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Fishmongers Hall, London | Tourist Information


Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9EL

0207 626 3531

Event Venue Near Fishmongers Hall

Schools Plus - Harris Academy Bermondsey
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
55 Southwark Park Road
London, SE16 3TZ

07889352972

School's Out. We're In. Schools Plus have teamed up with the fantastic Harris Academy Bermondsey to provide fantastic venue hire, for you! Open weekday evenings and all weekend. Want to throw a party but have no where to fit all your friends? We've got the space! Want to play some sports, or bring your sporting organisation? We've got the space! Want to have a regular church service? We've tot the space! Any event, we will do our best to accommodate you at a reasonable price.

Ministery Of Sound - Discoteche Of London
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
103 Gaunt Street
London, SE1 6DP

The Bottle Shop
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
128 Druid Street
London, SE1 2HH

020 3490 9252

The Bottle Shop offers one of London's greatest beer selections at the best London prices. We import beer from all over the world and wholesale it to Pubs and Bottle Shops in the UK. Our retail location is based in Bermondsey, 128 Druid Street SE1 2HH, and we are open to the public on Fridays 5:00pm-9:30pm & Saturdays from 10:00am-7:00pm. We are sometimes open on Thursday's for special events, Tap Take Overs, Meet The Brewers or Tastings. Check out our Events Pages for more info. Our space is now available to hire for private parties and events. We have 12 taps available, 6 downstairs and 6 up in our mezzanine. For more information about our retail location please email [email protected] and for information about wholesale please email [email protected]

Ugly Duck
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
47-49 Tanner Street
London, SE1 3PL

07826854146

Ruse Bar London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
280 Borough High Street
London, SE1 1JS

020 7378 6123

A stylish, warm area, perfect for a long dinner with friends or a working lunch. The Bar has everything from large dinner tables, to luxurious leather chairs for having a quiet cocktail after work. It can also be booked as private function room for professional events, parties or business lunches. The bar also offers an excellent environment for watching Sport. Ruse has all the top matches and games. We are South East London's Liverpool supporters bar and you can enjoy football in a more sophisticated setting. We have 3 plasma screens and 2 Sky boxes.

Comedy Bin at The Old School Yard
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
111 Long Lane, Borough
London, SE1 4PH

“MC Brian Chimombo host an exciting and friendly comedy night in the atmospheric basement of The Old School Yard – new acts mix it up with special guests and a headline each week. Fun, friendly and free.” for spots: www.comedybin.org/available_spots.htm email: [email protected]

Diane Anderson
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
200 Borough High Street
London, SE1 1JX

020 7378 0415

Dram & Smoke
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
All Ayer The Gaff
London,

Tanner & Co
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
50 Bermondsey Street
London, SE1 3UD

02073570244

Tanner Warehouse
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
50 Bermondsey Street
London, SE1 3UD

02073570244

Moonraker Studios
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1 Pocock Street
London, SE1 0FN

07951510540

College of Occupational Therapists
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
106-114 Borough High Street
London, SE1 1LB

020 7357 6480

Please note that we do not allow advertising on our social media channels. If you would like to advertise a job or event to our members, please contact [email protected] COT members are welcome to use this page to recruit participants for research, but please read our research recruitment guidelines first as we will have to remove any post that does not meet these requirements: http://bit.ly/JwrIjY Use of the BAOT/COT logo is not permitted without permission from COT. Use of our logo implies that you are representing BAOT/COT in an official capacity or that your event/organisation/etc is endorsed by COT.

Thames Luxury Charters
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Eagle Wharf, 53 Lafone Street
London, SE1 2LX

020 73577751

We have enormous affection for the River Thames. Carving its way through the very heart of our great capital city, the Thames is London's most famous asset. There is simply no better way to view London's beautiful sights than from your own private river boat. If you are lucky enough to have experienced this feeling - gliding past some of London's most famous landmarks illuminated in all their glory, glass of champagne in hand, gentle breeze on your face - then you will fully appreciate our level of affection! At Thames Luxury Charters we want to share our love of the iconic River Thames.

