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London Bridge, London | Tourist Information


London Bridge (King William Street)
London, United Kingdom SE1


Landmark Near London Bridge

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

+44 (0)20 7403 3761

An iconic London landmark and one of Britain's best loved historic sites, Tower Bridge is open to the public 363 days a year. Within the Bridge's iconic structure and magnificent Victorian Engine rooms, the Tower Bridge Exhibition is the best way of exploring the most famous bridge in the world! Come learn about this incredible feat of Victorian engineering, discover how the Bridge is raised and enjoy stunning panoramic views across London from our high-level walkways, 42 metres above the River Thames. Opening Times: 10:00 - 18:30 (last admission 17:30) Facebook is a public page. Please bear this in mind when posting your comments, especially regarding personal information. Further information on the City of London Corporation can be found at www.cityoflondon.gov.uk. The City of London Corporation is always happy to hear from you but please keep posts relevant. All comments will be monitored by Facebook and the City and any comments that are offensive or inappropriate will be removed. People who persistently cause conflict or offence to others will be removed and blocked from our social media pages.

The Shard London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

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The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group. HOUSE RULES Welcome to The Shard, in the heart of London Bridge. We hope our Facebook page can be a place where our community can feel free to express their feelings and opinions about The Shard or share their experiences with our building, our businesses or our neighbourhood. We welcome feedback, both positive and negative, and we aim to respond to comments that necessitate an answer promptly. Our Facebook house rules are designed to serve as a guideline to ensure our online community can enjoy our Facebook page in a pleasant environment. Guidelines First of all, we ask that you please use polite language and tone at all times. Please be mindful that our page attracts a wide audience and we ask that your comments are respectful and on-topic. It’s the policy of The Shard’s Facebook team that we don’t normally moderate Facebook posts, but we won’t tolerate abusive language, disruptive behaviour or illegal or objectionable content. This includes any material which might be defamatory, offensive, infringing, obscene, lewd, pornographic, violent, abusive, insulting, threatening, harassing, discriminatory, blasphemous, indecent or otherwise unlawful or objectionable. It also includes any material which is aggressive, argumentative or likely to be construed as bullying. No spamming or repetition, please, nor off-topic material in subject-specific threads or areas. We also will not tolerate language, content, postings or links that we consider racist, sexist, homophobic or grossly off-topic. If we consider a posting to fit any of these categories, it will be removed from our Facebook page. Get in Touch There’s a chance we might miss something, so if you are concerned that a user is breaking these rules on our Facebook page, please do let us know. Or if you feel we’ve hidden your post unnecessarily, we’re happy to provide an explanation. You can message us directly via this Facebook page or you can email us via [email protected] And do please keep in mind that the comments expressed within our Facebook page, unless an official post from The Shard, come from you – our community of fans – and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Shard.

Borough Market
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
8 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1TL

+44 (0) 20 7407 1002

Community Guidelines We love to hear from our friends and visitors and encourage you all to post your photos and experiences about Borough Market. And if you ask us a question, we'll do our very best to answer it! The Page is not the place to advertise your own page or something that's not related to Borough Market. If you do, then we're sorry, but we'll remove your post. Likewise if you post spam or abusive messages, your post will be removed and you may be banned from our Page. If you're unhappy at anytime with the service or experience you have at the Market, you can email us directly at [email protected] You can find out more about our complaints procedure on our website: http://boroughmarket.org.uk/page/complaints-procedure. Thanks for following us on Facebook - we hope you enjoy our updates!

London Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

Southwark Cathedral
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DA

+44 20 7367 6700

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for more than 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since the creation of the diocese of Southwark in 1905.Between 1106 and 1538 it was the church of an Augustinian priory, Southwark Priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a parish church, with the new dedication of St Saviour's. The church was in the diocese of Winchester until 1877, when the parish of St Saviour's, along with other South London parishes, was transferred to the diocese of Rochester. The present building retains the basic form of the Gothic structure built between 1220 and 1420, although the nave is a late 19th-century reconstruction.HistoryLegendary originsThe 16th-century London historian John Stow recorded an account of the origins of the Southwark Priory of St Mary that he had heard from Bartholomew Linsted, who had been the last prior when the priory was dissolved. Linsted claimed it had been founded as a nunnery "long before the Conquest" by a maiden named Mary, on the profits of a ferry across the Thames she had inherited from her parents. Later it was converted into a college of priests by "Swithen, a noble lady". Finally in 1106 it was refounded as an Augustinian priory.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 Battlebridge Lane, Southwark
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

