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Embassy of Sweden, London, London | Tourist Information



11 Montagu Pl
London, United Kingdom W1H 2

+44 20 7917 6400

The Embassy of Sweden in London is the diplomatic mission of Sweden in the United Kingdom. It is located by Montagu Square in Marylebone, just down the road from the embassy of Switzerland, and has housed the Swedish embassy since 1983.The Swedish ambassador's residence is located is a separate building at 27 Portland Place. Sweden also maintains a Trade Council at 259-269 Old Marylebone Road, Marylebone.

City Near Embassy of Sweden, London

London, England
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
1 Kensington Court
London, United Kingdom W8 5DL

020 7983 4000

London is the capital city of England and the United Kingdom, the largest metropolitan area in the United Kingdom, and the largest urban zone in the European Union according to some measures. Located on the River Thames, London has been a major settlement for two millennia, its history going back to its founding by the Romans, who called it Londinium. London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its square-mile mediaeval boundaries. Since at least the 19th century, the name London has also referred to the metropolis developed around this core.[4] The bulk of this conurbation forms the London region and the Greater London administrative area, governed by the elected Mayor of London and the London Assembly. London is a leading global city, with strengths in the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, professional services, research and development, tourism and transport all contributing to its prominence. It is the world's leading financial centre alongside New York City and has the fifth-largest metropolitan area GDP in the world and the largest in Europe (as of 2008). London has been described as a world cultural capital. It has the third most international visitors in the world and London Heathrow is the world's busiest airport by number of international passengers. London's 43 universities form the largest concentration of higher education in Europe. In 2012 London will become the first city to host the modern Summer Olympic Games three times. London has a diverse range of peoples, cultures, and religions, and more than 300 languages are spoken within its boundaries. In July 2010 Greater London had an official population of 7,825,200, making it the most populous municipality in the European Union, and accounting for 12.5% of the UK population. The Greater London Urban Area is the second-largest in the EU with a population of 8,278,251, while London's metropolitan area is the largest in the EU with an estimated total population of between 12 million and 14 million. London had the largest population of any city in the world from around 1831 to 1925. London contains four World Heritage Sites: the Tower of London; Kew Gardens; the site comprising the Palace of Westminster, Westminster Abbey, and St Margaret's Church; and the historic settlement of Greenwich (in which the Royal Observatory marks the Prime Meridian (0° longitude) and GMT). Other famous landmarks include Buckingham Palace, the London Eye, Piccadilly Circus, St Paul's Cathedral, Tower Bridge, Trafalgar Square and Wembley Stadium. London is home to numerous museums, galleries, libraries, sporting events and other cultural institutions, including the British Museum, National Gallery, Tate Modern, British Library, Wimbledon and 40 theatres. The London Underground is the oldest underground railway network in the world and the second-most extensive (after the Shanghai Metro).

University College Hospital
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
235 Euston Rd
London, United Kingdom WC1E 6

08451555000

University College Hospital is a teaching hospital located in London, United Kingdom. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London .The hospital has 665 in-patient beds, 12 operating theatres and houses the largest single critical care unit in the NHS. The Accident & Emergency department sees approximately 80,000 patients a year. It is a major teaching hospital and a key location for the UCL Medical School. It is also a major centre for medical research and part of both the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre.The hospital is located on Euston Road in the Fitzrovia area of the London Borough of Camden, adjacent to the main campus of UCL. The nearest London Underground stations are Euston Square and Warren Street, with Goodge Street nearby.

St Mary's Hospital, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Praed St,
London, United Kingdom W2 1

20-78866666

St Mary's Hospital is a hospital in Paddington, in the City of Westminster, London, founded in 1845. Since the UK's first academic health science centre was created in 2008, it has been operated by Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, which also operates Charing Cross Hospital, Hammersmith Hospital, Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital, and Western Eye Hospital.Until 1988 the hospital ran St Mary's Hospital Medical School, part of the federal University of London. In 1988 it merged with Imperial College London, and then with Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School in 1997 to form Imperial College School of Medicine. In 2007 Imperial College became an independent institution when it withdrew from the University of London.

Londyn
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
66 LANDSBURY DRIVE HAYES
London, United Kingdom

London is the capital and most populous city of England and the United Kingdom. Standing on the River Thames in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium. London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12sqmi medieval boundaries. Since at least the 19th century, "London" has also referred to the metropolis around this core, historically split between Middlesex, Essex, Surrey, Kent, and Hertfordshire, which today largely makes up Greater London, governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.London is a leading global city, in the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, professional services, research and development, tourism, and transport. It is one of the world's leading financial centres and has the fifth- or sixth-largest metropolitan area GDP in the world. London is a world cultural capital. It is the world's most-visited city as measured by international arrivals and has the world's largest city airport system measured by passenger traffic. London is the world's leading investment destination, hosting more international retailers and ultra high-net-worth individuals than any other city. London's universities form the largest concentration of higher education institutes in Europe, and a 2014 report placed it first in the world university rankings. According to the report London also ranks first in the world in software, multimedia development and design, and shares first position in technology readiness. In 2012, London became the first city to host the modern Summer Olympic Games three times.

Berkeley Square
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Berkeley Square, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

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Berkeley Square is a town square in Mayfair in the West End of London, in the City of Westminster. It was originally laid out in the mid 18th century by architect William Kent.The gardens in the centre are open to the public, and their very large London Plane trees are among the oldest in central London, planted in 1789.DescriptionWhilst Berkeley Square was originally a mostly residential area, there now remains only one residential block on the square – number 48. The square is mostly offices, including a number of hedge funds and wealth management businesses.The square features a sculptural fountain by Alexander Munro, a Pre-Raphaelite sculptor, made in 1865.The buildings around the square include several by other notable architects including Robert Adam, who designed Lansdowne House (since 1935 home of the Lansdowne Club) in the southwest corner of the square on Fitzmaurice Place. The daring staircase-hall of No. 44 is sometimes considered William Kent's masterpiece. Gunter's Tea Shop, founded under a different name in 1757, is also located here.

Piccadilly
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 8

Piccadilly is a road in the City of Westminster, London to the south of Mayfair, between Hyde Park Corner in the west and Piccadilly Circus in the east. It is part of the A4 road that connects central London to Hammersmith, Earl's Court, Heathrow Airport and the M4 motorway westward. St James's is to the south of the eastern section, while the western section is built up only on the northern side. At just under in length, Piccadilly is one of the widest and straightest streets in central London.Piccadilly has been a main road since at least medieval times, and in the middle ages was known as "the road to Reading" or "the way from Colnbrook". Around 1611 or 1612, a Robert Baker acquired land in the area and prospered by making and selling piccadills. Shortly after purchasing the land, he enclosed it and erected several dwellings, including his home, Pikadilly Hall. What is now Piccadilly was named Portugal Street in 1663 after Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, and grew in importance after the road from Charing Cross to Hyde Park Corner was closed to allow the creation of Green Park in 1668. Some of the most notable stately homes in London were built on the northern side of the street during this period, including Clarendon House and Burlington House in 1664. Berkeley House, constructed around the same time as Clarendon House, was destroyed by a fire in 1733 and rebuilt as Devonshire House in 1737 by William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire. It was later used as the main headquarters for the Whig party. Burlington House has since been home to several noted societies, including the Royal Academy of Arts, the Geological Society of London and the Royal Astronomical Society. Several members of the Rothschild family had mansions at the western end of the street. St James's Church was consecrated in 1684 and the surrounding area became St James Parish.

Time Out London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
125 Shaftesbury Avenue, Fl 4th
London, United Kingdom WC2H 8AD

0207 813 3000

Aberdeen, Scotland, Uk
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Aberdeenshire AB54 6DB Scotland UK
London, United Kingdom

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St. James's Square
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
St. James's, London, SW1
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4JU

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St. James's Square is the only square in the exclusive St James's district of the City of Westminster. It has predominantly Georgian and Neo-Georgian architecture and a garden in the centre. For its first two hundred or so years it was one of the three or four most fashionable residential address in London. It is now home to the headquarters of a number of well-known businesses, including BP and Rio Tinto Group; to three private members' clubs, the East India Club, the Canning Club and the Naval and Military Club; to the High Commission of Cyprus; and to the London Library. Also based in the square is the premises of the think tank Chatham House. The square's main feature is an equestrian statue of William III erected in 1808.HistoryIn 1662 Charles II extended a lease over the 45 acres of Pall Mall (St James's) Field held by Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans to 1720 and soon afterwards the earl began to lay out the property for development. The earl petitioned the king that the class of occupants they both hoped to attract to the new district would not take houses without the prospect of eventually acquiring them outright, and in 1665 the king granted the freehold of the site of St. James's Square and some closely adjacent parts of the field to the earl's trustees. The location was convenient for the royal palaces of Whitehall and St James. The houses on the east, north and west sides of the square were soon developed, each of them being constructed separately as was usual at that time.

Portland Hospital
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
205-209 Great Portland Street
London, United Kingdom W1W 5

20-73833486

The Portland Hospital for Women and Children, is a private hospital located on Great Portland Street, in the West End area of London, England. It belongs to the Hospital Corporation of America, the largest private operator of health care facilities in the world.The hospital has been the place of birth for several well-known people in Britain, such as Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie, Prince Oddysseus-Kimon of Greece and Denmark, as well as children of Jennifer Saunders, Victoria Beckham, Emma Bunton, Geri Halliwell, Melanie Brown, Melanie C, Noel Gallagher, Katie Price, Gillian Anderson, Louise Burfitt-Dons, Claudia Schiffer, Emma Willis and Boris Becker. It should also be noted that it is London's only private hospital dedicated entirely to the care of women and children, and their various health conditions.

