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Tower Bridge, London | Tourist Information


Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP


Bridge Near Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, SE1 2UP

+44 (0)20 7403 3761

An iconic London landmark and one of Britain's best loved historic sites, Tower Bridge is open to the public 363 days a year. Within the Bridge's iconic structure and magnificent Victorian Engine rooms, the Tower Bridge Exhibition is the best way of exploring the most famous bridge in the world! Come learn about this incredible feat of Victorian engineering, discover how the Bridge is raised and enjoy stunning panoramic views across London from our high-level walkways, 42 metres above the River Thames. Opening Times: 10:00 - 18:30 (last admission 17:30) Facebook is a public page. Please bear this in mind when posting your comments, especially regarding personal information. Further information on the City of London Corporation can be found at www.cityoflondon.gov.uk. The City of London Corporation is always happy to hear from you but please keep posts relevant. All comments will be monitored by Facebook and the City and any comments that are offensive or inappropriate will be removed. People who persistently cause conflict or offence to others will be removed and blocked from our social media pages.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (A3)
London, EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

Tower Bridge London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge
London, SE1 2UP

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London,

Official Facebook page of London Bridge railway station. In an emergency call 08457 11 41 41. Got a question? networkrail.co.uk/contactus

The London Bridge Experience & Tombs
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
2-4 Tooley Street
London, SE1 2S

0207 403 6333

Voted the UK's Best Year Round Scare Attraction for three years running, the London Bridge Experience and The London Tombs are two gruesome London tourist attractions not to be missed. Whether you are looking for somewhere scary to take the family, a despicable destination for a school trip, corporate event, celebrate Halloween or a treacherous tourist attraction, you've come to the right place! You'll be taken on a journey through the history of this exciting area of London, from the Roman invasion, right up to the present day with the exciting development of the London Bridge Quarter and the Shard! It is also the perfect place to celebrate Halloween with our 'Phobobophobia' extreme scares show - Halloween's most hellish event. The London Bridge Experience and London Tombs are two attractions for one price!

All Bar One Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
34 Shad Thames
London, SE1 2YG

20-79409771

Dim T
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 More London Place
London, SE1 2DB

02074037000

Strada Italiana, Tower Bridge, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 More London Place, The Riverside
London, SE1 2JP

020 7403 8321

Gauchos Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Gaucho Tower Bridge, 2 More London Riverside
London, E1W 1

020 7407 5222

wagamama
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Borough Market, 1 Clink Street
London, SE1 9DG

020 7403 3659

The Middle Of London Bridge!
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
City of London
London, EC4R 9

Cannon Street Railway Bridge
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
103 Cannon St
London, EC4N 5AG

020 7929 0831

Cannon Street Railway Bridge is a bridge in central London, crossing the River Thames. Downstream, the next bridge is London Bridge, and upstream Southwark Bridge. It carries trains over the river to Cannon Street station on the north bank. It was originally named Alexandra Bridge after Alexandra of Denmark who was the wife of the future King Edward VII.The bridge was designed by John Hawkshaw and John Wolfe-Barry for the South Eastern Railway. It was opened in 1866 after three years of construction. In its original form, it carried the railway over the Thames on five spans standing on cast-iron Doric pillars. It was subsequently widened between 1886–93 by Francis Brady and extensively renovated by British Rail between 1979–82, which resulted in many of its ornamental features being removed and the structure taking on an even more utilitarian appearance than before.It was the scene of the Marchioness disaster in 1989.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (A3)
London, EC4R 3

ロンドン橋はロンドンを流れるテムズ川にかかる橋。タワーブリッジとキャノン・ストリート鉄道橋の間に位置する。市内のシティとサザークを結び、プール・オブ・ロンドンの西端に位置する。この橋の架かる位置には古くから、何度も橋が架けられては倒壊しており、その回数の多さから『ロンドン橋落ちた』という民謡が生まれた。1750年にウェストミンスター・ブリッジが架けられるまでロンドン市内でテムズ川に架かる橋としては唯一のものであった。 橋の南側にはとロンドン・ブリッジ駅が、北側にはロンドン大火記念碑とバンク・アンド・モニュメント駅がある。 現在の橋はロンドンとポーツマスとを結ぶ道路A3の一部であり、大ロンドン庁により維持管理されている。ロンドン橋はプレストレストコンクリート橋であって極めて地味であるのに対して、直下流にあるタワーブリッジは2つの塔を持つ跳開橋であり見栄えがよい。このため、タワーブリッジの方がロンドン橋であると、世界中で極めてしばしば勘違いされている。歴史現在のロンドン橋が架かる位置にはその近辺も含め、2000年近くにもわたって橋が存在してきた。ロンドン地域でテムズ川に架かった最古の橋はローマ人によるもので、西暦46年に架けられた木製のものであった。1013年、侵略してきたスヴェン1世率いるデーン人たちを分裂させるためにエゼルレッド2世によって焼き落とされた。架け直された橋は1091年に嵐で破壊され、1136年には火災に遭っている。

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, SE1 9RY

02074036996

런던교는 영국 런던 시내를 흐르는 템스 강 위에 세워진 다리이다.