City Hall
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
110 The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2AA

+44 (0) 20 7983 4000

Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Tower of London
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4AB

0870 756 6060

The Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom are 141 historic ceremonial objects, including the regalia and vestments worn by kings and queens of the country at their coronations, as well as processional and anointing objects, plate, and christening fonts.A symbol of 1,000 years of monarchy, the sovereign's coronation regalia is the only working collection in Europe – other present-day monarchies have abandoned coronations in favour of inauguration or enthronement ceremonies – and is the largest set of regalia in the world. Objects used to invest and crown the monarch variously denote his or her roles as Head of State, Supreme Governor of the Church of England, and Commander-in-Chief of the British Armed Forces. Wives of kings are crowned as queen consort with a plainer set of regalia. Since 1831, a new crown has been made specially for each queen consort.The use of regalia by monarchs in Britain can be traced back to its early history. Most of the present collection as a whole dates from around 350 years ago when King Charles II acceded to the throne. The medieval coronation regalia and Tudor state regalia had been either sold or melted down by Oliver Cromwell, a republican who overthrew the monarchy in 1649, during the English Civil War. Notable among the precious stones which adorn the regalia are Cullinan I (the largest clear cut diamond in the world), Cullinan II (second-largest of the Cullinan diamonds), the Koh-i-Noor diamond with a history going back to the 13th century, the Stuart Sapphire, St Edward's Sapphire, and the Black Prince's Ruby – a large spinel worn by King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt.

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
SE1 2UP
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

Butler's Wharf
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Butlers Wharf West 40 Shad Thames Flat 9
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3403

Butler's Wharf is an English historic building on the south bank of the River Thames, just east of London's Tower Bridge, now housing luxury flats and restaurants. Lying between the picturesque street Shad Thames and the Thames Path, it overlooks both the bridge and St Katharine Docks on the other side of the river. Butler's Wharf is also used as a term for the surrounding area.HistoryButler's Wharf was built between 1871-73 as a shipping wharf and warehouse complex, accommodating goods unloaded from ships using the port of London. It contained what was reputedly the largest tea warehouse in the world. During the 20th century, Butler's Wharf and other warehouses in the area fell into disuse.From 1975-78, the artists' space at 2B Butler's Wharf was a key venue for early UK video art and performance art, used among others by Derek Jarman and the artists and dancers of X6 Dance Collective who published a magazine called New Dance for a number of years. Some of these people subsequently founded Chisenhale Studios and Chisenhale Dance Space, including Philip Jeck.In 1984, Butler's Wharf and the portion of Shad Thames running behind it featured prominently in the Doctor Who serial Resurrection of the Daleks.

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

Tower Hill tube station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
24-25 Great Tower St
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7222 1234

Tower Hill is a London Underground station at Tower Hill in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It is on the Circle line between Monument and Aldgate, and on the District line between Monument and Aldgate East. The station is in fare zone 1. It is a short distance from Tower Gateway DLR station and Fenchurch Street railway station.The entrance to Tower Hill station is a few metres from one of the largest remaining segments of the Roman London Wall which formerly surrounded the historic City of London. The station was built on the site of the former Tower of London tube station that closed in 1884. The present Tower Hill station opened in 1967 and replaced a nearby station with the same name but which was originally called Mark Lane, that was slightly farther west.ServicesTrain frequencies vary throughout the day, but the typical off-peak service pattern is:District line:Eastbound:12 tph to Upminster6 tph terminate at Tower Hill6 tph to Ealing Broadway6 tph to Richmond6 tph to WimbledonEastbound:6 tph to Hammersmith via Aldgate6 tph to Edgware Road via Embankment

Fishmongers Hall
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9EL

0207 626 3531

Tower Hill Memorial
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 St Mary at Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7283 9504

The Tower Hill Memorial is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission war memorial on the south side of Trinity Square Gardens, in London, England. The memorial commemorates those from the Merchant Navy and fishing fleets who died during both world wars and have "no grave but the sea". The memorial was designed by Edwin Lutyens with sculpture work by William Reid Dick, the Second World War extension was designed by Edward Maufe with sculpture work by Charles Wheeler.The First World War memorial takes the form of a vaulted corridor, long, wide and high. Inside are 12 bronze plaques engraved with 12,000 names. Those commemorated include Victoria Cross recipient, Archibald Bisset Smith.The Second World War memorial takes the form of a semi-circular sunken garden located behind the corridor, to its north. It contains the names of 24,000 British seamen and 50 Australian seamen, listed on the walls of the sunken garden. In the centre of the garden is a pool of bronze, engraved with a compass pointing north. Between the two memorials are two columns with statues representing an officer (western column) and a seaman (eastern).