Shangri-La Hotel, At The Shard, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
The Shard, 31 St Thomas Street
London, SE1 9QU

+44 20 7234 8000

Unicorn Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
147 Tooley Street
London, SE1 2HZ

The Unicorn Theatre is the UK's leading theatre for audiences aged 2–21. The theatre has its home in a custom-built, RIBA Award–winning building on Tooley Street, in the London Borough of Southwark, which opened in 2005. The theatre was designed by Keith Williams, built by Arup and comprises two theatre spaces (the Weston and Clore Theatres), an education studio, rehearsal space, café and the John Lyon meeting room.The theatre was founded in 1947, by Caryl Jenner, originally as a Mobile Theatre; In 1961, Jenner began presenting children's productions at the Arts Theatre in the West End, and in 1967 the company took over the lease of the theatre which then became Unicorn's permanent performing base until 1999; during this period the normal run of adult performances continued during the evenings.The Unicorn is a registered charity and is an Arts Council England National Portfolio organisation.OriginsFrom 1944 Caryl Jenner wrote Christmas pantomimes for small-time playhouses. During performances she would make note of the behaviour of the children, recording what scenes and sequences held their attention, and which did not. She began to formulate the principles that would guide her theatre and writing. In 1947 the ‘Mobile Theatre’ was born. Caryl's mission was to drive around the austere post-war towns of Britain, as well as isolated villages to bring theatre to new audiences. They supplemented their income by performing to adults in the evenings but their goal was always to captivate the minds and imagination of children.

Overseas Development Institute (ODI)
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
203 Blackfriars Road
London, SE1 8NN

+44 (0)20 7922 0300

City Hall, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
110 The Queens Walk, LONDON, SE1 2AA
London, SE1 2

20-79834100

City Hall is the headquarters of the Greater London Authority (GLA), which comprises the Mayor of London and the London Assembly. It is located in Southwark, on the south bank of the River Thames near Tower Bridge. It was designed by Norman Foster and opened in July 2002, two years after the Greater London Authority was created.BackgroundFor the first two years of its existence, the Greater London Authority was based at Romney House, Marsham Street in Westminster. Meetings of the London Assembly took place at Emmanuel Centre, also on Marsham Street.City Hall was constructed at a cost of £43 million on a site formerly occupied by wharves serving the Pool of London. The building does not belong to the GLA but is leased under a 25-year rent. Despite its name, City Hall is not in and does not serve a city (as recognised by English constitutional law), which often adds to the confusion of Greater London with the City of London, which has its headquarters at Guildhall. In June 2011, Mayor Boris Johnson announced that for the duration of the London 2012 Olympic Games, the building would be called London House.

Tower Bridge Walkways
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge, Tower Bridge Road
London, SE1 2UP

Glaziers Hall
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
9 Montague Close
London, SE1 9DD

+44 20 7403 3300

Situated between the River Thames, with unrivalled views over the City, and London’s cultural Southbank and Borough Market, Glaziers Hall is one of London’s most unique venues. The venue offers five flexible event spaces ideal for corporate events, presentations, conferences, receptions and dinners. Accommodating 10 – 600 guests, the rooms can be used in conjunction with each other or booked separately. Centrally located with excellent public transport links, including river taxis, the venue is only minutes’ walk from London Bridge and Waterloo station. Glaziers Hall is easy to reach on the many cycle routes and bicycle parking (including Santandar Cycle docking station) is available close by. If you are looking for one of the most unique London venues to host any event in a central London location, then the historic Glaziers Hall building is the perfect choice. The original Glaziers Hall in Fye Foot Lane was destroyed during the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not relocated for another 300 years. It’s current home, which was built in 1808 as a warehouse, adjoins London Bridge and the so-called ‘Nancy Steps’ made famous by Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist. Glaziers Hall’s evolving sustainability strategy includes the development of an Environmental Management System in partnership with Smart Green Business and Better Bankside – a move that will see this unique London venue reach Stage three certification.