Landmark Near Tower Bridge

Tower of London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Tower Hill
London, E1W 1

020 7480 6358

The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, separated from the eastern edge of the square mile of the City of London by the open space known as Tower Hill. It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078, and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite. The castle was used as a prison from 1100 (Ranulf Flambard) until 1952 (Kray twins), although that was not its primary purpose. A grand palace early in its history, it served as a royal residence. As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion, mainly under Kings Richard the Lionheart, Henry III, and Edward I in the 12th and 13th centuries. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains despite later activity on the site.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Morgan's Lane
London, SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Unit 22, Hays Galleria, Tooley Street,
London, SE1 2HD

020 7407 4301

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property – then a brewhouse – in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Tower of London
London, EC3N 4AB

0870 756 6060

The Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom are 141 historic ceremonial objects, including the regalia and vestments worn by kings and queens of the country at their coronations, as well as processional and anointing objects, plate, and christening fonts.A symbol of 1,000 years of monarchy, the sovereign's coronation regalia is the only working collection in Europe – other present-day monarchies have abandoned coronations in favour of inauguration or enthronement ceremonies – and is the largest set of regalia in the world. Objects used to invest and crown the monarch variously denote his or her roles as Head of State, Supreme Governor of the Church of England, and Commander-in-Chief of the British Armed Forces. Wives of kings are crowned as queen consort with a plainer set of regalia. Since 1831, a new crown has been made specially for each queen consort.The use of regalia by monarchs in Britain can be traced back to its early history. Most of the present collection as a whole dates from around 350 years ago when King Charles II acceded to the throne. The medieval coronation regalia and Tudor state regalia had been either sold or melted down by Oliver Cromwell, a republican who overthrew the monarchy in 1649, during the English Civil War. Notable among the precious stones which adorn the regalia are Cullinan I (the largest clear cut diamond in the world), Cullinan II (second-largest of the Cullinan diamonds), the Koh-i-Noor diamond with a history going back to the 13th century, the Stuart Sapphire, St Edward's Sapphire, and the Black Prince's Ruby – a large spinel worn by King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt.

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
SE1 2UP
London, SE1 2UP

Tower Hill tube station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
24-25 Great Tower St
London, EC3N 4

020 7222 1234

Tower Hill is a London Underground station located on Tower Hill in Greater London, England. The station is situated in the East End of London and Central London which is on the Circle line between Monument and Aldgate stations, and on the District line between Monument and Aldgate East. Tower Hill is is a short distance from Tower Gateway station for the Docklands Light Railway and National Rail at Fenchurch Street station for regional services in neighbouring Tower ward of the City of London, and Tower Millennium Pier for River Services.The entrance to Tower Hill station is a few metres from one of the largest remaining segments of the Roman London Wall which once surrounded the historic City of London. The station was built on the site of the former Tower of London tube station that closed in 1884. The present Tower Hill station opened in 1967 and replaced a nearby station with the same name but which was originally called Mark Lane, that was slightly farther west.

Bermondsey Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Bermondsey Square, Tower Bridge Rd
London, SE1 3

020 7234 0805

Bermondsey Square is located on Tower Bridge Road in Bermondsey, part of the London Borough of Southwark, in south London, England. The location was formerly the site of the 11th century Bermondsey Abbey.Archaeological excavations were undertaken in 2005–6 by Pre-Construct Archaeology. The earliest medieval remains found were a Norman church from around 1080, which was recorded in the Domesday Book. The area has subsequently undergone redevelopment and Bermondsey Square now contains apartments, offices, a boutique hotel, restaurants and an independent cinema.Bermondsey Market is an antiques market located at Bermondsey Square, which operates every Friday.Long Lane leads northwest to Borough High Street. This lane used to link the Abbey with St George the Martyr church on the High Street. To the west and heading north from the square is Bermondsey Street, leading to Tooley Street and London Bridge station about ten minutes walk away.

White Tower
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
The Tower of London
London, E1W 1

+44 (0)20 3166 6000

The White Tower is a central tower, the old keep, at the Tower of London. It was built by William the Conqueror during the early 1080s, and subsequently extended. The White Tower was the castle's strongest point militarily, and provided accommodation for the king and his representatives, as well as a chapel. Henry III ordered that the tower be whitewashed in 1240.HistoryThe castle which later became known as the Tower of London was begun by William the Conqueror in 1066. It began as a timber fortification enclosed by a palisade. In the next decade work began on the White Tower, the great stone keep that still dominates the castle today. The precise date of the White Tower's foundation is unknown, and it is also uncertain how long building took. It is traditionally held that construction began in 1078. This is because the Textus Roffensis records that Gundulf, Bishop of Rochester, oversaw the building work under instruction from William the Conqueror. Dendrochronological evidence suggests construction of the White Tower began in 1075–1079. The archaeology of the standing building suggests there was a pause in construction between 1080 and 1090–1093, although it is unknown why. Gundulf did more than just oversee work and was a skilled architect. Rochester's castle and cathedral were rebuilt under his auspices. As the main castle in England's capital, the Tower of London was an important royal building. The keep built by Gundulf bears testament to this as it was one of the largest in Christendom.