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

Hays Galleria
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Battle Bridge Lane
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

Bermondsey Market
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Bermondsey Square, London, SE1 3UN
London, United Kingdom

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Bermondsey Market is an antiques market located at Bermondsey Square on Tower Bridge Road in Bermondsey, part of the London Borough of Southwark, in South London, England. The location was formerly the site of Bermondsey Abbey. The site underwent redevelopment in 2006 and the market remained open during this period.HistoryThe Caledonian Market moved to its current location in 1950 after the old Caledonian Market site in Islington was designated for redevelopment in the late 1940s.Marché ouvertThe opening hours of the Bermondsey Market from 6am until noon reflect the ancient law of market ouvert, which was abolished in 1995. Under this law, in number of designated markets, including Bermondsey Market, if an item was sold between sunset and sunrise then its provenance could not be questioned, so stolen goods could be traded and good title would pass to the purchaser. To quote Minister for the Arts Estelle Morris in July 2003 during the Second Reading of the Dealing In Cultural Objects Bill: I did not have information about marché ouvert in the deep recesses of my mind, but experts reliably inform me that it no longer exists. The hon. Member for Uxbridge will be surprised to learn that it has been abolished only recently. It used to exist in designated markets, including Bermondsey. I am sure that the promoter will be interested in telling the hon. Member for Southwark, North and Bermondsey about that. In it, items could be sold before sunrise. Believe it or not, in this land of ours, people could sell stolen—my officials put "dodgy" in brackets, but we do not use that term—objects. I assure hon. Members that it has been abolished. I hope that that deals with the fears of the hon. Member for Uxbridge.

Train Station Near London Bridge

London Bridge Station
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
21 Railway Approach
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

03457 11 41 41

London Bridge is the oldest railway station in London, and one of the busiest. Owned and operated by Network Rail. All the history of the station at networkrail.co.uk/virtualarchive/london-bridge/

London Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

London Fenchurch Street Station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 4AJ

Station enquiries 08457 11 41 41

Fenchurch Street was the first railway station to be located within the City of London. Owned and operated by Network Rail.

London Cannon Street Station
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Cannon Street
London, United Kingdom EC4N 6AP

03457 11 41 41

Cannon Street station is at the heart of London's financial district and it is closed on Sundays. Owned and operated by Network Rail.

Bank London Underground and DLR Station
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Bank/Monument Complex, Princes Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 3LA

08432221234

These transport services are managed by Transport for London.

Liverpool Street London Underground Station
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Liverpool Street
London, United Kingdom EC2M 7PP

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

wagamama
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
1 Clink Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DG

020 7403 3659

London Bridge London Underground Station
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
21 Duke Street Hill
London, United Kingdom SE1 2SW

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Tower Hill London Underground Station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Trinity Square
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4DJ

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Aldgate East London Underground Station
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Whitechapel High Street
London, United Kingdom E1 7PT

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Aldgate London Underground Station
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Aldgate High Street
London, United Kingdom EC3N 1AH

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Monument London Underground Station
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
King William Street
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9AA

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

The Green Man Pub - Bank Tube Station
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
No. 1 Poultry Bank Station exit 9 City of London
London, United Kingdom EC2R 8EJ

020 7248 3529

Bermondsey London Underground Station
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
142 - 154 Jamaica Road
London, United Kingdom SE16 4RX

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Tower Hill tube station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
24-25 Great Tower St
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7222 1234