MALA
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
2 Marble Quay, St Katharine Docks
London, E1W 1UH

+44 (0) 2074806356

Serves traditional & contemporary Indian cuisine from North (Mainly Punjab) & South India, from Curries to Tandoori clay oven baked delights. including a delicious variaty of seafood dishes within our menu. And also a generous array of fine wines from all over the globe to compliment the diverse flavours of our cuisne. With a seating capasity of 200, the ambience of our restaurant is welcoming and relaxing, surrounded with antiques, paintings & murials from historic palaces around India which gives you the atmospheric feeling that you are actually there. And adding to the ambience, the impressive and beautiful view of St Katharine Docks marina can be seen from any where in the restaurant.

Rainmaking Loft
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
International House, 1 St Katharine's Way
London, E1W 1UN

Rainmaking Loft is a coworking space for tech startups, located in the vibrant, historic St Katharine Docks marina, next to Tower Bridge and The Tower of London. A stone’s throw away from Shoreditch and the City, we are proud to be a major player in supporting this dynamic area as the new up and coming ‘Tech Hub’. Rainmaking Loft’s members are Heroes at work. Our mission is to give them the best possible environment in which to grow their company. Whether that is connecting them to an experienced fellow member, helping them to find a suitable investor or offering access to our extensive network of experts. The London Loft is part of a family that also consists of Lofts in Copenhagen and Berlin, which members are welcome to make use of. In addition to co-working spaces, Rainmaking founded Startupbootcamp, an international accelerator program and Rainmaking Innovation, a global innovation consultancy in addition to an extensive portfolio of successful startups. Our space overlooks the Docks, which brings tranquillity into a bustling environment, boosting creativity. Creation is at the heart of our community, Rainmaking Loft encourages collaborations between members through quick sit-downs in the Club, whiteboard meetings, community events (e.g. Wednesday Yoga and Friday Beers) and more purpose built meetups (e.g. The Loft Lunch and The Inspiration Hour). We pride ourselves on our diversity at the Loft, counting more than 35 different nationalities. We are a close-knit community where startups can exchange and evolve together. Rainmaking Loft is not only home to more than 200 bright entrepreneurs. Our amazing location on St Katharine Docks is a unique setting suitable for a range of events. From workshops and conferences to panel debates, to drinks receptions and hackathons. Everything we host is marked by the energy of the startups around us. Our 1,400 sqft event space offers views of iconic London landmarks. Our unique and flexible space includes furniture for all types of events, high quality projector and screen and first class sound system. It accommodates a maximum of 150 people, but the space can be divided into intimate sections.

Tate Film
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Bankside
London, SE1 9TG

0207 887 8888

Old Billingsgate Hall
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Old Billingsgate Wal
London, EC3R 6DX

020 7283 2800

Old billinsgate London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Old Billinsgate Walk, 16 Lower Thames Street
London, EC3R 6 DX

Havengore
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Katharine Docks, 50 St Katharine's Way, London
London, E1W 1LA

0207 183 0110

The Steelyard
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
13-16 Allhallows Lane
London, EC4R 3UL

02072831505

Landmark Near Fishmongers Hall

Unicorn Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
147 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2HZ

The Unicorn Theatre is the UK's leading theatre for audiences aged 2–21. The theatre has its home in a custom-built, RIBA Award–winning building on Tooley Street, in the London Borough of Southwark, which opened in 2005. The theatre was designed by Keith Williams, built by Arup and comprises two theatre spaces (the Weston and Clore Theatres), an education studio, rehearsal space, café and the John Lyon meeting room.The theatre was founded in 1947, by Caryl Jenner, originally as a Mobile Theatre; In 1961, Jenner began presenting children's productions at the Arts Theatre in the West End, and in 1967 the company took over the lease of the theatre which then became Unicorn's permanent performing base until 1999; during this period the normal run of adult performances continued during the evenings.The Unicorn is a registered charity and is an Arts Council England National Portfolio organisation.OriginsFrom 1944 Caryl Jenner wrote Christmas pantomimes for small-time playhouses. During performances she would make note of the behaviour of the children, recording what scenes and sequences held their attention, and which did not. She began to formulate the principles that would guide her theatre and writing. In 1947 the ‘Mobile Theatre’ was born. Caryl's mission was to drive around the austere post-war towns of Britain, as well as isolated villages to bring theatre to new audiences. They supplemented their income by performing to adults in the evenings but their goal was always to captivate the minds and imagination of children.

