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Tower Bridge, London | Tourist Information


SE1 2UP
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP


Landmark Near Tower Bridge

Burgess Park
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Albany Rd
London, SE5 0

Burgess Park is a public park situated in the London Borough of Southwark, in an area between Camberwell to the west, Walworth to the north, Bermondsey to the east and Peckham to the south. At 56ha, it is one of the largest parks in South London.Unlike most other parks in London, Burgess Park was carved out of a highly built-up area of the city. Virtually all the land now occupied by the park was previously housing, industry and transport infrastructure. The idea for Burgess Park came out of the 1943 Abercrombie plan for open spaces in London, and the land has been gradually assembled and landscaped over the subsequent decades, first by the London County Council, then the Greater London Council, and since the mid-1980s, the London Borough of Southwark. An important stage in the construction of the park was the closure of the Grand Surrey Canal in the early 1970s, which terminated at Addington Wharf on Walworth Road. The Canal served the Surrey Commercial Docks, and the area near Camberwell was full of 19th century streets, houses and industrial buildings (including a ginger beer factory), many of which had suffered heavy bomb damage during WWII. The stretch of canal now incorporated in the Park is the site of Camberwell Wharf, which was virtually straight. Other land incorporated in the park was occupied by housing. While some of this housing was in poor condition, a lot of perfectly serviceable homes were demolished to build the park, and this has resulted in strong local feelings about the park.

Old Kent Road
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Old Kent Road
London, SE1 - SE15

Old Kent Road is a major thoroughfare in South East London, England, passing through the London Borough of Southwark. It was originally part of an ancient trackway that was paved by the Romans and used by the Anglo-Saxons who named it Wæcelinga Stræt (Watling Street). It is now part of the A2, a major road from London to Dover. The road was important in Roman times linking London to the coast at Richborough and Dover via Canterbury. It was a route for pilgrims in the Middle Ages as portrayed in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, when Old Kent Road was known as Kent Street. The route was used by soldiers returning from the Battle of Agincourt.In the 16th century, St Thomas-a-Watering on Old Kent Road was a place where religious dissenters and those found guilty of treason were publicly hanged. The road was rural in nature and several coaching inns were built alongside it. In the 19th century it acquired the name Old Kent Road and several industrial premises were set up to close to the Surrey Canal and a major business, the Metropolitan Gas Works was developed. In the 20th century, older property was demolished for redevelopment and Burgess Park was created. The Old Kent Road Baths opened around 1905 had Turkish and Russian bath facilities. In the 21st century, several retail parks and premises typical of out-of-town development have been built beside it while public houses have been redeveloped for other purposes.

McDonald's Restaurant
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
518 Old Kent Road, Peckham
London, SE1 5BA

020 7232 2450

Tustin Estate
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Tustin Estate, Old Kent Road
London, SE15 1DU

Tustin Estate was built in the mid 1960s, at the very end of the Old Kent Road and Ilderton Road, in South East London. It comprised of three tower blocks, Ambleside Point, Grasmere Point and Windermere Point, with underground parking, two storied Bowness House maisonettes above the shops, three storied maisonettes of Heversham House, Hillbeck Close old people’s home, Kentmere House flats, Manor Grove houses with gardens, Pilgrim’s Way primary school, Tustin Youth Club, all set around rolling greens and pathways, with The Penn playground in the middle. It was one of the greenest housing estates in London. Tustin was a self contained community, where kids could grow up on the estate, but off the streets. Where pet cats and dogs ran free. And children played out in safety. Where young children went to school without leaving the estate, whilst many Mum’s worked across the road, in the industrial streets opposite Manor Grove. Opposite was the Regal cinema, with the Astoria cinema within easy walking distance. Canals and bombsites were on the doorstep. Factory roofs, garages, and the gasworks were our climbing frames on the weekend. Even the odd tree house, at the back of Hillbeck Close. A pub on every corner, and Millwall Football Club was literally across the road. Tustin was unique – so much so that kids from other estates would come to hang out on the Tustin; especially the Tustin Club.

