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End Of Brighton Pier, Brighton | Tourist Information


Madeira Drive
Brighton, United Kingdom BN2 1

01273 609361

College and University Near End Of Brighton Pier

City College Brighton and Hove
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
City College Brighton & Hove, Pelham Street
Brighton, BN1 4FA

01273 667788

You can also like our other College Facebook page; The Student Services teams work to promote the health, well-being, safety and progression of all students at CCB based across all three sites at Pelham Street, Preston Road and City College East at Wilson Avenue. www.facebook.com/welfareandcareers

CU Next Tuesday
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
The Arch
Brighton, BN1 1NB

07533222324

University Of Brighton, Grand Parade
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
58-67 Grand Parade
Brighton, BN2 0JY

01273 600900

Pupils of Brighton College
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Eastern Road
Brighton, BN2 0AL

+44 (0)1273 704200

Brighton College is an institution divided between a Senior School known simply as Brighton College, the Prep School and the Pre-Prep School. All of these schools are co-educational independent schools in Brighton, England, sited immediately next to each another. The Senior School caters for children ages approx. 11 to 18. The current headmaster is Richard J. Cairns. The Good Schools Guide called the school a "Happy and forward-looking town school with a wide and healthy spread of pupils and parents", also stating: "A good bet to become an even more impressive school in the future. Founded in 1845 by William Aldwin Soames, who collected a group of like-minded local citizens to join him in the task (especially Edward Cornford, a solicitor), Brighton College was the first of the public schools to be founded in Sussex.

Brighton Hove & Sussex Sixth Form College
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
205 Dyke Road
Hove, BN3 6EG

01273 552200

Brighton, Hove & Sussex Sixth Form College, usually abbreviated to BHASVIC, is a college in Brighton & Hove, England for 16- to 19-year-old students.LocationThe college is in the Prestonville area of the city. It is situated at the corner of Dyke Road (A2010) and the Old Shoreham Road (A270), a major road junction in the north-west of the city of Brighton & Hove in Seven Dials.HistoryGrammar schoolThe college has its origins in the Brighton Proprietary Grammar and Commercial School, founded in July 1859 at Lancaster House, Grand Parade. The school continued as the Brighton, Hove and Sussex Grammar School. It opened on its present site in 1913. In 1914, not long after it opened, the school was requisitioned for use as a military hospital.Sixth form collegeThe current sixth form college was formed in 1975 following reorganisation of secondary education in East Sussex. There are two sixth form colleges (BHASVIC and Varndean College) in Brighton and Hove. BHASVIC draws nearly 40% of its students from East and West Sussex, the remainder living in Brighton and Hove. The joint admissions policy for BHASVIC, Varndean and City College gives top priority to applications from pupils at 11–16 schools in Brighton and Hove.Funding and governanceBHASVIC and other sixth form colleges in England were transferred under the Further and Higher Education Act 1992 out of local government control and established as independent FE Corporations. On 1 April 2010, under the Apprentices, Schools, Children and Learning Act 2009, the college was designated as a sixth form college. Over 90% of the college's funds come from the EFA (Education Funding Agency). Corporation Members (governors) are individuals from business, the local community, staff, students and parents. The principal of the college is an ex-officio member of the corporation.

St. John's School and College
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
17 Walpole Road
Brighton, BN2 0AF

01273 244000

St. John’s School and College is a place where learning is shaped around your hopes and aspirations; where our courses are tailored to meet your goals and where you are supported by a highly skilled staff team who respect your choices and lifestyle. St. John’s is a non maintained independent specialist school and independent specialist college, working with learners who have complex learning disabilities including some learners who may have difficulties resulting from behavioural, emotional and social difficulties (BESD), Autistic Spectrum Condition (ASC), Asperger’s Syndrome, and Pathological Demand Avoidance Syndrome (PDA). Our committed staff have high expectations for the learners, helping them to achieve outstanding success in their learning and preparation for their young adult lives. Learners can work with us on a residential, day, full or part time basis, in partnership with other providers, or on a sessional or outreach basis. The choice is yours.

International Summer School University of Sussex
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Arts Road
Brighton, BN1 9RH

+44 (0) 1273 877556

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to email us at: [email protected] Although we will be posting here regularly, we will not be able to answer your questions through this platform, so make sure you email us at the above address with any questions you might have. About this Facebook page: This Facebook page has been set up to keep you informed about what is happening at the International Summer School throughout a year. We will be posting about the application process, module availability, interesting facts about our tutors and staff members, the social programme, what to do and see in Brighton, and many more exciting things that we hope will be of your interest. Now a little bit of background on us: The University of Sussex is an internationally renowned institution, with a beautiful campus on the edge of Brighton; a lively, friendly city on the south coast of England which is less than an hour by train from London. You will live and learn with students from around the world. While our highly rated academic modules are the core of the summer school experience, you are also encouraged to take part in an exciting social programme that includes events on campus and in and around Brighton, as well as trips within the UK. Our team will also offer support for those seeking to travel elsewhere in Europe; all designed to help you make the most of this opportunity to explore a different academic and cultural environment. The University has a long history of welcoming international students. The majority of our students come from the US but in 2014 the ISS alone attracted students from over 30 countries, making the ISS a truly international experience. From the end of June to mid-August, you can study with us for either four or eight weeks and choose from more than 60 modules in subjects including sciences, business, humanities and social sciences, allowing you to gain credit towards your degree or to experiment with something new. Don't forget to visit our website to find out more about us: www.sussex.ac.uk/iss

Monday Night Project
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
79 - 81 West Street
Brighton, BN1 2Ra

07969070495

Walkabout plays host to Monday Night Project each and every Monday. Aiming to bring something fresh and unique to the midweek scene, MNP gives you an excuse to dress up, to make an effort, and to experience a night out the way it should be: * The best VIP Table Service in Brighton * The cheapest Monday night drinks * Live Acts and Celebrity PA's * Guest DJ's * Quirky Themes The Drinks // £1.50 ALL Drinks £1.50 ALL Drinks £1.50 ALL Drinks £1.50 ALL Drinks Exc. premium spirits e.g. Grey Goose etc.