Custom House, City of London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Dock Rd, London E16 3BX
London, EC3R 5B

The Custom House, on the north bank of the Thames in the City of London was formerly in use for the collection of customs duties. It was in use for many centuries and rebuilt on a number of occasions.HistoryUntil 1814 the Custom House stood in the parish of All Hallows Barking, immediately to the east of the present site.The site was long known as "Wool Quay", and, from the medieval period, a custom house was necessary there to levy the duty payable on exported wool. Such a building is recorded as early as 1377. The quay and the buildings on it were privately owned. Around 1380, one John Churchman built a custom house there to collect dues for the City of London, and in 1382 the crown came to an agreement to use its facilities.Churchman’s custom house remained in use until 1559, the freehold passing through various hands. Its replacement was erected under the direction of William Paulet, Marquess of Winchester, the Lord High Treasurer. A print from 1663 shows it as a three-storey building, with octagonal staircase towers. This structure was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666.The post-fire replacement was on a rather larger scale, to the designs of Christopher Wren. The original estimate was for £6,000, but the eventual cost was more than £10,000. The new building was short- lived: in January 1715 a fire, which began in a nearby house, damaged the it beyond repair, and a new, larger structure was built to the designs of Thomas Ripley, “Master-Carpenter” to the board of Customs. This necessitated the acquisition of ground to the north, fronting onto Thames Street, and the east. The main body of the new building, however, had the same plan as Wren’s, and may have re-used its foundations, but was of three, rather than two storeys.

Custom House, City of London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Dock Rd, London E16 3BX
London, EC3R 5B

The Custom House, on the north bank of the Thames in the City of London was formerly in use for the collection of customs duties. It was in use for many centuries and rebuilt on a number of occasions.HistoryUntil 1814 the Custom House stood in the parish of All Hallows Barking, immediately to the east of the present site.The site was long known as "Wool Quay", and, from the medieval period, a custom house was necessary there to levy the duty payable on exported wool. Such a building is recorded as early as 1377. The quay and the buildings on it were privately owned. Around 1380, one John Churchman built a custom house there to collect dues for the City of London, and in 1382 the crown came to an agreement to use its facilities.Churchman’s custom house remained in use until 1559, the freehold passing through various hands. Its replacement was erected under the direction of William Paulet, Marquess of Winchester, the Lord High Treasurer. A print from 1663 shows it as a three-storey building, with octagonal staircase towers. This structure was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666.The post-fire replacement was on a rather larger scale, to the designs of Christopher Wren. The original estimate was for £6,000, but the eventual cost was more than £10,000. The new building was short- lived: in January 1715 a fire, which began in a nearby house, damaged the it beyond repair, and a new, larger structure was built to the designs of Thomas Ripley, “Master-Carpenter” to the board of Customs. This necessitated the acquisition of ground to the north, fronting onto Thames Street, and the east. The main body of the new building, however, had the same plan as Wren’s, and may have re-used its foundations, but was of three, rather than two storeys.

Hays Galleria
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Battle Bridge Lane
London, SE1 2

020 7403 3583

St Magnus-the-Martyr
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Lower Thames Street EC3R 6DN
London, EC3R 6DN

+44 20 7626 4481

St Magnus the Martyr, London Bridge is a Church of England church and parish within the City of London. The church, which is located in Lower Thames Street near The Monument to the Great Fire of London, is part of the Diocese of London and under the pastoral care of the Bishop of London and the Bishop of Fulham. It is a Grade I listed building. The rector uses the title "Cardinal Rector", being one of three clerics in the Church of England to use the title Cardinal.St Magnus lies on the original alignment of London Bridge between the City and Southwark. The ancient parish was united with that of St Margaret, New Fish Street, in 1670 and with that of St Michael, Crooked Lane, in 1831. The three united parishes retained separate vestries and churchwardens. Parish clerks continue to be appointed for each of the three parishes.St Magnus is the guild church of the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers and the Worshipful Company of Plumbers, and the ward church of the Ward of Bridge and Bridge Without. It is also twinned with the Church of the Resurrection in New York City.

Bermondsey Market
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Bermondsey Square, London, SE1 3UN
London, SE1 3

020 7234 0805

Bermondsey Market is an antiques market located at Bermondsey Square on Tower Bridge Road in Bermondsey, part of the London Borough of Southwark, in South London, England. The location was formerly the site of Bermondsey Abbey. The site underwent redevelopment in 2006 and the market remained open during this period.HistoryThe Caledonian Market moved to its current location in 1950 after the old Caledonian Market site in Islington was designated for redevelopment in the late 1940s.Marché ouvertThe opening hours of the Bermondsey Market from 6am until noon reflect the ancient law of market ouvert, which was abolished in 1995. Under this law, in number of designated markets, including Bermondsey Market, if an item was sold between sunset and sunrise then its provenance could not be questioned, so stolen goods could be traded and good title would pass to the purchaser. To quote Minister for the Arts Estelle Morris in July 2003 during the Second Reading of the Dealing In Cultural Objects Bill: I did not have information about marché ouvert in the deep recesses of my mind, but experts reliably inform me that it no longer exists. The hon. Member for Uxbridge will be surprised to learn that it has been abolished only recently. It used to exist in designated markets, including Bermondsey. I am sure that the promoter will be interested in telling the hon. Member for Southwark, North and Bermondsey about that. In it, items could be sold before sunrise. Believe it or not, in this land of ours, people could sell stolen—my officials put "dodgy" in brackets, but we do not use that term—objects. I assure hon. Members that it has been abolished. I hope that that deals with the fears of the hon. Member for Uxbridge.