Hop Exchange
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
24 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1

The Hop Exchange is a Grade II listed building at No. 24 Southwark Street, London, in the Bankside area of the London Borough of Southwark. Opened in 1867 and designed by R.H. Moore it served as the centre for hop trading for the brewing industry.OverviewHops, introduced to England from the Netherlands, are still used in the brewing industry. They are harvested from farms (known as "hop gardens") in Kent, and in the 19th century they were brought by railway to London Bridge Station, or by boat up the River Thames. They were then stored in the many warehouses in the Borough area.The purpose of the Hop Exchange was to provide a single market centre for dealers in hops. A glass roof allowed business on the trading floor of the Great Hall to be conducted under natural light. There were many similar outcry floor exchanges across London, such as the Coal, Metal and Stock exchanges, but wartime bombing, fires, redevelopment and modernisation have left the Hop Exchange the only one still standing. However, a fire in 1920 led to the top two storeys being removed, and the Hop Exchange was then converted into offices.

Cora Brazier
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Borough High Street London, SE1 1JX UK
London, United Kingdom SE1 1JX

02073780411

Southwark Cathedral
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DA

+44 20 7367 6700

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for more than 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since the creation of the diocese of Southwark in 1905.Between 1106 and 1538 it was the church of an Augustinian priory, Southwark Priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a parish church, with the new dedication of St Saviour's. The church was in the diocese of Winchester until 1877, when the parish of St Saviour's, along with other South London parishes, was transferred to the diocese of Rochester. The present building retains the basic form of the Gothic structure built between 1220 and 1420, although the nave is a late 19th-century reconstruction.HistoryLegendary originsThe 16th-century London historian John Stow recorded an account of the origins of the Southwark Priory of St Mary that he had heard from Bartholomew Linsted, who had been the last prior when the priory was dissolved. Linsted claimed it had been founded as a nunnery "long before the Conquest" by a maiden named Mary, on the profits of a ferry across the Thames she had inherited from her parents. Later it was converted into a college of priests by "Swithen, a noble lady". Finally in 1106 it was refounded as an Augustinian priory.

Anglican Diocese of Southwark
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Trinity House, 4 Chapel Court, Borough High Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1HW

020 7939 9400

The Diocese of Southwark is one of the 42 dioceses of the Church of England, part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The diocese forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. It was created on 1 May 1905 from part of the ancient Diocese of Rochester that was served by a Suffragan Bishop of Southwark (1891–1905). Before 1877 the area was part of the Diocese of Winchester.The diocese covers Greater London south of the River Thames (except for the London Borough of Bexley and London Borough of Bromley) and east Surrey. Since the creation of the episcopal area scheme in 1991, the diocese is divided into three episcopal areas each of which contains two archdeaconries: Croydon Episcopal Area (overseen by the area Bishop of Croydon)Archdeaconry of Croydonincludes Deaneries of Croydon Addington, Croydon Central, Croydon North, Croydon South, and Suttonincludes Deaneries of Caterham, Godstone, and ReigateArchdeaconry of Lambethincludes Deaneries of Brixton, Clapham, Lambeth North, Lambeth South, Streatham, and Mertonincludes Deaneries of Battersea, Kingston, Richmond and Barnes, Tooting, and WandsworthArchdeaconry of Lewisham & Greenwichincludes Deaneries of Charlton, Deptford, East Lewisham, Eltham and Mottingham, Plumstead, and West Lewishamincludes Deaneries of Bermondsey, Camberwell, Dulwich, and Southwark and Newington In other ecclesiastical use, although having lost religious orders in the English Reformation, the diocese has the London home of the Archbishop of Canterbury and records centre of the Church of England in the diocese, Lambeth Palace.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Morgan's Lane
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

Globe Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
21 New Globe Walk, Bankside, London
London, United Kingdom SE1 9

