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Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London, London | Tourist Information



30 Charles Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

020-79173000

The Embassy of Saudi Arabia in London (officially the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia) (السفارة السعودية الملكية في لندن) is the diplomatic mission of Saudi Arabia in the United Kingdom. Saudi Arabia also maintains a Defence Attaché’s Office at 26 Queen's Gate, South Kensington, a Diplomatic Office of the Cultural Bureau at 630 Chiswick High Road, Gunnersbury, a Medical Section at 60 Queen Anne Street, Marylebone, a Commercial Section at 15/16 Queen Street, Mayfair, an Islamic Affairs Section at 2nd Floor, Park Lorne, 111 Park Road, Lisson Grove and an Information Section at 18 Seymour Street, Marylebone.The embassy is situated in Crewe House, a detached mansion designed and constructed by Edward Sheppard in 1730, set in its own grounds. Built in the Georgian style, it is a Grade II* listed building. The house was considerably altered in the late 18th and early 19th-century. Much of its neo-classical interior dates from the early 19th-century, and some of Shepard's original plasterwork ceilings may survive.

Community and Government Near Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London

London, England
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Kensington Court
London, United Kingdom W8 5DL

020 7983 4000

London is the capital city of England and the United Kingdom, the largest metropolitan area in the United Kingdom, and the largest urban zone in the European Union according to some measures. Located on the River Thames, London has been a major settlement for two millennia, its history going back to its founding by the Romans, who called it Londinium. London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its square-mile mediaeval boundaries. Since at least the 19th century, the name London has also referred to the metropolis developed around this core.[4] The bulk of this conurbation forms the London region and the Greater London administrative area, governed by the elected Mayor of London and the London Assembly. London is a leading global city, with strengths in the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, professional services, research and development, tourism and transport all contributing to its prominence. It is the world's leading financial centre alongside New York City and has the fifth-largest metropolitan area GDP in the world and the largest in Europe (as of 2008). London has been described as a world cultural capital. It has the third most international visitors in the world and London Heathrow is the world's busiest airport by number of international passengers. London's 43 universities form the largest concentration of higher education in Europe. In 2012 London will become the first city to host the modern Summer Olympic Games three times. London has a diverse range of peoples, cultures, and religions, and more than 300 languages are spoken within its boundaries. In July 2010 Greater London had an official population of 7,825,200, making it the most populous municipality in the European Union, and accounting for 12.5% of the UK population. The Greater London Urban Area is the second-largest in the EU with a population of 8,278,251, while London's metropolitan area is the largest in the EU with an estimated total population of between 12 million and 14 million. London had the largest population of any city in the world from around 1831 to 1925. London contains four World Heritage Sites: the Tower of London; Kew Gardens; the site comprising the Palace of Westminster, Westminster Abbey, and St Margaret's Church; and the historic settlement of Greenwich (in which the Royal Observatory marks the Prime Meridian (0° longitude) and GMT). Other famous landmarks include Buckingham Palace, the London Eye, Piccadilly Circus, St Paul's Cathedral, Tower Bridge, Trafalgar Square and Wembley Stadium. London is home to numerous museums, galleries, libraries, sporting events and other cultural institutions, including the British Museum, National Gallery, Tate Modern, British Library, Wimbledon and 40 theatres. The London Underground is the oldest underground railway network in the world and the second-most extensive (after the Shanghai Metro).

Green Park
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Green Park, The Royal Parks, London
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1J 7

0300 061 2350

Although situated so close to St James's Park, The Green Park is quite different in character. It is more peaceful with mature trees and grassland and is surrounded by Constitution Hill, Piccadilly and the Broad Walk. The Green Park was first recorded in 1554 as the place where a rebellion took place against the marriage of Mary I to Philip II of Spain. It was a famous duelling site until 1667 when Charles II bought an extra 40 acres and it became known as upper St James's Park. The Green Park is a peaceful refuge for people living, working or visiting central London, and is particularly popular for sunbathing and picnics in fine weather. It is also popular as a healthy walking route to work for commuters. The paths are used extensively by joggers and runners. - See more at: http://www.royalparks.org.uk/parks/green-park/about-green-park#sthash.WEFJqi0k.dpuf

The Mall, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

07515652715

The Mall is a road in the City of Westminster, central London, between Buckingham Palace at its western end and Trafalgar Square via Admiralty Arch to the east. Before it terminates at Whitehall it is met by Horse Guards Road and Spring Gardens where the Metropolitan Board of Works and London County Council were once based. It is closed to traffic on Sundays, public holidays and on ceremonial occasions.HistoryThe Mall began as a field for playing pall-mall. In the 17th and 18th centuries it was a fashionable promenade, bordered by trees.The Mall was envisioned as a ceremonial route in the early 20th century, matching the creation of similar ceremonial routes in other cities such as Berlin, Mexico City, Oslo, Paris, Saint Petersburg, Vienna and Washington, D.C. These routes were intended to be used for major national ceremonies. As part of the development – designed by Aston Webb – a new façade was constructed for Buckingham Palace, and the Victoria Memorial was erected.

Hamleys Regent Street, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
188-196 Regent Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 5BT

0371 704 1977

Royal Automobile Club
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
89 Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 5

020 7930 2345

The Royal Automobile Club is a British private club and is not to be confused with RAC, an automotive services company, which it formerly owned.It has two club houses: one in London at 89–91 Pall Mall, and the other in the countryside at Woodcote Park, Surrey, next to the City of London Freemen's School. Like many other gentlemen's clubs in London today, the Royal Automobile Club now permits women to be members.HistoryIt was founded on 10 August 1897 as the Automobile Club of Great Britain . The headquarters was originally in a block of flats at 4 Whitehall Court, moving to 119 Piccadilly in 1902.During 1902 the organisation, together with the recently formed Association of Motor Manufactures and Traders campaigned vigorously for the relaxation of speed limits claiming that the 14 mph speed limit imposed by the Locomotives on Highways Act 1896 was 'absurd' and was seldom observed. The organisations, with support from the Prime Minister Arthur Balfour, had considerable influence over the forthcoming Motor Car Act 1903 which originally proposed to remove all speed limits for cars while introducing the offence of driving recklessly. In the face of considerable opposition a speed limit of 20 mph was retained in addition to the creation of the offence of driving recklessly, dangerously or negligently.

Speakers' Corner
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Marble Arch, Hyde Park
London, United Kingdom W1K 1QB

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A Speakers' Corner is an area where open-air public speaking, debate and discussion are allowed. The original and most noted is in the northeast corner of Hyde Park in London, UK. Speakers here may talk on any subject, as long as the police consider their speeches lawful, although this right is not restricted to Speakers' Corner only. Contrary to popular belief, there is no immunity from the law, nor are any subjects proscribed, but in practice the police tend to be tolerant and therefore intervene only when they receive a complaint. On some occasions in the past, they have intervened on grounds of profanity. Historically there were a number of other areas designated as Speakers' Corners in other parks in London (e.g., Lincoln's Inn Fields Finsbury Park, Clapham Common, Kennington Park, and Victoria Park). More recently they have been set up in other British cities, and there are also Speakers' Corners in other countries.Hyde ParkThough Hyde Park Speakers' Corner is considered the paved area closest to Marble Arch, legally the public speaking area extends beyond the Reform Tree and covers a large area from Marble Arch to Victoria Gate, then along the Serpentine to Hyde Park Corner and the Broad Walk running from Hyde Park Corner to Marble Arch.Public riots broke out in the park in 1855, in protest over the Sunday Trading Bill, which forbade buying and selling on a Sunday, the only day working people had off. The riots were described by Karl Marx as the beginning of the English revolution.

Saint Christopher's Place
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
16-18 James Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 1

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Savile Club
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
69 Brook St
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

+44 (0)20 7629 5462

The Savile Club is a traditional London gentlemen's club founded in 1868. Though located somewhat out of the way from the main centre of London's gentlemen's clubs, closer to the residences of Mayfair than the clubs of Pall Mall and St James's Street, it still contains prominent names among its members. It was originally formed after a division of opinion within the old Eclectic Club as to whether to accept an offer of rooms by the Medical Club and cease to be simply a "night club" (in its 19th-century sense).Changing premisesInitially calling itself the New Club, it grew rapidly, outgrowing its first floor rooms overlooking Trafalgar Square at 9 Spring Gardens and moving to the second floor. It then moved to 15 Savile Row in 1871, where it changed its name to the Savile Club, before lack of space forced the club to move again in 1882, this time to 107 Piccadilly, a building owned by Lord Rosebery. With its views over Green Park it was described by the members as the "ideal clubhouse". However, after 50 years' residence, demolition of the building next door to create the Park Lane Hotel caused the old clubhouse such structural problems that, in 1927, the club moved to its present home at 69 Brook Street, part of the Grosvenor Estate in Mayfair. This was the former home of "Loulou" Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt, a Liberal cabinet minister who had taken his life on the premises to avert a scandal when his double life as a paedophile and sex offender was in danger of being uncovered. The building, a combination of Nos 69 and 71 Brook Street, owes its extravagant dix-huitième interior to Walter Burns, the brother-in-law of financier J.P. Morgan, who adapted it for his wife Fanny to entertain in suitable style. It thus includes an elegant hall, a grand staircase and a lavish ballroom.

Japanese Embassy
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
101-104 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

+44 (0) 20 7465 6500

Chatham House
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
10 St James's Square
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4L

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The Royal Institute of International Affairs, commonly known as Chatham House, is a non-profit, non-governmental organisation based in London whose mission is to analyse and promote the understanding of major international issues and current affairs. It is the originator of the Chatham House Rule and takes its name from the building where it is based, a Grade I listed 18th-century house in St. James's Square, designed in part by Henry Flitcroft and occupied by three British prime ministers, including William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham.In the University of Pennsylvania’s 2015 Global Go To Think Tanks Report, Chatham House is ranked the second most influential think tank in the world after the Brookings Institution, and the world's most influential non-U.S. think tank. In 2009, Chatham House was also named the top non-U.S. think tank by Foreign Policy magazine, which listed it as one of the top "scholars" for being among a handful of stars of the think-tank world who are regularly relied upon to set agendas and craft new initiatives.The current chairman of the Council of Chatham House is Stuart Popham and its director is Robin Niblett. The research directors are Rob Bailey, Patricia Lewis, Paola Subacchi and Alex Vines.

Brazilian Consulate
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
3 Vere Street
London, United Kingdom

+44 (0) 20 7659 1550

Embassy of Indonesia, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
38 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 2HW

The Embassy of Indonesia in London is the diplomatic mission of Indonesia in the United Kingdom. It is located on Grosvenor Square in Mayfair, close to the American embassy. Indonesia also maintain a Consular Department & Visa Section at 38A Adam’s Row, Mayfair.HistoryThe first diplomatic representative of Indonesia in the United Kingdom was Dr. Subandrio who served in 1949 until 1954. There have been 18 Ambassadors in the past years, including two air marshals, a lieutenant and Raden Mohammad Marty Muliana Natalegawa who is currently serving as the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Indonesia.DepartmentsThere are currently 10 Departments in the embassy including 2 Defence Attachés, 1 Transportation Attaché, 1 Trade Attaché and 1 Educational Attaché.