Leviathan
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, SE1 9SG

Elements
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
10 Pepys Street
London, EC3N 2NU

020 7265 6000

The Elizabeth Tower
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Bridge Street
London,

St Olave Hart Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
8 Hart St
London, EC3R 7

20-74884318

St Olave Hart Street is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on the corner of Hart Street and Seething Lane near Fenchurch Street railway station.John Betjeman described St Olave's as "a country church in the world of Seething Lane." The church is one of the smallest in the City and is one of only a handful of medieval City churches that escaped the Great Fire of London in 1666. In addition to being a local parish church, St Olave's is the Ward Church of the Tower Ward of the City of London.HistoryThe church is first recorded in the 13th century as St Olave-towards-the-Tower, a stone building replacing the earlier construction. It is dedicated to the patron saint of Norway, King Olaf II of Norway, who fought alongside the Anglo-Saxon King Ethelred the Unready against the Danes in the Battle of London Bridge in 1014. He was canonised after his death and the church of St Olave's was built apparently on the site of the battle. The Norwegian connection was reinforced during the Second World War when King Haakon VII of Norway worshipped there while in exile.Saint Olave's was rebuilt in the 13th century and then again in the 15th century. The present building dates from around 1450. According to John Stow's Survey of London, a major benefactor of the church in the late 15th century was wool merchant Richard Cely Sr., who held the advowson on the church . On his death, Cely bequeathed money for making the steeple and an altar in the church. The merchant mark of the Cely family was carved in two of the corbels in the nave . No memorial to the Celys now remains in the church.

St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
193 Bermondsey St
London, SE1 3

020 7234 0100

St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey is an Anglican church dedicated to St Mary Magdalen in Bermondsey in the London Borough of Southwark. The present building is late 17th century and is a Grade II* listed building.Its parish extends as far as the Thames (including the south tower of Tower Bridge, City Hall and part of London Bridge Station). The parishes of St Olave Tooley Street, St Luke Grange Road and St John Horsleydown have all been merged into it.HistoryA church of this dedication is first recorded on this site in 1290, serving lay workers at Bermondsey Abbey. The design of that building is not known, but in 1680 the church was demolished and rebuilt, retaining the late medieval tower with a gothic window and arches. This re-building was completed in about 1690, and was followed by the addition of a north gallery in 1705 and a south gallery in 1794. The south gallery retains the complete original boxed pews but those in the north gallery have had the gates removed.Further alterations were made under the supervision of the architect George Porter in 1830. He remodelled the tower and west end in an unacademic Gothic style and restored the medieval west window. The changes also involved removing the portico and school which extended into Bermondsey Street. The interior was redecorated in the Gothic Revival style in 1852 and is described in a document which can be dated to 1865 - 1879 by reference to the then rector. In 1883 the chancel was lengthened and a new stained glass window was installed, as well as other "beautification". Surviving the Blitz, the west end interior was damaged by fire in 1971. The church was first rendered externally in 1829, and was most recently re-rendered in 1994. A detailed description given in the volume of the Victoria County History covering the area, published in 1912. The church is now the oldest building in the locality, and the medieval arches are still visible inside the tower behind the organ (not normally accessible to the public).

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (A3)
London, EC4R 3

ロンドン橋はロンドンを流れるテムズ川にかかる橋。タワーブリッジとキャノン・ストリート鉄道橋の間に位置する。市内のシティとサザークを結び、プール・オブ・ロンドンの西端に位置する。この橋の架かる位置には古くから、何度も橋が架けられては倒壊しており、その回数の多さから『ロンドン橋落ちた』という民謡が生まれた。1750年にウェストミンスター・ブリッジが架けられるまでロンドン市内でテムズ川に架かる橋としては唯一のものであった。 橋の南側にはとロンドン・ブリッジ駅が、北側にはロンドン大火記念碑とバンク・アンド・モニュメント駅がある。 現在の橋はロンドンとポーツマスとを結ぶ道路A3の一部であり、大ロンドン庁により維持管理されている。ロンドン橋はプレストレストコンクリート橋であって極めて地味であるのに対して、直下流にあるタワーブリッジは2つの塔を持つ跳開橋であり見栄えがよい。このため、タワーブリッジの方がロンドン橋であると、世界中で極めてしばしば勘違いされている。歴史現在のロンドン橋が架かる位置にはその近辺も含め、2000年近くにもわたって橋が存在してきた。ロンドン地域でテムズ川に架かった最古の橋はローマ人によるもので、西暦46年に架けられた木製のものであった。1013年、侵略してきたスヴェン1世率いるデーン人たちを分裂させるためにエゼルレッド2世によって焼き落とされた。架け直された橋は1091年に嵐で破壊され、1136年には火災に遭っている。