St Peter's Church, Walworth
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
274-276 Walworth Rd
London, SE17 2TE

020 7060 3672

St Peter's Church is an Anglican parish church in Walworth, London, in the Woolwich Episcopal Area of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It was built between 1823–25 and was the first church designed by Sir John Soane, in the wave of the church-building following the Napoleonic wars. It is the best preserved of Soane's churches.It is a Commissioners' church, receiving a grant under the Church Building Act 1818 towards the cost of its construction. The church cost £18,592, and the grant from the Church Building Commission amounted to £9,354. The church is a Grade I listed building.It resembles two other churches by the same architect — in particular Holy Trinity Church Marylebone — in its use of London stock brickwork with stone dressings, and carries the Soane hallmark of tall arched windows set in recesses. The depressed Ionic front with cornice sand balustrade over avoids the architectural problems encountered when a pediment is used.The east end was altered in 1888, and following wartime bomb damage, major reconstruction was carried out in 1953. The interior was re-ordered in 1982. St Peter's has always maintained a catholic tradition of worship, pastoral care and mission within the parish of Walworth, St Peter.The building was badly damaged by German bombing on 29 October 1940, when more than 30 of those sheltering in the crypt were killed outright and 100 more were injured. The church was restored under the direction of Thomas F. Ford and was re-dedicated by the Bishop of Southwark on 11 July 1953.

St Peter's Church, Walworth
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
274-276 Walworth Rd
London, SE17 2TE

020 7060 3672

St Peter's Church is an Anglican parish church in Walworth, London, in the Woolwich Episcopal Area of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It was built between 1823–25 and was the first church designed by Sir John Soane, in the wave of the church-building following the Napoleonic wars. It is the best preserved of Soane's churches.It is a Commissioners' church, receiving a grant under the Church Building Act 1818 towards the cost of its construction. The church cost £18,592, and the grant from the Church Building Commission amounted to £9,354. The church is a Grade I listed building.It resembles two other churches by the same architect — in particular Holy Trinity Church Marylebone — in its use of London stock brickwork with stone dressings, and carries the Soane hallmark of tall arched windows set in recesses. The depressed Ionic front with cornice sand balustrade over avoids the architectural problems encountered when a pediment is used.The east end was altered in 1888, and following wartime bomb damage, major reconstruction was carried out in 1953. The interior was re-ordered in 1982. St Peter's has always maintained a catholic tradition of worship, pastoral care and mission within the parish of Walworth, St Peter.The building was badly damaged by German bombing on 29 October 1940, when more than 30 of those sheltering in the crypt were killed outright and 100 more were injured. The church was restored under the direction of Thomas F. Ford and was re-dedicated by the Bishop of Southwark on 11 July 1953.

Pardis
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
280 Old Kent Rd
London, SE1 5

+44 (0) 20 7703 9840

Moroccan food
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
messanger street
London, sE171TE

07479308699

Heritage Tours
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
15 Alma Grove
London, EA1

01843234 345

Driscoll House
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
172 New Kent Road
London, SE1 4

020 7703 4175

Driscoll House is a building at 172 New Kent Road, London, England, which has operated as a hostel since 1913. The building is on the south side of New Kent Road, between the Bricklayers' Arms flyover and Elephant and Castle station, and is a well-detailed example of the pre-World War I institutional Baroque style.Ada Lewis HouseWhen it opened as "Ada Lewis House" in 1913, it was one of the first of a small number of accommodation places for women in London. The opening ceremony was performed by Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, and the building was named after Ada Lewis, widow of philanthropist Samuel Lewis.Driscoll HouseThe building was eventually bought by Terence Driscoll, founder of the International Language Club in Croydon. He renamed the building after himself, and two plaques were later added to the front of the building in remembrance of the 335,451 men and women of the Commonwealth (left plaque) and the 292,131 Americans (right plaque), who gave their lives in the two World Wars. The plaques were unveiled on 13 August 1995. The left plaque was unveiled by Mr Driscoll, and the right plaque was unveiled by representative of Admiral William James Crowe, US Ambassador to the UK from 1994 to 1997.

New Kent Road
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
New Kent Road
London,

New Kent Road is a 1km road in the London Borough of Southwark. The road was created in 1751 when the Turnpike Trust upgraded a local footpath. This was done as part of the general road improvements associated with the creation of Westminster Bridge; in effect it was possible to travel from the West End/ Westminster to the south-east without having to go via the Borough of Southwark but could now cross St George's Fields to the junction of Newington Causeway and Newington Butts which is where New Kent Road starts at Elephant and Castle. The route runs eastward for a few hundred yards to the junction of Great Dover Street and Tower Bridge Road, known as Bricklayers' Arms, where it joins the original route to the south-east Old Kent Road (the A2).The road forms part of the London Inner Ring Road and as such forms part of the boundary of the London congestion charge zone. New Kent Road is designated the A201 which, to the north-west past the Elephant and Castle, becomes London Road.