Piccadilly
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
City of Westminster, United Kingdom

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Piccadilly è una delle principali strade di Londra e si sviluppa per 1,5 km partendo a sud-ovest da Hyde Park Corner per terminare a Piccadilly Circus a nord-est. La strada fa parte della strada nazionale A4 (Londra-Bristol) una delle principali arterie del paese. Piccadilly è interamente compresa nella City of Westminster.Edifici notabili sulla strada includono il grande magazzino Fortnum and Mason, la Royal Academy, l'Hotel Ritz, il club della Royal Air Force, la libreria Hatchards e le ambasciate del Giappone e di Malta nel Regno Unito.Cenni storiciSino al XVII secolo l'area era conosciuta con il nome di Portugal. Il nome Piccadilly si deve ad un sarto di nome Robert Baker, proprietario di un negozio nello Strand, che fece fortuna producendo e vendendo dei colli rigidi che erano di moda all'epoca e che erano chiamati picadils. Il sarto comprò una vasta area nella zona occidentale di Londra e nel 1612 vi fece costruire un palazzo che venne chiamato Piccadilly Hall.Dopo la restaurazione della monarchia inglese (1660) le aree di Piccadilly e di Mayfair (situata più a nord) divennero delle ambite località residenziali, vi vennero costruiti alcuni fra i più sontuosi palazzi londinesi dell'epoca come Clarendon House (dove ora si trova Albemarle Street), Berkeley House (in seguito Devonshire House) e la residenza di Sir John Denham's (poi Burlington House). Successiva è invece la costruzione di Melbourne House (ora The Albany), Apsley House, Bath House e Cambridge House.

Lulworth Cove, Dorset
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
BH20 5RS
London, United Kingdom

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Embassy of Bulgaria, London
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
186-188 Queen's Gate
London, United Kingdom SW7 5

+44 (0) 20 7584 9400

The Embassy of Bulgaria in London is the diplomatic mission of Bulgaria in the United Kingdom. Diplomatic relations between the two countries date from 1879 and there has been a Bulgarian embassy in London since 1903.

Marlybone Road
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom

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Marlborough House
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1D

020 7747 6491

Marlborough House is a Grade I listed mansion in the City of Westminster, in The Mall, London, east of St James's Palace. It was built for Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, the favourite and confidante of Queen Anne. For over a century it served as the London residence of the Dukes of Marlborough. It is now the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat.ConstructionThe Duchess wanted her new house to be "strong, plain and convenient and good". The architect Christopher Wren and his son of the same name designed a brick building with rusticated stone quoins (cornerstones) that was completed in 1711.The house was taken up by the Crown in 1817. In the 1820s plans were drawn up to demolish Marlborough House and replace it with a terrace of similar dimensions to the two in neighbouring Carlton House Terrace, and this idea even featured on some contemporary maps, including Christopher and John Greenwood's large-scale London map of 1830, but the proposal was not implemented.

Notting Hill
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Mall Arndale 91-93 The Mall
London, United Kingdom

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Romanian Embassy 1 Belgarve Sq.
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Belgrave Sq.
London, United Kingdom

Consulate General Of The Kingdom Of Morocco
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
97-99 Praed St
London, United Kingdom W2 1NT

020 7724 0624

Salsa !
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
96 Charing Cross Rd
London, United Kingdom

020 7379 3277

Embassy Of The Republic Of Hungary
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
46 Eaton Pl
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8AL

020 7325 5218

The Embassy's events, news about Hungary in the UK press, UK-HU relationship

Community and Government Near Embassy of Sweden, London

Video365
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Edgware Road
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2AA

Broadcasting House
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
BBC Broadcasting House Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AA

020 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

Baker Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
113 Baker St
Oxford, United Kingdom W1U 6TD

Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid the street out in the 18th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived at a fictional 221B Baker Street address. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises.Baker Street is a busy thoroughfare, lying in postcode areas NW1/W1 and forming part of the A41 there. It runs south from Regent's Park, the junction with Park Road, parallel to Gloucester Place, meeting Marylebone Road, Portman Square and Wigmore Street. At the junction with Wigmore Street, Baker Street turns into Orchard Street, which ends when it meets with Oxford Street. After Portman Square the road continues as Orchard Street.The street is served by the London Underground by Baker Street tube station, one of the world's oldest surviving underground stations. Next door is Transport for London's lost property office.

The Wallace Collection
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Manchester Square
London, United Kingdom W1U 3

020 7563 9500

Odeon Marble Arch
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
10 Edgware Road
London, United Kingdom W2 2EN

0871 224 4007

London Central Mosque
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Regents Lodge, 146 Park Rd, London NW8 7RG
London, United Kingdom NW8 7

The London Central Mosque is a mosque located near Regent's Park in London, United Kingdom. It was designed by Sir Frederick Gibberd, completed in 1978, and has a prominent golden dome. The main hall can accommodate over 5,000 worshippers, with women praying on a balcony overlooking the hall. The mosque holds a chandelier and a vast carpet, with very little furniture.The inside of the dome is decorated with broken shapes in the Islamic tradition. There is also a small bookshop and halal café on the premises. The mosque is joined to the Islamic Cultural Centre which was officially opened by King George VI in 1944. The land was donated by George VI to the Muslim community of Britain in return for the donation of land in Cairo by King Farouk of Egypt and Sudan on which to build an Anglican cathedral.History1900 - 1931 Several efforts were made to build a mosque in London, including one, initiated by Lord Headley, a convert to Islam.1937 This project (Nizamia Mosque, later changed to present name) was funded by the Nizam of Hyderabad and the foundation stone of the mosque was laid on Friday, 4 June 1937, by HH Prince Azam Jah eldest son of Mir Osman Ali Khan the last ruler of Hyderabad State.

Wigmore Hall
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
36 Wigmore Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 2BP

+44 (0)20 7935 2141

Europe’s leading venue for chamber music and song – presenting over 400 classical music concerts a year in the heart of London’s West End.

Harley Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Harley Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1G 9

2076-360838

Harley Street is a street in Marylebone, central London, which has been noted since the 19th century for its large number of private specialists in medicine and surgery.OverviewSince the 19th century, the number of doctors, hospitals, and medical organizations in and around Harley Street has greatly increased. Records show that there were around 20 doctors in 1860, 80 by 1900, and almost 200 by 1914. When the National Health Service was established in 1948, there were around 1,500. Today, there are more than 3,000 people employed in the Harley Street area, in clinics, medical and paramedical practices, and hospitals such as The Harley Street Clinic and The London Clinic.It has been speculated that doctors were originally attracted to the area by the development of commodious housing and central proximity to the important railway stations of Paddington, Kings Cross, St Pancras, Euston and, later, Marylebone. The nearest Tube stations are Regent's Park and Oxford Circus.Land ownershipHarley Street is part of the Howard de Walden Estate.

RIBA
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
66 Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1B 1

+44 (0)207 580 5533

Welcome to the RIBA Facebook page. 'Like' the RIBA facebook page if you are an architecture fan and would like to know about news, talks, exhibitions and architecture awards and to have a behind-the-scenes look at some of the RIBA's main events.

Cavendish Square Gardens
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Cavendish Square, London
London, United Kingdom W1G 0

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Speakers' Corner
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Marble Arch, Hyde Park
London, United Kingdom W1K 1QB

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A Speakers' Corner is an area where open-air public speaking, debate and discussion are allowed. The original and most noted is in the northeast corner of Hyde Park in London, UK. Speakers here may talk on any subject, as long as the police consider their speeches lawful, although this right is not restricted to Speakers' Corner only. Contrary to popular belief, there is no immunity from the law, nor are any subjects proscribed, but in practice the police tend to be tolerant and therefore intervene only when they receive a complaint. On some occasions in the past, they have intervened on grounds of profanity. Historically there were a number of other areas designated as Speakers' Corners in other parks in London (e.g., Lincoln's Inn Fields Finsbury Park, Clapham Common, Kennington Park, and Victoria Park). More recently they have been set up in other British cities, and there are also Speakers' Corners in other countries.Hyde ParkThough Hyde Park Speakers' Corner is considered the paved area closest to Marble Arch, legally the public speaking area extends beyond the Reform Tree and covers a large area from Marble Arch to Victoria Gate, then along the Serpentine to Hyde Park Corner and the Broad Walk running from Hyde Park Corner to Marble Arch.Public riots broke out in the park in 1855, in protest over the Sunday Trading Bill, which forbade buying and selling on a Sunday, the only day working people had off. The riots were described by Karl Marx as the beginning of the English revolution.