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (A3)
London, EC4R 3

ロンドン橋はロンドンを流れるテムズ川にかかる橋。タワーブリッジとキャノン・ストリート鉄道橋の間に位置する。市内のシティとサザークを結び、プール・オブ・ロンドンの西端に位置する。この橋の架かる位置には古くから、何度も橋が架けられては倒壊しており、その回数の多さから『ロンドン橋落ちた』という民謡が生まれた。1750年にウェストミンスター・ブリッジが架けられるまでロンドン市内でテムズ川に架かる橋としては唯一のものであった。 橋の南側にはとロンドン・ブリッジ駅が、北側にはロンドン大火記念碑とバンク・アンド・モニュメント駅がある。 現在の橋はロンドンとポーツマスとを結ぶ道路A3の一部であり、大ロンドン庁により維持管理されている。ロンドン橋はプレストレストコンクリート橋であって極めて地味であるのに対して、直下流にあるタワーブリッジは2つの塔を持つ跳開橋であり見栄えがよい。このため、タワーブリッジの方がロンドン橋であると、世界中で極めてしばしば勘違いされている。歴史現在のロンドン橋が架かる位置にはその近辺も含め、2000年近くにもわたって橋が存在してきた。ロンドン地域でテムズ川に架かった最古の橋はローマ人によるもので、西暦46年に架けられた木製のものであった。1013年、侵略してきたスヴェン1世率いるデーン人たちを分裂させるためにエゼルレッド2世によって焼き落とされた。架け直された橋は1091年に嵐で破壊され、1136年には火災に遭っている。

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Morgan's Lane
London, SE1 2

HMS „Belfast” – krążownik lekki brytyjskiej marynarki Royal Navy z okresu II wojny światowej.BudowaWraz z siostrzanym HMS „Edinburgh”, krążownik należał do typu Edinburgh, określanego też jako trzecia seria typu Town. Oba krążowniki zamówione przez Admiralicję w roku 1936 miały być brytyjską odpowiedzią na zwodowanie dwóch włoskich krążowników typu Giuseppe Garibaldi o wyporności 9591 ton. Do służby w Royal Navy HMS „Belfast” wcielony w sierpniu 1939 roku.Okres II wojny światowej„Belfast” rozpoczął wojnę w składzie 18 Eskadry Krążowników Home Fleet pod dowództwem kapitana J. Scotta. 9 października 1939 HMS „Belfast” przechwycił na północ od Orkadów niemiecki liniowiec „Cap Norte” o pojemności 13 615 BRT. Wkrótce potem przeniesiony został do bazy w Rosyth, gdzie 21 listopada 1939 podczas wychodzenia z portu krążownik wszedł na niemiecką minę magnetyczną postawioną przez U-21. Eksplodująca pod dnem mina spowodowała na tyle poważne uszkodzenia kadłuba, że HMS „Belfast” został wyłączony z działań na okres 3 lat.Po remoncie okręt ponownie został wcielony do służby 8 grudnia 1942, zostając w styczniu następnego roku okrętem flagowym 10 Eskadry Krążowników Home Fleet pod komendą kontradmirała Burnetta. Pierwszą operacją HMS „Belfast” na Morzu Arktycznym była osłona konwoju JW-53 w lutym 1943 roku. Również kolejny konwój JW-54 płynący w dwóch częściach w listopadzie 1943 roku był osłaniany przez 10 Eskadrę Krążowników.

70 Mark Lane
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
70 Mark Lane
London, EC3R 7NQ

0207 264 8740

London Bridge bus station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge Station Unit 10
London, SE1 9SP

020 7357 0069

London Bridge bus station serves the London Bridge area of the city of London and is situated at the London Bridge tube and rail station.There are three stands at the station which are situated on the station forecourt.London Buses routes 17, 43, 48, 141, 149 and 521 and night routes N21 and N343 serve the station.New bus stationA new bus station was built as part of the new Shard London Bridge "Gem" development which was open in 2012.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, SE1 9RY

02074036996

런던교는 영국 런던 시내를 흐르는 템스 강 위에 세워진 다리이다.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, SE1 9RY

02074036996

런던교는 영국 런던 시내를 흐르는 템스 강 위에 세워진 다리이다.

The George Inn, Southwark
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
77 Borough High Street, Southwark, London, England
London, SE1 1

The George, or George Inn, is a public house established in the medieval period on Borough High Street in Southwark, London. Currently owned and leased by the National Trust, it is located about 250 m from the south side of the River Thames near London Bridge. It is the only surviving galleried London coaching inn. The first map of Southwark (Duchy of Lancaster ca1543) clearly shows it marked as 'Gorge'. It was formerly known as the George and Dragon, named after the legend of Saint George and the Dragon. It is by far the oldest pub in London.HistoryIn 1677 the George was rebuilt after a serious fire that destroyed most of medieval Southwark. There had been many such inns in this part of London. Probably the most famous was The Tabard where, in 1388, Chaucer began The Canterbury Tales. The Tabard was also rebuilt after the same fire, but was demolished in the late nineteenth century.Later, the Great Northern Railway used the George as a depot and pulled down two of its fronts to build warehousing. Now just the south face remains.The George was one of the many famous coaching inns in the days of Charles Dickens. Dickens in fact visited the George and referred to it in Little Dorrit. It is thought that the galleried inns were the inspiration of the original theatres, that the Players were on a dais in the courtyard with the standing audience next to them and that those paying a premium would be in the galleries with a better view.