The Jam Factory
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
27 Green Walk
London, SE1 4

Bermondsey Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Bermondsey Square, Tower Bridge Rd
London, SE1 3

020 7234 0805

Bermondsey Square is located on Tower Bridge Road in Bermondsey, part of the London Borough of Southwark, in south London, England. The location was formerly the site of the 11th century Bermondsey Abbey.Archaeological excavations were undertaken in 2005–6 by Pre-Construct Archaeology. The earliest medieval remains found were a Norman church from around 1080, which was recorded in the Domesday Book. The area has subsequently undergone redevelopment and Bermondsey Square now contains apartments, offices, a boutique hotel, restaurants and an independent cinema.Bermondsey Market is an antiques market located at Bermondsey Square, which operates every Friday.Long Lane leads northwest to Borough High Street. This lane used to link the Abbey with St George the Martyr church on the High Street. To the west and heading north from the square is Bermondsey Street, leading to Tooley Street and London Bridge station about ten minutes walk away.

Bermondsey Market
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Bermondsey Square, London, SE1 3UN
London, SE1 3

020 7234 0805

Bermondsey Market is an antiques market located at Bermondsey Square on Tower Bridge Road in Bermondsey, part of the London Borough of Southwark, in South London, England. The location was formerly the site of Bermondsey Abbey. The site underwent redevelopment in 2006 and the market remained open during this period.HistoryThe Caledonian Market moved to its current location in 1950 after the old Caledonian Market site in Islington was designated for redevelopment in the late 1940s.Marché ouvertThe opening hours of the Bermondsey Market from 6am until noon reflect the ancient law of market ouvert, which was abolished in 1995. Under this law, in number of designated markets, including Bermondsey Market, if an item was sold between sunset and sunrise then its provenance could not be questioned, so stolen goods could be traded and good title would pass to the purchaser. To quote Minister for the Arts Estelle Morris in July 2003 during the Second Reading of the Dealing In Cultural Objects Bill: I did not have information about marché ouvert in the deep recesses of my mind, but experts reliably inform me that it no longer exists. The hon. Member for Uxbridge will be surprised to learn that it has been abolished only recently. It used to exist in designated markets, including Bermondsey. I am sure that the promoter will be interested in telling the hon. Member for Southwark, North and Bermondsey about that. In it, items could be sold before sunrise. Believe it or not, in this land of ours, people could sell stolen—my officials put "dodgy" in brackets, but we do not use that term—objects. I assure hon. Members that it has been abolished. I hope that that deals with the fears of the hon. Member for Uxbridge.

Shere House Sculpture Garden
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Great Dover Street
London, SE14YG

An art installation by Grassroot Garden, commissioned by Tabard Gardens North Tenants & Residents Association, inspired by Geoffrey Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’. Funded by a Cleaner Greener Safer grant from Borough, Bankside & Walworth Community Council. In the 1380s, half a mile from present day Shere House (located at the intersection of Trinity Street and Great Dover St), the fictional characters from Geoffrey Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’ set off on their pilgrimage towards Canterbury Cathedral. Anglo-Saxon society and culture is satirised and brought to life through the narrator’s description of the pilgrims and the tales they told on their journey. This installation imagines the twenty-nine pilgrims passing through this site, each depicted by a carved pole tilted towards Canterbury. Each pilgrim represents a section of the social hierarchy of medieval Britain, from the aristocratic nobility though to the criminal class. The carved poles are arranged in ascending height to mirror the social strata portrayed in Chaucer’s verse. The space the carvings occupy was planted with native British plants shrubs and hedging in order to create a wildlife friendly micro-habitat. Species planted include field maple, hawthorn, blackthorn, dog rose, hazel, common buckthorn, alder buckthorn, sea buckthorn, dogwood, wayfaring tree, and guelder rose. Links to hundreds of articles and essays on Chaucer and his characters: http://www.luminarium.org/medlit/chaucessays.htm Context and overview of the Canterbury Tales: http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/canterbury/context.html Social hierarchy in the Canterbury Tales: http://www.angieanderson.net/images/The_Canterbury_Tales_-_Chaucer_s_Adherence_....pdf Wife of Bath and historical context for women: http://jcc.icc.org.ro/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/JCC-vol-1-no-2-2011-pages-128-140.pdf Growth of vernacular literature: http://www.oxforddnb.com/public/themes/94/94766.html Chaucer the narrator: http://engl381-mueller.wikispaces.umb.edu/file/view/barbara.nolan.boethius.pdf http://web.archive.org/web/20000229181339/http://www.geocities.com/CollegePark/Hall/1170/chaucerhtml/pilgrim.html