Saint Christopher's Place
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
16-18 James Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 1

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Savile Club
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
69 Brook St
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

+44 (0)20 7629 5462

The Savile Club is a traditional London gentlemen's club founded in 1868. Though located somewhat out of the way from the main centre of London's gentlemen's clubs, closer to the residences of Mayfair than the clubs of Pall Mall and St James's Street, it still contains prominent names among its members. It was originally formed after a division of opinion within the old Eclectic Club as to whether to accept an offer of rooms by the Medical Club and cease to be simply a "night club" (in its 19th-century sense).Changing premisesInitially calling itself the New Club, it grew rapidly, outgrowing its first floor rooms overlooking Trafalgar Square at 9 Spring Gardens and moving to the second floor. It then moved to 15 Savile Row in 1871, where it changed its name to the Savile Club, before lack of space forced the club to move again in 1882, this time to 107 Piccadilly, a building owned by Lord Rosebery. With its views over Green Park it was described by the members as the "ideal clubhouse". However, after 50 years' residence, demolition of the building next door to create the Park Lane Hotel caused the old clubhouse such structural problems that, in 1927, the club moved to its present home at 69 Brook Street, part of the Grosvenor Estate in Mayfair. This was the former home of "Loulou" Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt, a Liberal cabinet minister who had taken his life on the premises to avert a scandal when his double life as a paedophile and sex offender was in danger of being uncovered. The building, a combination of Nos 69 and 71 Brook Street, owes its extravagant dix-huitième interior to Walter Burns, the brother-in-law of financier J.P. Morgan, who adapted it for his wife Fanny to entertain in suitable style. It thus includes an elegant hall, a grand staircase and a lavish ballroom.

Brazilian Consulate
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
3 Vere Street
London, United Kingdom

+44 (0) 20 7659 1550

Embassy of Indonesia, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
38 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 2HW

The Embassy of Indonesia in London is the diplomatic mission of Indonesia in the United Kingdom. It is located on Grosvenor Square in Mayfair, close to the American embassy. Indonesia also maintain a Consular Department & Visa Section at 38A Adam’s Row, Mayfair.HistoryThe first diplomatic representative of Indonesia in the United Kingdom was Dr. Subandrio who served in 1949 until 1954. There have been 18 Ambassadors in the past years, including two air marshals, a lieutenant and Raden Mohammad Marty Muliana Natalegawa who is currently serving as the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Indonesia.DepartmentsThere are currently 10 Departments in the embassy including 2 Defence Attachés, 1 Transportation Attaché, 1 Trade Attaché and 1 Educational Attaché.

All Souls Church, Langham Place
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
2 All Souls Place
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1B 3DA

020 7580 3522

All Souls Church is an Anglican Evangelical church in central London, situated in Langham Place in Marylebone, at the north end of Regent Street. It was designed in regency style by John Nash and consecrated in 1824.As it is very near BBC Broadcasting House, the BBC often broadcasts from the church. As well as the core church membership, many hundreds of visitors come to All Souls, bringing the average number of those coming through the doors for services on Sundays to around 2,500 every week. All Souls has an international congregation, with all ages represented.HistoryThe church was designed by John Nash, favourite architect of King George IV. Its prominent circular spired vestibule was designed to provide an eye-catching monument at the point where Regent Street, newly-laid out as part of Nash's scheme to link Piccadilly with the new Regent's Park, takes an awkward abrupt bend westward to align with the pre-existing Portland Place.All Souls was a Commissioners' church, a grant of £12,819 being given by the Church Building Commission towards the cost of its construction. The commission had been set up under an act of 1818, and Nash, as one of the three architects employed by the Board of Works, had been asked to supply specimen designs as soon as the act was passed. It was, however, one of only two Commissioners' churches to be built to his designs, the other being the Gothic Revival St Mary, Haggerston. All Souls is the last surviving church by John Nash.

Italian Embassy in London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
14 Three Kings Yard
London, United Kingdom W1K 4EH

+4420 7312 2200

The Embassy of Italy in the United Kingdom is the official representation of Italian interests in the UK, and promotes dialogue and cooperation between the two countries in a wide range of areas, from politics, economy and commercial affairs to culture and scientific research. The Embassy also has an office for Italy’s representation at the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and a representative at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). The Embassy's Facebook page is a social media tool to engage and interact with a wider audience and raise the visibility of our varied activities. We look forward to an open and stimulating dialogue with all friends, fans and visitors! Please note that this page is NOT intended for Consular queries (e.g. passport, visa, citizenship, marriage and birth registration, notary public matters etc). You should consult the websites or Facebook page of the Italian Consulates in the UK for assistance on these matters. For the Facebook page of the Italian Consulate General in London please consult: https://www.facebook.com/consolatogeneralelondra Although we encourage constructive comments on a wide range of issues, please note that this page is not intended as a political forum. We do not tolerate any abusive, racist language or profanity. Any such postings will be deleted.

Rudolf Steiner House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
35 Park Rd
London, United Kingdom NW1 6XT

+44 (0) 20 7723 4400

Westminster Magistrates' Court
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
181 Marylebone Rd
London, United Kingdom NW1 5

020 3126 3050

Manchester Square
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
20 Manchester Square
London, United Kingdom W1u 3PZ

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Manchester Square is an 18th-century garden square in the Marylebone area in London, England, a short distance north of Oxford Street. It is one of the smaller but better preserved Georgian squares in central London. The central section of the northern side of the square is occupied by a mansion once known as Manchester House and later as Hertford House, which is now the home of the Wallace Collection, a major collection of fine and decorative arts. The house and square form part of Marylebone's Portman Estate. Construction on both was underway by around 1776.Famous residents in the square have included Julius Benedict, the German-born composer, who lived at no. 2, John Hughlings Jackson, the English neurologist, who lived at no. 3, and Alfred, Lord Milner, the British statesman and colonial administrator, at no. 14. Admiral Sir Thomas Foley and his wife (later widow) Lady Lucy Anne FitzGerald occupied no. 1 as their London townhouse during the first half of the nineteenth century. In 1814 and 1815 Manchester Square became briefly famous, when newspapers reported that a pig-faced woman was living there.The cover photograph for Please Please Me, the first LP by The Beatles, was taken by Angus McBean in 1963. It showed the group looking down over the stairwell inside EMI House in Manchester Square, EMI's London headquarters at the time (now demolished). A repeat photo was taken in 1969 for the cover of their then-intended Get Back album; it was not used when the project saw release as Let It Be, but was eventually used on the retrospective albums 1962–1966 and 1967–1970.

Consulate and Embassy Near Embassy of Sweden, London

U.S. Embassy London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
24 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 6

020-7499-9000

Polish Embassy UK
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
47 Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1B 1JH

+44 (0) 207 291 3520

HE Mr Witold Sobków has been the Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Poland to the Court of St. James`s since 2012. Ambasadorem Nadzwyczajnym i Pełnomocnym Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej akredytowanym przy Dworze św. Jakuba od 2012r. jest JE Pan Witold Sobków.

Consulado Geral De Portugal Em Londres
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
3, Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1B 1HR

+442072913770

Japanese Embassy
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
101-104 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

+44 (0) 20 7465 6500

Brazilian Consulate
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
3 Vere Street
London, United Kingdom

+44 (0) 20 7659 1550

Embassy of Indonesia, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
38 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 2HW

The Embassy of Indonesia in London is the diplomatic mission of Indonesia in the United Kingdom. It is located on Grosvenor Square in Mayfair, close to the American embassy. Indonesia also maintain a Consular Department & Visa Section at 38A Adam’s Row, Mayfair.HistoryThe first diplomatic representative of Indonesia in the United Kingdom was Dr. Subandrio who served in 1949 until 1954. There have been 18 Ambassadors in the past years, including two air marshals, a lieutenant and Raden Mohammad Marty Muliana Natalegawa who is currently serving as the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Indonesia.DepartmentsThere are currently 10 Departments in the embassy including 2 Defence Attachés, 1 Transportation Attaché, 1 Trade Attaché and 1 Educational Attaché.

Chinese Embassy
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
49-51 Portland Pl
London, United Kingdom W1B 1JL

+44 (0) 20 7299 4049

Egyptian Embassy, London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
26 South St
London, United Kingdom W1K 2XD

2074997947

US Embassy
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
24 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1A 2LQ

020 7499 9000

Colombian Consulate
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
35 Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1B 1

20-76379893

Canadian High Commission
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 4

020 7258 6600

KBRI london
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
38 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 2

+442072909600

Embassy of Poland, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
15 Devonshire St
London, United Kingdom W1G 7AP

020 7580 5481

The Embassy of Poland in London (Ambasada Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej w Londynie) is the diplomatic mission of Poland in the United Kingdom. It is located on Portland Place next to the High Commission of Kenya building. It forms part of a group of Grade II* listed buildings in Portland Place.History Involving the Embassy of Poland in London, Main Chancery BuildingShortly after regaining independence in 1918, there seemed to be a general feeling of ambivalence towards Britain demonstrated by most Polish statesmen, as if they were neglecting British relations, who played a major role in helping to re-establish the post-World War I - Second Polish Republic. However, with newly-restored independence, the country's government instead concentrated on shoring up good relations with traditional ally France, and immediate neighbour Germany.As a result of this focus, it was not until 1929 that the first Polish legation was sent to establish a permanent embassy in London. The establishment of this Polish embassy building in London would go on to play one of the most important roles of Poland's history.By the late 1930s when world war was once again becoming inevitable, the government of the Second Polish Republic requested the necessary military aid from the British government; as Poland was still rebuilding civilian infrastructure from the aftermath of World War I. The government also signed a three-way mutual defence pact with the United Kingdom and France with the original intent being to make sure an independent and sovereign, democratic Poland would never again have to stand alone against a German invasion. Thus, much of the bureaucracy surrounding these pre-war pacts found itself centred in the halls and corridors of number 47, Portland Place.