Landmark Near End Of Brighton Pier

Brighton Dome
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Church Street
Brighton, BN1 1UD

01273 709709

Hobgoblin Brighton
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
31 York Place
Brighton, BN1 4GU

01273 682933

St George's Church, Brighton
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
St George's Road, Kemp Town
Brighton, BN2 1

01273 279448

St George's Church is an Anglican church in the Kemptown area of Brighton, in the English city of Brighton and Hove. It was built at the request of Thomas Read Kemp, who had created and financed the Kemp Town estate on the cliffs east of Brighton in the early 19th century, and is now regarded as the parish church of the wider Kemptown area. It is a Grade II listed building.HistoryThomas Read Kemp, born in 1782 in Lewes, East Sussex, returned to the Church of England in 1823, seven years after founding his own independent sect. Turning his attention to architecture and town planning, he decided to create a residential estate on land beyond the existing eastern boundary of Brighton, with large houses for affluent people. Designed by Charles Busby and Amon Wilds and built by Thomas Cubitt, this estate became Kemp Town, although Kemp had fled the country to escape debts by the time construction finished.The Busby–Wilds partnership had also been responsible for building the Holy Trinity chapel (in Ship Street in central Brighton) for Kemp's sect, and in 1824 Kemp enlisted Busby to build a church to serve the new estate. He obtained a private Act of Parliament on 3 June 1824, which allowed him to appoint a perpetual curate and derive income from the rental or sale of pews. This was a common procedure at the time: it allowed churches to be built as an investment, and pew rental could be quite profitable.

St Peter's Church, Brighton
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
York Place
Brighton, BN1 4GU

01273 676051

St Peter's Church is a church in Brighton in the English city of Brighton and Hove. It is near the centre of the town, on an island between two major roads, the A23 London Road and A270 Lewes Road. Built from 1824–28 to a design by Sir Charles Barry, it is arguably the finest example of the pre-Victorian Gothic Revival style. It is a Grade II* listed building. It was the parish church of Brighton from 1873 to 2007 and is sometimes unofficially referred to as "Brighton's cathedral".History of the buildingSt Peter's Church was founded as a chapel of ease associated with Brighton's oldest church and its existing parish church, St Nicholas'. The contract to design the new church was won in open competition by Charles Barry, then only in his mid-twenties. It was built in an approximation of the 14th- and 15th-century Perpendicular or Late Gothic style, typical of the so-called Commissioners' churches, of which St Peter's was one. It was not a revival of its style in the manner of Barry's pupil Augustus Pugin, but, as Nikolaus Pevsner described it, " remedies this fault by remarkable inventiveness and boldness".

Volk's Electric Railway
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
285 Madeira Drive
Brighton, BN2 1EN

01273 292718

Volk's Electric Railway is a narrow gauge heritage railway that runs along a length of the seafront of the English seaside resort of Brighton. It was built by Magnus Volk, the first section being completed in August 1883, and is the oldest operating electric railway in the world. Although it was preceded by Werner von Siemens's 1879 demonstration line in Berlin and by the Gross-Lichterfelde Tramway of 1881, neither line is still operational.Operated as a historical seafront tourist attraction, the railway does not usually run during the winter months, and its service is also liable to occasional suspension due to severe weather or maintenance issues.HistoryIn 1883 Magnus Volk opened a short, electric railway running for 1/4mi between Swimming Arch and Chain Pier. Electrical power at 50 V DC was supplied to the small car using the two running rails. In 1884 the line was extended a further 1/2mile beyond the Chain Pier to Paston Place, and regauged to. The electrical supply was increased to 160 V DC and the power plant was installed in the arch built into the cliff face at Paston Place. In 1886 an off-set third rail was added to minimise current leakage.

Brighton Unitarian Church
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
New Road
Brighton, BN1 1UF

01273 696022

The Brighton Unitarian Church, previously known as Christ Church, is a Unitarian chapel in Brighton, England. Built in 1820 by prolific local architect Amon Henry Wilds on land sold to the fledgling Unitarian community by the Prince Regent, the stuccoed Greek Revival building occupies a prominent position near the corner of Church Road and New Road in the centre of Brighton, near the Royal Pavilion and the city's main theatres. It has had Grade II listed status since 1952. It is a member of the General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches, the umbrella organisation for British Unitarians.HistoryBrighton in the late eighteenth century was turning from a fishing village to a fashionable resort, largely because of the patronage of the Prince Regent. New Road, as it is now known, was built on his instructions. The main north-south road leading out of the old town ran next to the Royal Pavilion, where he lived; noise and traffic disturbed him and made access to his stables difficult. He asked the architect of his stables to build a new road further to the west, and closed the original route. New Road was pedestrianised in 2007.A congregation of Baptists with Calvinist views had been established in Brighton since the 18th century. A rift developed from 1791, when William Stevens, a newcomer, introduced Universalist views. In 1793 or 1795, Stevens and 18 others (including the original pastor) were expelled. From 1797, a small but steadily growing congregation met at Stevens' house; by 1806 they had moved to a small chapel in Jew Street, near the Baptists' meeting place in Bond Street. A Unitarian missionary popularised the theology among the congregation, and assistance from the leader of the Unitarian community in nearby Ditchling, John Chatfield, enabled a meeting room to be bought. This opened in 1812.

St. Bartholomew's
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Ann Street
Brighton, BN1 4GP

01273 620491

St John the Baptist's Church, Brighton
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
2 Bristol Road
Brighton, BN2 1AP

01273 681587

St John the Baptist's Church is a Roman Catholic church in the Kemptown area of the English city of Brighton and Hove. It was the first Roman Catholic church built in Brighton after the process of Catholic Emancipation in the early 19th century removed restrictions on Catholic worship. Located on Bristol Road, a main road east of the city centre, it is one of 11 Catholic churches in Brighton and Hove. The Classical-style building, which was funded by Maria Fitzherbert and completed in 1835, has been listed at Grade II* by English Heritage for its architectural and historical importance.HistoryLaws against Roman Catholic worship were in place in Britain until the early 19th century, although some restrictions were relaxed by the passing of Acts of Parliament in 1778 and 1791 . The 1791 Act allowed Catholic churches to be built for the first time, although there were restrictions on their design and appearance: no bells or steeples were allowed.Brighton's Roman Catholic community at the time of the Relief Act was small, but two factors caused it to grow in the 1790s. Many refugees from the French Revolution settled in Brighton after escaping from France; and Maria Fitzherbert, a twice-widowed Catholic, began a relationship with the Prince Regent . She accompanied the Prince Regent whenever he visited Brighton, and had her own house .