St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
193 Bermondsey St
London, SE1 3

020 7234 0100

St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey is an Anglican church dedicated to St Mary Magdalen in Bermondsey in the London Borough of Southwark. The present building is late 17th century and is a Grade II* listed building.Its parish extends as far as the Thames (including the south tower of Tower Bridge, City Hall and part of London Bridge Station). The parishes of St Olave Tooley Street, St Luke Grange Road and St John Horsleydown have all been merged into it.HistoryA church of this dedication is first recorded on this site in 1290, serving lay workers at Bermondsey Abbey. The design of that building is not known, but in 1680 the church was demolished and rebuilt, retaining the late medieval tower with a gothic window and arches. This re-building was completed in about 1690, and was followed by the addition of a north gallery in 1705 and a south gallery in 1794. The south gallery retains the complete original boxed pews but those in the north gallery have had the gates removed.Further alterations were made under the supervision of the architect George Porter in 1830. He remodelled the tower and west end in an unacademic Gothic style and restored the medieval west window. The changes also involved removing the portico and school which extended into Bermondsey Street. The interior was redecorated in the Gothic Revival style in 1852 and is described in a document which can be dated to 1865 - 1879 by reference to the then rector. In 1883 the chancel was lengthened and a new stained glass window was installed, as well as other "beautification". Surviving the Blitz, the west end interior was damaged by fire in 1971. The church was first rendered externally in 1829, and was most recently re-rendered in 1994. A detailed description given in the volume of the Victoria County History covering the area, published in 1912. The church is now the oldest building in the locality, and the medieval arches are still visible inside the tower behind the organ (not normally accessible to the public).

Neal's Yard Dairy
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
106-114 Druid Street
London, SE1 2HH

+44 (0) 20 7367 0799

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, SE1 2UP

The George Inn, Southwark
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
77 Borough High Street, Southwark, London, England
London, SE1 1

The George, or George Inn, is a public house established in the medieval period on Borough High Street in Southwark, London. Currently owned and leased by the National Trust, it is located about 250 m from the south side of the River Thames near London Bridge. It is the only surviving galleried London coaching inn. The first map of Southwark (Duchy of Lancaster ca1543) clearly shows it marked as 'Gorge'. It was formerly known as the George and Dragon, named after the legend of Saint George and the Dragon. It is by far the oldest pub in London.HistoryIn 1677 the George was rebuilt after a serious fire that destroyed most of medieval Southwark. There had been many such inns in this part of London. Probably the most famous was The Tabard where, in 1388, Chaucer began The Canterbury Tales. The Tabard was also rebuilt after the same fire, but was demolished in the late nineteenth century.Later, the Great Northern Railway used the George as a depot and pulled down two of its fronts to build warehousing. Now just the south face remains.The George was one of the many famous coaching inns in the days of Charles Dickens. Dickens in fact visited the George and referred to it in Little Dorrit. It is thought that the galleried inns were the inspiration of the original theatres, that the Players were on a dais in the courtyard with the standing audience next to them and that those paying a premium would be in the galleries with a better view.

The George Inn, Southwark
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
77 Borough High Street, Southwark, London, England
London, SE1 1

The George, or George Inn, is a public house established in the medieval period on Borough High Street in Southwark, London. Currently owned and leased by the National Trust, it is located about 250 m from the south side of the River Thames near London Bridge. It is the only surviving galleried London coaching inn. The first map of Southwark (Duchy of Lancaster ca1543) clearly shows it marked as 'Gorge'. It was formerly known as the George and Dragon, named after the legend of Saint George and the Dragon. It is by far the oldest pub in London.HistoryIn 1677 the George was rebuilt after a serious fire that destroyed most of medieval Southwark. There had been many such inns in this part of London. Probably the most famous was The Tabard where, in 1388, Chaucer began The Canterbury Tales. The Tabard was also rebuilt after the same fire, but was demolished in the late nineteenth century.Later, the Great Northern Railway used the George as a depot and pulled down two of its fronts to build warehousing. Now just the south face remains.The George was one of the many famous coaching inns in the days of Charles Dickens. Dickens in fact visited the George and referred to it in Little Dorrit. It is thought that the galleried inns were the inspiration of the original theatres, that the Players were on a dais in the courtyard with the standing audience next to them and that those paying a premium would be in the galleries with a better view.