Embassy Of The Arab Republic of Egypt
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
23 South St
London, United Kingdom W1K 2XD

020 7499 3304

Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
30 Charles Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

020-79173000

The Embassy of Saudi Arabia in London (officially the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia) (السفارة السعودية الملكية في لندن) is the diplomatic mission of Saudi Arabia in the United Kingdom. Saudi Arabia also maintains a Defence Attaché’s Office at 26 Queen's Gate, South Kensington, a Diplomatic Office of the Cultural Bureau at 630 Chiswick High Road, Gunnersbury, a Medical Section at 60 Queen Anne Street, Marylebone, a Commercial Section at 15/16 Queen Street, Mayfair, an Islamic Affairs Section at 2nd Floor, Park Lorne, 111 Park Road, Lisson Grove and an Information Section at 18 Seymour Street, Marylebone.The embassy is situated in Crewe House, a detached mansion designed and constructed by Edward Sheppard in 1730, set in its own grounds. Built in the Georgian style, it is a Grade II* listed building. The house was considerably altered in the late 18th and early 19th-century. Much of its neo-classical interior dates from the early 19th-century, and some of Shepard's original plasterwork ceilings may survive.

Embassy of Myanmar, London
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
19A Charles St
London, United Kingdom W1J 5DX

+44 (0) 207 499 4340

The Embassy of Myanmar in London, also referred to as the Embassy of Burma, is the diplomatic mission of Myanmar in the United Kingdom.

Embassy of Switzerland in the United Kingdom
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Montagu Place
London, United Kingdom W1H 2BQ

+44 (0)20 7616 6000

The Embassy of Switzerland in the United Kingdom is the official representation of Swiss interests in the UK, and promotes dialogue and cooperation between the two countries in a wide range of areas, from politics, economy and finance to culture, sport and scientific research. The Embassy's Facebook page is a new tool to engage and interact with a wider audience and raise the visibility of our varied activities. We look forward to an open and stimulating dialogue with all friends, fans and visitors! Please note that this site is NOT designed for Visa or Consular queries. Please contact [email protected] or [email protected] if you require assistance in these matters.

Turkish Embassy
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
69 Portland Place
London, United Kingdom

Consulate General Of The Kingdom Of Morocco
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
97-99 Praed St
London, United Kingdom W2 1NT

020 7724 0624

High Commission of Sri Lanka, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
13 Hyde Park Gardens
London, United Kingdom W2 2LU

+44 (0) 20 7262 1841

The High Commission of Sri Lanka in London is the diplomatic mission of Sri Lanka in the United Kingdom. There has been a Sri Lankan High Commission in London since 1948

Government Organization Near Embassy of Sweden, London

Green Park
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Green Park, The Royal Parks, London
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1J 7

0300 061 2350

Although situated so close to St James's Park, The Green Park is quite different in character. It is more peaceful with mature trees and grassland and is surrounded by Constitution Hill, Piccadilly and the Broad Walk. The Green Park was first recorded in 1554 as the place where a rebellion took place against the marriage of Mary I to Philip II of Spain. It was a famous duelling site until 1667 when Charles II bought an extra 40 acres and it became known as upper St James's Park. The Green Park is a peaceful refuge for people living, working or visiting central London, and is particularly popular for sunbathing and picnics in fine weather. It is also popular as a healthy walking route to work for commuters. The paths are used extensively by joggers and runners. - See more at: http://www.royalparks.org.uk/parks/green-park/about-green-park#sthash.WEFJqi0k.dpuf

U.S. Embassy London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
24 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 6

020-7499-9000

Polish Embassy UK
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
47 Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1B 1JH

+44 (0) 207 291 3520

HE Mr Witold Sobków has been the Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Poland to the Court of St. James`s since 2012. Ambasadorem Nadzwyczajnym i Pełnomocnym Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej akredytowanym przy Dworze św. Jakuba od 2012r. jest JE Pan Witold Sobków.

Japanese Embassy
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
101-104 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

+44 (0) 20 7465 6500

Italian Cultural Institute London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
39 Belgrave Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8NX

020 7235 1461

Embassy of Indonesia, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
38 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 2HW

The Embassy of Indonesia in London is the diplomatic mission of Indonesia in the United Kingdom. It is located on Grosvenor Square in Mayfair, close to the American embassy. Indonesia also maintain a Consular Department & Visa Section at 38A Adam’s Row, Mayfair.HistoryThe first diplomatic representative of Indonesia in the United Kingdom was Dr. Subandrio who served in 1949 until 1954. There have been 18 Ambassadors in the past years, including two air marshals, a lieutenant and Raden Mohammad Marty Muliana Natalegawa who is currently serving as the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Indonesia.DepartmentsThere are currently 10 Departments in the embassy including 2 Defence Attachés, 1 Transportation Attaché, 1 Trade Attaché and 1 Educational Attaché.

Chinese Embassy
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
49-51 Portland Pl
London, United Kingdom W1B 1JL

+44 (0) 20 7299 4049

Italian Embassy in London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
14 Three Kings Yard
London, United Kingdom W1K 4EH

+4420 7312 2200

The Embassy of Italy in the United Kingdom is the official representation of Italian interests in the UK, and promotes dialogue and cooperation between the two countries in a wide range of areas, from politics, economy and commercial affairs to culture and scientific research. The Embassy also has an office for Italy’s representation at the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and a representative at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). The Embassy's Facebook page is a social media tool to engage and interact with a wider audience and raise the visibility of our varied activities. We look forward to an open and stimulating dialogue with all friends, fans and visitors! Please note that this page is NOT intended for Consular queries (e.g. passport, visa, citizenship, marriage and birth registration, notary public matters etc). You should consult the websites or Facebook page of the Italian Consulates in the UK for assistance on these matters. For the Facebook page of the Italian Consulate General in London please consult: https://www.facebook.com/consolatogeneralelondra Although we encourage constructive comments on a wide range of issues, please note that this page is not intended as a political forum. We do not tolerate any abusive, racist language or profanity. Any such postings will be deleted.

T.C. Londra Büyükelçiliği / Turkish Embassy in London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
43 Belgrave Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8PA

020 7393 0202

For visa or Turkish citizen services related matters, please contact the Turkish Consulate General on 020 7591 6900 between 2:30 and 5:30 pm Monday to Friday. Alternatively you can email the department on [email protected] or check their website: www.turkishconsulate.org.uk.

Embassy of Ecuador, London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
3 Hans Crescent Flat 3b
London, United Kingdom SW1X 0

20-75842648

The embassy of Ecuador in London is the diplomatic mission of Ecuador in the United Kingdom. It is headed by the ambassador of Ecuador to the United Kingdom. It is located in the Knightsbridge district in a building it shares with the Embassy of Colombia, near Harrods, Hyde Park, and Hans Place, precisely at 3 Hans Crescent at the intersection of Basil Street, and it is served by the Knightsbridge station.The Ecuadorian embassy is the temporary home of the Australian editor, activist, publisher and journalist Julian Assange, who initially entered it on 19 June 2012 claiming diplomatic asylum, which was granted by the Ecuadorian government on 16 August 2012.The embassy is charged with representing the interests of the president and government of Ecuador, improving diplomatic relations between Ecuador and the accredited countries, promoting and improving the image and standing of Ecuador in the accredited nations, promoting the culture of Ecuador, encouraging and facilitating tourism to and from Ecuador, and ensuring the safety of Ecuadorians abroad.

Burlington House
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
31 Burlington Arcade
London, United Kingdom W1J 0PG

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Burlington House is a building on Piccadilly in London. It was originally a private Palladian mansion, and was expanded in the mid-19th century after being purchased by the British government. The main building is at the northern end of the courtyard and houses the Royal Academy, while five learned societies occupy the two wings on the east and west sides of the courtyard and the Piccadilly wing at the southern end. These societies, collectively known as the Courtyard Societies are:Geological Society of London (Piccadilly/east wing)Linnean Society of London (Piccadilly/west wing)Royal Astronomical Society (west wing)Society of Antiquaries of London (west wing)Royal Society of Chemistry (east wing) Burlington House is most familiar to the general public as the venue for the Royal Academy's temporary art exhibitions.HistoryThe house was one of the earliest of a number of very large private residences built on the north side of Piccadilly, previously a country lane, from the 1660s onwards. The first version was begun by Sir John Denham about 1664. It was a red-brick double-pile hip-roofed mansion with a recessed centre, typical of the style of the time, or perhaps even a little old fashioned. Denham may have acted as his own architect, or he may have employed Hugh May, who certainly became involved in the construction after the house was sold in an incomplete state in 1667 to Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Burlington, from whom it derives its name. Burlington had the house completed.

T.C. Londra Başkonsolosluğu
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Rutland Lodge,Rutland Gardens
London, United Kingdom SW7 1BW

02075916900

Singapore High Commission in London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
9 Wilton Crescent, Belgravia
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8SP

+44 20 7235 8315

Operational Hours : Consular Section : Mondays - Fridays, 9.30 am to 12.30pm General : Mondays - Fridays, 9.00 am to 5.00 pm Closed from 1.00 pm to 2.00 pm Email: [email protected] (General) [email protected] (Consular) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Banner: Courtesy of the Singapore Tourism Board

Embassy of Switzerland in the United Kingdom
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Montagu Place
London, United Kingdom W1H 2BQ

+44 (0)20 7616 6000

The Embassy of Switzerland in the United Kingdom is the official representation of Swiss interests in the UK, and promotes dialogue and cooperation between the two countries in a wide range of areas, from politics, economy and finance to culture, sport and scientific research. The Embassy's Facebook page is a new tool to engage and interact with a wider audience and raise the visibility of our varied activities. We look forward to an open and stimulating dialogue with all friends, fans and visitors! Please note that this site is NOT designed for Visa or Consular queries. Please contact [email protected] or [email protected] if you require assistance in these matters.