The George Inn, Southwark
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
77 Borough High Street, Southwark, London, England
London, SE1 1

The George, or George Inn, is a public house established in the medieval period on Borough High Street in Southwark, London. Currently owned and leased by the National Trust, it is located about 250 m from the south side of the River Thames near London Bridge. It is the only surviving galleried London coaching inn. The first map of Southwark (Duchy of Lancaster ca1543) clearly shows it marked as 'Gorge'. It was formerly known as the George and Dragon, named after the legend of Saint George and the Dragon. It is by far the oldest pub in London.HistoryIn 1677 the George was rebuilt after a serious fire that destroyed most of medieval Southwark. There had been many such inns in this part of London. Probably the most famous was The Tabard where, in 1388, Chaucer began The Canterbury Tales. The Tabard was also rebuilt after the same fire, but was demolished in the late nineteenth century.Later, the Great Northern Railway used the George as a depot and pulled down two of its fronts to build warehousing. Now just the south face remains.The George was one of the many famous coaching inns in the days of Charles Dickens. Dickens in fact visited the George and referred to it in Little Dorrit. It is thought that the galleried inns were the inspiration of the original theatres, that the Players were on a dais in the courtyard with the standing audience next to them and that those paying a premium would be in the galleries with a better view.

Neal's Yard Dairy
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
106-114 Druid Street
London, SE1 2HH

+44 (0) 20 7367 0799

Cora Brazier
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Borough High Street London, SE1 1JX UK
London, SE1 1JX

02073780411

Travel and Transportation Near Tower Bridge

The View from The Shard
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Joiner Street
London, SE1 9QU

+44(0)844 499 7111

The View from The Shard is situated at the top of The Shard – the tallest building in Western Europe, and is London’s newest visitor attraction. At almost twice the height of any other viewing platform in London, The View from The Shard offers visitors a 360 degree view of London for up to 40 miles. Advanced tickets are £25.95 for adults and £19.95 for children. Visits are queue and crowd free, and visitors are allowed to stay and enjoy the view for as long as they like. www.theviewfromtheshard.com

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Morgan's Lane
London, SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

Sky Lounge Double Tree Tower Hill
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
7 Pepys Street
London, EC3N 4AF

44-207-7091000

Aldgate
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Aldgate High Street
London,

020 7636 8309

Aldgate was the eastern-most gateway through the London Wall leading from the City of London to Whitechapel and the East End of London. It gives its name to a City ward bounded by White Kennet Street in the north and Crutched Friars in the south, taking in Leadenhall and Fenchurch Streets, which remain principal thoroughfares through the City, each splitting from the short street named Aldgate that connects to Aldgate High Street. The road is situated 2.3mi east north-east of Charing Cross.John Cass's school, where a plaque records the former placement of London Wall, is sited on the north side of Aldgate (the street).EtymologyThe etymology of the name "Aldgate" is disputed. It is first recorded in 1052 as Æst geat ("east gate") but had become Alegate by 1108. Writing in the 16th century, John Stow derived the name from "Old Gate" (Aeld Gate). However, Henry Harben, writing in 1918, contended that this was wrong and that documents show that the "d" is missing in documents written before 1486–7. Alternative meanings include "Ale Gate" in connection with a putative ale-house or "All Gate" meaning the gate was free to all. Other possibilities canvassed by Harben include reference to a Saxon named "Ealh," or reference to foreigners ("el") or oil ("ele") or "awl". Gillian Bebbington, writing in 1972, suggests Alegate, Aelgate ("public gate") or Aeldgate" (Old Gate") as equally viable alternatives whilst Weinreb and Hibbert, writing in 1983, revert to Stow's theory that the name means "Old Gate".

The Shard
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, SE1 2TH

Southwark Brewing Company
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
46 Druid Street
London, SE1 2EZ

02033024190

Oxford Street- London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Oxsford Street- London
London, W1C 1DX

Borough High Street
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
128-132 Borough High Street
London, SE1 1LB

Giuseppe's Italian Restaurant London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
47 Borough High Street
London, se1 1nb LON

0207 407 3451

http://www.youtube.com/user/giuseppesplace ITALIAN RESTAURANT LONDON BRIDGE

Dutch Master Party Boat
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Tower Milleniun Pier
London,

020 7623 1805

Her three decks offer both spacious covered areas as well as copious open deck making her one of the best all weather event vessels on the Thames. Famous on the Thames as one of the best party boats around, Dutch Master offers the perfect large capacity for proms and students as well as established promoters and club nights. With two bars, impressive speaker system and London’s sites, she always delivers a guaranteed party to remember.