Italian Embassy in London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
14 Three Kings Yard
London, United Kingdom W1K 4EH

+4420 7312 2200

The Embassy of Italy in the United Kingdom is the official representation of Italian interests in the UK, and promotes dialogue and cooperation between the two countries in a wide range of areas, from politics, economy and commercial affairs to culture and scientific research. The Embassy also has an office for Italy’s representation at the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and a representative at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). The Embassy's Facebook page is a social media tool to engage and interact with a wider audience and raise the visibility of our varied activities. We look forward to an open and stimulating dialogue with all friends, fans and visitors! Please note that this page is NOT intended for Consular queries (e.g. passport, visa, citizenship, marriage and birth registration, notary public matters etc). You should consult the websites or Facebook page of the Italian Consulates in the UK for assistance on these matters. For the Facebook page of the Italian Consulate General in London please consult: https://www.facebook.com/consolatogeneralelondra Although we encourage constructive comments on a wide range of issues, please note that this page is not intended as a political forum. We do not tolerate any abusive, racist language or profanity. Any such postings will be deleted.

Marlborough House
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1D

020 7747 6491

Marlborough House is a Grade I listed mansion in the City of Westminster, in The Mall, London, east of St James's Palace. It was built for Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, the favourite and confidante of Queen Anne. For over a century it served as the London residence of the Dukes of Marlborough. It is now the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat.ConstructionThe Duchess wanted her new house to be "strong, plain and convenient and good". The architect Christopher Wren and his son of the same name designed a brick building with rusticated stone quoins (cornerstones) that was completed in 1711.The house was taken up by the Crown in 1817. In the 1820s plans were drawn up to demolish Marlborough House and replace it with a terrace of similar dimensions to the two in neighbouring Carlton House Terrace, and this idea even featured on some contemporary maps, including Christopher and John Greenwood's large-scale London map of 1830, but the proposal was not implemented.

RAF Club, 128 Piccadilly
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
128 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

Canada Gate
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Constitution Hill
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

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Burlington House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
31 Burlington Arcade
London, United Kingdom W1J 0PG

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Burlington House is a building on Piccadilly in London. It was originally a private Palladian mansion, and was expanded in the mid-19th century after being purchased by the British government. The main building is at the northern end of the courtyard and houses the Royal Academy, while five learned societies occupy the two wings on the east and west sides of the courtyard and the Piccadilly wing at the southern end. These societies, collectively known as the Courtyard Societies are:Geological Society of London (Piccadilly/east wing)Linnean Society of London (Piccadilly/west wing)Royal Astronomical Society (west wing)Society of Antiquaries of London (west wing)Royal Society of Chemistry (east wing) Burlington House is most familiar to the general public as the venue for the Royal Academy's temporary art exhibitions.HistoryThe house was one of the earliest of a number of very large private residences built on the north side of Piccadilly, previously a country lane, from the 1660s onwards. The first version was begun by Sir John Denham about 1664. It was a red-brick double-pile hip-roofed mansion with a recessed centre, typical of the style of the time, or perhaps even a little old fashioned. Denham may have acted as his own architect, or he may have employed Hugh May, who certainly became involved in the construction after the house was sold in an incomplete state in 1667 to Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Burlington, from whom it derives its name. Burlington had the house completed.

Buckingham Palace, London.
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace
London, United Kingdom London SW1A 1AA

Animals in War Memorial
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Brook Gate, Park Lane
London, United Kingdom W1K 7

020 7641 6000

The Animals in War Memorial is a war memorial in Hyde Park, London. It is located on Park Lane, at the junction with Upper Brook Street, on the eastern edge of the park.The memorial was designed by English sculptor David Backhouse to commemorate the countless animals that have served and died under British military command throughout history. It was unveiled in November 2004 by Princess Anne, the Princess Royal.HistoryThe memorial was inspired by Jilly Cooper's book Animals in War, and was made possible by a specially created fund of £1.4 million from public donations of which Cooper was a co-trustee. The memorial consists of a 55 ft by 58 ft (16.8 m by 17.7 m) curved Portland stone wall: the symbolic arena of war, emblazoned with images of various struggling animals, along with two heavily-laden bronze mules progressing up the stairs of the monument, and a bronze horse and bronze dog beyond it looking into the distance.The Animals in War Memorial was officially opened on 24 November 2004 by Anne, Princess Royal.In May 2013, it was one of two London war memorials vandalised on the same night. The word 'Islam' was spray-painted on it and the nearby RAF Bomber Command Memorial.InscriptionsBeneath the main header, "Animals in War", the memorial has two separate inscriptions; the first and larger reads:"This monument is dedicated to all the animals that served and died alongside British and allied forces in wars and campaigns throughout time."

St James's Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
11 Hamilton Place
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

20-74951771

St James's Street is the principal street in the district of St James's, central London. It runs from Piccadilly downhill to St James's Palace and Pall Mall. The main gatehouse of the palace is at the southern end of the road, and in the 17th century Clarendon House faced down the street across Piccadilly on the site of most of Albemarle Street.St James's Street was built up without an over-all plan but received a boost with Lord St Albans' planned construction of St. James's Square. Today St James's Street contains several of London's best known gentlemen's clubs, such as Brooks's, the Carlton Club and White's, some exclusive shops and various offices. A series of small side streets on its western side lead to some extremely expensive properties overlooking Green Park, including Spencer House and the Royal Over-Seas League at the end of Park Place.Two 18th-century yards survive behind the noble frontages and giant orders of columns or pilasters of the street. One is Blue Ball Yard, with stables built in 1742. The other is Pickering Place, with four informal Georgian brick houses of 1731. Jermyn Street leads off St James's Street to the east. The nearest tube station is Green Park to the west on Piccadilly.

Consulate and Embassy Near Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London

U.S. Embassy London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
24 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 6

020-7499-9000

Japanese Embassy
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
101-104 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

+44 (0) 20 7465 6500

Italian Cultural Institute London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
39 Belgrave Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8NX

020 7235 1461

Brazilian Consulate
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
3 Vere Street
London, United Kingdom

+44 (0) 20 7659 1550

Embassy of Indonesia, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
38 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 2HW

The Embassy of Indonesia in London is the diplomatic mission of Indonesia in the United Kingdom. It is located on Grosvenor Square in Mayfair, close to the American embassy. Indonesia also maintain a Consular Department & Visa Section at 38A Adam’s Row, Mayfair.HistoryThe first diplomatic representative of Indonesia in the United Kingdom was Dr. Subandrio who served in 1949 until 1954. There have been 18 Ambassadors in the past years, including two air marshals, a lieutenant and Raden Mohammad Marty Muliana Natalegawa who is currently serving as the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Indonesia.DepartmentsThere are currently 10 Departments in the embassy including 2 Defence Attachés, 1 Transportation Attaché, 1 Trade Attaché and 1 Educational Attaché.

High Commission of Malaysia, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
45, BELGRAVE SQUARE,
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8Q

+44 20 7235 8033

The High Commission of Malaysia in London is the diplomatic mission of Malaysia in the United Kingdom. Prior to independence the then-Malaya had a Commission in London; this was upgraded to a full High Commission upon independence in 1957. It was initially located on Trafalgar Square before relocating to Great Portland Street; it then moved to its current location in the mid 1960s.

Egyptian Embassy, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
26 South St
London, United Kingdom W1K 2XD

2074997947

US Embassy
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
24 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1A 2LQ

020 7499 9000

T.C. Londra Büyükelçiliği / Turkish Embassy in London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
43 Belgrave Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8PA

020 7393 0202

For visa or Turkish citizen services related matters, please contact the Turkish Consulate General on 020 7591 6900 between 2:30 and 5:30 pm Monday to Friday. Alternatively you can email the department on [email protected] or check their website: www.turkishconsulate.org.uk.

French Embassy
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
58 Knightsbridge
London, United Kingdom SW1X 7JT

+44 (0) 20 7073 1000

Canadian High Commission
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 4

020 7258 6600

Singapore High Commission in London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
9 Wilton Crescent, Belgravia
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8SP

+44 20 7235 8315

Operational Hours : Consular Section : Mondays - Fridays, 9.30 am to 12.30pm General : Mondays - Fridays, 9.00 am to 5.00 pm Closed from 1.00 pm to 2.00 pm Email: [email protected] (General) [email protected] (Consular) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Banner: Courtesy of the Singapore Tourism Board

KBRI london
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
38 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 2

+442072909600

Romanian Embassy 1 Belgarve Sq.
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
1 Belgrave Sq.
London, United Kingdom

Embassy Of The Arab Republic of Egypt
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
23 South St
London, United Kingdom W1K 2XD

020 7499 3304

Trinidad & Tobago High Commission, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
42 Belgrave Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8NT

+44 207 245 9351

The Trinidad & Tobago High Commission London is responsible for it's national residents and creating opportunities for Trinidad and Tobago within the United Kingdom and Europe in the fields of foreign trade, culture and tourism.

Embassy of Myanmar, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
19A Charles St
London, United Kingdom W1J 5DX

+44 (0) 207 499 4340

The Embassy of Myanmar in London, also referred to as the Embassy of Burma, is the diplomatic mission of Myanmar in the United Kingdom.

Embassy Of The Syrian Arab Republic
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
8 Belgrave Square
London, United Kingdom

020 7245 9012

The Portuguese Embassy
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
11 Belgrave Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8

020 7235 5331

Argentine Ambassador's Residence
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
49 Belgrave Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8QZ

Landmark Near Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London

Royal Academy of Arts
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Burlington House, Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0BD

02073008000

Wellington Arch
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Constitution Hill
London, United Kingdom W1J 7JZ

0207 9302726

Set in the heart of Royal London at Hyde Park Corner, Wellington Arch is a landmark for Londoners and visitors alike and a great addition to a memorable day out in London. The balconies also offer unique views across London and of the Household Cavalry, passing beneath on their way to and from the Changing of the Guard at Horse Guards Parade every morning. It was originally commissioned as a grand outer entrance to Buckingham Palace and moved to its present site in 1882.

Berkeley Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Berkeley Square, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

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Berkeley Square is a town square in Mayfair in the West End of London, in the City of Westminster. It was originally laid out in the mid 18th century by architect William Kent.The gardens in the centre are open to the public, and their very large London Plane trees are among the oldest in central London, planted in 1789.DescriptionWhilst Berkeley Square was originally a mostly residential area, there now remains only one residential block on the square – number 48. The square is mostly offices, including a number of hedge funds and wealth management businesses.The square features a sculptural fountain by Alexander Munro, a Pre-Raphaelite sculptor, made in 1865.The buildings around the square include several by other notable architects including Robert Adam, who designed Lansdowne House (since 1935 home of the Lansdowne Club) in the southwest corner of the square on Fitzmaurice Place. The daring staircase-hall of No. 44 is sometimes considered William Kent's masterpiece. Gunter's Tea Shop, founded under a different name in 1757, is also located here.

Piccadilly
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 8

Piccadilly is a road in the City of Westminster, London to the south of Mayfair, between Hyde Park Corner in the west and Piccadilly Circus in the east. It is part of the A4 road that connects central London to Hammersmith, Earl's Court, Heathrow Airport and the M4 motorway westward. St James's is to the south of the eastern section, while the western section is built up only on the northern side. At just under in length, Piccadilly is one of the widest and straightest streets in central London.Piccadilly has been a main road since at least medieval times, and in the middle ages was known as "the road to Reading" or "the way from Colnbrook". Around 1611 or 1612, a Robert Baker acquired land in the area and prospered by making and selling piccadills. Shortly after purchasing the land, he enclosed it and erected several dwellings, including his home, Pikadilly Hall. What is now Piccadilly was named Portugal Street in 1663 after Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, and grew in importance after the road from Charing Cross to Hyde Park Corner was closed to allow the creation of Green Park in 1668. Some of the most notable stately homes in London were built on the northern side of the street during this period, including Clarendon House and Burlington House in 1664. Berkeley House, constructed around the same time as Clarendon House, was destroyed by a fire in 1733 and rebuilt as Devonshire House in 1737 by William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire. It was later used as the main headquarters for the Whig party. Burlington House has since been home to several noted societies, including the Royal Academy of Arts, the Geological Society of London and the Royal Astronomical Society. Several members of the Rothschild family had mansions at the western end of the street. St James's Church was consecrated in 1684 and the surrounding area became St James Parish.

Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
The Dorchester Hotel, Park Lane,
London, United Kingdom W1K 1QA

020 7629 8888

Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester is a restaurant located in The Dorchester, a hotel in Park Lane, London. It is one of 27 restaurants operated by French chef Alain Ducasse: the head chef is Jean-Philippe Blondet, who replaced Jocelyn Herland in January 2016. Since 2010, it has been one of four UK-sited restaurants to hold three Michelin stars. It opened in 2007 to mixed opinions, but the reviews have since improved.DescriptionAt the time of opening, Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester was one of 27 restaurants around the world operated by Ducasse. He intended the restaurant to have "the modernity of Beige in Tokyo, the seriousness of La Plaza Athénée in Paris and the flavours of Le Louis XV in Monaco meeting the energy of London."The Head Chef was originally intended to be Nicola Canuti, but Canuti was replaced before opening by Jocelyn Herland, who moved from Ducasse's La Plaza Athénée in Paris. Patrick Jouin designed the interior of the restaurant, in light coffee and cream colours. The tables feature ceramic vegetables as centrepieces, handmade butter dishes in pink marble, and Porthault linen tablecloths.The restaurant features a special table for up to six diners called the "Table Lumière", which is surrounded by a thin white curtain which allows diners at the table to view out into the restaurant but prevents other diners from viewing in, and is lit by 4,500 fibre optic lights. Diners who book this table are allowed to select from a choice of tableware and menus, described by the restaurant as being a bespoke dining experience.

Savile Club
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
69 Brook St
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

+44 (0)20 7629 5462

The Savile Club is a traditional London gentlemen's club founded in 1868. Though located somewhat out of the way from the main centre of London's gentlemen's clubs, closer to the residences of Mayfair than the clubs of Pall Mall and St James's Street, it still contains prominent names among its members. It was originally formed after a division of opinion within the old Eclectic Club as to whether to accept an offer of rooms by the Medical Club and cease to be simply a "night club" (in its 19th-century sense).Changing premisesInitially calling itself the New Club, it grew rapidly, outgrowing its first floor rooms overlooking Trafalgar Square at 9 Spring Gardens and moving to the second floor. It then moved to 15 Savile Row in 1871, where it changed its name to the Savile Club, before lack of space forced the club to move again in 1882, this time to 107 Piccadilly, a building owned by Lord Rosebery. With its views over Green Park it was described by the members as the "ideal clubhouse". However, after 50 years' residence, demolition of the building next door to create the Park Lane Hotel caused the old clubhouse such structural problems that, in 1927, the club moved to its present home at 69 Brook Street, part of the Grosvenor Estate in Mayfair. This was the former home of "Loulou" Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt, a Liberal cabinet minister who had taken his life on the premises to avert a scandal when his double life as a paedophile and sex offender was in danger of being uncovered. The building, a combination of Nos 69 and 71 Brook Street, owes its extravagant dix-huitième interior to Walter Burns, the brother-in-law of financier J.P. Morgan, who adapted it for his wife Fanny to entertain in suitable style. It thus includes an elegant hall, a grand staircase and a lavish ballroom.

Savile Row
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
3 savile row, london
London, United Kingdom W1S 3

020 7734 2436

Savile Row is a street in Mayfair, central London. Known principally for its traditional bespoke tailoring for men, the street has had a varied history that has included accommodating the headquarters of the Royal Geographical Society at 1 Savile Row, where significant British explorations to Africa and the South Pole were planned; and more recently, the Apple office of the Beatles at 3 Savile Row, where the band's final live performance was held on the roof of the building.Originally named Savile Street, it was built between 1731 and 1735 as part of the development of the Burlington Estate. It was designed under the influence of Burlington's interpretation of Palladian architecture, known as "Burlingtonian". Henry Flitcroft, under the supervision of Daniel Garrett, appears to have been the main architect – though 1 and 22–23 Savile Row were designed by William Kent. Initially, the street was occupied mainly by military officers and their wives; later William Pitt the Younger and Irish-born playwright and MP, Richard Brinsley Sheridan were residents.Tailors started doing business in the area in the late 18th century; first in Cork Street, about 1790, then by 1803 in Savile Row itself. In 1846, Henry Poole, later credited as the creator of the dinner jacket or tuxedo, opened an entrance to Savile Row from his tailoring premises in Old Burlington Street. In 1969, Nutters of Savile Row modernised the style and approach of traditional Savile Row tailoring; a modernisation that continued in the 1990s with the "New Bespoke Movement", involving the designers Richard James, Ozwald Boateng, and Timothy Everest. The term "bespoke" as applied to fine tailoring is understood to have originated in Savile Row, and came to mean a suit cut and made by hand.

Hilton London Hyde Park Hotel
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
129 Bayswater Road
London, United Kingdom W2 4RJ

The Hilton London Hyde Park is a hotel situated on Bayswater Road, overlooking Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens in central London. It was opened in July 1999.The building was originally the Coburg Court Hotel, first opened in 1907, and it was later renamed the Coburg Hotel in the early 1960s.The Coburg Hotel was used as a filming location in Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy (1972). Richard Blaney and Babs Milligan check into the Coburg as "Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Wilde". Filming took place at the hotel during September 1971. The interiors of the Coburg Hotel were mostly recreated at Pinewood Studios, except for the policemen's point-of-view shot showing the fire escape, which was filmed by assistant director Colin M. Brewer from a fifth-floor room.The current hotel is the first Hilton Hotels & Resorts hotel in London with a state-of-the-art meeting room featuring an interactive projection and speaker system.

Piccadilly
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
City of Westminster, United Kingdom

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Piccadilly è una delle principali strade di Londra e si sviluppa per 1,5 km partendo a sud-ovest da Hyde Park Corner per terminare a Piccadilly Circus a nord-est. La strada fa parte della strada nazionale A4 (Londra-Bristol) una delle principali arterie del paese. Piccadilly è interamente compresa nella City of Westminster.Edifici notabili sulla strada includono il grande magazzino Fortnum and Mason, la Royal Academy, l'Hotel Ritz, il club della Royal Air Force, la libreria Hatchards e le ambasciate del Giappone e di Malta nel Regno Unito.Cenni storiciSino al XVII secolo l'area era conosciuta con il nome di Portugal. Il nome Piccadilly si deve ad un sarto di nome Robert Baker, proprietario di un negozio nello Strand, che fece fortuna producendo e vendendo dei colli rigidi che erano di moda all'epoca e che erano chiamati picadils. Il sarto comprò una vasta area nella zona occidentale di Londra e nel 1612 vi fece costruire un palazzo che venne chiamato Piccadilly Hall.Dopo la restaurazione della monarchia inglese (1660) le aree di Piccadilly e di Mayfair (situata più a nord) divennero delle ambite località residenziali, vi vennero costruiti alcuni fra i più sontuosi palazzi londinesi dell'epoca come Clarendon House (dove ora si trova Albemarle Street), Berkeley House (in seguito Devonshire House) e la residenza di Sir John Denham's (poi Burlington House). Successiva è invece la costruzione di Melbourne House (ora The Albany), Apsley House, Bath House e Cambridge House.

Piccadilly
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
City of Westminster, United Kingdom

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Piccadilly è una delle principali strade di Londra e si sviluppa per 1,5 km partendo a sud-ovest da Hyde Park Corner per terminare a Piccadilly Circus a nord-est. La strada fa parte della strada nazionale A4 (Londra-Bristol) una delle principali arterie del paese. Piccadilly è interamente compresa nella City of Westminster.Edifici notabili sulla strada includono il grande magazzino Fortnum and Mason, la Royal Academy, l'Hotel Ritz, il club della Royal Air Force, la libreria Hatchards e le ambasciate del Giappone e di Malta nel Regno Unito.Cenni storiciSino al XVII secolo l'area era conosciuta con il nome di Portugal. Il nome Piccadilly si deve ad un sarto di nome Robert Baker, proprietario di un negozio nello Strand, che fece fortuna producendo e vendendo dei colli rigidi che erano di moda all'epoca e che erano chiamati picadils. Il sarto comprò una vasta area nella zona occidentale di Londra e nel 1612 vi fece costruire un palazzo che venne chiamato Piccadilly Hall.Dopo la restaurazione della monarchia inglese (1660) le aree di Piccadilly e di Mayfair (situata più a nord) divennero delle ambite località residenziali, vi vennero costruiti alcuni fra i più sontuosi palazzi londinesi dell'epoca come Clarendon House (dove ora si trova Albemarle Street), Berkeley House (in seguito Devonshire House) e la residenza di Sir John Denham's (poi Burlington House). Successiva è invece la costruzione di Melbourne House (ora The Albany), Apsley House, Bath House e Cambridge House.

Embassy of Indonesia, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
38 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 2HW

The Embassy of Indonesia in London is the diplomatic mission of Indonesia in the United Kingdom. It is located on Grosvenor Square in Mayfair, close to the American embassy. Indonesia also maintain a Consular Department & Visa Section at 38A Adam’s Row, Mayfair.HistoryThe first diplomatic representative of Indonesia in the United Kingdom was Dr. Subandrio who served in 1949 until 1954. There have been 18 Ambassadors in the past years, including two air marshals, a lieutenant and Raden Mohammad Marty Muliana Natalegawa who is currently serving as the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Indonesia.DepartmentsThere are currently 10 Departments in the embassy including 2 Defence Attachés, 1 Transportation Attaché, 1 Trade Attaché and 1 Educational Attaché.

Burlington House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
31 Burlington Arcade
London, United Kingdom W1J 0PG

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Burlington House is a building on Piccadilly in London. It was originally a private Palladian mansion, and was expanded in the mid-19th century after being purchased by the British government. The main building is at the northern end of the courtyard and houses the Royal Academy, while five learned societies occupy the two wings on the east and west sides of the courtyard and the Piccadilly wing at the southern end. These societies, collectively known as the Courtyard Societies are:Geological Society of London (Piccadilly/east wing)Linnean Society of London (Piccadilly/west wing)Royal Astronomical Society (west wing)Society of Antiquaries of London (west wing)Royal Society of Chemistry (east wing) Burlington House is most familiar to the general public as the venue for the Royal Academy's temporary art exhibitions.HistoryThe house was one of the earliest of a number of very large private residences built on the north side of Piccadilly, previously a country lane, from the 1660s onwards. The first version was begun by Sir John Denham about 1664. It was a red-brick double-pile hip-roofed mansion with a recessed centre, typical of the style of the time, or perhaps even a little old fashioned. Denham may have acted as his own architect, or he may have employed Hugh May, who certainly became involved in the construction after the house was sold in an incomplete state in 1667 to Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Burlington, from whom it derives its name. Burlington had the house completed.