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
St Mary's Hospital, Praed Street,
London, United Kingdom W2 1NY

020 3313 5000

Imperial College Healthcare is an NHS Trust and Academic Health Science Centre in London, England. The Trust manages five hospitals: Charing Cross Hospital, Hammersmith Hospital, Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital, St Mary's Hospital and Western Eye Hospital. The Trust is one of the largest in England and has an annual turnover of £800 million, treating more than a million patients a year. The Trust's chief executive is Dr Tracey Batten. The chair of the Trust is Sir Richard Sykes. Images and videos in these pages are copyright Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and Imperial College Healthcare Charity. Images of artworks are the copyright of the artist also. The views expressed on this social network by our followers do not necessarily reflect the views of Imperial College Healthcare. Please do not ask for clinical opinion or advice through this network - always contact your GP for health advice. We encourage users to contribute to this page and would like to remind everyone to maintain a friendly and respectful tone.

Westminster City Council
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
64 Victoria St
London, United Kingdom SW1E 6AN

020 7641 6000

International Coffee Organization
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
22 Berners Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 3DD

+44 (0)20 7612 0600

The International Coffee Organization (ICO) is the main intergovernmental organization for coffee, bringing together exporting and importing Governments to tackle the challenges facing the world coffee sector through international cooperation. Its Member Governments represent 98% of world coffee production and 83% of world consumption.

Embassy of Turkey, London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
43 Belgrave Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8

The Embassy of Turkey in London is the diplomatic mission of Turkey in the United Kingdom. There was formerly an embassy of the Ottoman Empire in London dating from 1793; this was suspended in 1914 following the outbreak of the First World War and replaced by the embassy of the new Republic of Turkey in 1924. From 1901-1954 the embassy was located at 69 Portland Place before moving to its current location; however this building was kept and is currently used as the Ambassador's Residence.The embassy is housed in one of a group of Grade I listed buildings at 38—48 Belgrave Square.Turkey also maintains a Consulate at Rutland Lodge, Rutland Gardens, Knightsbridge.

Embassy of Colombia to the UK
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
3 Hans Crescent
London, United Kingdom SW1X 0LN

+44 (0)20 7589 9177

The Embassy of Colombia in London represents the Government of Colombia in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. It serves as a bridge between the countries by strengthening bilateral relations, widening the commercial exchange and further developing co-operation projects. Beyond the political role, the Embassy promotes Colombia across the UK by coordinating and collaborating with academic, cultural and social activities as well as a maintaining a constant dialogue with an ever-wider range of sectors in British society actively involved with Colombia.

Embassy of Qatar, London
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
1 South Audley St
London, United Kingdom W1K 1

+442074932200

The Embassy of Qatar at 1 South Audley Street in Mayfair, London is the diplomatic mission of Qatar in the United Kingdom. The embassy is housed in a Grade II listed three storey house designed by the architect Frederick Pepys Cockerell and completed after his death by George Aitchison.The exterior of the house is richly decorated with a terracotta freize depicting putti.Qatar also maintains a Cultural and Military Section at 21 Hertford Street, Mayfair and a Health Section at 30 Collingham Gardens, South Kensington.In 2013 there was a protest outside the embassy against the alleged mistreatment of migrant workers in Qatar.

Landmark Near Embassy of Sweden, London

Madame Tussauds London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LR
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

0871 894 3000

Oxford Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street, London
London, United Kingdom W1K 1NA

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Oxford Street is a major road in the City of Westminster in the West End of London. It is Europe's busiest shopping street, with around half a million daily visitors, and as of 2012 had approximately 300 shops. It is designated as part of the A40, a major road between London and Fishguard, though it is not signed as such, and traffic is regularly restricted to buses and taxis.The road was originally a Roman road, part of the Via Trinobantina between Essex and Hampshire via London. It was known as Tyburn Road through the Middle Ages and was once notorious as a street where prisoners from Newgate Prison would be transported towards a public hanging. It became known as Oxford Road and then Oxford Street in the 18th century, and began to change character from a residential street to commercial and retail purposes by the late 19th century, also attracting street traders, confidence tricksters and prostitution. The first department stores in Britain opened on Oxford Street in the early 20th century, including Selfridges, John Lewis and HMV. Unlike nearby shopping streets such as Bond Street, it has retained an element of downmarket street trading alongside more prestigious retail stores. The street suffered heavy bombing during World War II, and several longstanding stores including John Lewis were completely destroyed and rebuilt from scratch.

Baker Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
113 Baker St
Oxford, United Kingdom W1U 6TD

Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid the street out in the 18th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived at a fictional 221B Baker Street address. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises.Baker Street is a busy thoroughfare, lying in postcode areas NW1/W1 and forming part of the A41 there. It runs south from Regent's Park, the junction with Park Road, parallel to Gloucester Place, meeting Marylebone Road, Portman Square and Wigmore Street. At the junction with Wigmore Street, Baker Street turns into Orchard Street, which ends when it meets with Oxford Street. After Portman Square the road continues as Orchard Street.The street is served by the London Underground by Baker Street tube station, one of the world's oldest surviving underground stations. Next door is Transport for London's lost property office.

Marble Arch
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1H 7

870-2427114

Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch and London landmark. The structure was designed by John Nash in 1827 to be the state entrance to the cour d'honneur of Buckingham Palace; it stood near the site of what is today the three bayed, central projection of the palace containing the well known balcony. In 1851 it was relocated and following the widening of Park Lane in the early 1960s is now sited, isolated and incongruously, on a large traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street, Park Lane, and Edgware Road.Historically, only members of the Royal Family and the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery are permitted to pass through the arch; this happens only in ceremonial processions.The arch gives its name to the vicinity of its site, particularly, the southern portion of Edgware Road and also to the nearby underground station.Design and constructionThe design of the arch is based on that of the Arch of Constantine in Rome and the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel in Paris. The arch is faced with Carrara marble with embellishments of marble extracted near Seravezza. John Flaxman was chosen to make the commemorative sculpture. After his death in 1826 the commission was divided between Sir Richard Westmacott, Edward Hodges Baily and J.C.F. Rossi. In 1829, a bronze equestrian statue of George IV was commissioned from Sir Francis Chantrey, with the intention of placing it on top of the arch.

Marble Arch
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1H 7

870-2427114

Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch and London landmark. The structure was designed by John Nash in 1827 to be the state entrance to the cour d'honneur of Buckingham Palace; it stood near the site of what is today the three bayed, central projection of the palace containing the well known balcony. In 1851 it was relocated and following the widening of Park Lane in the early 1960s is now sited, isolated and incongruously, on a large traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street, Park Lane, and Edgware Road.Historically, only members of the Royal Family and the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery are permitted to pass through the arch; this happens only in ceremonial processions.The arch gives its name to the vicinity of its site, particularly, the southern portion of Edgware Road and also to the nearby underground station.Design and constructionThe design of the arch is based on that of the Arch of Constantine in Rome and the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel in Paris. The arch is faced with Carrara marble with embellishments of marble extracted near Seravezza. John Flaxman was chosen to make the commemorative sculpture. After his death in 1826 the commission was divided between Sir Richard Westmacott, Edward Hodges Baily and J.C.F. Rossi. In 1829, a bronze equestrian statue of George IV was commissioned from Sir Francis Chantrey, with the intention of placing it on top of the arch.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

Selfridges, Oxford Street is a Grade II listed retail premises, located in Oxford Street, London, England. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

Selfridges, Oxford Street is a Grade II listed retail premises, located in Oxford Street, London, England. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

Harley Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Harley Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1G 9

2076-360838

Harley Street is a street in Marylebone, central London, which has been noted since the 19th century for its large number of private specialists in medicine and surgery.OverviewSince the 19th century, the number of doctors, hospitals, and medical organizations in and around Harley Street has greatly increased. Records show that there were around 20 doctors in 1860, 80 by 1900, and almost 200 by 1914. When the National Health Service was established in 1948, there were around 1,500. Today, there are more than 3,000 people employed in the Harley Street area, in clinics, medical and paramedical practices, and hospitals such as The Harley Street Clinic and The London Clinic.It has been speculated that doctors were originally attracted to the area by the development of commodious housing and central proximity to the important railway stations of Paddington, Kings Cross, St Pancras, Euston and, later, Marylebone. The nearest Tube stations are Regent's Park and Oxford Circus.Land ownershipHarley Street is part of the Howard de Walden Estate.