020 7407 0043

The Globe Theatre was a theatre in London associated with William Shakespeare. It was built in 1599 by Shakespeare's playing company, the Lord Chamberlain's Men, on land owned by Thomas Brend and inherited by his son, Nicholas Brend and grandson Sir Matthew Brend, and was destroyed by fire on 29 June 1613. A second Globe Theatre was built on the same site by June 1614 and closed by an Ordinance issued on 6 September 1642.A modern reconstruction of the Globe, named "Shakespeare's Globe", opened in 1997 approximately 230m from the site of the original theatre. From 1909, the current Gielgud Theatre was called "Globe Theatre", until it was renamed (in honour of John Gielgud) in 1994.LocationsExamination of old property records has identified the plot of land occupied by the Globe as extending from the west side of modern-day Southwark Bridge Road eastwards as far as Porter Street and from Park Street southwards as far as the back of Gatehouse Square. However, the precise location of the building remained unknown until a small part of the foundations, including one original pier base, was discovered in 1989 beneath the car park at the rear of Anchor Terrace on Park Street. The shape of the foundations is now replicated on the surface. As the majority of the foundations lies beneath 67—70 Anchor Terrace, a listed building, no further excavations have been permitted.

Sam Wanamaker Playhouse
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
21 new globe walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DT

020 7401 9919

The Sam Wanamaker Playhouse is an indoor theatre forming part of Shakespeare's Globe, along with the Globe Theatre on Bankside, London. Built making use of 17th-century plans for an indoor theatre, the playhouse recalls the layout and style of the Blackfriars Theatre, although it is not an exact reconstruction. Its shell was built during the construction of the Shakespeare's Globe complex, notable for the reconstruction of the open-air Globe Theatre of the same period. The shell was used as a space for education workshops and rehearsals until enough money was raised to complete the playhouse. It opened in January 2014, named after Sam Wanamaker, the leading figure in the Globe's reconstruction.HistoryThe shell was intended to house a "simulacrum" of the sixteenth-century Blackfriars Theatre from the opposite side of the Thames, adapted as a playhouse in 1596 during Elizabeth's reign. The Lord Chamberlain's Men, Shakespeare's playing company, began to use it in 1608, five years into the Jacobean era.As no reliable plans of the Blackfriars Theatre are known, the plan for the new theatre was based on drawings found in the 1960s at Worcester College, Oxford, at first thought to date from the early 17th century, and to be the work of Inigo Jones. The shell was built to accommodate a theatre as specified by the drawings, and the planned name was the Inigo Jones Theatre. In 2005, the drawings were dated to 1660 and attributed to John Webb. They nevertheless represent the earliest known plan for an English theatre, and are thought to approximate the layout of the Blackfriars Theatre. Some features believed to be typical of earlier in the 17th century were added to the new theatre's design.

Pudding Lane
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Pudding lane
London, United Kingdom

Pudding Lane es una calle de la City de Londres, donde exactamente se originó el Gran incendio de Londres del domingo 2 de septiembre hasta el martes 4 de septiembre de 1666. La calle está ubicada a la salida Eastcheap, cerca de Puente de Londres y el Monumento al Gran Incendio de Londres.Según el cronista John Stow, esta calle es llamada así por los "puddings" (una palabra medieval de vísceras y órganos ) que caían de los carros que bajaban por la calle de los carniceros en Eastcheap mientras se dirigían a las barcazas de residuos en el río Támesis. Una placa en la pared de un edificio llamado Faryners House, en Pudding Lane, registra el sitio del inicio del incendio. Esta placa fue presentada por el Gremio de Panaderos de Londres en 1986.El incendio fue producido por el panadero Thomas Farynor,que ya no era muy listo todo ocurrió porque por un pequeño descuido dejó la chimenea encendida durante la noche, y al poco tiempo se encontraron, él y su familia, entre las llamas. Todos ellos pudieron sobrevivir, a excepción de la criada, que no llegó a salir del edificio. Resultó que aquella noche hacia un fuerte viento y reforzó la fuerza y la rapidez del fuego, el otro factor fue que las casas eran de madera. Todo el desastre producido fue redactado y después publicado por Samuel Pepys.

Pudding Lane
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Pudding lane
London, United Kingdom

Pudding Sokağı İngiltere'nin başkenti Londra'da bulunan dar bir geçittir. 1666 yılında çıkan Büyük Londra Yangını'nın başlangıç noktası olan Thomas Farryner'ın ekmek fırını bu sokakta yer almıştır. Londra Köprüsü'ne yakın bir alandadır. Tarihçi John Stow'un söylediklerine göre sokak adını, eski İngilizcede iç organ demek olan Pudding sözcüğünden almıştır. Bu da söylenceye göre Thames Nehri'ndeki çöp kayıklarına kasapların atmış olduğu sakatatı taşıyan at arabalarından düşen hayvan iç organlarıdır.