Spencer House, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
27 St James's Place
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1NR

Spencer House is a mansion in St James's, London, and is the property of the Earl Spencer.The house was commissioned by John, 1st Earl Spencer in 1756, the Earl requiring a large London house to cement his position and status. The architect he chose was John Vardy who had studied under William Kent. Vardy is responsible for the facades of the mansion that we see today.DesignIn 1758 James 'Athenian' Stuart who had studied the arcadian values of Ancient Greek architecture replaced Vardy as the architect of the project; as a direct result of this Spencer House was to have authentic Greek details in the internal decoration, and thus it became one of the first examples in London of the neoclassical style, which was to sweep the country.As the home of successive Earls and Countesses Spencer the state rooms of the house became a theatre for the pageant that was London high society. The Spencer family lived at the mansion continuously until 1895, when the house was let. The Spencers returned for a brief while in the first quarter of the 20th century; then again the house was let, at various times as either a club or offices. During the Blitz of World War II it was stripped of its few remaining authentic treasures, specially made furniture, and fireplaces.

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
114 Mount St
London, United Kingdom W1K 3

02074937811

The Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, also known as Farm Street Church, is a Roman Catholic parish church run by the Society of Jesus in Mayfair, central London. Its main entrance is in Farm Street, though it can also be accessed from the adjacent Mount Street Gardens. Sir Simon Jenkins, in his book England's Thousand Best Churches, describes the church as "Gothic Revival at its most sumptuous".

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
114 Mount St
London, United Kingdom W1K 3

02074937811

The Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, also known as Farm Street Church, is a Roman Catholic parish church run by the Society of Jesus in Mayfair, central London. Its main entrance is in Farm Street, though it can also be accessed from the adjacent Mount Street Gardens. Sir Simon Jenkins, in his book England's Thousand Best Churches, describes the church as "Gothic Revival at its most sumptuous".

St James's Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
11 Hamilton Place
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

20-74951771

St James's Street is the principal street in the district of St James's, central London. It runs from Piccadilly downhill to St James's Palace and Pall Mall. The main gatehouse of the palace is at the southern end of the road, and in the 17th century Clarendon House faced down the street across Piccadilly on the site of most of Albemarle Street.St James's Street was built up without an over-all plan but received a boost with Lord St Albans' planned construction of St. James's Square. Today St James's Street contains several of London's best known gentlemen's clubs, such as Brooks's, the Carlton Club and White's, some exclusive shops and various offices. A series of small side streets on its western side lead to some extremely expensive properties overlooking Green Park, including Spencer House and the Royal Over-Seas League at the end of Park Place.Two 18th-century yards survive behind the noble frontages and giant orders of columns or pilasters of the street. One is Blue Ball Yard, with stables built in 1742. The other is Pickering Place, with four informal Georgian brick houses of 1731. Jermyn Street leads off St James's Street to the east. The nearest tube station is Green Park to the west on Piccadilly.

Apsley House
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner, 149 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

020 7499 5676

Apsley House, also known as Number One, London, is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner, on the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south towards the busy traffic roundabout in the centre of which stands the Wellington Arch. It is a Grade I listed building.It is sometimes referred to as the Wellington Museum. The house is now run by English Heritage and is open to the public as a museum and art gallery, exhibiting 83 paintings from the Spanish royal collection. The 9th Duke of Wellington retains the use of part of the buildings. It is perhaps the only preserved example of an English aristocratic town house from its period. The practice has been to maintain the rooms as far as possible in the original style and decor. It contains the 1st Duke's collection of paintings, porcelain, the silver centrepiece made for the Duke in Portugal, c. 1815, sculpture and furniture. Antonio Canova's heroic marble nude of Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker made 1802–10, holding a gilded Nike in the palm of his right hand, and standing to the raised left hand holding a staff. It was set up for a time in the Louvre and was bought by the Government for Wellington in 1816 (according to Nikolaus Pevsner) and stands in Adam's Stairwell.

Apsley House
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner, 149 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

020 7499 5676

Apsley House, also known as Number One, London, is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner, on the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south towards the busy traffic roundabout in the centre of which stands the Wellington Arch. It is a Grade I listed building.It is sometimes referred to as the Wellington Museum. The house is now run by English Heritage and is open to the public as a museum and art gallery, exhibiting 83 paintings from the Spanish royal collection. The 9th Duke of Wellington retains the use of part of the buildings. It is perhaps the only preserved example of an English aristocratic town house from its period. The practice has been to maintain the rooms as far as possible in the original style and decor. It contains the 1st Duke's collection of paintings, porcelain, the silver centrepiece made for the Duke in Portugal, c. 1815, sculpture and furniture. Antonio Canova's heroic marble nude of Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker made 1802–10, holding a gilded Nike in the palm of his right hand, and standing to the raised left hand holding a staff. It was set up for a time in the Louvre and was bought by the Government for Wellington in 1816 (according to Nikolaus Pevsner) and stands in Adam's Stairwell.

Embassy of Myanmar, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
19A Charles St
London, United Kingdom W1J 5DX

+44 (0) 207 499 4340

The Embassy of Myanmar in London, also referred to as the Embassy of Burma, is the diplomatic mission of Myanmar in the United Kingdom.

New Zealand War Memorial, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner
London, United Kingdom W1J 7JZ

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The New Zealand War Memorial in London is a memorial to the war dead of New Zealand in the First and Second World Wars, unveiled in 2006. Officially named "Southern Stand", the memorial was designed by architect John Hardwick-Smith and sculptor Paul Dibble, both from New Zealand.It is located on the Piccadilly side of Hyde Park Corner, northeast of the Wellington Arch, and is diagonally opposite the Australian War Memorial. The traffic island that also houses an Equestrian statue of the Duke of Wellington, the Machine Gun Corps Memorial and the Royal Artillery Memorial.BackgroundThe memorial was established to commemorate "the enduring bond between New Zealand and the United Kingdom", and the lives lost by the two countries during the two World Wars. Dibble said:Thousands of soldiers from New Zealand served with the British Army in South Africa during the Boer War, at Gallipoli and on the Western Front during the First World War, and the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force served in England, the Middle East and Italy in the Second World War. Hundreds of New Zealanders also served in the Royal Flying Corps, Royal Air Force, and Royal Navy, including the battlecruiser HMS New Zealand and the light cruiser HMS Achilles. Prominent wartime commanders with connections to New Zealand included Bernard Freyberg and Keith Park.

Landmark Near Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London

Royal Academy of Arts
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Burlington House, Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0BD

02073008000

Wellington Arch
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Constitution Hill
London, United Kingdom W1J 7JZ

0207 9302726

Set in the heart of Royal London at Hyde Park Corner, Wellington Arch is a landmark for Londoners and visitors alike and a great addition to a memorable day out in London. The balconies also offer unique views across London and of the Household Cavalry, passing beneath on their way to and from the Changing of the Guard at Horse Guards Parade every morning. It was originally commissioned as a grand outer entrance to Buckingham Palace and moved to its present site in 1882.

Berkeley Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Berkeley Square, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

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Berkeley Square is a town square in Mayfair in the West End of London, in the City of Westminster. It was originally laid out in the mid 18th century by architect William Kent.The gardens in the centre are open to the public, and their very large London Plane trees are among the oldest in central London, planted in 1789.DescriptionWhilst Berkeley Square was originally a mostly residential area, there now remains only one residential block on the square – number 48. The square is mostly offices, including a number of hedge funds and wealth management businesses.The square features a sculptural fountain by Alexander Munro, a Pre-Raphaelite sculptor, made in 1865.The buildings around the square include several by other notable architects including Robert Adam, who designed Lansdowne House (since 1935 home of the Lansdowne Club) in the southwest corner of the square on Fitzmaurice Place. The daring staircase-hall of No. 44 is sometimes considered William Kent's masterpiece. Gunter's Tea Shop, founded under a different name in 1757, is also located here.

Piccadilly
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 8

Piccadilly is a road in the City of Westminster, London to the south of Mayfair, between Hyde Park Corner in the west and Piccadilly Circus in the east. It is part of the A4 road that connects central London to Hammersmith, Earl's Court, Heathrow Airport and the M4 motorway westward. St James's is to the south of the eastern section, while the western section is built up only on the northern side. At just under in length, Piccadilly is one of the widest and straightest streets in central London.Piccadilly has been a main road since at least medieval times, and in the middle ages was known as "the road to Reading" or "the way from Colnbrook". Around 1611 or 1612, a Robert Baker acquired land in the area and prospered by making and selling piccadills. Shortly after purchasing the land, he enclosed it and erected several dwellings, including his home, Pikadilly Hall. What is now Piccadilly was named Portugal Street in 1663 after Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, and grew in importance after the road from Charing Cross to Hyde Park Corner was closed to allow the creation of Green Park in 1668. Some of the most notable stately homes in London were built on the northern side of the street during this period, including Clarendon House and Burlington House in 1664. Berkeley House, constructed around the same time as Clarendon House, was destroyed by a fire in 1733 and rebuilt as Devonshire House in 1737 by William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire. It was later used as the main headquarters for the Whig party. Burlington House has since been home to several noted societies, including the Royal Academy of Arts, the Geological Society of London and the Royal Astronomical Society. Several members of the Rothschild family had mansions at the western end of the street. St James's Church was consecrated in 1684 and the surrounding area became St James Parish.

Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
The Dorchester Hotel, Park Lane,
London, United Kingdom W1K 1QA

020 7629 8888

Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester is a restaurant located in The Dorchester, a hotel in Park Lane, London. It is one of 27 restaurants operated by French chef Alain Ducasse: the head chef is Jean-Philippe Blondet, who replaced Jocelyn Herland in January 2016. Since 2010, it has been one of four UK-sited restaurants to hold three Michelin stars. It opened in 2007 to mixed opinions, but the reviews have since improved.DescriptionAt the time of opening, Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester was one of 27 restaurants around the world operated by Ducasse. He intended the restaurant to have "the modernity of Beige in Tokyo, the seriousness of La Plaza Athénée in Paris and the flavours of Le Louis XV in Monaco meeting the energy of London."The Head Chef was originally intended to be Nicola Canuti, but Canuti was replaced before opening by Jocelyn Herland, who moved from Ducasse's La Plaza Athénée in Paris. Patrick Jouin designed the interior of the restaurant, in light coffee and cream colours. The tables feature ceramic vegetables as centrepieces, handmade butter dishes in pink marble, and Porthault linen tablecloths.The restaurant features a special table for up to six diners called the "Table Lumière", which is surrounded by a thin white curtain which allows diners at the table to view out into the restaurant but prevents other diners from viewing in, and is lit by 4,500 fibre optic lights. Diners who book this table are allowed to select from a choice of tableware and menus, described by the restaurant as being a bespoke dining experience.

Savile Club
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
69 Brook St
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

+44 (0)20 7629 5462

The Savile Club is a traditional London gentlemen's club founded in 1868. Though located somewhat out of the way from the main centre of London's gentlemen's clubs, closer to the residences of Mayfair than the clubs of Pall Mall and St James's Street, it still contains prominent names among its members. It was originally formed after a division of opinion within the old Eclectic Club as to whether to accept an offer of rooms by the Medical Club and cease to be simply a "night club" (in its 19th-century sense).Changing premisesInitially calling itself the New Club, it grew rapidly, outgrowing its first floor rooms overlooking Trafalgar Square at 9 Spring Gardens and moving to the second floor. It then moved to 15 Savile Row in 1871, where it changed its name to the Savile Club, before lack of space forced the club to move again in 1882, this time to 107 Piccadilly, a building owned by Lord Rosebery. With its views over Green Park it was described by the members as the "ideal clubhouse". However, after 50 years' residence, demolition of the building next door to create the Park Lane Hotel caused the old clubhouse such structural problems that, in 1927, the club moved to its present home at 69 Brook Street, part of the Grosvenor Estate in Mayfair. This was the former home of "Loulou" Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt, a Liberal cabinet minister who had taken his life on the premises to avert a scandal when his double life as a paedophile and sex offender was in danger of being uncovered. The building, a combination of Nos 69 and 71 Brook Street, owes its extravagant dix-huitième interior to Walter Burns, the brother-in-law of financier J.P. Morgan, who adapted it for his wife Fanny to entertain in suitable style. It thus includes an elegant hall, a grand staircase and a lavish ballroom.