Tower Hill is a London Underground station at Tower Hill in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It is on the Circle line between Monument and Aldgate, and on the District line between Monument and Aldgate East. The station is in fare zone 1. It is a short distance from Tower Gateway DLR station and Fenchurch Street railway station.The entrance to Tower Hill station is a few metres from one of the largest remaining segments of the Roman London Wall which formerly surrounded the historic City of London. The station was built on the site of the former Tower of London tube station that closed in 1884. The present Tower Hill station opened in 1967 and replaced a nearby station with the same name but which was originally called Mark Lane, that was slightly farther west.ServicesTrain frequencies vary throughout the day, but the typical off-peak service pattern is:District line:Eastbound:12 tph to Upminster6 tph terminate at Tower Hill6 tph to Ealing Broadway6 tph to Richmond6 tph to WimbledonEastbound:6 tph to Hammersmith via Aldgate6 tph to Edgware Road via Embankment

Fenchurch Seafood Bar & Grill, 20 Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch St
London, United Kingdom EC3M 3BY

0333 772 0020

The Lane Bar, Osborn Street, London
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
12-20 Osborn Street
London, United Kingdom E1 6TE

02073771797

Mansion House Station
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
38 Cannon Street
London, United Kingdom EC4N 6JD

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

Tower Gateway DLR Station
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
The Minories
London, United Kingdom EC3N 1JL

08432221234

This transport service is managed by Transport for London.

Starbucks SSP Rail - Liverpool Street Station
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Lower Concourse
London, United Kingdom EC2M 7QH

Landmark Near London Bridge

Unicorn Theatre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
147 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2HZ

The Unicorn Theatre is the UK's leading theatre for audiences aged 2–21. The theatre has its home in a custom-built, RIBA Award–winning building on Tooley Street, in the London Borough of Southwark, which opened in 2005. The theatre was designed by Keith Williams, built by Arup and comprises two theatre spaces (the Weston and Clore Theatres), an education studio, rehearsal space, café and the John Lyon meeting room.The theatre was founded in 1947, by Caryl Jenner, originally as a Mobile Theatre; In 1961, Jenner began presenting children's productions at the Arts Theatre in the West End, and in 1967 the company took over the lease of the theatre which then became Unicorn's permanent performing base until 1999; during this period the normal run of adult performances continued during the evenings.The Unicorn is a registered charity and is an Arts Council England National Portfolio organisation.OriginsFrom 1944 Caryl Jenner wrote Christmas pantomimes for small-time playhouses. During performances she would make note of the behaviour of the children, recording what scenes and sequences held their attention, and which did not. She began to formulate the principles that would guide her theatre and writing. In 1947 the ‘Mobile Theatre’ was born. Caryl's mission was to drive around the austere post-war towns of Britain, as well as isolated villages to bring theatre to new audiences. They supplemented their income by performing to adults in the evenings but their goal was always to captivate the minds and imagination of children.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

Butler's Wharf
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Butlers Wharf West 40 Shad Thames Flat 9
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3403

Butler's Wharf is an English historic building on the south bank of the River Thames, just east of London's Tower Bridge, now housing luxury flats and restaurants. Lying between the picturesque street Shad Thames and the Thames Path, it overlooks both the bridge and St Katharine Docks on the other side of the river. Butler's Wharf is also used as a term for the surrounding area.HistoryButler's Wharf was built between 1871-73 as a shipping wharf and warehouse complex, accommodating goods unloaded from ships using the port of London. It contained what was reputedly the largest tea warehouse in the world. During the 20th century, Butler's Wharf and other warehouses in the area fell into disuse.From 1975-78, the artists' space at 2B Butler's Wharf was a key venue for early UK video art and performance art, used among others by Derek Jarman and the artists and dancers of X6 Dance Collective who published a magazine called New Dance for a number of years. Some of these people subsequently founded Chisenhale Studios and Chisenhale Dance Space, including Philip Jeck.In 1984, Butler's Wharf and the portion of Shad Thames running behind it featured prominently in the Doctor Who serial Resurrection of the Daleks.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 Battlebridge Lane, Southwark
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

The Shard
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group.

