on the site of today's Clarence Hotel, making it convenient for overseas merchants. The cost of building the exchange was met by the Parliament of Ireland, and this is reflected by the initials "SPQH", standing for "Senatus PopulusQue Hibernicus", meaning "The senate and people of Ireland" (an Irish version of SPQR).

Ha'penny Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Wellington Quay/Bachelors Walk
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

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Natural History Museum
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Street, Dubin 2
Dublin, Ireland

Ireland's Natural History Museum (Músaem Stair an Dúlra), sometimes called the Dead Zoo a branch of the National Museum of Ireland, is housed on Merrion Street in Dublin, Ireland. The museum was built in 1856 for parts of the collection of the Royal Dublin Society and building and collection were later passed to the Irish State.The Museum's collection and building have changed little since Victorian times, and it is sometimes described as a "museum of a museum".CollectionThe building is a ‘cabinet-style’ museum designed to showcase a wide-ranging and comprehensive zoological collection, and has changed little in over a century. Often described as a ‘museum of a museum’, its 10,000 exhibits provide a glimpse of the natural world that has delighted generations of visitors since the doors opened in 1857.As the collection is unique in range and vintage, the exhibits are a product of their age, with faded and worn pelts and visible marks from bullets and rough taxidermy. Larger specimens are displayed in large, wood-framed glass cases while smaller ones are kept under glass, protected from sunlight by moveable leather panels. The main room is heated by an underfloor system similar to a Roman hypocaust.The Irish Room, the ground floor of the museum, displays Irish animals, notably several mounted skeletons of giant Irish deer. Numerous skulls of those and other deer line the walls. Stuffed and mounted mammals, birds, fish — and insects and other animals native to or found in Ireland — comprise the rest of the ground floor. Many of the specimens of currently extant animals, such as badgers, hares, and foxes, are over a century old. A basking shark hangs from this ceiling.

Grafton Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Grafton Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Dáil Éireann
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Leinster House, Kildare Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 618 3000

Fitzwilliam Square
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
20 Fitzwilliam Street Upper
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Fitzwilliam Square is a Georgian garden square in the south of central Dublin, Ireland. It was the last of the five Georgian squares in Dublin to be built, and is the smallest.The square was developed by Richard FitzWilliam, 7th Viscount FitzWilliam, hence the name. It was designed from 1789 and laid out in 1792. The center of the square was enclosed in 1813 through an Act of the Parliament of Ireland. To the north is the much larger Merrion Square, with which Richard FitzWilliam was also involved. The square was a popular place for the Irish Social Season of aristocrats entertaining in Dublin between January and Saint Patrick's Day each year.Shootings took place in the square during Bloody Sunday of 1920. Sir Thomas O'Shaughnessy (1850–1933), the last Recorder of Dublin, lived in Fitzwilliam Square and died there on 7 March 1933.The N11 road passes through the northwest side of the square on its way into central Dublin.In March 2011, the entire space at 14 Fitzwilliam Square was let on a flexible seven-year lease to gold bullion brokers GoldCore.

The Gaeity Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Sth King Street
Dublin, Ireland

Place to Eat/Drink Near Mansion House

Guinness Storehouse
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

Guinness Storehouse is a Guinness-themed tourist attraction at St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening in 2000, it has received over four million visitors.The Storehouse covers seven floors surrounding a glass atrium shaped in the form of a pint of Guinness. The ground floor introduces the beer's four ingredients (water, barley, hops and yeast), and the brewery's founder, Arthur Guinness. Other floors feature the history of Guinness advertising and include an interactive exhibit on responsible drinking. The seventh floor houses the Gravity Bar with views of Dublin and where visitors may drink a pint of Guinness included in the price of admission, which was €18 in March 2015, described as "overpriced" by Condé Nast Traveler. In 2006, a new wing opened incorporating a live installation of the present-day brewing process.HistoryThe building in which the Storehouse is located was constructed in 1902 as a fermentation plant for the St. James's Gate Brewery (where yeast is added to the brew). The building was designed in the style of the Chicago School of Architecture and was the first multi-storey steel-framed building to be constructed in Ireland. The building was used continuously as the fermentation plant of the Brewery until its closure in 1988, when a new fermentation plant was completed near the River Liffey.In 1997, it was decided to convert the building into the Guinness Storehouse, replacing the Guinness Hop Store as the Brewery's visitor centre. The redesign of the building was undertaken by the UK-based design firm Imagination in conjunction with the Dublin-based architects firm RKD, and the Storehouse opened to the public on 2 December 2000. In 2006 a new wing was developed at a cost of €2.5 million, including a live installation demonstrating the modern brewing process.