Savile Row
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
3 savile row, london
London, United Kingdom W1S 3

020 7734 2436

Savile Row is a street in Mayfair, central London. Known principally for its traditional bespoke tailoring for men, the street has had a varied history that has included accommodating the headquarters of the Royal Geographical Society at 1 Savile Row, where significant British explorations to Africa and the South Pole were planned; and more recently, the Apple office of the Beatles at 3 Savile Row, where the band's final live performance was held on the roof of the building.Originally named Savile Street, it was built between 1731 and 1735 as part of the development of the Burlington Estate. It was designed under the influence of Burlington's interpretation of Palladian architecture, known as "Burlingtonian". Henry Flitcroft, under the supervision of Daniel Garrett, appears to have been the main architect – though 1 and 22–23 Savile Row were designed by William Kent. Initially, the street was occupied mainly by military officers and their wives; later William Pitt the Younger and Irish-born playwright and MP, Richard Brinsley Sheridan were residents.Tailors started doing business in the area in the late 18th century; first in Cork Street, about 1790, then by 1803 in Savile Row itself. In 1846, Henry Poole, later credited as the creator of the dinner jacket or tuxedo, opened an entrance to Savile Row from his tailoring premises in Old Burlington Street. In 1969, Nutters of Savile Row modernised the style and approach of traditional Savile Row tailoring; a modernisation that continued in the 1990s with the "New Bespoke Movement", involving the designers Richard James, Ozwald Boateng, and Timothy Everest. The term "bespoke" as applied to fine tailoring is understood to have originated in Savile Row, and came to mean a suit cut and made by hand.

Hilton London Hyde Park Hotel
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
129 Bayswater Road
London, United Kingdom W2 4RJ

The Hilton London Hyde Park is a hotel situated on Bayswater Road, overlooking Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens in central London. It was opened in July 1999.The building was originally the Coburg Court Hotel, first opened in 1907, and it was later renamed the Coburg Hotel in the early 1960s.The Coburg Hotel was used as a filming location in Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy (1972). Richard Blaney and Babs Milligan check into the Coburg as "Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Wilde". Filming took place at the hotel during September 1971. The interiors of the Coburg Hotel were mostly recreated at Pinewood Studios, except for the policemen's point-of-view shot showing the fire escape, which was filmed by assistant director Colin M. Brewer from a fifth-floor room.The current hotel is the first Hilton Hotels & Resorts hotel in London with a state-of-the-art meeting room featuring an interactive projection and speaker system.

Piccadilly
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
City of Westminster, United Kingdom

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Piccadilly è una delle principali strade di Londra e si sviluppa per 1,5 km partendo a sud-ovest da Hyde Park Corner per terminare a Piccadilly Circus a nord-est. La strada fa parte della strada nazionale A4 (Londra-Bristol) una delle principali arterie del paese. Piccadilly è interamente compresa nella City of Westminster.Edifici notabili sulla strada includono il grande magazzino Fortnum and Mason, la Royal Academy, l'Hotel Ritz, il club della Royal Air Force, la libreria Hatchards e le ambasciate del Giappone e di Malta nel Regno Unito.Cenni storiciSino al XVII secolo l'area era conosciuta con il nome di Portugal. Il nome Piccadilly si deve ad un sarto di nome Robert Baker, proprietario di un negozio nello Strand, che fece fortuna producendo e vendendo dei colli rigidi che erano di moda all'epoca e che erano chiamati picadils. Il sarto comprò una vasta area nella zona occidentale di Londra e nel 1612 vi fece costruire un palazzo che venne chiamato Piccadilly Hall.Dopo la restaurazione della monarchia inglese (1660) le aree di Piccadilly e di Mayfair (situata più a nord) divennero delle ambite località residenziali, vi vennero costruiti alcuni fra i più sontuosi palazzi londinesi dell'epoca come Clarendon House (dove ora si trova Albemarle Street), Berkeley House (in seguito Devonshire House) e la residenza di Sir John Denham's (poi Burlington House). Successiva è invece la costruzione di Melbourne House (ora The Albany), Apsley House, Bath House e Cambridge House.

Piccadilly
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
City of Westminster, United Kingdom

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Piccadilly è una delle principali strade di Londra e si sviluppa per 1,5 km partendo a sud-ovest da Hyde Park Corner per terminare a Piccadilly Circus a nord-est. La strada fa parte della strada nazionale A4 (Londra-Bristol) una delle principali arterie del paese. Piccadilly è interamente compresa nella City of Westminster.Edifici notabili sulla strada includono il grande magazzino Fortnum and Mason, la Royal Academy, l'Hotel Ritz, il club della Royal Air Force, la libreria Hatchards e le ambasciate del Giappone e di Malta nel Regno Unito.Cenni storiciSino al XVII secolo l'area era conosciuta con il nome di Portugal. Il nome Piccadilly si deve ad un sarto di nome Robert Baker, proprietario di un negozio nello Strand, che fece fortuna producendo e vendendo dei colli rigidi che erano di moda all'epoca e che erano chiamati picadils. Il sarto comprò una vasta area nella zona occidentale di Londra e nel 1612 vi fece costruire un palazzo che venne chiamato Piccadilly Hall.Dopo la restaurazione della monarchia inglese (1660) le aree di Piccadilly e di Mayfair (situata più a nord) divennero delle ambite località residenziali, vi vennero costruiti alcuni fra i più sontuosi palazzi londinesi dell'epoca come Clarendon House (dove ora si trova Albemarle Street), Berkeley House (in seguito Devonshire House) e la residenza di Sir John Denham's (poi Burlington House). Successiva è invece la costruzione di Melbourne House (ora The Albany), Apsley House, Bath House e Cambridge House.

Embassy of Indonesia, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
38 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 2HW

The Embassy of Indonesia in London is the diplomatic mission of Indonesia in the United Kingdom. It is located on Grosvenor Square in Mayfair, close to the American embassy. Indonesia also maintain a Consular Department & Visa Section at 38A Adam’s Row, Mayfair.HistoryThe first diplomatic representative of Indonesia in the United Kingdom was Dr. Subandrio who served in 1949 until 1954. There have been 18 Ambassadors in the past years, including two air marshals, a lieutenant and Raden Mohammad Marty Muliana Natalegawa who is currently serving as the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Indonesia.DepartmentsThere are currently 10 Departments in the embassy including 2 Defence Attachés, 1 Transportation Attaché, 1 Trade Attaché and 1 Educational Attaché.

Burlington House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
31 Burlington Arcade
London, United Kingdom W1J 0PG

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Burlington House is a building on Piccadilly in London. It was originally a private Palladian mansion, and was expanded in the mid-19th century after being purchased by the British government. The main building is at the northern end of the courtyard and houses the Royal Academy, while five learned societies occupy the two wings on the east and west sides of the courtyard and the Piccadilly wing at the southern end. These societies, collectively known as the Courtyard Societies are:Geological Society of London (Piccadilly/east wing)Linnean Society of London (Piccadilly/west wing)Royal Astronomical Society (west wing)Society of Antiquaries of London (west wing)Royal Society of Chemistry (east wing) Burlington House is most familiar to the general public as the venue for the Royal Academy's temporary art exhibitions.HistoryThe house was one of the earliest of a number of very large private residences built on the north side of Piccadilly, previously a country lane, from the 1660s onwards. The first version was begun by Sir John Denham about 1664. It was a red-brick double-pile hip-roofed mansion with a recessed centre, typical of the style of the time, or perhaps even a little old fashioned. Denham may have acted as his own architect, or he may have employed Hugh May, who certainly became involved in the construction after the house was sold in an incomplete state in 1667 to Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Burlington, from whom it derives its name. Burlington had the house completed.

Spencer House, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
27 St James's Place
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1NR

Spencer House is a mansion in St James's, London, and is the property of the Earl Spencer.The house was commissioned by John, 1st Earl Spencer in 1756, the Earl requiring a large London house to cement his position and status. The architect he chose was John Vardy who had studied under William Kent. Vardy is responsible for the facades of the mansion that we see today.DesignIn 1758 James 'Athenian' Stuart who had studied the arcadian values of Ancient Greek architecture replaced Vardy as the architect of the project; as a direct result of this Spencer House was to have authentic Greek details in the internal decoration, and thus it became one of the first examples in London of the neoclassical style, which was to sweep the country.As the home of successive Earls and Countesses Spencer the state rooms of the house became a theatre for the pageant that was London high society. The Spencer family lived at the mansion continuously until 1895, when the house was let. The Spencers returned for a brief while in the first quarter of the 20th century; then again the house was let, at various times as either a club or offices. During the Blitz of World War II it was stripped of its few remaining authentic treasures, specially made furniture, and fireplaces.

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
114 Mount St
London, United Kingdom W1K 3

02074937811

The Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, also known as Farm Street Church, is a Roman Catholic parish church run by the Society of Jesus in Mayfair, central London. Its main entrance is in Farm Street, though it can also be accessed from the adjacent Mount Street Gardens. Sir Simon Jenkins, in his book England's Thousand Best Churches, describes the church as "Gothic Revival at its most sumptuous".

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
114 Mount St
London, United Kingdom W1K 3

02074937811

The Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, also known as Farm Street Church, is a Roman Catholic parish church run by the Society of Jesus in Mayfair, central London. Its main entrance is in Farm Street, though it can also be accessed from the adjacent Mount Street Gardens. Sir Simon Jenkins, in his book England's Thousand Best Churches, describes the church as "Gothic Revival at its most sumptuous".

St James's Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
11 Hamilton Place
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

20-74951771

St James's Street is the principal street in the district of St James's, central London. It runs from Piccadilly downhill to St James's Palace and Pall Mall. The main gatehouse of the palace is at the southern end of the road, and in the 17th century Clarendon House faced down the street across Piccadilly on the site of most of Albemarle Street.St James's Street was built up without an over-all plan but received a boost with Lord St Albans' planned construction of St. James's Square. Today St James's Street contains several of London's best known gentlemen's clubs, such as Brooks's, the Carlton Club and White's, some exclusive shops and various offices. A series of small side streets on its western side lead to some extremely expensive properties overlooking Green Park, including Spencer House and the Royal Over-Seas League at the end of Park Place.Two 18th-century yards survive behind the noble frontages and giant orders of columns or pilasters of the street. One is Blue Ball Yard, with stables built in 1742. The other is Pickering Place, with four informal Georgian brick houses of 1731. Jermyn Street leads off St James's Street to the east. The nearest tube station is Green Park to the west on Piccadilly.