The Shard London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

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The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group. HOUSE RULES Welcome to The Shard, in the heart of London Bridge. We hope our Facebook page can be a place where our community can feel free to express their feelings and opinions about The Shard or share their experiences with our building, our businesses or our neighbourhood. We welcome feedback, both positive and negative, and we aim to respond to comments that necessitate an answer promptly. Our Facebook house rules are designed to serve as a guideline to ensure our online community can enjoy our Facebook page in a pleasant environment. Guidelines First of all, we ask that you please use polite language and tone at all times. Please be mindful that our page attracts a wide audience and we ask that your comments are respectful and on-topic. It’s the policy of The Shard’s Facebook team that we don’t normally moderate Facebook posts, but we won’t tolerate abusive language, disruptive behaviour or illegal or objectionable content. This includes any material which might be defamatory, offensive, infringing, obscene, lewd, pornographic, violent, abusive, insulting, threatening, harassing, discriminatory, blasphemous, indecent or otherwise unlawful or objectionable. It also includes any material which is aggressive, argumentative or likely to be construed as bullying. No spamming or repetition, please, nor off-topic material in subject-specific threads or areas. We also will not tolerate language, content, postings or links that we consider racist, sexist, homophobic or grossly off-topic. If we consider a posting to fit any of these categories, it will be removed from our Facebook page. Get in Touch There’s a chance we might miss something, so if you are concerned that a user is breaking these rules on our Facebook page, please do let us know. Or if you feel we’ve hidden your post unnecessarily, we’re happy to provide an explanation. You can message us directly via this Facebook page or you can email us via [email protected] And do please keep in mind that the comments expressed within our Facebook page, unless an official post from The Shard, come from you – our community of fans – and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Shard.

Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Tower of London
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4AB

0870 756 6060

The Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom are 141 historic ceremonial objects, including the regalia and vestments worn by kings and queens of the country at their coronations, as well as processional and anointing objects, plate, and christening fonts.A symbol of 1,000 years of monarchy, the sovereign's coronation regalia is the only working collection in Europe – other present-day monarchies have abandoned coronations in favour of inauguration or enthronement ceremonies – and is the largest set of regalia in the world. Objects used to invest and crown the monarch variously denote his or her roles as Head of State, Supreme Governor of the Church of England, and Commander-in-Chief of the British Armed Forces. Wives of kings are crowned as queen consort with a plainer set of regalia. Since 1831, a new crown has been made specially for each queen consort.The use of regalia by monarchs in Britain can be traced back to its early history. Most of the present collection as a whole dates from around 350 years ago when King Charles II acceded to the throne. The medieval coronation regalia and Tudor state regalia had been either sold or melted down by Oliver Cromwell, a republican who overthrew the monarchy in 1649, during the English Civil War. Notable among the precious stones which adorn the regalia are Cullinan I (the largest clear cut diamond in the world), Cullinan II (second-largest of the Cullinan diamonds), the Koh-i-Noor diamond with a history going back to the 13th century, the Stuart Sapphire, St Edward's Sapphire, and the Black Prince's Ruby – a large spinel worn by King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt.

London Bridge bus station
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge Unit 10
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SP

020 7357 0069

London Bridge bus station serves the London Bridge area of the city of London and is situated at the London Bridge tube and rail station.There are three stands at the station which are situated on the station forecourt.London Buses routes 17, 43, 48, 141, 149 and 521 and night routes N21 and N343 serve the station.New bus stationA new bus station was built as part of the new Shard London Bridge "Gem" development which was open in 2012.

St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
193 Bermondsey St
London, United Kingdom SE1 3

020 7234 0100

St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey is an Anglican church dedicated to St Mary Magdalen in Bermondsey in the London Borough of Southwark. The present building is late 17th century and is a Grade II* listed building.Its parish extends as far as the Thames (including the south tower of Tower Bridge, City Hall and part of London Bridge Station). The parishes of St Olave Tooley Street, St Luke Grange Road and St John Horsleydown have all been merged into it.HistoryA church of this dedication is first recorded on this site in 1290, serving lay workers at Bermondsey Abbey. The design of that building is not known, but in 1680 the church was demolished and rebuilt, retaining the late medieval tower with a gothic window and arches. This re-building was completed in about 1690, and was followed by the addition of a north gallery in 1705 and a south gallery in 1794. The south gallery retains the complete original boxed pews but those in the north gallery have had the gates removed.Further alterations were made under the supervision of the architect George Porter in 1830. He remodelled the tower and west end in an unacademic Gothic style and restored the medieval west window. The changes also involved removing the portico and school which extended into Bermondsey Street. The interior was redecorated in the Gothic Revival style in 1852 and is described in a document which can be dated to 1865 - 1879 by reference to the then rector. In 1883 the chancel was lengthened and a new stained glass window was installed, as well as other "beautification". Surviving the Blitz, the west end interior was damaged by fire in 1971. The church was first rendered externally in 1829, and was most recently re-rendered in 1994. A detailed description given in the volume of the Victoria County History covering the area, published in 1912. The church is now the oldest building in the locality, and the medieval arches are still visible inside the tower behind the organ (not normally accessible to the public).