Leviathan
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, SE1 9SG

Floatworks London Bridge
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
1 Thrale St
London, SE1 9HW

020 7357 0111

Hop Exchange
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
24 Southwark Street
London, SE1 1

The Hop Exchange is a Grade II listed building at No. 24 Southwark Street, London, in the Bankside area of the London Borough of Southwark. Opened in 1867 and designed by R.H. Moore it served as the centre for hop trading for the brewing industry.OverviewHops, introduced to England from the Netherlands, are still used in the brewing industry. They are harvested from farms (known as "hop gardens") in Kent, and in the 19th century they were brought by railway to London Bridge Station, or by boat up the River Thames. They were then stored in the many warehouses in the Borough area.The purpose of the Hop Exchange was to provide a single market centre for dealers in hops. A glass roof allowed business on the trading floor of the Great Hall to be conducted under natural light. There were many similar outcry floor exchanges across London, such as the Coal, Metal and Stock exchanges, but wartime bombing, fires, redevelopment and modernisation have left the Hop Exchange the only one still standing. However, a fire in 1920 led to the top two storeys being removed, and the Hop Exchange was then converted into offices.

Cora Brazier
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Borough High Street London, SE1 1JX UK
London, SE1 1JX

02073780411

Hays Galleria
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Battle Bridge Lane
London, SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Borough Market
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
8 Southwark Streethh
London, SE1 1TL

+44 (0) 20 7407 1002

Community Guidelines We love to hear from our friends and visitors and encourage you all to post your photos and experiences about Borough Market. And if you ask us a question, we'll do our very best to answer it! The Page is not the place to advertise your own page or something that's not related to Borough Market. If you do, then we're sorry, but we'll remove your post. Likewise if you post spam or abusive messages, your post will be removed and you may be banned from our Page. If you're unhappy at anytime with the service or experience you have at the Market, you can email us directly at info@boroughmarket.org.uk. You can find out more about our complaints procedure on our website: http://boroughmarket.org.uk/page/complaints-procedure. Thanks for following us on Facebook - we hope you enjoy our updates!

London Bridge bus station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge Station Unit 10
London, SE1 9SP

020 7357 0069

London Bridge bus station serves the London Bridge area of the city of London and is situated at the London Bridge tube and rail station.There are three stands at the station which are situated on the station forecourt.London Buses routes 17, 43, 48, 141, 149 and 521 and night routes N21 and N343 serve the station.New bus stationA new bus station was built as part of the new Shard London Bridge "Gem" development which was open in 2012.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Unit 22, Hays Galleria, Tooley Street,
London, SE1 2HD

020 7407 4301

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property – then a brewhouse – in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

Southwark Cathedral
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, SE1 9DA

+44 20 7367 6700

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for more than 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since the creation of the diocese of Southwark in 1905.Between 1106 and 1538 it was the church of an Augustinian priory, Southwark Priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a parish church, with the new dedication of St Saviour's. The church was in the diocese of Winchester until 1877, when the parish of St Saviour's, along with other South London parishes, was transferred to the diocese of Rochester. The present building retains the basic form of the Gothic structure built between 1220 and 1420, although the nave is a late 19th-century reconstruction.HistoryLegendary originsThe 16th-century London historian John Stow recorded an account of the origins of the Southwark Priory of St Mary that he had heard from Bartholomew Linsted, who had been the last prior when the priory was dissolved. Linsted claimed it had been founded as a nunnery "long before the Conquest" by a maiden named Mary, on the profits of a ferry across the Thames she had inherited from her parents. Later it was converted into a college of priests by "Swithen, a noble lady". Finally in 1106 it was refounded as an Augustinian priory.