Apsley House
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner, 149 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

020 7499 5676

Apsley House, also known as Number One, London, is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner, on the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south towards the busy traffic roundabout in the centre of which stands the Wellington Arch. It is a Grade I listed building.It is sometimes referred to as the Wellington Museum. The house is now run by English Heritage and is open to the public as a museum and art gallery, exhibiting 83 paintings from the Spanish royal collection. The 9th Duke of Wellington retains the use of part of the buildings. It is perhaps the only preserved example of an English aristocratic town house from its period. The practice has been to maintain the rooms as far as possible in the original style and decor. It contains the 1st Duke's collection of paintings, porcelain, the silver centrepiece made for the Duke in Portugal, c. 1815, sculpture and furniture. Antonio Canova's heroic marble nude of Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker made 1802–10, holding a gilded Nike in the palm of his right hand, and standing to the raised left hand holding a staff. It was set up for a time in the Louvre and was bought by the Government for Wellington in 1816 (according to Nikolaus Pevsner) and stands in Adam's Stairwell.

Apsley House
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner, 149 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

020 7499 5676

Apsley House, also known as Number One, London, is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner, on the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south towards the busy traffic roundabout in the centre of which stands the Wellington Arch. It is a Grade I listed building.It is sometimes referred to as the Wellington Museum. The house is now run by English Heritage and is open to the public as a museum and art gallery, exhibiting 83 paintings from the Spanish royal collection. The 9th Duke of Wellington retains the use of part of the buildings. It is perhaps the only preserved example of an English aristocratic town house from its period. The practice has been to maintain the rooms as far as possible in the original style and decor. It contains the 1st Duke's collection of paintings, porcelain, the silver centrepiece made for the Duke in Portugal, c. 1815, sculpture and furniture. Antonio Canova's heroic marble nude of Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker made 1802–10, holding a gilded Nike in the palm of his right hand, and standing to the raised left hand holding a staff. It was set up for a time in the Louvre and was bought by the Government for Wellington in 1816 (according to Nikolaus Pevsner) and stands in Adam's Stairwell.

Embassy of Myanmar, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
19A Charles St
London, United Kingdom W1J 5DX

+44 (0) 207 499 4340

The Embassy of Myanmar in London, also referred to as the Embassy of Burma, is the diplomatic mission of Myanmar in the United Kingdom.

New Zealand War Memorial, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner
London, United Kingdom W1J 7JZ

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The New Zealand War Memorial in London is a memorial to the war dead of New Zealand in the First and Second World Wars, unveiled in 2006. Officially named "Southern Stand", the memorial was designed by architect John Hardwick-Smith and sculptor Paul Dibble, both from New Zealand.It is located on the Piccadilly side of Hyde Park Corner, northeast of the Wellington Arch, and is diagonally opposite the Australian War Memorial. The traffic island that also houses an Equestrian statue of the Duke of Wellington, the Machine Gun Corps Memorial and the Royal Artillery Memorial.BackgroundThe memorial was established to commemorate "the enduring bond between New Zealand and the United Kingdom", and the lives lost by the two countries during the two World Wars. Dibble said:Thousands of soldiers from New Zealand served with the British Army in South Africa during the Boer War, at Gallipoli and on the Western Front during the First World War, and the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force served in England, the Middle East and Italy in the Second World War. Hundreds of New Zealanders also served in the Royal Flying Corps, Royal Air Force, and Royal Navy, including the battlecruiser HMS New Zealand and the light cruiser HMS Achilles. Prominent wartime commanders with connections to New Zealand included Bernard Freyberg and Keith Park.

Religious Center Near Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London

Marble Arch
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1H 7

870-2427114

Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch and London landmark. The structure was designed by John Nash in 1827 to be the state entrance to the cour d'honneur of Buckingham Palace; it stood near the site of what is today the three bayed, central projection of the palace containing the well known balcony. In 1851 it was relocated and following the widening of Park Lane in the early 1960s is now sited, isolated and incongruously, on a large traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street, Park Lane, and Edgware Road.Historically, only members of the Royal Family and the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery are permitted to pass through the arch; this happens only in ceremonial processions.The arch gives its name to the vicinity of its site, particularly, the southern portion of Edgware Road and also to the nearby underground station.Design and constructionThe design of the arch is based on that of the Arch of Constantine in Rome and the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel in Paris. The arch is faced with Carrara marble with embellishments of marble extracted near Seravezza. John Flaxman was chosen to make the commemorative sculpture. After his death in 1826 the commission was divided between Sir Richard Westmacott, Edward Hodges Baily and J.C.F. Rossi. In 1829, a bronze equestrian statue of George IV was commissioned from Sir Francis Chantrey, with the intention of placing it on top of the arch.

Westminster Cathedral
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
42 Francis Street
London, United Kingdom SW1P 1QW

Westminster Cathedral, or The Metropolitan Cathedral of the Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, in London is the mother church of the Catholic Church in England and Wales.The site on which the cathedral stands in the City of Westminster was purchased by the Archdiocese of Westminster in 1885. Westminster Cathedral is the largest Catholic church in England and Wales and the seat of the Archbishop of Westminster.John Betjeman called it "a masterpiece in striped brick and stone in an intricate pattern of bonding, the domes being all-brick in order to prove that the good craftsman has no need of steel or concrete."HistoryIn the late 19th century, the Catholic Church's hierarchy had only recently been restored in England and Wales, and it was in memory of Cardinal Wiseman (who died in 1865, and was the first Archbishop of Westminster from 1850) that the first substantial sum of money was raised for the new cathedral. The land was acquired in 1884 by Wiseman's successor, Cardinal Manning, having previously been occupied by the second Tothill Fields Bridewell prison.After two false starts in 1867 (under architect Henry Clutton) and 1892 (architect Baron von Herstel), construction started in 1895 under Manning's successor, the third archbishop Cardinal Vaughan with John Francis Bentley as architect, and built in a style heavily influenced by Byzantine architecture.

Apollo Theatre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
31 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 7

020 7494 5070

The Apollo Theatre is a Grade II listed West End theatre, on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster, in central London. Designed by the architect Lewin Sharp for owner Henry Lowenfeld, it became the fourth legitimate theatre to be constructed on the street when it opened its doors on 21 February 1901, with the American musical comedy The Belle of Bohemia.HistoryConstructionBecause Henry Lowenfeld had bought land on the newly created Shaftesbury Avenue at the turn of the 20th century – next door to the Lyric Theatre which opened in 1888 – the Apollo is one of the few theatres in London to be freehold.The only complete theatre design of architect Lewin Sharp, the Apollo was specifically designed for musical theatre and named after the Greek god of the arts and leader of the muses. Constructed by builder Walter Wallis of plain London brick in keeping with the neighbouring streets, the front piece is in the Renaissance style with sculpted stone fascia by T. Simpson. The structure encloses a four-level auditorium, with three cantilevered balconies and a first floor central loggia, decorated in the Louis XIV Style by Hubert van Hooydonk. In keeping with then European style, each level has its own foyer and promenade.

Sofra
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
1 St Christopher's Place
London, United Kingdom W1U 1

+44 (0) 20 7224 4080

Abercrombie and Fitch
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
40 Savile Row
London, United Kingdom W1S 3ES

+44 844 412 5750

Victoria Memorial, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

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The Victoria Memorial is a monument to Queen Victoria, located at the end of The Mall in London, and designed and executed by the sculptor Sir Thomas Brock. Designed in 1901, it was unveiled on 16 May 1911, though it was not completed until 1924. It was the centrepiece of an ambitious urban planning scheme, which included the creation of the Queen’s Gardens to a design by Sir Aston Webb, and the refacing of Buckingham Palace (which stands behind the memorial) by the same architect.Like the earlier Albert Memorial in Kensington Gardens, commemorating Victoria's consort, the Victoria Memorial has an elaborate scheme of iconographic sculpture. The central pylon of the memorial is of Pentelic marble, and individual statues are in Carrara marble and gilt bronze. The memorial weighs 2,300 tonnes and is 104 ft wide. In 1970 it was listed at Grade I.HistoryProposal and announcementsKing Edward VII suggested that a joint Parliamentary committee should be formed to develop plans for a Memorial to Queen Victoria following her death. The first meeting took place on 19 February 1901 at the Foreign Office, Whitehall. The first secretary of the committee was Arthur Bigge, 1st Baron Stamfordham. Initially these meetings were behind closed doors, and the proceedings were not revealed to the public. However the Lord Mayor of London, Sir Joseph Dimsdale, publicly announced that the committee had decided that the Memorial should be "monumental".

St. James's Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
St. James's, London, SW1
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4JU

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St. James's Square is the only square in the exclusive St James's district of the City of Westminster. It has predominantly Georgian and Neo-Georgian architecture and a garden in the centre. For its first two hundred or so years it was one of the three or four most fashionable residential address in London. It is now home to the headquarters of a number of well-known businesses, including BP and Rio Tinto Group; to three private members' clubs, the East India Club, the Canning Club and the Naval and Military Club; to the High Commission of Cyprus; and to the London Library. Also based in the square is the premises of the think tank Chatham House. The square's main feature is an equestrian statue of William III erected in 1808.HistoryIn 1662 Charles II extended a lease over the 45 acres of Pall Mall (St James's) Field held by Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans to 1720 and soon afterwards the earl began to lay out the property for development. The earl petitioned the king that the class of occupants they both hoped to attract to the new district would not take houses without the prospect of eventually acquiring them outright, and in 1665 the king granted the freehold of the site of St. James's Square and some closely adjacent parts of the field to the earl's trustees. The location was convenient for the royal palaces of Whitehall and St James. The houses on the east, north and west sides of the square were soon developed, each of them being constructed separately as was usual at that time.

Shaftesbury Avenue
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
65 - 73 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 6

020 7031 4300

Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, that runs in a north-easterly direction from Piccadilly Circus to New Oxford Street, crossing Charing Cross Road at Cambridge Circus. From Piccadilly Circus to Cambridge Circus it is in the City of Westminster and from Cambridge Circus to New Oxford Street it is in the London Borough of Camden.Shaftesbury Avenue was built in the late 19th century (1877–86) by the architect George Vulliamy and the engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette to provide a north-south traffic artery through the crowded districts of St. Giles and Soho. It was also part of a slum clearance measure, to push impoverished workers out of the city centre although the street's construction was stalled by legislation requiring rehousing some of these displaced residents, overcrowding persisted. Charles Booth's Poverty Map shows the neighbourhood makeup shortly after Shaftesbury Avenue opened. It is generally considered the heart of London's West End theatre district, with the Lyric, Apollo, Gielgud and Queen's theatres clustered together on the north side of the road between Piccadilly Circus and Charing Cross Road. At the intersection of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road there is also the large Palace Theatre. Finally, the north-eastern end of the road has another large theatre, called the Shaftesbury Theatre.

Chatham House
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
10 St James's Square
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4L

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The Royal Institute of International Affairs, commonly known as Chatham House, is a non-profit, non-governmental organisation based in London whose mission is to analyse and promote the understanding of major international issues and current affairs. It is the originator of the Chatham House Rule and takes its name from the building where it is based, a Grade I listed 18th-century house in St. James's Square, designed in part by Henry Flitcroft and occupied by three British prime ministers, including William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham.In the University of Pennsylvania’s 2015 Global Go To Think Tanks Report, Chatham House is ranked the second most influential think tank in the world after the Brookings Institution, and the world's most influential non-U.S. think tank. In 2009, Chatham House was also named the top non-U.S. think tank by Foreign Policy magazine, which listed it as one of the top "scholars" for being among a handful of stars of the think-tank world who are regularly relied upon to set agendas and craft new initiatives.The current chairman of the Council of Chatham House is Stuart Popham and its director is Robin Niblett. The research directors are Rob Bailey, Patricia Lewis, Paola Subacchi and Alex Vines.