St Nicholas' Church, Brighton
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Dyke Road
Brighton, BN1 3

07746 198026

The Church of Saint Nicholas of Myra, usually known as St. Nicholas Church, is an Anglican church in Brighton, England. It is both the original parish church of Brighton and the oldest surviving building in Brighton. It is located on high ground at the junction of Church Street and Dyke Road in the city centre, very close to the main shopping areas. Due to its architectural significance the church is a Grade II* listed building.Early historyThe Domesday Book of 1086 records the presence of a church, valued at £12, in what was then the small fishing village of Bristelmestune. Shortly afterwards, it was granted to the Cluniac priory in nearby Lewes. Although there is no certainty over where this church was located, it is possible that it stood on the site of the present-day St. Nicholas church: although Bristelmestune was located some distance to the south immediately adjacent to the coast, the ground there was marshy and suffered from erosion, and was vulnerable to attacks from invaders. The higher ground of the hill where the present church stands would have been better strategically and defensively, as well as being highly visible to residents of the village and the fishermen at sea.Construction of the present churchIn its current form, St. Nicholas church dates from the mid-14th century, although the tower that was built at that time used some stones of Norman origin, which may have come from the original church. Also, a font from that period is preserved within the church. It was carved in around 1170 in Caen Stone, and in 2001 was relocated to a prominent position at the west end of the church - the latest of several moves over the centuries.

St Bartholomew's Church, Brighton
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Ann Street
Brighton, BN1 4

01273 620491

St Bartholomew's Church, dedicated to the apostle Bartholomew, is an Anglican church in Brighton, England. The neo-gothic building is located on Ann Street, on a sloping site between Brighton railway station and the A23 London Road, adjacent to the New England Quarter development. It is notable for its height - dominating the streets around it and being visible from many parts of the city - and its distinctive red-brick construction.History and constructionThe Revd Henry Michell Wagner, who had occupied the position of Vicar of Brighton since 1824, died in 1870, giving his son, the Revd Arthur Douglas Wagner (the curate of St Paul's Church in West Street), the opportunity to continue and improve his father's proposals for new parish churches in Brighton. He undertook three such schemes in the 1870s, two in conjunction with his two half-brothers, but Saint Bartholomew's is the only church which was his sole responsibility throughout.In 1868, Arthur Wagner had built a temporary church on Providence Place, a back street parallel with the main London Road, along with a school accommodating 400 pupils. After his father's death, he resolved to build a more impressive new church in the same area. The original plan, which was submitted to the Town Council in 1871 and approved on 7 June of that year, consisted of a combined church and school building, 322 feet in length, 46 feet wide, and 41¾ feet high. This was amended shortly afterwards to reduce the number of bays in the interior from 13 to 11½; the additional space formed a "courtyard" area between the church and the existing school building, which was to be retained.

Chapel Royal, Brighton
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
164 North St
Brighton, BN1 1EA

01273 328767

The Chapel Royal is an 18th-century place of worship in the centre of Brighton, part of the English city of Brighton and Hove. Built as a chapel of ease, it became one of Brighton's most important churches, gaining its own parish and becoming closely associated with the Prince Regent and fashionable Regency-era society. It remains an active church.HistoryIn the 18th century, Brighton was a small town based on a declining fishing industry and still suffering the effects of damage caused by the Great Storm of 1703. Its population in the middle of the century was approximately 2,000. Its fortunes improved after a doctor from nearby Lewes, Richard Russell, wrote a treatise encouraging the use of seawater as a cure for illness, in particular glandular swellings. He recommended bathing in the sea and drinking the water at Brighton. This form of medical therapy became popular, and helped make the town a fashionable place to visit. Brighton became increasingly popular throughout the rest of the century, but received its next significant boost when the Prince Regent, son of King George III, made his first visit in 1783. By 1786 he had a home in the town—a rented farmhouse near the Old Steine, inland from the coast—and he later commissioned the architect John Nash to build a palace, the Royal Pavilion, for him on the site. The Prince was an infrequent churchgoer, and Brighton's only Anglican church, St Nicholas, was a long way from his home and up a steep hill. Furthermore, the ever-increasing number of visitors and residents caused overcrowding in the church. In 1789 the new Vicar of Brighton, Revd Thomas Hudson, decided to resolve these problems by building a new chapel near the Prince's house. He hoped to encourage the Prince to attend, and thereby worship more often than he had in the past, and considered that a more central chapel would relieve the pressure on the parish church.

Brighton Friends Meeting House
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Ship Street
Brighton, BN1 1

01273 770258

The Brighton Friends Meeting House is a Friends meeting house (Quaker place of worship) in the centre of Brighton, part of the city of Brighton and Hove in East Sussex, England. The building, which dates from 1805, replaced an earlier meeting house of 1690 what was then a small fishing village on the Sussex coast. Located at the junction of Ship Street and Prince Albert Street in The Lanes, the heart of Brighton's "old town" area, its architectural and historic importance has been recognised by English Heritage's granting of Grade II listed status.HistoryThe Quaker community in Brighton had been prevented from congregating in public by the 1664 Conventicle Act, but some freedom was granted after the Act of Toleration 1689 was passed under William and Mary's joint sovereignty. By 1690, the community acquired a former malthouse and some adjoining land, which became their first permanent meeting house and a burial ground respectively. This stood near the junction of North Street and New Road, where the Pavilion Theatre now stands. When some pleasure gardens were laid out next to the meeting house in the 1790s, the community sold its grounds (known as Quaker's Croft and extending to 1acre) to the Prince Regent, and sold the building separately; it was immediately demolished by its new owner. They used the £1,800 funds to buy a plot of land east of Ship Street for £1,000 and build a new meeting house, accessed by a narrow passageway next to two cottages which came with the land. It had an attached caretaker's cottage, and opened for worship in 1805. A large extension was added to the north in 1850; and in 1876, another extension was built to house educational facilities. This is now used for various cultural activities as well.