221B Baker Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
221B Baker Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 6X

+44(0) 20 7224 3688

221B Baker Street is the London address of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, created by author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In the United Kingdom, postal addresses with a number followed by a letter may indicate a separate address within a larger, often residential building. Baker Street in Holmes' time was a high-class residential district, and Holmes' apartment was probably part of a Georgian terrace.At the time the Holmes stories were published, addresses in Baker Street did not go as high as 221. Baker Street was later extended, and in 1932 the Abbey National Building Society moved into premises at 219–229 Baker Street. For many years, Abbey National employed a full-time secretary to answer mail addressed to Sherlock Holmes. In 1990, a blue plaque signifying 221B Baker Street was installed at the Sherlock Holmes Museum, situated elsewhere on the same block, and there followed a 15-year dispute between Abbey National and the Holmes Museum for the right to receive mail addressed to 221B Baker Street. Since the closure of Abbey House in 2005, ownership of the address by the Holmes Museum has not been challenged, despite its location between 237 and 241 Baker Street.Conan Doyle's intentionsWe met next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B, Baker Street, of which he had spoken at our meeting. They consisted of a couple of comfortable bed-rooms and a single large airy sitting-room, cheerfully furnished, and illuminated by two broad windows.(Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet, 1887)

Marble Arch
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
63-79 SEYMOUR STREET
London, United Kingdom W2 2HF

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Speakers' Corner
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Marble Arch, Hyde Park
London, United Kingdom W1K 1QB

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A Speakers' Corner is an area where open-air public speaking, debate and discussion are allowed. The original and most noted is in the northeast corner of Hyde Park in London, UK. Speakers here may talk on any subject, as long as the police consider their speeches lawful, although this right is not restricted to Speakers' Corner only. Contrary to popular belief, there is no immunity from the law, nor are any subjects proscribed, but in practice the police tend to be tolerant and therefore intervene only when they receive a complaint. On some occasions in the past, they have intervened on grounds of profanity. Historically there were a number of other areas designated as Speakers' Corners in other parks in London (e.g., Lincoln's Inn Fields Finsbury Park, Clapham Common, Kennington Park, and Victoria Park). More recently they have been set up in other British cities, and there are also Speakers' Corners in other countries.Hyde ParkThough Hyde Park Speakers' Corner is considered the paved area closest to Marble Arch, legally the public speaking area extends beyond the Reform Tree and covers a large area from Marble Arch to Victoria Gate, then along the Serpentine to Hyde Park Corner and the Broad Walk running from Hyde Park Corner to Marble Arch.Public riots broke out in the park in 1855, in protest over the Sunday Trading Bill, which forbade buying and selling on a Sunday, the only day working people had off. The riots were described by Karl Marx as the beginning of the English revolution.

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Westmoreland Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 8

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street, named The Heart Hospital until refurbished and renamed in 2015, was a specialist cardiac hospital located in London, United Kingdom until 2015. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London (UCL). After the 2015 refurbishment the hospital provided thoracic surgery, and the UCLH urology department moved there.Before the 2015 refurbishment the Heart Hospital conducted over 1,000 surgical heart operations each year, had 95 in-patient beds, and was one of the largest cardiac centres in the UK. It treated around 1,700 new outpatients, 5,500 follow-up outpatients and 1,200 inpatients each year. It was a centre for cardiac research, home to the UCL Centre for Cardiology in the Young, and part of the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre. It is a teaching hospital for the UCL Medical School.

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Westmoreland Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 8

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street, named The Heart Hospital until refurbished and renamed in 2015, was a specialist cardiac hospital located in London, United Kingdom until 2015. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London (UCL). After the 2015 refurbishment the hospital provided thoracic surgery, and the UCLH urology department moved there.Before the 2015 refurbishment the Heart Hospital conducted over 1,000 surgical heart operations each year, had 95 in-patient beds, and was one of the largest cardiac centres in the UK. It treated around 1,700 new outpatients, 5,500 follow-up outpatients and 1,200 inpatients each year. It was a centre for cardiac research, home to the UCL Centre for Cardiology in the Young, and part of the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre. It is a teaching hospital for the UCL Medical School.

Daunt Books
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
83 Marylebone High St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6

020 7224 2295

Daunt Books is a chain of bookshops in London, founded by James Daunt. It traditionally specialised in travel books. In 2010 it began publishing.BookshopsThe Marylebone High Street branch is housed in a former Edwardian bookshop with long oak galleries, graceful skylights and William Morris prints. The older section of the Marylebone shop was completed in 1912, and was originally an antiquarian bookshop called Francis Edwards. It is alleged to be the first custom-built bookshop in the world. A large, walk-in safe is visible near the entrance to the travel gallery, and is where expensive volumes were once stored. The shop was bought by former banker James Daunt and renamed Daunt Books in 1990. It now focuses on first-hand titles (especially travel-related material).The company has branches in Chelsea, Holland Park, Cheapside, Hampstead and Belsize Park. The Owl Bookshop in Kentish Town was bought by Daunt Books, but retained its original name. Daunt Books opened its first branch outside London in Saffron Walden, Essex, under the name Hart’s Books. It opened its second branch outside London in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, under the name The Marlow Bookshop.Specialising in travel, Daunt Books arranges its sections geographically, with guides, phrase books, travel writing, history and fiction grouped by their relevant country. Reviews have mentioned its customer service and knowledgeable staff.

Western Eye Hospital
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
153-173 Marylebone Rd
London, United Kingdom NW1 5QH

020 3312 6666

Western Eye Hospital is an ophthalmology hospital in west London.The hospital operates an emergency department 24-hours a day, for ambulance and walk-in cases. It features a minor surgical theatre, a triage system, inpatient beds and two ophthalmic operating theatres. It treats a wide range of eye conditions from glaucoma to wet age-related macular degeneration, a major cause of blindness.The lead consultant is Mr Graham Duguid and the hospital is owned and operated by Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust who also run the nearby St Mary's Hospital, Paddington, as well as Charing Cross Hospital, Hammersmith Hospital and Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital. WEH has been providing ophthalmic services since 1856.Notable alumniBashar al-Assad - President of Syria (attended postgraduate studies at the Western Eye Hospital, specializing in ophthalmology.)

Western Eye Hospital
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
153-173 Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5QH

0207 886 66 66

St Marylebone Parish Church
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5LT

St Marylebone Parish Church is an Anglican church on the Marylebone Road in London. It was built to the designs of Thomas Hardwick in 1813–17. The present site is the third used by the parish for its church. The first was further south, near Oxford Street. The church there was demolished in 1400 and a new one erected further north. This was completely rebuilt in 1740–42, and converted into a chapel-of-ease when Hardwick's church was constructed. The Marylebone area takes its name from the church. Located behind the church is St Marylebone School, a Church of England school for girls.Previous churchesFirst churchThe first church for the parish was built in the vicinity of the present Marble Arch c.1200, and dedicated to St John the Evangelist.Second churchIn 1400 the Bishop of London gave the parishioners permission to demolish the church of St John and build a new one in a more convenient position, near a recently completed chapel, which could be used until the new church was completed. The bishop stipulated that the old churchyard should be preserved, but also gave permission to enclose a new burial ground at the new site, The church was dedicated to the Virgin Mary. It was closer to the village, at the north end of Marylebone High Street. Having fallen into a state of decay, it was demolished in 1740.

Manchester Square
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
20 Manchester Square
London, United Kingdom W1u 3PZ

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Manchester Square is an 18th-century garden square in the Marylebone area in London, England, a short distance north of Oxford Street. It is one of the smaller but better preserved Georgian squares in central London. The central section of the northern side of the square is occupied by a mansion once known as Manchester House and later as Hertford House, which is now the home of the Wallace Collection, a major collection of fine and decorative arts. The house and square form part of Marylebone's Portman Estate. Construction on both was underway by around 1776.Famous residents in the square have included Julius Benedict, the German-born composer, who lived at no. 2, John Hughlings Jackson, the English neurologist, who lived at no. 3, and Alfred, Lord Milner, the British statesman and colonial administrator, at no. 14. Admiral Sir Thomas Foley and his wife (later widow) Lady Lucy Anne FitzGerald occupied no. 1 as their London townhouse during the first half of the nineteenth century. In 1814 and 1815 Manchester Square became briefly famous, when newspapers reported that a pig-faced woman was living there.The cover photograph for Please Please Me, the first LP by The Beatles, was taken by Angus McBean in 1963. It showed the group looking down over the stairwell inside EMI House in Manchester Square, EMI's London headquarters at the time (now demolished). A repeat photo was taken in 1969 for the cover of their then-intended Get Back album; it was not used when the project saw release as Let It Be, but was eventually used on the retrospective albums 1962–1966 and 1967–1970.

Animals in War Memorial
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Brook Gate, Park Lane
London, United Kingdom W1K 7

020 7641 6000

The Animals in War Memorial is a war memorial in Hyde Park, London. It is located on Park Lane, at the junction with Upper Brook Street, on the eastern edge of the park.The memorial was designed by English sculptor David Backhouse to commemorate the countless animals that have served and died under British military command throughout history. It was unveiled in November 2004 by Princess Anne, the Princess Royal.HistoryThe memorial was inspired by Jilly Cooper's book Animals in War, and was made possible by a specially created fund of £1.4 million from public donations of which Cooper was a co-trustee. The memorial consists of a 55 ft by 58 ft (16.8 m by 17.7 m) curved Portland stone wall: the symbolic arena of war, emblazoned with images of various struggling animals, along with two heavily-laden bronze mules progressing up the stairs of the monument, and a bronze horse and bronze dog beyond it looking into the distance.The Animals in War Memorial was officially opened on 24 November 2004 by Anne, Princess Royal.In May 2013, it was one of two London war memorials vandalised on the same night. The word 'Islam' was spray-painted on it and the nearby RAF Bomber Command Memorial.InscriptionsBeneath the main header, "Animals in War", the memorial has two separate inscriptions; the first and larger reads:"This monument is dedicated to all the animals that served and died alongside British and allied forces in wars and campaigns throughout time."