St Olave Hart Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8 Hart St
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7

20-74884318

St Olave Hart Street is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on the corner of Hart Street and Seething Lane near Fenchurch Street railway station.John Betjeman described St Olave's as "a country church in the world of Seething Lane." The church is one of the smallest in the City and is one of only a handful of medieval City churches that escaped the Great Fire of London in 1666. In addition to being a local parish church, St Olave's is the Ward Church of the Tower Ward of the City of London.HistoryThe church is first recorded in the 13th century as St Olave-towards-the-Tower, a stone building replacing the earlier construction. It is dedicated to the patron saint of Norway, King Olaf II of Norway, who fought alongside the Anglo-Saxon King Ethelred the Unready against the Danes in the Battle of London Bridge in 1014. He was canonised after his death and the church of St Olave's was built apparently on the site of the battle. The Norwegian connection was reinforced during the Second World War when King Haakon VII of Norway worshipped there while in exile.Saint Olave's was rebuilt in the 13th century and then again in the 15th century. The present building dates from around 1450. According to John Stow's Survey of London, a major benefactor of the church in the late 15th century was wool merchant Richard Cely Sr., who held the advowson on the church . On his death, Cely bequeathed money for making the steeple and an altar in the church. The merchant mark of the Cely family was carved in two of the corbels in the nave . No memorial to the Celys now remains in the church.

St James Garlickhythe
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Garlick Hill
London, United Kingdom EC4V 2AL

+44 20 7236 1719

St. James Garlickhythe is a Church of England parish church in Vintry ward of the City of London, nicknamed ‘Wren’s lantern’ owing to its profusion of windows. Recorded since the 12th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. It is also the official church of eleven City livery companies.HistoryThe church is dedicated to the disciple St James known as ‘the Great’. St. James Garlickhythe is a stop on a pilgrim’s route ending at the cathedral of Santiago da Compostela. Visitors to the London church may have their credencial, or pilgrim passport, stamped with the impression of a scallop shell.'Garlickhythe' refers to the nearby landing place, or "hythe", near which garlic was sold in medieval times.The earliest surviving reference to the church is as ‘ecclesiam Sancti Jacobi’ in a 12th-century will. Other records of the church refer to it as ‘St James in the Vintry’, ‘St James Comyns’, ‘St James-by-the-Thames’ and ‘St James super Ripam’.The ships from France loaded with garlic also carried wine and St James has a long association with wine merchants. The church is located in the city ward of Vintry and in 1326, the Sheriff of London and Vintner, Richard de Rothing, paid to have the church rebuilt. Another company with long associations with the church is the Joiners' Company, who trace their origins back to a religious guild founded in St James in 1375.

St Clement's, Eastcheap
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Clement's Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4N 7HR

020 7623 5454

St Clement Eastcheap is a Church of England parish church in Candlewick Ward of the City of London. It is located on Clement's Lane, off King William Street and close to London Bridge and the River Thames.Clement was a disciple of St Peter the Apostle and was ordained as Bishop of Rome in the year 93 AD. By legend, Clement was martyred by being tied to an anchor and thrown into the Black Sea, which led to his adoption as a patron saint of sailors. The dedication to St Clement is unusual in London, with only one other ancient church there dedicated to this saint, namely St Clement Danes, Westminster. It is also located a little north of the Thames, but further west from Eastcheap and outside the old City boundary, just beyond the Temple Bar on the Strand.HistoryMedieval periodEastcheap was one of the main streets of medieval London. The name 'Eastcheap' derives from the Saxon word 'cheap', meaning a market, and Eastcheap was so called to distinguish it from Westcheap, later to become Cheapside. The southern end of Clement's Lane opened onto Eastcheap until the 1880s when the construction of King William Street separated Clement's Lane from Eastcheap, which still remains nearby as a street.