Sussex Heights
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
St. Margaret's Place
Brighton, BN1 2

01273 205179

Sussex Heights is a residential tower block in the centre of Brighton, part of the English city of Brighton and Hove. Built between 1966 and 1968 on the site of a historic church, it rises to 334ft— as of March 2013 Sussex Heights is the 48th tallest building in the UK. Until 2005 it was the tallest residential tower in the UK outside London. Richard Seifert's design has been criticised for its overbearing scale and contrast with neighbouring Regency architecture, but it is acknowledged as an "imposing and prestigious" luxury apartment block with good facilities. Peregrine falcons have been resident at the top of the tower for several years, and have successfully bred. Until 2015, it was the tallest structure in Brighton, however it has now been exceeded by the i360 Tower, which stands 162 metres.HistoryCharles Busby was part of an architectural partnership (with Amon Wilds and his son Amon Henry Wilds) which gave Brighton much of its character in the 19th century. They met high demand for residential, ecclesiastical and public buildings of all types in the rich, fashionable town by producing elegant designs which combined contemporary architectural expectations with imaginative devices (such as prominent cornices, bold bay windows and columns with decorative capitals) in a distinctively "powerful and assertive" style. Busby has been described as the best architect of the three, having already achieved much by the age of 20. He moved to Brighton in 1822 and joined Amon and Amon Henry Wilds.

Dorset Gardens Methodist Church
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Dorset Gardens Methodist Church
Brighton, BN2 1GS

01273 605502

The Dorset Gardens Methodist Church is a Methodist church in the Kemptown area of the city of Brighton and Hove, England. Although it is a modern building—completed in 2003—it is the third Methodist place of worship on the site: it replaced an older, larger church which was in turn a rebuilding of Brighton's first Methodist church. Between them, the churches have played an important part in the history of Methodism in Brighton.HistoryOn 26 August 1808, Brighton's first Methodist church opened on the west side of Dorset Gardens, a street running northwards from St James's Street—a main route eastwards out of Brighton. The opposite side of Dorset Gardens had been developed with large houses in the 1790s. The church, which followed the Wesleyan Methodist doctrine, was built in red brick with rounded windows and a square entrance porch, Three of the four interior sides of the square building were galleried, and the church's choir occupied one section. In about 1840, a hall, gas lighting, new entrance (leading on to Dorset Gardens itself) and organ were added. The Minister at the time (1855) did not want the church to have an organ, however, and was not present at the dedication ceremony.Another red-brick building, somewhat larger and with an Italianate tower, was designed and constructed by Liverpool-based architect C. O. Ellison in 1884, with a new organ and electric lighting added in 1894. The brick was set off by terracotta dressings at regular intervals, and the overall style appears to have been influenced by Renaissance architecture. A large extension was built on the south side in 1929, and it is this part of the site upon which the present church stands. This was opened in April 2003, three years after the 1884 building was demolished, and cost £1.6 million.

St Michael's Church, Brighton
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Road
Brighton, BN1 3FU

01273822284

St. Michael's Church (in full, St. Michael and All Angels) is an Anglican church in Brighton, England, dating from the mid-Victorian era. Located on Victoria Road in the Montpelier area, to the east of Montpelier Road, it is one of the largest churches in the city of Brighton and Hove. The church is a Grade I listed building.Origins and the local areaThe church serves the loosely defined Montpelier and Clifton Hill areas of Brighton, which lie west of the major Dyke Road and cover the steep slopes between the Seven Dials district and the seafront. St Stephen's Church had served parts of the district since 1851, when it had been moved to Montpelier Place from its previous location in Castle Square, close to the Royal Pavilion. However, it was not convenient for the area as a whole, with most of its parishioners being drawn instead from the streets to the south of the church.Development of the Montpelier and Clifton Hill areas started in the 1820s, and by the 1840s they had essentially taken the form they remain in today, with a range of high-quality houses, many in the form of Regency terraces and crescents such as Clifton Terrace. However, one area of open land remained: at the time (the 1850s) it was known as Temple Fields, and consisted of a field, a pond and a partly built house. This was chosen as the site for a new church to serve the area. On present-day maps, Temple Fields is the area bounded by Denmark Terrace, Clifton Hill, Powis Road and Victoria Road. The church faces three streets: St. Michael's Place, Powis Road and Victoria Road (on which the main entrance is located).

St Joseph's Church, Brighton
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Elm Grove
Brighton, BN2 3

01273 386159

St Joseph's Church is a Roman Catholic church in the Elm Grove area of Brighton, part of the English city of Brighton and Hove. It is one of eleven Roman Catholic churches in the city. The church was built in several stages, and outstanding debts meant that its official dedication did not take place until 1979. It has been listed at Grade II* by English Heritage in view of its architectural importance.HistoryElm Grove was built to connect the Lewes Road, which ran into the centre of Brighton, and Brighton Racecourse at the top of Race Hill. The road was laid out on the steeply sloping site in the 1850s, and rapid residential development occurred over the next decade. More houses were built later in the 19th century on the road itself and on streets running to the north and south, and by 1900 the area was densely populated.A Roman Catholic place of worship has existed at the bottom (west) end of Elm Grove since the late 1860s. Recent research has found that a temporary mission chapel, completed in 1869, stood on the site now occupied by St Joseph's. (Older sources suggested that the building completed in that year was the first part of the present church structure.) A local resident, Matthew Haddock, died in the 1870s; in his will he expressed a wish for a permanent church to be built to replace the mission chapel, and his wife donated £10,000 of bonds to fund this. Architect William Kedo Broder designed a tall stone building in accordance with Mrs Haddock's proposals, and the first part of the building—the sanctuary and part of the nave—was opened in May 1879. In 1880 the sanctuary was enlarged and the apse was built. Before any more of Kedo Broder's designs could be realised, he was killed in January 1881, falling from a moving train.