King Edward VII's Hospital
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
5-10 Beaumont St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6AA

020 7486 4411

King Edward VII's Hospital is a charity-registered private hospital in the City of Westminster in London, known as King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers from 1904 to 2000.HistoryEarly historyThe hospital was established in 1899 at the suggestion of the Prince of Wales . Agnes Keyser, a mistress of the Prince, and her sister Fanny used their house at 17 Grosvenor Crescent to help sick and wounded British Army officers who had returned from the Boer War. King Edward VII became the hospital's first patron. In 1904 it officially became King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers.20th centuryDuring the First World War, the hospital was at 9 Grosvenor Gardens, where officers would be nursed; the young novelist Stuart Cloete was one of them, as was the future British Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan, who underwent a series of long operations followed by recuperation there from 1916–18, from serious wounds sustained in conflict during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. In 1930, the hospital was awarded a Royal Charter "to operate an acute Hospital where serving and retired officers of the Services and their spouses can be treated at preferential rates."In 1941 the interior of the building was badly damaged by bombing, and Sister Agnes died from natural causes. In 1948 the hospital moved to Beaumont Street. It was officially opened on 15 October by Queen Mary.

Landmark Near Embassy of Sweden, London

Baker Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
113 Baker St
Oxford, United Kingdom W1U 6TD

Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid the street out in the 18th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived at a fictional 221B Baker Street address. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises.Baker Street is a busy thoroughfare, lying in postcode areas NW1/W1 and forming part of the A41 there. It runs south from Regent's Park, the junction with Park Road, parallel to Gloucester Place, meeting Marylebone Road, Portman Square and Wigmore Street. At the junction with Wigmore Street, Baker Street turns into Orchard Street, which ends when it meets with Oxford Street. After Portman Square the road continues as Orchard Street.The street is served by the London Underground by Baker Street tube station, one of the world's oldest surviving underground stations. Next door is Transport for London's lost property office.

High Commission of Belize, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
45 Crawford Pl 3rd Floor
London, United Kingdom

+44 (0) 207 723 3603

The High Commission of Belize in London is the diplomatic mission of Belize in the United Kingdom. It shares the building with the High Commission of Antigua and Barbuda.

Chiltern Firehouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Chiltern Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 7

020 7073 7676

The Chiltern Firehouse is a restaurant and hotel located at 1 Chiltern Street, Marylebone, London, England occupying the Grade II listed building of the former Marylebone Fire Station, also known as Manchester Square Fire Station. It is owned by André Balazs, a hotel chain owner, who also owns the Chateau Marmont Hotel in Los Angeles, California and The Mercer Hotel in New York City. The head chef is Nuno Mendes.Manchester Square Fire StationThe Manchester Square Fire Station was built in 1889, by the London County Council Architect's Department, "in the Vulliamy manner". "Red brick with stone dressings; tiled roof. Free Tudor-Gothic style". It initially served as a fire station, and was one of the first fire stations in London. The original architect was Robert Pearsall. Originally known as Manchester Square Fire Station (Manchester Square is nearby), it was decommissioned in June 2005 by the London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority. For some years subsequently, it had been in occasional use as an exhibition space for local artists, as there was a long and complex planning process to convert it to a luxury hotel and restaurant. David Archer of Archer Humphryes Architects acted as lead architect for the project.

221B Baker Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
221B Baker Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 6X

+44(0) 20 7224 3688

221B Baker Street is the London address of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, created by author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In the United Kingdom, postal addresses with a number followed by a letter may indicate a separate address within a larger, often residential building. Baker Street in Holmes' time was a high-class residential district, and Holmes' apartment was probably part of a Georgian terrace.At the time the Holmes stories were published, addresses in Baker Street did not go as high as 221. Baker Street was later extended, and in 1932 the Abbey National Building Society moved into premises at 219–229 Baker Street. For many years, Abbey National employed a full-time secretary to answer mail addressed to Sherlock Holmes. In 1990, a blue plaque signifying 221B Baker Street was installed at the Sherlock Holmes Museum, situated elsewhere on the same block, and there followed a 15-year dispute between Abbey National and the Holmes Museum for the right to receive mail addressed to 221B Baker Street. Since the closure of Abbey House in 2005, ownership of the address by the Holmes Museum has not been challenged, despite its location between 237 and 241 Baker Street.Conan Doyle's intentionsWe met next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B, Baker Street, of which he had spoken at our meeting. They consisted of a couple of comfortable bed-rooms and a single large airy sitting-room, cheerfully furnished, and illuminated by two broad windows.(Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet, 1887)

St James's, Spanish Place
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
22 George Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 3

St James's Church, Spanish Place, is a large English Gothic Roman Catholic church in Marylebone, London. Although currently situated in George Street, the church maintains its connection with Spanish Place, the road opposite the current church, because of its historic connection with the Spanish Embassy.SiteThe church is located in George Street, Marylebone, behind the Wallace Collection and close to Marylebone High Street.HistoryIn the reign of Elizabeth I the Bishops of Ely let their palace and chapel in Ely Place to the Spanish Ambassador and, until the reign of Charles I, it was occupied by the High Representative of the Court of Spain. During this period the chapel was freely used by English Roman Catholics and became a sanctuary to some degree for them.After the restoration of Charles II the Spanish Embassy was re-established in London, first on Ormond Street and then at Hertford House, Manchester Square, where the Wallace Collection is now housed. Here, in 1791, shortly after the Roman Catholic Relief Act 1791 repealed some of the laws affecting Catholic worship, a chapel was built on the corner of Spanish Place and Charles Street (now George Street), largely through the efforts of Doctor Thomas Hussey who had been a chaplain at the embassy since his ordination in 1769. Most of the objects of piety in the present church are legacies from this older building. In 1827 the official Spanish connection with the chapel ceased and it was handed over to the London Vicariate.

Manchester Square
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
20 Manchester Square
London, United Kingdom W1u 3PZ

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Manchester Square is an 18th-century garden square in the Marylebone area in London, England, a short distance north of Oxford Street. It is one of the smaller but better preserved Georgian squares in central London. The central section of the northern side of the square is occupied by a mansion once known as Manchester House and later as Hertford House, which is now the home of the Wallace Collection, a major collection of fine and decorative arts. The house and square form part of Marylebone's Portman Estate. Construction on both was underway by around 1776.Famous residents in the square have included Julius Benedict, the German-born composer, who lived at no. 2, John Hughlings Jackson, the English neurologist, who lived at no. 3, and Alfred, Lord Milner, the British statesman and colonial administrator, at no. 14. Admiral Sir Thomas Foley and his wife (later widow) Lady Lucy Anne FitzGerald occupied no. 1 as their London townhouse during the first half of the nineteenth century. In 1814 and 1815 Manchester Square became briefly famous, when newspapers reported that a pig-faced woman was living there.The cover photograph for Please Please Me, the first LP by The Beatles, was taken by Angus McBean in 1963. It showed the group looking down over the stairwell inside EMI House in Manchester Square, EMI's London headquarters at the time (now demolished). A repeat photo was taken in 1969 for the cover of their then-intended Get Back album; it was not used when the project saw release as Let It Be, but was eventually used on the retrospective albums 1962–1966 and 1967–1970.

High Commission of the Maldives, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
22 Nottingham Pl
London, United Kingdom W1U 5

02072242135

The High Commission of the Maldives in London is the diplomatic mission of the Maldives in the United Kingdom. It was established in 1995 by upgrading the existing Maldives Government Trade Representative's Office; it was formally opened by former Maldivian President Maumoon Abdul Gayoom.

St Cyprian's, Clarence Gate
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Glentworth St
London, United Kingdom NW1 6AX

020 7258 0724

St Cyprian's Church is an Anglican church in the Marylebone district of London, UK, founded in 1866 by Father Charles Gutch. It is dedicated to Saint Cyprian, a third-century martyr and Bishop of Carthage and is located by the south-western corner of Regent's Park, next to Clarence Gate Gardens just off Baker Street.HistoryFather Charles Gutch, who was previously curate at St Matthias', Stoke Newington, St Paul's, Knightsbridge, and All Saints, Margaret Street, was anxious to acquire a church of his own in London, so that he could manage it in his own style. He proposed to build a mission church in a poor and neglected northeastern corner of Marylebone, which would require a portion of the parishes of St Marylebone and St Paul, Rossmore Road to be handed over. However, neither the Rector of St Marlebone nor the Vicar of St Paul's approved of the churchmanship of Father Gutch. Further, he proposed to dedicate the mission to St Cyprian of Carthage, explaining:This caused further difficulties, and only a few weeks before the mission was due to be opened, the Bishop of London protested, claiming that the dedication would be against his and his predecessor's rules, and suggested that the district be named after one of the Apostles instead. Farther Gurch pointed out that a number of other churches in the Diocese had recently been dedicated to other saints, and the dedication to St Cyprian was allowed to remain. It celebrated its first Eucharist on 29 March 1866.

Embassy of Latvia, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
45 Nottingham Pl
London, United Kingdom W1U 5

20-73120040

The Embassy of Latvia in London is the diplomatic mission of Latvia in the United Kingdom.