Old Jameson Whiskey Distillery
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 (1) 8072348

Dublin City Center
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Dublin City Centre
Dublin, Ireland Dub

Mix Like a pro is a professional DJ course running in Dublin City Centre.

Dublin City
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Arran Quay
Dublin, Ireland

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Dublin Temple Bar
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
47/48 Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland D02 N725

01 672 5286

Bello bar
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
1 Portobello Harbour
Dublin, Ireland

0863584435

Located below the Lower Deck, Bello Bar is reviving a Dublin tradition of live music at Portobello harbour. From low key intimate performances to vibrant gigs Bello Bar will showcase local and international acts across the wide spectrum of contemporary music. Opening mid-October 2013, details to be announced. We are currently seeking artists, bands and musicians to perform at Bello Bar. If you are interested contact us at [email protected]

Clement & Pekoe
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
50 South William St
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

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Monday - Friday 8am - 7pm Saturday 9 - 6.30 Sunday 11 - 6

The Honorable Society Of Kings Inns
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Henrietta Street
Dublin, Ireland

+ 353 1 874 4840

Birchalls Ranelagh
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
127 - 129 Ranelagh Village
Dublin, Ireland Ireland

014973985

Gills Pub
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
555 North Circular Road
Dublin, Ireland

Krüst Bakery
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
6 South Georges Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

+35315517622

Ireland's most innovative bakery #yeswegothecronut

Walshes
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
6/7 Stoneybatter
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 7

(01)6799693

Ladurée Dublin
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1-3 South William Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

(01) 679 8828

It all began in 1862, when Louis Ernest Ladurée, a miller from France’s southwest, created a bakery in Paris at 16 rue Royale. The beginning of this century found Paris wrapped up in a frenzy of distraction and going out in public. Louis Ernest Ladurée’s wife, Jeanne Souchard, had the idea of mixing styles: The Parisian café and pastry shop gave birth to one of the first tea salons in town. The story of the Ladurée Macaroon starts in the middle of the 20th century with Pierre Desfontaines, who first thought of taking two macaroon shells and joining them with a delicious ganache filling. The reputation of this ‘salon de thé’ created an environment for gastronomic creativity in Paris.

St stephens Green Park off Grafton Street, Dublin
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St. Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland

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Tommys
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
19 Stoneybatter
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

(01)6778178

Ely at IFSC, Dublin
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
george's dock
Dublin, Ireland Dubli

016720010

Kanum mespil
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
77 Mespil Road
Dublin, Ireland

016608616

D-One Bar
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
94 Capel Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 552 8277

Sunset House
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Summerhill Parade
Dublin, Ireland

(01)8555573

Mercantile Hotel, 28 Dame Street, Temple Bar, Dublin D2
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
28 Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland

1 670 7100

Public Places and Attractions Near Mansion House

Temple Bar
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland 2

Guinness Brewery
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
St James Gate
Dublin, Ireland

St. James's Gate Brewery is a brewery founded in 1759 in Dublin, Ireland, by Arthur Guinness. The company is now a part of Diageo, a company formed from the merger of Guinness and Grand Metropolitan in 1997. The main product of the brewery is Guinness Draught.Originally leased in 1759 to Arthur Guinness at IR£45 (Irish pounds) per year for 9,000 years, St. James's Gate has been the home of Guinness ever since. It became the largest brewery in Ireland in 1838, and the largest in the world by 1886, with an annual output of 1.2 million barrels. Although no longer the largest brewery in the world, it is still the largest brewer of stout in the world. The company has since bought out the originally leased property, and during the 19th and early 20th centuries the brewery owned most of the buildings in the surrounding area, including many streets of housing for brewery employees, and offices associated with the brewery. The brewery also made all of its own power using its own power plant.There is an attached exhibition on the 250-year-old history of Guinness, called the Guinness Storehouse.HistoryArthur Guinness started brewing ales in Leixlip, County Kildare, and then from 1759 at the St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin. On 31 December he signed a 9,000-year lease at £45 per annum for the unused brewery. However, the lease is no longer in effect because the brewery property has been bought out when it expanded beyond the original 4-acre site.