St Paul's Church, Brighton
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
West Street
Brighton, BN1 2RS

+44 1273 203231

St Paul's Church, dedicated to the missionary and Apostle to the Gentiles Paul of Tarsus, is a Church of England parish church in Brighton in the English county of Sussex. It is located on West Street in the city centre, close to the seafront and the main shopping areas.History and constructionThe church was the fourth to have been built on the instruction of Rev. Henry Michell Wagner, Vicar of Brighton since 1824. His first was All Souls on Eastern Road, built between 1833 and 1834 but demolished in 1968. This was followed by Christ Church on Montpelier Road in Montpelier, near the boundary with Hove, to which King William IV, his Queen Consort Adelaide and his successor Queen Victoria had each contributed £50 towards the £4,500 cost of construction. This church was demolished in 1982. His third was the church of St John the Evangelist in Carlton Hill, on the edge of the Kemptown district. This church, which had again received a £50 donation from Queen Victoria, was consecrated in 1840, and became the Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity after it closed in 1980. St. Paul's is therefore the earliest of Rev. Wagner's churches to remain in use as a place of Anglican worship.

St Paul's Church, Brighton
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
West Street
Brighton, BN1 2RS

+44 1273 203231

St Paul's Church, dedicated to the missionary and Apostle to the Gentiles Paul of Tarsus, is a Church of England parish church in Brighton in the English county of Sussex. It is located on West Street in the city centre, close to the seafront and the main shopping areas.History and constructionThe church was the fourth to have been built on the instruction of Rev. Henry Michell Wagner, Vicar of Brighton since 1824. His first was All Souls on Eastern Road, built between 1833 and 1834 but demolished in 1968. This was followed by Christ Church on Montpelier Road in Montpelier, near the boundary with Hove, to which King William IV, his Queen Consort Adelaide and his successor Queen Victoria had each contributed £50 towards the £4,500 cost of construction. This church was demolished in 1982. His third was the church of St John the Evangelist in Carlton Hill, on the edge of the Kemptown district. This church, which had again received a £50 donation from Queen Victoria, was consecrated in 1840, and became the Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity after it closed in 1980. St. Paul's is therefore the earliest of Rev. Wagner's churches to remain in use as a place of Anglican worship.

St Luke's Church, Queen's Park, Brighton
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
31 Queens Park Rd Flat 2
Brighton, BN2 9BZ

St Luke's Church is an Anglican church in the Queen's Park area of Brighton, part of the English city of Brighton and Hove. Occupying a large corner site on Queen's Park Road, it was designed in the 1880s by Sir Arthur Blomfield in the Early English style, and has been given listed building status because of its architectural importance.HistoryQueen's Park was laid out as an ornamental park of 15.3acre in 1824. Charles Barry was hired to design decorative entrances and a villa for the park's owner. Housing development around the park had started in the 1810s and continued throughout the 19th century. The first Anglican place of worship in the area was built in 1875 and became a chapel of ease to St Mary's Church in Kemptown when that church was completed. The red-brick building was on the west side of Queen's Park Road. In 1880 a separate parish was established, and preparatory work on the new church started the following year on the opposite side of the road. The site was bought for £900; the foundation stone was laid in 1882 by the Bishop of Chichester, Richard Durnford; and Arthur Blomfield finished the church in 1885, apart from a proposed spire which was never built because of a lack of money. The new St Luke's Church was consecrated on 16 April 1885. The 1875 building held services until then; it then became the church hall until it was gutted by fire and demolished in the 1970s, after which flats were built on the site.

St Luke's Church, Queen's Park, Brighton
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
31 Queens Park Rd Flat 2
Brighton, BN2 9BZ

St Luke's Church is an Anglican church in the Queen's Park area of Brighton, part of the English city of Brighton and Hove. Occupying a large corner site on Queen's Park Road, it was designed in the 1880s by Sir Arthur Blomfield in the Early English style, and has been given listed building status because of its architectural importance.HistoryQueen's Park was laid out as an ornamental park of 15.3acre in 1824. Charles Barry was hired to design decorative entrances and a villa for the park's owner. Housing development around the park had started in the 1810s and continued throughout the 19th century. The first Anglican place of worship in the area was built in 1875 and became a chapel of ease to St Mary's Church in Kemptown when that church was completed. The red-brick building was on the west side of Queen's Park Road. In 1880 a separate parish was established, and preparatory work on the new church started the following year on the opposite side of the road. The site was bought for £900; the foundation stone was laid in 1882 by the Bishop of Chichester, Richard Durnford; and Arthur Blomfield finished the church in 1885, apart from a proposed spire which was never built because of a lack of money. The new St Luke's Church was consecrated on 16 April 1885. The 1875 building held services until then; it then became the church hall until it was gutted by fire and demolished in the 1970s, after which flats were built on the site.

Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity, Brighton
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Carlton Hill
Brighton, BN2 0

01273 746653

The Church of the Holy Trinity is a Greek Orthodox church in Brighton, part of the English city of Brighton and Hove. Built in 1838 in one of Brighton's most notorious slum districts, Carlton Hill, it was an Anglican church for most of its life: dedicated to St John the Evangelist, it was used by the Anglican community until it was declared redundant in 1980. After some uncertainty about its future, it was sold to Brighton's Greek Orthodox community in 1985 and has been used as their permanent place of worship since then. Reflecting its architectural and historical importance, it has been listed at Grade II since 1971.HistoryCarlton Hill is a long, steep road on high ground known as the East Cliff, north of the Kemp Town development and south of Hanover. Following Brighton's rapid growth in the early 19th century, it became established as one of its most deprived slum areas. Henry Michell Wagner, the Vicar of Brighton from 1824 until his death in 1870, was committed to providing free churches for Brighton's poor people, at a time when pew-rents were standard in Anglican churches. He used his large fortune to build six churches in which most of the seats were free rather than subject to pew-rents. The need for such action was urgent in the early years of his curacy: by 1830 about 18,000 poor people lived in the town, representing nearly half the population, but only 3,000 rent-free pews were available in the existing churches.

Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity, Brighton
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Carlton Hill
Brighton, BN2 0

01273 746653

The Church of the Holy Trinity is a Greek Orthodox church in Brighton, part of the English city of Brighton and Hove. Built in 1838 in one of Brighton's most notorious slum districts, Carlton Hill, it was an Anglican church for most of its life: dedicated to St John the Evangelist, it was used by the Anglican community until it was declared redundant in 1980. After some uncertainty about its future, it was sold to Brighton's Greek Orthodox community in 1985 and has been used as their permanent place of worship since then. Reflecting its architectural and historical importance, it has been listed at Grade II since 1971.HistoryCarlton Hill is a long, steep road on high ground known as the East Cliff, north of the Kemp Town development and south of Hanover. Following Brighton's rapid growth in the early 19th century, it became established as one of its most deprived slum areas. Henry Michell Wagner, the Vicar of Brighton from 1824 until his death in 1870, was committed to providing free churches for Brighton's poor people, at a time when pew-rents were standard in Anglican churches. He used his large fortune to build six churches in which most of the seats were free rather than subject to pew-rents. The need for such action was urgent in the early years of his curacy: by 1830 about 18,000 poor people lived in the town, representing nearly half the population, but only 3,000 rent-free pews were available in the existing churches.

Bedford Towers
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
137 Kings Road
Brighton, BN1 2JG

Church of the Annunciation, Brighton
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
89 Washington Street
Brighton, BN2 9

1273-681341

The Church of the Annunciation is an Anglican church in Brighton, part of the English city of Brighton and Hove. It was one of several churches built in the 1860s on behalf of Rev. Arthur Wagner, the son of Rev. Henry Michell Wagner, Vicar of Brighton (1824–1870), and served a new area of poor housing in what is now the Hanover district. The church is a Grade II listed building.HistoryArthur Wagner was ordained in 1850. For the next 20 years, until his father's death, he had some degree of freedom to choose the sites and designs for new churches in Brighton, which was growing rapidly at the time. Having paid for the construction and opening of one chapel of ease in 1862, in a working-class area in what is now the North Laine area, he decided to do the same in 1864 in another poor area which was being constructed on high ground between the Old Steine (site of the Royal Pavilion) and Queen's Park. The chosen site, on Washington Street, was narrow and offered little room to expand. Nevertheless, a local architect named William Dancy designed a building similar to St Mary Magdalene's (the church financed by Wagner in 1862) but adapted to fit the location.The Church of the Annunciation was opened on 15 August 1864, and was initially administered by curates from St Paul's Church before being allocated its own parish, which covers much of the present-day Hanover area. Its popularity ensured that an enlargement was required by 1881. Little could be done in the small space available, but Brighton-based architect Edmund Scott — who had worked with Wagner on St Bartholomew's Church a few years earlier — was able to provide a new north aisle in a similar style to the original south aisle, using wooden columns for support in the same way as Dancy had. The rebuilt church, which cost £5,000 (again, fully funded by Wagner), was consecrated in 1884.

Church of the Annunciation, Brighton
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
89 Washington Street
Brighton, BN2 9

1273-681341

The Church of the Annunciation is an Anglican church in Brighton, part of the English city of Brighton and Hove. It was one of several churches built in the 1860s on behalf of Rev. Arthur Wagner, the son of Rev. Henry Michell Wagner, Vicar of Brighton (1824–1870), and served a new area of poor housing in what is now the Hanover district. The church is a Grade II listed building.HistoryArthur Wagner was ordained in 1850. For the next 20 years, until his father's death, he had some degree of freedom to choose the sites and designs for new churches in Brighton, which was growing rapidly at the time. Having paid for the construction and opening of one chapel of ease in 1862, in a working-class area in what is now the North Laine area, he decided to do the same in 1864 in another poor area which was being constructed on high ground between the Old Steine (site of the Royal Pavilion) and Queen's Park. The chosen site, on Washington Street, was narrow and offered little room to expand. Nevertheless, a local architect named William Dancy designed a building similar to St Mary Magdalene's (the church financed by Wagner in 1862) but adapted to fit the location.The Church of the Annunciation was opened on 15 August 1864, and was initially administered by curates from St Paul's Church before being allocated its own parish, which covers much of the present-day Hanover area. Its popularity ensured that an enlargement was required by 1881. Little could be done in the small space available, but Brighton-based architect Edmund Scott — who had worked with Wagner on St Bartholomew's Church a few years earlier — was able to provide a new north aisle in a similar style to the original south aisle, using wooden columns for support in the same way as Dancy had. The rebuilt church, which cost £5,000 (again, fully funded by Wagner), was consecrated in 1884.

Montpelier Cresent
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
20 Montpelier Crescent
Brighton, BN1 3JF

Local Business Near End Of Brighton Pier

Poison Ivy
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
129 St James's Street
Brighton, BN2 1

01273204076

Lucky Voice Brighton
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
8 Black Lion Street
Brighton, BN1 1

01273 715 770

Lucky Voice Brighton has luxury private karaoke rooms for up to 15 people and a chic cocktail bar. Perfect for birthdays, hen nights or just a spontaneous night out with friends. Our famous fans include Sir Paul McCartney, the Arctic Monkeys and Kate Moss. "The best place in the world" - The Observer Call 01273 715 770 or email [email protected] to book your room!

Madeira Drive
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Madeira Drive
Brighton, BN2 1

Harry Ramsden's Brighton
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Steine Street
Brighton, BN2 1TA

01273690691

The Mucky Duck
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
7-9 Manchester Street
Brighton, BN2 1TF

01273601450

A homely independent pub with a wide range of draught and bottled beers, premium wines and spirits and local craft ales. Our full burger menu is served until 10pm Monday to Saturday. On Sundays we have Charlie's Kitchen pop-up serving delicious, organic, locally-sourced roasts. Vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free and dairy-free options available. In the evenings we have Pop-Up Pottery on Mondays, pub quizzes on Tuesdays, live Irish Folk music each Wednesday and our live gypsy jazz band every Thursday. Live DJ's play Friday and Saturday from 9pm until 1am.