London Stone
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon Street
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

02076268246

London Stone is a historic landmark traditionally housed at 111 Cannon Street in the City of London. It is an irregular block of oolitic limestone measuring 53 × 43 × 30 cm (21 × 17 × 12"), the remnant of a once much larger object that had stood for many centuries on the south side of the street. Currently the stone is housed at the Museum of London pending reconstruction of the 111 Cannon Street building.The name "London Stone" was first recorded around the year 1100. The date and original purpose of the Stone are unknown, although it is possibly of Roman origin, and there has been interest and speculation about it since at least the 16th century. There are modern claims that it was formerly an object of veneration, or has some occult significance. These assertions however, are completely unsubstantiated.DescriptionThe present London Stone is only the upper portion of a once much larger object, as described below under History. The surviving portion is a block of oolitic limestone approximately 53 cm wide, 43 cm high, and 30 cm front to back (21 × 17 × 12 inches). A study in the 1960s indicated that the stone is Clipsham Limestone, a good-quality stone from Rutland transported to London for building purposes in both the Roman and medieval periods. More recently Kevin Hayward has suggested that it may be Bath stone, the stone most used for monuments and sculpture in early Roman London and in Saxon times.

Lime Street, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Bootlegger, 25-26 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom

Lime Street is a minor road in the City of London between Fenchurch Street to the south and Leadenhall Street to the north. Its name comes from the lime burners who once sold lime from there for use in construction.It is perhaps best known as the current home of the world's largest insurance market, Lloyd's of London, since its newest building was opened on the street in 1986. Opposite Lloyd's, the Willis Building is the global headquarters of insurance broker Willis. A 35-storey building has been proposed at 52-54 Lime Street, and upon approval and completion by 2017 will become the European headquarters of global insurer W. R. Berkley.The northern portion of the street is pedestrianised. Vehicular through-access to Leadenhall Street is prevented by a firegate, forcing drivers to bear right onto Fenchurch Avenue, from which a left turn onto Billiter Street returns vehicles to Leadenhall Street.Nearby is the Norman Foster-designed and gherkin-shaped skyscraper 30 St Mary Axe, and the Leadenhall Building. Leadenhall Market is on Lime Street's western side, adjacent to Lloyd's.

Londinium
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8-18 London Bridge St
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

Londinium was a settlement established on the current site of the City of London around 43. Its bridge over the River Thames turned the city into a road nexus and major port, serving as a major commercial centre in Roman Britain until its abandonment during the 5th century.Following its foundation in the mid-1st century, early Londinium occupied the relatively small area of 1.4sqkm, roughly equivalent to the size of present-day Hyde Park, with a fortified garrison on one of its hills. In the year 60 or 61, the rebellion of the Iceni under Boudica forced the garrison to abandon the settlement, which was then razed. Following the Iceni's defeat at the Battle of Watling Street, the city was rebuilt as a planned Roman town and recovered within about a decade. During the later decades of the 1st century, Londinium expanded rapidly, becoming Great Britain's largest city. By the turn of the century, Londinium had grown to about 60,000 people, almost certainly replacing Camulodunum (Colchester) as the provincial capital and by the 2nd century, Londinium was at its height. Its forum and basilica were one of the largest structures north of the Alps, when the Emperor Hadrian visited Londinium in 122. Excavations have discovered evidence of a major fire that destroyed most of the city shortly thereafter, but the city was again rebuilt. By the second half of the 2nd century, Londinium appears to have shrunk in both size and population.

Lloyd's Coffee House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Gracechurch Street 55
London, United Kingdom EC3V 9

020 7621 0911

Lloyd's Coffee House was a coffee shop in London opened by Edward Lloyd (c. 1648–15 February 1713) originally on Tower Street in around 1688. The establishment was a popular place for sailors, merchants and shipowners, and Lloyd catered to them with reliable shipping news. The shipping industry community frequented the place to discuss insurance deals among themselves. The dealing that took place led to the establishment of the insurance market Lloyd's of London, Lloyd's Register and several related shipping and insurance businesses.Just after Christmas 1691, the coffee shop relocated to Lombard Street. Merchants continued to discuss insurance matters here until 1774 when the participating members of the insurance arrangement formed a committee and moved to the Royal Exchange on Cornhill as the Society of Lloyd's.Traces of the coffee houseThe 17th century original shop frontage of Lloyd's Coffee House is owned by Lloyd's of London and has been re-erected on display at the National Maritime Museum. A blue plaque in Lombard Street commemorates the coffee house's second location (now occupied at ground level by Sainsbury's supermarket). It was fictionalized in the 1936 film Lloyd's of London.