O'Connell Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland

O'Connell Street is Dublin's main thoroughfare. It measures 49 m (54 yds) in width at its southern end, 46 m (50 yds) at the north, and is 500 m (547 yds) in length. During the 17th century it was a narrow street known as Drogheda Street (named after Henry Moore, Earl of Drogheda). It was widened, and renamed 'Sackville Street' (named after Lionel Sackville, 1st Duke of Dorset) in the late 1700s until 1924, when it was renamed in honour of Daniel O'Connell, a nationalist leader of the early 19th century, whose statue stands at the lower end of the street, facing O'Connell Bridge.IntroductionLocated in the heart of Dublin city, O'Connell Street forms part of a grand thoroughfare created in the 18th century that runs through the centre of the capital, O'Connell Bridge, Westmoreland Street, College Green and Dame Street, terminating at City Hall and Dublin Castle. Situated just north of the River Liffey, the street has a fine axial positioning, running close to a north-south orientation. Lined with many handsome buildings, O'Connell Street is the most monumental of Dublin's commercial streets, having been largely rebuilt in the early 20th century following extensive destruction in the struggle for Irish independence and subsequent civil war. It has the air of an imposing 1920s boulevard, with signature stone-faced neoclassical buildings such as Clerys department store complemented by the more subtle grain of elegant bank and retail premises. O'Connell Street Upper by contrast retains something of its original 18th century character, with the western side conforming to original plot widths and some original fabric still intact.

Old Jameson Whiskey Distillery
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 (1) 8072348

Heuston railway station
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
St Johns Road West
Dublin, Ireland Dubli

1850 366 222 / 01 703 3299

Heuston Station is one of Ireland's main railway stations, serving the south, southwest and west. It is operated by Iarnród Éireann, the national railway operator. It also houses the head office of its parent company - Córas Iompair Éireann.HistoryThe station opened on 4 August 1846 as the terminus and headquarters of the Great Southern and Western Railway (GS&WR). It was originally called Kingsbridge Station after the nearby Kings Bridge over the River Liffey. In 1966, on the 50th anniversary of the Easter Rising it was renamed "Heuston Station", in honour of Sean Heuston, an executed leader of the Rising, who had worked in the station's offices.Designed by Sancton Wood, the handsome original buildings remain. The five panels along the front represent, in order: VIII.VIC - being the Act of Parliament that incorporated the GS&WR Coat of Arms of Cork City Coat of Arms of Dublin City Coat of Arms of Limerick City AD. 1844 - being the year of incorporation of the GS&WR Since its renewal (by Quinn Savage Smyth architects and engineers Buro Happold) it includes two branches of Eason's, as well as some dining facilities, including a Supermacs and a pub.

Jervis Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
24-29 Mary Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

+353 1 878 1323

Cliff Of Moher
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Co. Clare
Galway, Ireland

Phoenix Park, Dublin
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Dublin 8, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland

Trinity College
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
College Green
Dublin, Ireland

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Clontarf Seafront
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
Clontarf Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

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Science Gallery Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Trinity College, Pearse Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

+353-18964091

In 2008, a car park in a forgotten corner of Dublin was transformed into an experimental space that would bridge art and science, unleashing their combined creative potential. Over 1.9 million visitors to Science Gallery Dublin have experienced exhibitions ranging from living art experiments to materials science, to the future of the human race to the future of play. We develop an ever-changing programme of exhibitions and events fuelled by the expertise of scientists, researchers, students, artists, designers, inventors, creative thinkers and entrepreneurs.

Natural History Museum
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Street, Dubin 2
Dublin, Ireland

Ireland's Natural History Museum (Músaem Stair an Dúlra), sometimes called the Dead Zoo a branch of the National Museum of Ireland, is housed on Merrion Street in Dublin, Ireland. The museum was built in 1856 for parts of the collection of the Royal Dublin Society and building and collection were later passed to the Irish State.The Museum's collection and building have changed little since Victorian times, and it is sometimes described as a "museum of a museum".CollectionThe building is a ‘cabinet-style’ museum designed to showcase a wide-ranging and comprehensive zoological collection, and has changed little in over a century. Often described as a ‘museum of a museum’, its 10,000 exhibits provide a glimpse of the natural world that has delighted generations of visitors since the doors opened in 1857.As the collection is unique in range and vintage, the exhibits are a product of their age, with faded and worn pelts and visible marks from bullets and rough taxidermy. Larger specimens are displayed in large, wood-framed glass cases while smaller ones are kept under glass, protected from sunlight by moveable leather panels. The main room is heated by an underfloor system similar to a Roman hypocaust.The Irish Room, the ground floor of the museum, displays Irish animals, notably several mounted skeletons of giant Irish deer. Numerous skulls of those and other deer line the walls. Stuffed and mounted mammals, birds, fish — and insects and other animals native to or found in Ireland — comprise the rest of the ground floor. Many of the specimens of currently extant animals, such as badgers, hares, and foxes, are over a century old. A basking shark hangs from this ceiling.