Oxford Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street, London
London, United Kingdom W1K 1NA

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Oxford Street is a major road in the City of Westminster in the West End of London. It is Europe's busiest shopping street, with around half a million daily visitors, and as of 2012 had approximately 300 shops. It is designated as part of the A40, a major road between London and Fishguard, though it is not signed as such, and traffic is regularly restricted to buses and taxis.The road was originally a Roman road, part of the Via Trinobantina between Essex and Hampshire via London. It was known as Tyburn Road through the Middle Ages and was once notorious as a street where prisoners from Newgate Prison would be transported towards a public hanging. It became known as Oxford Road and then Oxford Street in the 18th century, and began to change character from a residential street to commercial and retail purposes by the late 19th century, also attracting street traders, confidence tricksters and prostitution. The first department stores in Britain opened on Oxford Street in the early 20th century, including Selfridges, John Lewis and HMV. Unlike nearby shopping streets such as Bond Street, it has retained an element of downmarket street trading alongside more prestigious retail stores. The street suffered heavy bombing during World War II, and several longstanding stores including John Lewis were completely destroyed and rebuilt from scratch.

St George's Fields, Westminster
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
1 St. Georges Fields
London, United Kingdom W2 2

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St George's Fields are a former burial ground of St George's, Hanover Square, lying between Connaught Street and Bayswater Road de-consecrated and sold off by the Church Commissioners in the 1970s to be built upon by The Utopian Housing Association, a housing trust.The architects, Design 5, used a ziggurat style of building (similar to the Brunswick by Patrick Hodgkinson), retaining much of the open space whilst creating 300 dwellings. Parts of the double walls surrounding the burial ground - reputedly designed to frustrate grave robbers - have been preserved along with a number of tombstones.The burial ground was also used for years as an archery ground, hence the nearby Archery Close and one of the new buildings being called Archery Steps.The estate is now in private ownership although the grounds of St George's Fields are opened to the public once a year under the London Garden Square Scheme when one of London's oldest plane trees, with a girth of over 18ft, may be seen set amongst the other trees.Although the buildings on the estate are not listed they have been included within the Bayswater Road Conservation Area established by the City of Westminster to preserve the amenities of this historic area.Within ten minutes walk is London Paddington station The nearest London Underground stations are Marble Arch Lancaster Gate on the Central line and the edgware road station.

King Edward VII's Hospital
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
5-10 Beaumont St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6AA

020 7486 4411

King Edward VII's Hospital is a charity-registered private hospital in the City of Westminster in London, known as King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers from 1904 to 2000.HistoryEarly historyThe hospital was established in 1899 at the suggestion of the Prince of Wales . Agnes Keyser, a mistress of the Prince, and her sister Fanny used their house at 17 Grosvenor Crescent to help sick and wounded British Army officers who had returned from the Boer War. King Edward VII became the hospital's first patron. In 1904 it officially became King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers.20th centuryDuring the First World War, the hospital was at 9 Grosvenor Gardens, where officers would be nursed; the young novelist Stuart Cloete was one of them, as was the future British Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan, who underwent a series of long operations followed by recuperation there from 1916–18, from serious wounds sustained in conflict during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. In 1930, the hospital was awarded a Royal Charter "to operate an acute Hospital where serving and retired officers of the Services and their spouses can be treated at preferential rates."In 1941 the interior of the building was badly damaged by bombing, and Sister Agnes died from natural causes. In 1948 the hospital moved to Beaumont Street. It was officially opened on 15 October by Queen Mary.

Ze Wunderhouse
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
22 Broadley St
London, United Kingdom NW8 8AE

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Westmoreland Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 8

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street, named The Heart Hospital until refurbished and renamed in 2015, was a specialist cardiac hospital located in London, United Kingdom until 2015. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London (UCL). After the 2015 refurbishment the hospital provided thoracic surgery, and the UCLH urology department moved there.Before the 2015 refurbishment the Heart Hospital conducted over 1,000 surgical heart operations each year, had 95 in-patient beds, and was one of the largest cardiac centres in the UK. It treated around 1,700 new outpatients, 5,500 follow-up outpatients and 1,200 inpatients each year. It was a centre for cardiac research, home to the UCL Centre for Cardiology in the Young, and part of the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre. It is a teaching hospital for the UCL Medical School.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

Selfridges, Oxford Street is a Grade II listed retail premises, located in Oxford Street, London, England. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

Marylebone Gardens
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
35 Marylebone High Street
London, United Kingdom w1u 4qa

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Marylebone or Marybone Gardens was a London pleasure garden sited in the grounds of the old manor house of Marylebone and frequented from the mid-17th century, when Marylebone was a village separated from London by fields and market gardens, to the third quarter of the 18th century.Early historyIt was situated in the area which is now between Marylebone Road, Marylebone High Street, Weymouth Street, and Harley Street; its site was developed as Beaumont Street and part of Devonshire Street.Originally consisting of two bowling greens adjoining the Rose of Normandy tavern on the east side of Marylebone High Street, its size was increased to about eight acres by acquisition of land from Marylebone Manor House, which had been converted into a hunting lodge by Henry VIII and was later used as a boarding school, eventually being demolished in 1791. The Marylebone Gardens, surrounded by a high brick wall and set about with fruit trees, had a carriage entrance in the High Street of Marylebone village and another entrance from the fields at the back. Its center was an open oval bowling green encompassed by a wide gravelled walk and many smaller walks and greens surrounded by clipped quickset hedges, "kept in good order, and indented like town walls."

Paddington Green Police Station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
2-4 Harrow Rd
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W2 1

+44 20 7230 1212

Paddington Green Police Station is located in Paddington, central London, England. The station is operated by the Metropolitan Police Service, and is a conventional police station, open to members of the public from 08:00 - 18:00, from Monday to Sunday. It also serves as the most important high-security station in the United Kingdom. This is because prisoners suspected of terrorism are held at the station for questioning. The building is a typical 1960s office block, but underneath the station are sixteen cells located below ground level, which have a separate custody suite from the building's other cells. Building work was completed in 1971.High-profile terrorist suspects arrested across the UK are often taken to Paddington Green Police Station for interrogation, and holding until escorted to a Court of Law. Suspects who have been held there include members of the IRA, the British nationals released from Guantanamo Bay, and the 21 July 2005 London bombers.On 10 October 1992, a bomb was exploded in a phone box outside the police station, injuring one person.In 2007, a joint parliamentary human rights committee stated that the old and decrepit mid-1960s police station was "plainly inadequate" to hold such high-risk prisoners. Lord Carlile, the official reviewer of the government's terrorism laws, said the Metropolitan Police needed a new custody suite suitable for up to 30 terrorism suspects. The old cells were 12-foot square, contained no windows and were reportedly too hot in the summer and too cold in winter. Refurbishments were made in 2009 at a cost of £490,000. Suspects now have access to an audio-visual system on which they can watch films and listen to music whilst incarcerated. This system was added because it was deemed inhumane to keep people locked up for to 28 days without any stimulation. One anti-terrorist officer was reported to be angry with these improvements saying, "If you beat up your wife or have a fight down the pub you will be slung in a cramped cell with nothing more than a toilet and a mattress. But if you are a terrorist intent on blowing things up then you get a luxurious cell with a telly and a CD player." The cells are lined with brown paper before suspects arrive so that any traces of explosives found on their bodies can be proven not to have been picked up from the cells.

Speakers' Corner
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Marble Arch, Hyde Park
London, United Kingdom W1K 1QB

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A Speakers' Corner is an area where open-air public speaking, debate and discussion are allowed. The original and most noted is in the northeast corner of Hyde Park in London, UK. Speakers here may talk on any subject, as long as the police consider their speeches lawful, although this right is not restricted to Speakers' Corner only. Contrary to popular belief, there is no immunity from the law, nor are any subjects proscribed, but in practice the police tend to be tolerant and therefore intervene only when they receive a complaint. On some occasions in the past, they have intervened on grounds of profanity. Historically there were a number of other areas designated as Speakers' Corners in other parks in London (e.g., Lincoln's Inn Fields Finsbury Park, Clapham Common, Kennington Park, and Victoria Park). More recently they have been set up in other British cities, and there are also Speakers' Corners in other countries.Hyde ParkThough Hyde Park Speakers' Corner is considered the paved area closest to Marble Arch, legally the public speaking area extends beyond the Reform Tree and covers a large area from Marble Arch to Victoria Gate, then along the Serpentine to Hyde Park Corner and the Broad Walk running from Hyde Park Corner to Marble Arch.Public riots broke out in the park in 1855, in protest over the Sunday Trading Bill, which forbade buying and selling on a Sunday, the only day working people had off. The riots were described by Karl Marx as the beginning of the English revolution.

Harley Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Harley Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1G 9

2076-360838

Harley Street is a street in Marylebone, central London, which has been noted since the 19th century for its large number of private specialists in medicine and surgery.OverviewSince the 19th century, the number of doctors, hospitals, and medical organizations in and around Harley Street has greatly increased. Records show that there were around 20 doctors in 1860, 80 by 1900, and almost 200 by 1914. When the National Health Service was established in 1948, there were around 1,500. Today, there are more than 3,000 people employed in the Harley Street area, in clinics, medical and paramedical practices, and hospitals such as The Harley Street Clinic and The London Clinic.It has been speculated that doctors were originally attracted to the area by the development of commodious housing and central proximity to the important railway stations of Paddington, Kings Cross, St Pancras, Euston and, later, Marylebone. The nearest Tube stations are Regent's Park and Oxford Circus.Land ownershipHarley Street is part of the Howard de Walden Estate.

High Commission of Sri Lanka, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
13 Hyde Park Gardens
London, United Kingdom W2 2LU

+44 (0) 20 7262 1841

The High Commission of Sri Lanka in London is the diplomatic mission of Sri Lanka in the United Kingdom. There has been a Sri Lankan High Commission in London since 1948