Crazy Golf
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Lower Promenade, Madeira Dr
Brighton, BN2 1

The Tea Cosy Brighton
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
3 George Street
Brighton, BN2 1RH

Shogun Ramen
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
13 Prince Albert Street
Brighton, BN1 1

The House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
37 East St
Brighton,

01273 321111

LUSH UK
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
41 East Street
Brighton, BN1 1HL

01273774700

Club Revenge
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
32 Old Steine
Brighton, BN1 1

Atlantic Seafront
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
16 Marine Parade
Brighton, BN2 1

01273695944

Quadrophenia Alley
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
11 East St
Brighton, BN1 1HP

Brighton War Memorial
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
24 Dukes Lane, The Lanes
Brighton, BN1 1

01273 727232

Brighton and Hove Council Town Hall
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Bartholomews
Brighton, BN50 9

1273-290000

Brighton Judo Club
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
1/9 St James's Street (off Dorset Gardens), Brighton, BN2 1RU
Brighton, BN2 1RU

Brighton Fishing Quarter Gallery
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
205 King Road Arches
Brighton, BN1 1NB

01273 730182

Bartholomew House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
7 Bartholomews
Brighton, BN1 1HG

+44 (0) 1273 777573

The Whisky Shop
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
64 East St
Brighton, BN1 1

01273 327962

Links of London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
39-40 Meeting House Lane
Brighton,

+44 (0) 12 7332 4318

East Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
68 Hanover Street
Brighton,

Paperchase
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
66 East Street
Brighton, BN1 1

+44 (0) 1273 739150

L'Occitane
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
23 East Street
Brighton, BN1 1

+44 (0) 1273 719171

Barbour
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
11 East Street
Brighton, BN1 1HP

0191 455 4444

Tourist Attraction Near End Of Brighton Pier

Brighton Pier
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Madeira Drive
Brighton, BN2 1TW

01273609361

Check out our Twitter page: http://twitter.com/#!/BrightonPier and our website: http://www.brightonpier.co.uk/ for all the information on Brighton Pier you'll ever need!!!

The Lanes
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
9 Brighton Place
Brighton, BN1 1

1273-294296

The Lanes are a collection of narrow lanes in Brighton, in the city of Brighton and Hove famous for their small shops (including several antique shops) and narrow alleyways.HistoryThe area that is now the Lanes was part of the original settlement of Brighthelmstone, but they were built up during the late 18th century and were fully laid out by 1792 which was after the supposed benefits of sea water had been made public by Dr Richard Russell of Lewes but before the Prince Regent made Brighton one of his homes by developing the Royal Pavilion.BoundariesThe Lanes are commonly taken to be bounded by North Street to the north, Ship Street to the west and Prince Albert Street and the north side of Bartholomew Square to the south. The eastern boundary is less well-defined and can be considered either East Street or Market Street.Meeting House LaneMeeting House Lane is one of the wider lanes which meets with the busy shopping road of North Street and eventually winds around to Market Street. The north end of Meeting House Lane meets North Street a few yards down the road from the southern end of North Laine which is not part of The Lanes.Dukes LaneUnlike many of the other lanes in this oldest part of Brighton, Dukes Lane, which leads off of Duke Street, was a "reproduction street" constructed in 1979 and is relatively new.

British Airways i360
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Lower Kings Road
Brighton and Hove, BN1 2LN

0333 772 0360

Take a flight to the skies and see Brighton and Sussex as you have never seen them before! Glide up slowly to 450ft high to enjoy breathtaking 360° views of up to 26 miles from the world’s tallest moving observation tower and the world’s first vertical cable car, conceived and designed by Marks Barfield Architects, the creators of the London Eye. British Airways i360 has a fully enclosed, aerodynamically shaped, futuristic glass viewing pod with room for up to 200 visitors to move around in and admire the views from different angles. British Airways i360 pod houses the Nyetimber Sky Bar, the most unique bar in the UK. The beach building, at the base of the tower, includes The Belle Vue Brighton restaurant; a shop and fully flexible hospitality rooms. Afternoon tea can be enjoyed in the West Pier Tea Room, located in a reconstructed 1866 West Pier toll booth. Follow our story here as it unfolds and on our website www.britishairwaysi360.com As from 3 March 2014 the following comments policy shall apply: Please note that we moderate these pages. This facebook page is written by British Airways i360. You may, offer comment for publication here but in doing so you acknowledge and agree that we are under no obligation to publish any comment submitted. We reserve the right to edit and amend any contribution to make it suitable for publication if we think it appropriate. We reserve the right to delete any comment or block any commentator who we decide is behaving in a disruptive or disagreeable manner.

Brighton Wheel
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Daltons Bastion, Madeira Drive
Brighton, BN2 1

01273 722 822

Visit the Brighton Wheel for stunning, panoramic views of the city's famous landmarks and coastline 50 metres above sea level - and fascinating commentary of Brighton and Hove's heritage.

Royal Pavilion Ice Rink
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
4 Pavilion Buildings
Brighton, BN1 1EE

0844 8472352

Brighton’s Royal Pavilion Real Ice Rink. Viewed by many as the most romantic and beautiful setting for a rink in the country, under an hour from Central London, it set a new standard in Christmas ice rinks for thousands of visitors last year. With the former Royal pleasure palace as backdrop, the 840 square metre rink has space for 260 skaters per session and superb child-friendly facilities, with penguin stabilisers and learners’ area, as well as boots available in sizes from ‘just walking’ with double blades to safe blades for bigger kids. Whether you are bringing the kids for a cake and coffee, dropping by for a drink after work or going on a Christmas outing with the family, we can offer you a good time. https://twitter.com/pavilionicerink

Pavilion Gardens Cafe
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
New Road, Royal Pavilion Grounds
Brighton, BN1 1UG

01273730712

The best open air cafe in Brighton right in the heart of the cultural quarter. Currently in our 75th Anniversary serving our very many regulars with the highest standards of food and drink, quick and great customer service.

The Palace Pier
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Madeira Drive
Brighton, BN2 1

01273 609 361

Brighton Toy and Model Museum
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
52-55 Trafalgar Street
Brighton and Hove, BN1 4EB

01273 749494

WELCOME to the group for Brighton Toy and Model Museum, a truly extraordinary attraction full of childhood dreams and memories... Looking to revisit your childhood? Want to show your children/grandchildren or even grandchildren the toys you used to play with? Or in turn want to see what your parents/grandparents or even great grandparents used to play with? … … Then you will enjoy a visit to Brighton Toy and Model Museum, home to one of the finest collections of toys and models in the world. Situated under Brighton station, you will find a treasure cove of over 10,000 exhibits on display, including collections of toys from over the last 100 years, period antique toys, examples from the world’s top toy makers plus priceless model train collection. The museum is one of Brighton’s most fascinating attractions and an Aladdin’s cave for the whole family to enjoy! What You Will See: - A priceless model train collection with an extensive ‘0’ gauge working layout - A working ‘00’ model of the Sussex countryside - Tin Plate toys, cars and buses, exotic toys and model ships, large-scale radio controlled aeroplanes and helicopters - Dolls and rare dolls house furniture - Old-fashioned penny arcade games and a working mutoscope, displaying early photographic animation - Many types of construction toys - Soft toys, teddy bears, puppets and toy theatres - Military and Historical dioramas

Brighton Fishing Museum
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
201 Kings Road Arches
Brighton, BN1 1NB

+44 (0) 1273 723064

Paint Pots
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
39 Trafalgar Street
Brighton, BN1 4ED

01273 696682

Baby Footprints and Handprints Birthday parties for all ages Team Building Hen Parties Great for foreign language student outings Gift Vouchers for those arty friends you know would love it! OPEN EVERY DAY!