The Quays, Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
12 Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland Dublin2

01 6713922

Temple Bar District, Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland 2

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Botanic Garden Dublin
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
Glasnevin
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

01 804 0300

Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Charlemont House, Parnell Square North
Dublin, Ireland D01 F2X9

+353 (0)1 222 5550

North Circular Road
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
North Circular Road
Dublin, Ireland D1

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Four Courts
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Inns Quay
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 7

The Four Courts is Ireland's main courts building, located on Inns Quay in Dublin. The Four Courts are the location of the Supreme Court, the High Court and the Dublin Circuit Court. Until 2010 the building also housed the Central Criminal Court.Gandon's BuildingWork based on the design of Thomas Cooley for the Public Records Office of Ireland, began in 1776. After his death in 1784 renowned architect James Gandon was appointed to finish the building, which we recognise today as the Four Courts. It was built between 1786 and 1796, while the finishing touches to the arcades and wings were completed in 1802. The lands were previously used by the King's Inns. The building originally housed the four courts of Chancery, King's Bench, Exchequer and Common Pleas, hence the name of the building. A major revision in the court system in the late nineteenth century saw these courts merged into a new High Court of Ireland, but the building has retained its historic name. This courts system remained until 1924, when the new Irish Free State introduced a new courts structure, replacing the High Court of Ireland, the Lord Chief Justice of Ireland and the Lord Chancellor of Ireland with a Supreme Court of Justice presided over by the Chief Justice and a High Court of Justice, presided over by the President of the High Court. In 1961 the words "of justice" were dropped from the names of both courts when they were belatedly re-established consequent upon the enactment of the 1937 Constitution.

St Lukes Hospital
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
highfield rd
Dublin, Ireland 6w

01 4065000

Custom House Harbour
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Custom House Harbour
Dublin, Ireland

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Local Business Near Mansion House

Mansion House, Dublin
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
2, Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

The Mansion House on Dawson Street, Dublin, has been the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin since 1715.FeaturesThe Mansion House's most famous features include the "Round Room", where the First Dáil assembled on 21 January 1919 to proclaim the Irish Declaration of Independence. On 21 January 1969 a special fiftieth anniversary joint session of Dáil Éireann and Seanad Éireann assembled there and was addressed by the then President of Ireland, Éamon de Valera.Externally, the distinctive metal portico over the main door was erected for the visit of Queen Victoria in 1900.Visitors and occupantsIts most famous occupants included Lord Mayors: Daniel O'Connell, nineteenth century nationalist leader Alfie Byrne (1930s), longest serving Lord Mayor in the 800-year history of the office Jim Mitchell (1976–77), the youngest Lord Mayor of Dublin, aged 29, in the history of the office Famous visitors to the mayoral residence include: Prince Rainier III and Princess Grace of Monaco Pope John Paul II Queen Victoria Mother Teresa Nelson Mandela

Celtic Whiskey Shop
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dub

(01)6759744

Peruke & Periwig
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
31 Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland

016727190

Milano Restaurant Dawson St
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
38 Dawson St
Dublin, Ireland

00 353 1 670 7744

Having brought pizza perfection to Ireland in 1995, Milano is known for its authentic Italian pizzas, pastas, salads and desserts, freshly prepared in an open kitchen by pizzaiolos and served in a relaxed and sociable setting.

Celtic Whiskey Shop & Wines On The Green
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
27-28 Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Irel

+353(0)16759744

Located on Dawson Street in the heart of Dublin city centre. We are Ireland's biggest whiskey experts but stock a lot more. Being spirits specialists we stock one of the biggest ranges in Europe of vodka, gin, rum and other spirits. We are also importers of some of the best wines in Ireland with a strong range including many exclusive and sought after brands. For more information go to our sister websites: www.celticwhiskeyshop.com and www.winesonthegreen.com

Fans of Garth Ennis
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Molesworth Street (Dublin)
Dundalk, Ireland

353424706703

Grand Lodge of Ireland
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
17 Molesworth Street
Dublin, Ireland

Round Room at the Mansion House
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353(0)16344628