The Gloucester
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
187 Sloane St
London, United Kingdom SW1X 9

0207 235 0298

Animals in War Memorial
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Brook Gate, Park Lane
London, United Kingdom W1K 7

020 7641 6000

The Animals in War Memorial is a war memorial in Hyde Park, London. It is located on Park Lane, at the junction with Upper Brook Street, on the eastern edge of the park.The memorial was designed by English sculptor David Backhouse to commemorate the countless animals that have served and died under British military command throughout history. It was unveiled in November 2004 by Princess Anne, the Princess Royal.HistoryThe memorial was inspired by Jilly Cooper's book Animals in War, and was made possible by a specially created fund of £1.4 million from public donations of which Cooper was a co-trustee. The memorial consists of a 55 ft by 58 ft (16.8 m by 17.7 m) curved Portland stone wall: the symbolic arena of war, emblazoned with images of various struggling animals, along with two heavily-laden bronze mules progressing up the stairs of the monument, and a bronze horse and bronze dog beyond it looking into the distance.The Animals in War Memorial was officially opened on 24 November 2004 by Anne, Princess Royal.In May 2013, it was one of two London war memorials vandalised on the same night. The word 'Islam' was spray-painted on it and the nearby RAF Bomber Command Memorial.InscriptionsBeneath the main header, "Animals in War", the memorial has two separate inscriptions; the first and larger reads:"This monument is dedicated to all the animals that served and died alongside British and allied forces in wars and campaigns throughout time."

St James's Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
11 Hamilton Place
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

20-74951771

St James's Street is the principal street in the district of St James's, central London. It runs from Piccadilly downhill to St James's Palace and Pall Mall. The main gatehouse of the palace is at the southern end of the road, and in the 17th century Clarendon House faced down the street across Piccadilly on the site of most of Albemarle Street.St James's Street was built up without an over-all plan but received a boost with Lord St Albans' planned construction of St. James's Square. Today St James's Street contains several of London's best known gentlemen's clubs, such as Brooks's, the Carlton Club and White's, some exclusive shops and various offices. A series of small side streets on its western side lead to some extremely expensive properties overlooking Green Park, including Spencer House and the Royal Over-Seas League at the end of Park Place.Two 18th-century yards survive behind the noble frontages and giant orders of columns or pilasters of the street. One is Blue Ball Yard, with stables built in 1742. The other is Pickering Place, with four informal Georgian brick houses of 1731. Jermyn Street leads off St James's Street to the east. The nearest tube station is Green Park to the west on Piccadilly.

The Gloucester
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
187 Sloane Street, Knihtsbridge
London, United Kingdom SW1X 9

0207 235 0298

Real English pub situated in the heart of fashionable Knightsbridge on Sloane street. Offering a warm and friendly sanctuary from the hustle and bustle of chic, exclusive boutiques. Real cask beer, hearty English food, realistic prices.

St James's, Spanish Place
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
22 George Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 3

St James's Church, Spanish Place, is a large English Gothic Roman Catholic church in Marylebone, London. Although currently situated in George Street, the church maintains its connection with Spanish Place, the road opposite the current church, because of its historic connection with the Spanish Embassy.SiteThe church is located in George Street, Marylebone, behind the Wallace Collection and close to Marylebone High Street.HistoryIn the reign of Elizabeth I the Bishops of Ely let their palace and chapel in Ely Place to the Spanish Ambassador and, until the reign of Charles I, it was occupied by the High Representative of the Court of Spain. During this period the chapel was freely used by English Roman Catholics and became a sanctuary to some degree for them.After the restoration of Charles II the Spanish Embassy was re-established in London, first on Ormond Street and then at Hertford House, Manchester Square, where the Wallace Collection is now housed. Here, in 1791, shortly after the Roman Catholic Relief Act 1791 repealed some of the laws affecting Catholic worship, a chapel was built on the corner of Spanish Place and Charles Street (now George Street), largely through the efforts of Doctor Thomas Hussey who had been a chaplain at the embassy since his ordination in 1769. Most of the objects of piety in the present church are legacies from this older building. In 1827 the official Spanish connection with the chapel ceased and it was handed over to the London Vicariate.

Christ Church Mayfair
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
21B Down Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

20-76295885

Embassy of Austria, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
18 Belgrave Mews West
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8HU

The Embassy of Austria in London is the diplomatic mission of Austria in the United Kingdom. Austria also maintain a Commercial Section at 45 Prince’s Gate, South Kensington and a Cultural Section at 28 Rutland Gate, South Kensington.HistoryThe Austrian Habsburg Monarchy had a permanent delegation in London from 1677 onwards, it was upgraded to the embassy of the Austrian Empire in 1860. The residence was in Chandos House in Marylebone, before it moved to Belgravia in 1866, thus making this the only building used by the Austro-Hungarian Foreign Service that is still used today the Austrian government.Following the rupture of diplomatic relations between Austria-Hungary and Britain after the outbreak of the First World War the embassy was looked after first by the government of America and then that of Sweden. Following the end of that conflict the embassy was given to the government of the new state of Austria, though a dispute over ownership of the embassy with Hungary was not resolved until 1934. Following the unification of Austria with Nazi Germany in 1938 the building was used as a German consulate, and was then looked after by the Swiss government following the outbreak of the Second World War. After a brief period of use by the Ministry of Works Austria resumed occupation of the embassy in 1949 where it remains to this day.

Училище " Боянь Мага",Лондон/ Bulgarian art school, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Soho Parish School , 23 Great Windmill Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 7LFВ

моб.+447919022006;

Българско Училище и Читалище за Български език , изкуства, занаяти и природа за деца от 0 до 19 години с нови методи на преподаване. Предмети- Български език, История, Литература, Пеене и блок-флейта, Рисуване, Моделиране, Калиграфия Извънкласни дейности Български Народни Танци- Танцов състав ''България" Детска вокална група "Шарени чорапки" Музика: пиано,солфеж, китара, кларинет, блок-флейта Драма и Куклен театър. Всички предмети се преподават на Български Език. Библиотеката разполага с книги за деца и възрастни с вяра,че нашите книги ще се увеличават Класове Група за родител и бебе ''Първи стъпки" 0-3 г Предучилищна група ''Букварче" 4-6 г 1-12 клас КУРСОВЕ: За Бременни майки, Български народни танци, Арт и Музикална терапия, Драма и куклен театър, "Паневритмия"- Танцът на Живота. Училището работи всеки петък от 16-19 и всяка събота от 10.00 до 14.00часа ( без ваканциите). Училище Боян Мага Mayfair Library,25 South Audley street,London, W1K 2PB Информация и записвания: Димитрина Ангелова 07919022006 Роси Китанова -07761719145 Oнлайн записване в сайта на училището http://boyanmaga.org/ Училище Боянъ Мага работи с любезното съдействие и подкрепата на Българското Посолство в Лондон, АБУЧ - Агенцията за Българите в Чужбина и МОМН - Министерство на Образованието Младежта и Науката

Westminster Synagogue
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Kent House, Rutland Gardens
London, United Kingdom SW7 1BX

020 7584 3953

Tyburn Convent
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
8 Hyde Park Pl
London, United Kingdom W2 2

20-77237262

Charing Cross Library
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
4-6 Charing Cross Rd
London, United Kingdom WC2N 4

+44 (0) 20 7641 4628

Landmark Near Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London

Embassy of Myanmar, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
19A Charles St
London, United Kingdom W1J 5DX

+44 (0) 207 499 4340

The Embassy of Myanmar in London, also referred to as the Embassy of Burma, is the diplomatic mission of Myanmar in the United Kingdom.

High Commission of The Bahamas, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
10 Chesterfield Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 5JL

02074084488

The High Commission of The Bahamas in London is the diplomatic mission of The Bahamas in the United Kingdom.

Embassy of Qatar, London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1 South Audley St
London, United Kingdom W1K 1

+442074932200

The Embassy of Qatar at 1 South Audley Street in Mayfair, London is the diplomatic mission of Qatar in the United Kingdom. The embassy is housed in a Grade II listed three storey house designed by the architect Frederick Pepys Cockerell and completed after his death by George Aitchison.The exterior of the house is richly decorated with a terracotta freize depicting putti.Qatar also maintains a Cultural and Military Section at 21 Hertford Street, Mayfair and a Health Section at 30 Collingham Gardens, South Kensington.In 2013 there was a protest outside the embassy against the alleged mistreatment of migrant workers in Qatar.

Hilton London Hyde Park Hotel
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
129 Bayswater Road
London, United Kingdom W2 4RJ

The Hilton London Hyde Park is a hotel situated on Bayswater Road, overlooking Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens in central London. It was opened in July 1999.The building was originally the Coburg Court Hotel, first opened in 1907, and it was later renamed the Coburg Hotel in the early 1960s.The Coburg Hotel was used as a filming location in Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy (1972). Richard Blaney and Babs Milligan check into the Coburg as "Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Wilde". Filming took place at the hotel during September 1971. The interiors of the Coburg Hotel were mostly recreated at Pinewood Studios, except for the policemen's point-of-view shot showing the fire escape, which was filmed by assistant director Colin M. Brewer from a fifth-floor room.The current hotel is the first Hilton Hotels & Resorts hotel in London with a state-of-the-art meeting room featuring an interactive projection and speaker system.

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
114 Mount St
London, United Kingdom W1K 3

02074937811

The Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, also known as Farm Street Church, is a Roman Catholic parish church run by the Society of Jesus in Mayfair, central London. Its main entrance is in Farm Street, though it can also be accessed from the adjacent Mount Street Gardens. Sir Simon Jenkins, in his book England's Thousand Best Churches, describes the church as "Gothic Revival at its most sumptuous".

Embassy of Egypt, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 Lowndes Street
London, United Kingdom

The Embassy of Egypt in London is the diplomatic mission of Egypt in the United Kingdom.Egypt also maintains several other buildings in London: a Consulate General at 2 Lowndes Street, Belgravia, a Press & Information Office at 299 Oxford Street, a Cultural Office at 4 Chesterfield Gardens, Mayfair and a Medical Office at 47 Longridge Road, Earl's Court.There have been several protests outside the embassy in recent years: in 2011 during the protests against Hosni Mubarak, in 2013 following the violent clashes in Cairo between supporters and opponents of Mohammed Morsi and also in 2013 there was a protest against the rise of sexual attacks against women in Egypt.

Grosvenor Chapel
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
24 South Audley St
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1K 2

020 7499 1684

Grosvenor Chapel is an Anglican church in what is now the City of Westminster, in England, built in 1730s. It inspired many churches in New England. It is situated on South Audley Street in Mayfair.HistoryThe foundation stone of the Grosvenor Chapel was laid on 7 April 1730 by Sir Richard Grosvenor, 4th Baronet, owner of the surrounding property, who had leased the site for 99 years at a peppercorn rent to a syndicate of four “undertakers” led by Benjamin Timbrell, a prosperous local builder.The new building was completed and ready to use by April 1731.Soon after the original 99-year lease ran out in 1829 the chapel was brought within the parochial system as a chapel of ease to St George's, Hanover Square.The chapel has been the spiritual home to a number of famous people including John Wilkes, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington, and his wife (parents to the Duke of Wellington), Florence Nightingale, U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Bishop Charles Gore.During the Second World War men and women of the American armed forces were welcomed to the chapel for their Sunday services, as recorded on a tablet outside the west wall, and after the war the congregation regularly included such people as the writer Rose Macaulay and Sir John Betjeman, Poet Laureate from 1972 until his death in 1984.