Red Box Coffee
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
30 New Road
Brighton, BN11uf

07852992838

Local business Near End Of Brighton Pier

Horatio's Bar Brighton Pier
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Brighton Pier, Madeira Drive
Brighton, United Kingdom BN2 1TW

01273 609361

The Palace Pier
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Madeira Drive
Brighton, United Kingdom BN2 1

01273 609 361

Palm Court Restaurant, Brighton Pier, Brighton
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Brighton Pier
Brighton, United Kingdom BN2 1TW

01273 609361

Grand Junction Cafe
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
250d Kings Road Arches
Brighton, United Kingdom BN2 1

Brighton Sewer Tours
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Arch number 260, under Brighton Pier
Brighton, United Kingdom BN2 1

01903 272606

KULA
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
75-79 East Street
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1

KULA is your night at Madame Geisha. A Fresh night, bringing you the hottest people, and the best music and DJ's on Brighton's clubbing scene. ┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅ ♫ MUSIC POLICY ♫ 1 BIG MASH-UP of HOUSE/CHART/POP/ELECTRO/DUB-STEP/RNB/ You name it, we got it! Dj's announced on the weekly events! Expect to hear: Rihanna♫Labrinth♫Tinie Tempah♫Cher Lloyd♫Maroon 5♫Christina Aguilera♫Ed Sheeran♫LMFAO♫Charlene Soraia♫Kelly Clarkson♫David Guetta♫Usher♫The Wanted♫Lana Del Rey♫Lucenzo & Qwote♫Christina Perri♫Gym Class Heroes♫Rizzle Kicks♫Coldplay♫Nicole Scherzinger♫Sean Paul♫Cobra Starship♫Adele♫One Direction♫Sak Noel♫Dappy♫Florence + the Machine♫James Morrison♫The Calling♫Bruno Mars♫Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds♫Nicki Minaj♫Birdy♫Goo Goo Dolls♫Beyoncé♫Olly Murs♫Pixie Lott♫Delilah♫Katy Perry♫Calvin Harris♫Nero♫High Contrast♫Emeli Sandé♫Martin Solveig & Dragonette♫Laidback Luke♫Example♫Duck Sauce♫Chase & Status♫Chris Brown♫Alexandra Stan♫Benny Benassi♫DJ Fresh♫Snoop Dogg♫Sneakbo♫Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs♫N-Trance♫Mike Delinquent Project & KCat/Wynter Gordon♫Massive Attack♫Skrillex♫Modestep♫Swedish House Mafia♫New Order♫DJ Sammy & Yanou♫Jay-Z♫Jason Derulo♫Bad Meets Evil♫Drake♫Professor Green♫Aloe Blacc♫Wretch 32♫Jennifer Lopez♫Eminem♫Bluey Robinson♫Kanye West♫JLS♫Cee Lo Green♫Switch & Andrea Martin♫Black Eyes Peas♫Sean Kingston♫... Pretty Much EVERYTHING! ┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅ ***VERY IMPORTANT*** ******************** £1.50 - Vodka mixer £2.50 - Double's £1 - Shots £2 - Beers ┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅ Door Tax: Guestlist FREE 10.00pm - 10.30pm Guestlist £3 10:30pm - Midnight (£4 without) Guestlist £4 Midnight - 01:00am (£5 without) ┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅ VIP tables are available to book for Large groups / Events / Birthdays ┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅ Photography by Ramon Della Torre You must like the KULA page to see pictures, and event invitations http://www.facebook.com/pages/KULA/199828700085625 ┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅┅ This is DUKES PROMOTIONS - FOR VIP/BIRTHDAY BOOKINGS CONTACT: Rosco Faulkes Ramon Della Torre 07590605022

Seasiders
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
254 Kings Road Arches
Brighton, United Kingdom BN2 1TD

01273 606577

Osho
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
250A Kings Road Arches
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1

01273 746067

The Harvester Brighton Sea Front
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Unit 1 The Terrace, Madeira Drive
Brighton, United Kingdom

01273696207

Harvester, Seafront
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Unit 1 The Terraces, Madeira Drive
Brighton, United Kingdom BN2 1AY

01273 696207

Love Lucy
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
247 Kings rd arches
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1

07812346439

Bar Rogue
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
35 Old Steine
Brighton, United Kingdom BN2 1

Crazy Golf
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Lower Promenade, Madeira Dr
Brighton, United Kingdom BN2 1

Brighton Aquarium
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
6 Steine St
Brighton, United Kingdom BN2 1

0871 423 2110

Days Brighton
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
79 East Street
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1NF

1273-748888

Harvester
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
No 1 Madeira Drive
Brighton, United Kingdom BN2 1AY

01273 696 207

At Harvester Madeira in Brighton, you will find our famous grills and salad bar - we serve real food that's fresh, fun and full of flavour.

Brighton Big Screen outdoor cinema
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Madeira Drive
Brighton, United Kingdom BN2 1T

01273 204200

Sealife, Brighton
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
BN2 1TB
Brighton, United Kingdom BN2 1

The Royal Albion Hotel
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
35 Old Steine
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1NT

0871 222 0038

Britannia Hotels
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
35 Old Steine
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1NT

01273 329202

The Royal Albion Hotel in Brighton is a Regency Style Hotel built in 1826 and is traditionally decorated and furnished throughout. The hotel offers character and style in a premier position directly opposite Brighton Pier, so if you are looking for a seafront hotel in Brighton, you won't get much closer than this. Facing the sea, it's right at the heart of the action.