Grange Road Bermondsey
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
50 Grange Road
London,

City Cruises
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
220 Jamaica Rd
London, SE16 4

20-77400400

Weatherspoon Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
15 Trinity Square
London, E1 8

Bermondsey tube station
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
142-145 Jamaica Rd
London, SE16 4

020 7222 1234

Bermondsey is a London Underground station. It is situated in the eastern part of Bermondsey in the London Borough of Southwark, and so also serves the western part of Rotherhithe.The station itself was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects and was originally intended to have a multi-storey office building sitting on top. London Underground have yet to realise this second phase of the scheme.It is on the Jubilee line, having been built as part of the Jubilee Line Extension between and stations. It is notable for its extensive use of natural light. The main station entrance is situated on the south side of Jamaica Road. The station is in Travelcard Zone 2.The station was opened on 17 September 1999.Station designLike its extension counterparts, Bermondsey station was designed with a futuristic style in mind by Ian Ritchie Architects. Extensively using natural light, it is built in both a cut-and-cover and tube design. The cut-and-cover section is supported by latticed concrete beams allowing light to penetrate to the platform level. The escalators down to this area are lined by flat concrete with a high ceiling to give a feeling of spaciousness. The bored section is encased with metal to keep in line the futuristic and metallic theme of the extension. As with all other deep level stations on the Jubilee Line Extension, Bermondsey station has platform screen doors for passenger safety and comfort.

The Elizabeth Tower
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Bridge Street
London,

The Times News International
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
1 London Bridge Street
London, SE1 9GF

020 7782 5000

Lime Street, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Bootlegger, 25-26 Lime Street
London,

Lime Street is a minor road in the City of London between Fenchurch Street to the south and Leadenhall Street to the north. Its name comes from the lime burners who once sold lime from there for use in construction.It is perhaps best known as the current home of the world's largest insurance market, Lloyd's of London, since its newest building was opened on the street in 1986. Opposite Lloyd's, the Willis Building is the global headquarters of insurance broker Willis. A 35-storey building has been proposed at 52-54 Lime Street, and upon approval and completion by 2017 will become the European headquarters of global insurer W. R. Berkley.The northern portion of the street is pedestrianised. Vehicular through-access to Leadenhall Street is prevented by a firegate, forcing drivers to bear right onto Fenchurch Avenue, from which a left turn onto Billiter Street returns vehicles to Leadenhall Street.Nearby is the Norman Foster-designed and gherkin-shaped skyscraper 30 St Mary Axe, and the Leadenhall Building. Leadenhall Market is on Lime Street's western side, adjacent to Lloyd's.

Downings Road Moorings
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
31 Mill Street
London, SE1 2EA

Sunday Times Travel
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
1 London Bridge Street
London, SE1 9GF

02077825000

This is the Facebook page for the Sunday Times Travel section and Sunday Times Travel Magazine. We're here to talk travel with you

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Morgan's Lane
London, SE1 2

HMS „Belfast” – krążownik lekki brytyjskiej marynarki Royal Navy z okresu II wojny światowej.BudowaWraz z siostrzanym HMS „Edinburgh”, krążownik należał do typu Edinburgh, określanego też jako trzecia seria typu Town. Oba krążowniki zamówione przez Admiralicję w roku 1936 miały być brytyjską odpowiedzią na zwodowanie dwóch włoskich krążowników typu Giuseppe Garibaldi o wyporności 9591 ton. Do służby w Royal Navy HMS „Belfast” wcielony w sierpniu 1939 roku.Okres II wojny światowej„Belfast” rozpoczął wojnę w składzie 18 Eskadry Krążowników Home Fleet pod dowództwem kapitana J. Scotta. 9 października 1939 HMS „Belfast” przechwycił na północ od Orkadów niemiecki liniowiec „Cap Norte” o pojemności 13 615 BRT. Wkrótce potem przeniesiony został do bazy w Rosyth, gdzie 21 listopada 1939 podczas wychodzenia z portu krążownik wszedł na niemiecką minę magnetyczną postawioną przez U-21. Eksplodująca pod dnem mina spowodowała na tyle poważne uszkodzenia kadłuba, że HMS „Belfast” został wyłączony z działań na okres 3 lat.Po remoncie okręt ponownie został wcielony do służby 8 grudnia 1942, zostając w styczniu następnego roku okrętem flagowym 10 Eskadry Krążowników Home Fleet pod komendą kontradmirała Burnetta. Pierwszą operacją HMS „Belfast” na Morzu Arktycznym była osłona konwoju JW-53 w lutym 1943 roku. Również kolejny konwój JW-54 płynący w dwóch częściach w listopadzie 1943 roku był osłaniany przez 10 Eskadrę Krążowników.

Cheval Residences Three Quays
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
40 Lower Thames Street
London,

Frenchurch Train Sation
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Streer
London,

Think London Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
203 Long Lane
London, SE1 4PN

London Country Tours
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
1 Hill Crescent
London, 8NB KT4

07775888534

Our popular chauffeur-driven tours of London and to towns and castles across England and the UK are customised to your itinerary. An experienced tour guide will meet you or your group at the airport, cruise ship or hotel, and chauffeur you in comfort on your chosen private tour of London or the UK. Enjoy tailored one to five-day guided London tours or sightseeing trips of Britain’s famous towns, cities and castles by luxury car. Visit stately Windsor Castle and Hampton Court one day see the stunning Lake District and William Shakespeare’s birthplace in Stratford Upon Avon the next. Experience a Harry Potter tour, or visit an ancient burial site such as Stonehenge. Your knowledgeable private guide will put together the perfect guided tour package for you!