The Conference and Events Venue at the Mansion House has been Ireland’s premier events venue in the heart of the city since 1821. It has 6 versatile and flexible spaces with state of the art facilities catering for events from 7 to 700 guests. The historical circular Round Room and Supper Room (FIRE Restaurant) are complimented by the recent addition of the luxurious Glass Room Suites. The Round Room Experience In 1919 the first Dáil Eireann met under our spectacular circular roof. Throughout the years we have proudly welcomed Pope John Paul II, Queen Victoria, Prince Rainier III and Princess Grace of Monaco to name a few. The grandeur of our timeless 19th century setting combined with recent restoration and cutting- edge technology guarantees a lasting impression on your delegates. With the ever increasing demand in the industry for high end production, the venue underwent a transformation of its Audio Visual and Lighting offering in August 2015. Working closely with our in-house production team we have been able to create a product that puts the venue out there in a league all of its own. With its unique purpose built 20ft curved screen and customised lighting experience the Round Room has been transformed and brought into 21st century. *State of the Art Lighting Upgrade *Cutting Edge Audio Visual *Unique branding options ∙∙Achieve visibility and branding to showcase your brand on custom-branded entrance flags along the private branded Dawson Street entrance. ∙∙ Fantastic rigging points around the circular venue ensure a lasting impression. Please click here to take a Virtual Tour of the Conference & Events Venue at The Mansion House The Glass Room Suites The Stunning Glass Room Suites are flooded with natural daylight thanks to their unique floor to ceiling windows and double door features which give private access to our magnificent Sun-drenched Terrace overlooking the Lord Mayor’s Garden. FIRE Restaurant Originally known as The Supper Room on account of it having been built as the supper room to the Lord Mayor (see history); FIRE Restaurant can be used as the catering room for events taking place in The Round Room and as part of our “Day delegate packages” Complete with inbuilt PA system for speeches, and capability to add a raised podium; during the mornings and early afternoons, FIRE is also the ideal venue for exclusive bookings of 100-220 guests for corporate & charity breakfast/lunch events; or for a more intimate theatre style set-up for up to 100 guests. The Lounge Our event space is complemented by the luxurious Lounge area which during the day is our popular semi-private space for informal breakout sessions, tea and coffee breaks and meeting registration for The Glass Room Suites. The Lounge is also the perfect pre-lunch drinks reception area for FIRE Restaurant and The Glass Room Suites. The Conference and Events Venue at the Mansion House. A beautiful place to do business.

Shivaga Thai Massage Centre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
14 Anne's Street South
Dublin, Ireland Dubl

0871189695

At Shivaga Thai Massage Centre, located in the heart of Dublin City, near Grafton Street, we believe that a significant change towards healing begins with a persons awareness. Massage therapy allows the client to experience balance, harmony and relief, giving them the perspective and self knowledge to make a proactive change. Our team of professionals are highly trained to address muscular imbalances, postural problems, chronic pain, stress management, flexibility and the enhancement of athletic performance. Through specialized massage techniques, strengthening and stretching sessions, we help our clients achieve their healthy lifetime goals. Whether you are here for a specific medical condition or just a relaxing quality massage, you know that this is the one place that will make you feel healthy, young, and refreshed all at the same time. At Shivaga Thai Massage Centre you get serious pampering and an excellent massage in a warm, relaxing enviroment at affordable prices. How to find us Shivaga Thai Massage Centre is located in the heart of Dublin 2, two minutes from St. Stephen's Green and just off Grafton Street at 14 South Anne Street. We are on the second floor over MBT Barefoot shoe shop.

Coffeeangel
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
16 Anne Street South
Dublin, Ireland D02 VF29

+35319696001

Therapie Clinic
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
8-9 Molesworth Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

(01)4721222

National Museum of Ireland Archaeology
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Kildare Street
Dublin, Ireland

Hibernian Club, Stephen's Green
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
9 St Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dubl

(01)6774744

Next
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Dundrum Town centre
Dublin, Ireland

00 353 1205 1310

The Heights Hotel
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
5 Temple Road Blackrock Village Blackrock Co., Dublin
Dublin, Ireland

Leinster House, Kildare Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Kildare Street.
Dublin, Ireland

Marco Pierre White Steakhouse And Grill
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
51 Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

(01)6771155

Topshop
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland

Eddie Rocket's City Diner
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
7 South Anne Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Gourmet Burger Kitchen, South Annes Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
5 South Annes Street
Dublin, Ireland D