Piccadilly
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
City of Westminster, United Kingdom

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Piccadilly è una delle principali strade di Londra e si sviluppa per 1,5 km partendo a sud-ovest da Hyde Park Corner per terminare a Piccadilly Circus a nord-est. La strada fa parte della strada nazionale A4 (Londra-Bristol) una delle principali arterie del paese. Piccadilly è interamente compresa nella City of Westminster.Edifici notabili sulla strada includono il grande magazzino Fortnum and Mason, la Royal Academy, l'Hotel Ritz, il club della Royal Air Force, la libreria Hatchards e le ambasciate del Giappone e di Malta nel Regno Unito.Cenni storiciSino al XVII secolo l'area era conosciuta con il nome di Portugal. Il nome Piccadilly si deve ad un sarto di nome Robert Baker, proprietario di un negozio nello Strand, che fece fortuna producendo e vendendo dei colli rigidi che erano di moda all'epoca e che erano chiamati picadils. Il sarto comprò una vasta area nella zona occidentale di Londra e nel 1612 vi fece costruire un palazzo che venne chiamato Piccadilly Hall.Dopo la restaurazione della monarchia inglese (1660) le aree di Piccadilly e di Mayfair (situata più a nord) divennero delle ambite località residenziali, vi vennero costruiti alcuni fra i più sontuosi palazzi londinesi dell'epoca come Clarendon House (dove ora si trova Albemarle Street), Berkeley House (in seguito Devonshire House) e la residenza di Sir John Denham's (poi Burlington House). Successiva è invece la costruzione di Melbourne House (ora The Albany), Apsley House, Bath House e Cambridge House.

Piccadilly
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 8

Piccadilly is a road in the City of Westminster, London to the south of Mayfair, between Hyde Park Corner in the west and Piccadilly Circus in the east. It is part of the A4 road that connects central London to Hammersmith, Earl's Court, Heathrow Airport and the M4 motorway westward. St James's is to the south of the eastern section, while the western section is built up only on the northern side. At just under in length, Piccadilly is one of the widest and straightest streets in central London.Piccadilly has been a main road since at least medieval times, and in the middle ages was known as "the road to Reading" or "the way from Colnbrook". Around 1611 or 1612, a Robert Baker acquired land in the area and prospered by making and selling piccadills. Shortly after purchasing the land, he enclosed it and erected several dwellings, including his home, Pikadilly Hall. What is now Piccadilly was named Portugal Street in 1663 after Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, and grew in importance after the road from Charing Cross to Hyde Park Corner was closed to allow the creation of Green Park in 1668. Some of the most notable stately homes in London were built on the northern side of the street during this period, including Clarendon House and Burlington House in 1664. Berkeley House, constructed around the same time as Clarendon House, was destroyed by a fire in 1733 and rebuilt as Devonshire House in 1737 by William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire. It was later used as the main headquarters for the Whig party. Burlington House has since been home to several noted societies, including the Royal Academy of Arts, the Geological Society of London and the Royal Astronomical Society. Several members of the Rothschild family had mansions at the western end of the street. St James's Church was consecrated in 1684 and the surrounding area became St James Parish.

Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
6 Grafton St
London, United Kingdom W1S 4FE

2074999821

The Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, London is Hong Kong's representation in the United Kingdom. As a Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong does not have an embassy.The office is located at 18 Bedford Square in the City of Westminster in central London; the building also houses the London office of the London Representative Office of the Hong Kong Monetary Authority. It was previously located at 6 Grafton Street..The current Director-General of the office is Priscilla To, who reports to the Special Representative for Hong Kong Economic & Trade Affairs to the European Union, Brussels ETO.The Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office Act 1996 enacted by UK's Parliament conferred a number of personal immunity and tax privileges on HKETO London. When Hong Kong was under British administration, the office was known as the Hong Kong Government Office and was headed by a Commissioner.Apart from the UK, HKETO London is also responsible for maintaining ties with Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Russia and Sweden.

Embassy of Indonesia, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
38 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 2HW

The Embassy of Indonesia in London is the diplomatic mission of Indonesia in the United Kingdom. It is located on Grosvenor Square in Mayfair, close to the American embassy. Indonesia also maintain a Consular Department & Visa Section at 38A Adam’s Row, Mayfair.HistoryThe first diplomatic representative of Indonesia in the United Kingdom was Dr. Subandrio who served in 1949 until 1954. There have been 18 Ambassadors in the past years, including two air marshals, a lieutenant and Raden Mohammad Marty Muliana Natalegawa who is currently serving as the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Indonesia.DepartmentsThere are currently 10 Departments in the embassy including 2 Defence Attachés, 1 Transportation Attaché, 1 Trade Attaché and 1 Educational Attaché.

New Zealand War Memorial, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner
London, United Kingdom W1J 7JZ

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The New Zealand War Memorial in London is a memorial to the war dead of New Zealand in the First and Second World Wars, unveiled in 2006. Officially named "Southern Stand", the memorial was designed by architect John Hardwick-Smith and sculptor Paul Dibble, both from New Zealand.It is located on the Piccadilly side of Hyde Park Corner, northeast of the Wellington Arch, and is diagonally opposite the Australian War Memorial. The traffic island that also houses an Equestrian statue of the Duke of Wellington, the Machine Gun Corps Memorial and the Royal Artillery Memorial.BackgroundThe memorial was established to commemorate "the enduring bond between New Zealand and the United Kingdom", and the lives lost by the two countries during the two World Wars. Dibble said:Thousands of soldiers from New Zealand served with the British Army in South Africa during the Boer War, at Gallipoli and on the Western Front during the First World War, and the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force served in England, the Middle East and Italy in the Second World War. Hundreds of New Zealanders also served in the Royal Flying Corps, Royal Air Force, and Royal Navy, including the battlecruiser HMS New Zealand and the light cruiser HMS Achilles. Prominent wartime commanders with connections to New Zealand included Bernard Freyberg and Keith Park.

Gimpel Fils
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
30 Davies Street
London, United Kingdom

Gimpel Fils is a London art gallery based at 30 Davies Street in Westminster just off Grosvenor Square. The gallery was founded by Charles and Peter Gimpel, sons of the celebrated Parisian art dealer, René Gimpel, author of the Diary of an Art Dealer. Throughout its history it has maintained a commitment to contemporary British and International art.

Wellington Arch
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Constitution Hill
London, United Kingdom W1J 7JZ

0207 9302726

Set in the heart of Royal London at Hyde Park Corner, Wellington Arch is a landmark for Londoners and visitors alike and a great addition to a memorable day out in London. The balconies also offer unique views across London and of the Household Cavalry, passing beneath on their way to and from the Changing of the Guard at Horse Guards Parade every morning. It was originally commissioned as a grand outer entrance to Buckingham Palace and moved to its present site in 1882.

Savile Club
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
69 Brook St
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

+44 (0)20 7629 5462

The Savile Club is a traditional London gentlemen's club founded in 1868. Though located somewhat out of the way from the main centre of London's gentlemen's clubs, closer to the residences of Mayfair than the clubs of Pall Mall and St James's Street, it still contains prominent names among its members. It was originally formed after a division of opinion within the old Eclectic Club as to whether to accept an offer of rooms by the Medical Club and cease to be simply a "night club" (in its 19th-century sense).Changing premisesInitially calling itself the New Club, it grew rapidly, outgrowing its first floor rooms overlooking Trafalgar Square at 9 Spring Gardens and moving to the second floor. It then moved to 15 Savile Row in 1871, where it changed its name to the Savile Club, before lack of space forced the club to move again in 1882, this time to 107 Piccadilly, a building owned by Lord Rosebery. With its views over Green Park it was described by the members as the "ideal clubhouse". However, after 50 years' residence, demolition of the building next door to create the Park Lane Hotel caused the old clubhouse such structural problems that, in 1927, the club moved to its present home at 69 Brook Street, part of the Grosvenor Estate in Mayfair. This was the former home of "Loulou" Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt, a Liberal cabinet minister who had taken his life on the premises to avert a scandal when his double life as a paedophile and sex offender was in danger of being uncovered. The building, a combination of Nos 69 and 71 Brook Street, owes its extravagant dix-huitième interior to Walter Burns, the brother-in-law of financier J.P. Morgan, who adapted it for his wife Fanny to entertain in suitable style. It thus includes an elegant hall, a grand staircase and a lavish ballroom.

Bridgewater House, Westminster
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
14 Cleveland Row
City of Westminster, United Kingdom SW1A 1

Bridgewater House is at 14 Cleveland Row, Westminster, London, England. It is a Grade I listed building.HistoryThe earliest known house on the site was Berkshire House built in about 1626-27 for Thomas Howard, second son of the Earl of Suffolk and Master of the Horse to Charles I of England when he was Prince of Wales. Howard was later created Earl of Berkshire. After being occupied by Parliamentarian troops in the English Civil War, used for the Portuguese Embassy, and lived in by Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, the house was lived in by Charles II's mistress Barbara Villiers, who was made Duchess of Cleveland in 1670, following which the house was known as Cleveland House. She refaced the old house and added new wings. After being owned for some years by a speculator the house was sold in 1700 to John Egerton, 3rd Earl of Bridgewater, after which it passed by inheritance until 1948.Cleveland House was re-designed in the Palazzo style by Sir Charles Barry in 1840 and the rebuilding was completed and renamed in 1854 for Lord Ellesmere, heir of the 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. It is built in Bath stone with a slate roof in three storeys with a basement.

Lancashire Court
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
4-12 Lancashire Court, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1S 1EY

0207 518 9388

Welcome to Lancashire Court Tucked away behind the bustling streets of shoppers on New Bond Street lies a hidden treasure waiting to be explored. Lancashire Court is a uniquely charming haven offering visitors a sampling of some of London's finest restaurants, bars and stores. Whether browsing the shops by day, or sampling the indulgent delights by night, Lancashire Court provides the perfect setting for any occasion.

Albany (London)
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Albany Courtyard, Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0DS

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The Albany, or simply Albany, is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, London.BuildingThe Albany was built in 1770–74 by Sir William Chambers for the newly created 1st Viscount Melbourne as Melbourne House. It is a three-storey mansion, seven bays (windows) wide, with a pair of service wings flanking a front courtyard. In 1791, Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany abandoned Dover House, Whitehall (now a government office), and took up residence. In 1802 the Duke in turn gave up the house and it was converted by Henry Holland into 69 bachelor apartments (known as "sets"). This was achieved by subdividing the main block and its two service wings, and by adding two new parallel long buildings covering most of the garden, running as far as a new rear gate building on Burlington Gardens. Holland's new buildings of 1802-3 flank a covered walkway supported on thin iron columns and with an upswept roof. The blocks are white painted render in a simpler Regency style than Chambers' work. Most sets are accessed off common staircases without doors, like Oxbridge colleges and the Inns of Court.HistorySince its conversion, the Albany has been a prestigious set of bachelor apartments in London. The residents have included such famous names as the poet Lord Byron and the future Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone, and numerous members of the aristocracy.

St James's Palace
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

Embassy of Ireland, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
17 Grosvenor Place
London, United Kingdom SW1X 7

20-72352171

The Embassy of Ireland in London is the diplomatic mission of the Republic of Ireland in the United Kingdom. Ireland also maintains a Passport and Visa Office at 114A Cromwell Road, South Kensington.The London mission is concurrently the non-resident ambassador to the nation(s) of: Barbados.