Lombard Street, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Lombard Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 9EA

Lombard Street, London, is a street notable for its connections with the City of London's merchant, banking and insurance industries, stretching back to medieval times.From Bank junction, where nine streets converge by the Bank of England, Lombard Street runs southeast for a short distance before bearing left into a more easterly direction, and terminates at a junction with Gracechurch Street and Fenchurch Street. Its overall length is 260m.It has often been compared with Wall Street in New York City.DescriptionLombard Street, since the construction of King William Street, has two distinctive sections. The short section between Bank junction and the church of St Mary Woolnoth is spacious and carries two-way traffic including several bus routes, which continues along King William Street. Lombard Street bears to the east and the remainder is much narrower (retaining its medieval character) and is one-way.At the eastern end of the street, a number of modern buildings exist on both sides, in contrast to the older buildings and architectural styles along much of its length. Built in 1990–92, the former headquarters of Barclays covers a large plot on the north corner of Lombard and Gracechurch Streets, and is the largest and tallest building in the immediate vicinity of Lombard Street, at 87m high.Addresses on the street are numbered 1 to 40 along the south side, running from Bank to Gracechurch Street, then 41 to 82 along the north side, from Gracechurch Street to Bank. The postcode for the street is EC3V.

Lloyd's building
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 7JJ

+44 20 7327 1000

The Lloyd's building is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. It is located on the former site of East India House in Lime Street, in London's main financial district, the City of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior.Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by Historic England to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch".HistoryThe first Lloyd's building had been built on this site in 1928. In 1958, due to expansion of the market, a new building was constructed across the road at 51 Lime Street . Lloyd's now occupied the Heysham Building and the Cooper Building.By the 1970s Lloyd's had again outgrown these two buildings and proposed to extend the Cooper Building. In 1978, the corporation ran an architectural competition which attracted designs from practices such as Foster Associates, Arup and I.M. Pei. Lloyd's commissioned Richard Rogers to redevelop the site, and the original 1928 building on the western corner of Lime and Leadenhall Streets was demolished to make way for the present one which was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 18 November 1986. The 1928 building's entrance at 12 Leadenhall Street was preserved and forms a rather incongruous attachment to the 1986 structure. Demolition of the 1958 building commenced in 2004 to make way for the 26-storey Willis Building.

St Mary Aldermary
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Watling St
London, United Kingdom EC4M 9BW

020 7248 9902

St Mary Aldermary is an Anglican church in Bow Lane in the City of London. Of medieval origin, it was rebuilt from 1510. Badly damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666, it was rebuilt once more, this time by Sir Christopher Wren, unlike the vast majority of his City churches in a Gothic style.HistoryThere has been a church on the site for over 900 years. Its name is usually taken to mean that it is the oldest of the City churches dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The patronage of the rectory of St Mary Aldermary belonged to the prior and chapter of Canterbury, but was transferred to the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1400.In 1510, Sir Henry Keeble financed the building of a new church. The tower was still unfinished when he died in 1518. In 1629, two legacies enabled it to be completed, and the work, begun 120 years before, was finished within three years. Keble was buried in a vault beneath the floor of church, but his grave was not allowed to remain for long. Richard Newcourt recorded that Sir William Laxton, who died in 1556, and Sir Tho. Lodge, who died in 1583 (both which were Grocers and had been Mayors of this City), were buried in the Vault of this Sir Henry Keeble, his bones unkindly cast out, and his Monument pull'd down, in place whereof, Monuments were set up of the others. John Stow mentions various dignitaries buried in the early church in his 1598 Survey of London. They include Richard Chaucer, vintner, said by Stow to be the father of the poet Geoffrey Chaucer. John Milton married his third wife, Elizabeth Minshull, in the church in 1663. The parish registers date from 1558, and are now deposited in the Guildhall Library.