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

Tower Hill Memorial
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 St Mary at Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7283 9504

The Tower Hill Memorial is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission war memorial on the south side of Trinity Square Gardens, in London, England. The memorial commemorates those from the Merchant Navy and fishing fleets who died during both world wars and have "no grave but the sea". The memorial was designed by Edwin Lutyens with sculpture work by William Reid Dick, the Second World War extension was designed by Edward Maufe with sculpture work by Charles Wheeler.The First World War memorial takes the form of a vaulted corridor, long, wide and high. Inside are 12 bronze plaques engraved with 12,000 names. Those commemorated include Victoria Cross recipient, Archibald Bisset Smith.The Second World War memorial takes the form of a semi-circular sunken garden located behind the corridor, to its north. It contains the names of 24,000 British seamen and 50 Australian seamen, listed on the walls of the sunken garden. In the centre of the garden is a pool of bronze, engraved with a compass pointing north. Between the two memorials are two columns with statues representing an officer (western column) and a seaman (eastern).

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

Bermondsey Market
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Bermondsey Square, London, SE1 3UN
London, United Kingdom

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Bermondsey Market is an antiques market located at Bermondsey Square on Tower Bridge Road in Bermondsey, part of the London Borough of Southwark, in South London, England. The location was formerly the site of Bermondsey Abbey. The site underwent redevelopment in 2006 and the market remained open during this period.HistoryThe Caledonian Market moved to its current location in 1950 after the old Caledonian Market site in Islington was designated for redevelopment in the late 1940s.Marché ouvertThe opening hours of the Bermondsey Market from 6am until noon reflect the ancient law of market ouvert, which was abolished in 1995. Under this law, in number of designated markets, including Bermondsey Market, if an item was sold between sunset and sunrise then its provenance could not be questioned, so stolen goods could be traded and good title would pass to the purchaser. To quote Minister for the Arts Estelle Morris in July 2003 during the Second Reading of the Dealing In Cultural Objects Bill: I did not have information about marché ouvert in the deep recesses of my mind, but experts reliably inform me that it no longer exists. The hon. Member for Uxbridge will be surprised to learn that it has been abolished only recently. It used to exist in designated markets, including Bermondsey. I am sure that the promoter will be interested in telling the hon. Member for Southwark, North and Bermondsey about that. In it, items could be sold before sunrise. Believe it or not, in this land of ours, people could sell stolen—my officials put "dodgy" in brackets, but we do not use that term—objects. I assure hon. Members that it has been abolished. I hope that that deals with the fears of the hon. Member for Uxbridge.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

Southwark Cathedral
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DA

+44 20 7367 6700

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for more than 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since the creation of the diocese of Southwark in 1905.Between 1106 and 1538 it was the church of an Augustinian priory, Southwark Priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a parish church, with the new dedication of St Saviour's. The church was in the diocese of Winchester until 1877, when the parish of St Saviour's, along with other South London parishes, was transferred to the diocese of Rochester. The present building retains the basic form of the Gothic structure built between 1220 and 1420, although the nave is a late 19th-century reconstruction.HistoryLegendary originsThe 16th-century London historian John Stow recorded an account of the origins of the Southwark Priory of St Mary that he had heard from Bartholomew Linsted, who had been the last prior when the priory was dissolved. Linsted claimed it had been founded as a nunnery "long before the Conquest" by a maiden named Mary, on the profits of a ferry across the Thames she had inherited from her parents. Later it was converted into a college of priests by "Swithen, a noble lady". Finally in 1106 it was refounded as an Augustinian priory.