Anglican Diocese of Southwark
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Trinity House, 4 Chapel Court, Borough High Street
London, SE1 1HW

020 7939 9400

The Diocese of Southwark is one of the 42 dioceses of the Church of England, part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The diocese forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. It was created on 1 May 1905 from part of the ancient Diocese of Rochester that was served by a Suffragan Bishop of Southwark (1891–1905). Before 1877 the area was part of the Diocese of Winchester.The diocese covers Greater London south of the River Thames (except for the London Borough of Bexley and London Borough of Bromley) and east Surrey. Since the creation of the episcopal area scheme in 1991, the diocese is divided into three episcopal areas each of which contains two archdeaconries: Croydon Episcopal Area (overseen by the area Bishop of Croydon)Archdeaconry of Croydonincludes Deaneries of Croydon Addington, Croydon Central, Croydon North, Croydon South, and Suttonincludes Deaneries of Caterham, Godstone, and ReigateArchdeaconry of Lambethincludes Deaneries of Brixton, Clapham, Lambeth North, Lambeth South, Streatham, and Mertonincludes Deaneries of Battersea, Kingston, Richmond and Barnes, Tooting, and WandsworthArchdeaconry of Lewisham & Greenwichincludes Deaneries of Charlton, Deptford, East Lewisham, Eltham and Mottingham, Plumstead, and West Lewishamincludes Deaneries of Bermondsey, Camberwell, Dulwich, and Southwark and Newington In other ecclesiastical use, although having lost religious orders in the English Reformation, the diocese has the London home of the Archbishop of Canterbury and records centre of the Church of England in the diocese, Lambeth Palace.

Local business Near Tower Bridge

Bermondsey Health Centre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
108 Grange Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 3BW

+44 (0) 20 3049 7220

Golden Delight
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
130 Grange Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 3AL

+44 (0) 20 7237 7590

Crisis @ Christmas Warehouse
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
46 Willow Walk, Unit 7, Southwark, London, SE1 5SF
London, United Kingdom SE1 5

Kintore Way Children's Centre (SureStart)
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
97-102 Grange Road, Bermondsey
London, United Kingdom

020 7525 1196

Tradition Office Cleaning
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
26 Aberdour Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 4SG

020 7231 5888

Creative IT Laptop Repair
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
80 Willow Walk, The Willows, Unit 1
London, United Kingdom SE1 5SY

020 7237 6805

We specialise in all types of laptop computer repair services including: Laptop Motherboard Repair and Replacement Laptop Keyboard Repair and Replacement LCD and LED Screen Repair and Replacement Laptop Hard Drive Data Recovery Laptop Hard Drive Upgrade and Replacement Laptop Screen Backlight Repair and Replacement Laptop Screen Inverter Replacement Operating System Upgrade and Installation Laptop Software Troubleshooting Troubleshoot and Fix Video and Graphics Problems Laptop DC Power Jack Repair and Replacement

Bermondsey Project
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
46 Willow Walk Unit 7
London, United Kingdom SE1 5SF

020 7036 2816

Miloco Studios - Orinoco Complex
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
36 Leroy Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 4SP

+44 (0) 207232008

The Pool, The Bridge, The Bunker, The Red Room London

Cold Mountain Kit
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
44 Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 4TR

+44(0)20 7740 3393

We think that climbing shops should be fun, not intimidating, so we take extra care in helping our customers find what's right for them. To do this we have easily one of the biggest ranges of climbing equipment in London, not to impress, but to make sure we have what you need. Our staff are friendly and experienced and most importantly know the kit they sell. Chat, browse, buy or just sit on the sofa and watch a film. Our brands include Boreal, La Sportiva, Scarpa, Evolv, DMM, Beal, Petzl, Black Diamond, Grivel, Moon, Metolius, Prana, Sealine, MSR, Karma Climbing, Pitch Climbing, CAMP, Edelrid, Wild Country and Red Chili. Please note that the map shown by FB is incorrect. Use our address.

ABLE MODELS
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1.2.3 The Leathermarket, Weston Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2ER

Tower Bridge Care Center
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1 Tower Bridge Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 4

020 7394 6840

Artesian Health Centre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
137-138 Grange Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 3GF

+44 (0) 20 7403 3618

The Victoria
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
68-70 Pages Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 4H

20-72373248

Southwark Studios
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
40 Crimscott Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 5TE

Bermondsey Spa Gardens
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Spa Rd
London, United Kingdom SE16 3

Shahi Tandoori
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
77 Grange Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 3

+44 (0) 20 7231 5015

Andrew Kirby Veterinary Surgery
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
79 Grange Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 3BW

0207 232 2637

Cafe Amisha
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
161 Grange Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 3GH

02072317151

Best of Bermondsey Cafe
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
163 Grange Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 3

Planet Pizza
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
33 Bartholomew St
London, United Kingdom SE1 4

(020) 7403 2727