First Degree Couriers
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
30B Wild's Rents
London, SE1 4

020 3751 1111

Thrifty
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
169 Tower Bridge Road
London, SE1 3

20-74033458

Clink & Bankside Company
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1 Clink Street
London, SE1 9

20-74036515

The Loadstar
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
5 Morocco Street
London, SE1 3HB

+44 207 403 2005

Alex Lennane launched The Loadstar blog in March 2011, and it grew out of the encouragement we had from the industry. That original content remains at the core of the website http://www.theloadstar.co.uk/. The Loadstar also remains an independent voice in the industry. Alex is an experienced writer on aviation and logistics, with many contacts in the air cargo industry, and she edits the quarterly magazine Airline Cargo Management. She is also Europe editor for the Seattle-based subscription news service, Cargo Facts. She has freelanced for IFW, HeavyLiftPFI and Cargo Systems, among other publications. She is also editor of Low Cost & Regional Airline Business. Gavin van Marle joined The Loadstar from Lloyds List, where he was senior reporter. He was previously editor of IFW and before that Cargo Systems. He is managing editor of Port Technology International, and contributes monthly columns for Drewry Shipping Consultants and Lloyds List. Gavin also works as a consultant on the sea freight industry, providing insight to shippers and other companies, and is the author of the forthcoming book Around the World in Freighty Ways: Adventures in Globalisation.

Local business Near Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
SE1 2UP
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

The Bridge House Bar & Dining Room
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
218 Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

+44 2074075818

The Bridge House Pub
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

The Bridge House Adnams Ale House
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
218 Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

Picnic Basket
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
16 Horselydown Lane
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

20-74134704

The Bridge Tandoori Restaurant
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
214 Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

+44 (0) 20 7403 9242

Krystals Express
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
210 Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

20-74076931

Anchor Tap
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
20A Horselydown Lane
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 4637

....a little bit of Yorkshire by the banks of the Thames - Sam Smith's and all!

Colourcentric
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
212 Tower Bridge Road Entrance on Horselydown Lane
London, United Kingdom SE1 2RA

+44 208 6165822 or 0800 007 4540

Document production service to include wide and small format printing and scanning, vinyl printing for banners and pop-up displays. Digital colour production, books, posters, brochures

Eye-D Creative
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
212A Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE12UP

+44 (0)207 407 1440

Our creative approach is rooted in cutting edge strategy. That means getting our talented creative minds involved early in the strategic process and vice versa, so that everyone involved has a deep understanding of the project, it’s purpose and parameters. We believe this more cohesive approach allows us to deliver more effective creative campaigns and communications. Our clients’ benefit by gaining deeper engagement with their target audience that is more likely to evoke their desired response. As an independent, we’ve learned to be agile and flexible. That allows us to move fast and be highly reactive, as well as being proactive between projects. And that allows our customers to be comfortable in the knowledge that they’re being well looked after, even if the proverbial does hit the fan. Building enduring relationships with our clients has been critical to our success and those relationships are based on trust, transparency and a genuine desire to make every campaign a success – after all, their success is our success. We’ve been around since 97 and have worked in many business sectors. We currently focus our attention on entertainment and leisure, but we welcome any challenge.

The Don
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
224A Tower Bridge Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

+44 (0) 20 7403 4704

Tower Bridge Park
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road SE1 2UP London, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom

+44 20 7403 3761

FAITH IN STYLE
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
220 Tower Bridge Road, Fl Second
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

+44 (0) 207 357 0326

Distributors Of Style – A lifestyle fashion distribution company working with mid – high premium brands. Our business strategy is to launch and organically widen fashion brands new to the UK. As a company we work closely with all major independent fashion stores and department stores at all levels. Being a complete fashion distribution company we offer all brands full marketing support, product placement and distribution centre facilities which is all managed and provided in house.

RJmetis
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Clarence Centre for Enterprise & Innovation
London, United Kingdom SE1 6FE

+44 (0) 845 303 1000

We still bring you great cloud based software for flexible workspaces and still love to help people who are running flexible workspaces - but we now offer more.

Draft House Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
206-208 Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

020 7378 9995

The Draft House is a small group of Public Houses with good food and great beer. We aim to do for beer what our culture has done for food and wine over the past twenty years. Namely, we take its provenance, cellaring and serving seriously. We celebrate choice and quality with an extraordinary range of strange and wonderful brews, both bottled and on tap.

Circle Bar
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
13-15 Queen Elizabeth St
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JE

Hara the Circle Bar
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
13 Queen Elizabeth Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

20-74038886

Starbucks - South Bank - Shad Thames
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
49 Shad Thames Tower Bridge Piazza
London, United Kingdom SE1 2NJ

02073788640

Caffé Paradiso
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
45 Shad Thames
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

20-73786606

Starbucks UK
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
49 Shad Thames
London, United Kingdom

02073788640