Anglican Diocese of Southwark
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Trinity House, 4 Chapel Court, Borough High Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1HW

020 7939 9400

The Diocese of Southwark is one of the 42 dioceses of the Church of England, part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The diocese forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. It was created on 1 May 1905 from part of the ancient Diocese of Rochester that was served by a Suffragan Bishop of Southwark (1891–1905). Before 1877 the area was part of the Diocese of Winchester.The diocese covers Greater London south of the River Thames (except for the London Borough of Bexley and London Borough of Bromley) and east Surrey. Since the creation of the episcopal area scheme in 1991, the diocese is divided into three episcopal areas each of which contains two archdeaconries: Croydon Episcopal Area (overseen by the area Bishop of Croydon)Archdeaconry of Croydonincludes Deaneries of Croydon Addington, Croydon Central, Croydon North, Croydon South, and Suttonincludes Deaneries of Caterham, Godstone, and ReigateArchdeaconry of Lambethincludes Deaneries of Brixton, Clapham, Lambeth North, Lambeth South, Streatham, and Mertonincludes Deaneries of Battersea, Kingston, Richmond and Barnes, Tooting, and WandsworthArchdeaconry of Lewisham & Greenwichincludes Deaneries of Charlton, Deptford, East Lewisham, Eltham and Mottingham, Plumstead, and West Lewishamincludes Deaneries of Bermondsey, Camberwell, Dulwich, and Southwark and Newington In other ecclesiastical use, although having lost religious orders in the English Reformation, the diocese has the London home of the Archbishop of Canterbury and records centre of the Church of England in the diocese, Lambeth Palace.

St Olave Hart Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
8 Hart St
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7

20-74884318

St Olave Hart Street is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on the corner of Hart Street and Seething Lane near Fenchurch Street railway station.John Betjeman described St Olave's as "a country church in the world of Seething Lane." The church is one of the smallest in the City and is one of only a handful of medieval City churches that escaped the Great Fire of London in 1666. In addition to being a local parish church, St Olave's is the Ward Church of the Tower Ward of the City of London.HistoryThe church is first recorded in the 13th century as St Olave-towards-the-Tower, a stone building replacing the earlier construction. It is dedicated to the patron saint of Norway, King Olaf II of Norway, who fought alongside the Anglo-Saxon King Ethelred the Unready against the Danes in the Battle of London Bridge in 1014. He was canonised after his death and the church of St Olave's was built apparently on the site of the battle. The Norwegian connection was reinforced during the Second World War when King Haakon VII of Norway worshipped there while in exile.Saint Olave's was rebuilt in the 13th century and then again in the 15th century. The present building dates from around 1450. According to John Stow's Survey of London, a major benefactor of the church in the late 15th century was wool merchant Richard Cely Sr., who held the advowson on the church . On his death, Cely bequeathed money for making the steeple and an altar in the church. The merchant mark of the Cely family was carved in two of the corbels in the nave . No memorial to the Celys now remains in the church.

St Margaret Pattens
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
18 Rood Lane
London, United Kingdom EC3M 1HS

20-76236630

St Margaret Pattens is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on Eastcheap near the Monument. The dedication is to St. Margaret of Antioch.HistoryThe church was first recorded in 1067, at which time the church was probably built from wood. It was rebuilt in stone at some unknown subsequent date but fell into disrepair and had to be demolished in 1530. It was rebuilt in 1538 but was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. The present church was built by Sir Christopher Wren in 1687. It is one of only a few City churches to have escaped significant damage in the Second World War.In 1954 St Margaret Pattens ceased to be a parish church and became one of the City’s guild churches, within the living of the Lord Chancellor and under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of London. They have a regular weekday, rather than Sunday congregation, drawn mostly from people who work in offices nearby.The church was designated a Grade I listed building on 4 January 1950.BuildingThe church's exterior is notable for its 200-ft high spire, Wren's third highest and the only one that he designed in a medieval style. This is sometimes referred to as Wren's only "true spire". Its interior is a simple rectangle with some unusual fittings – the only canopied pews in London, dating from the 17th century. These were intended for the churchwardens. The initials "CW" which appear in one of the pews have been thought to refer to Christopher Wren, but they may also signify "church warden." Other features in the interior include a punishment box carved with the Devil's head where wrongdoers had to sit during the church service.

Fishmongers Hall
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9EL

0207 626 3531

Pudding Lane
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Pudding lane
London, United Kingdom

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Pudding Sokağı İngiltere'nin başkenti Londra'da bulunan dar bir geçittir. 1666 yılında çıkan Büyük Londra Yangını'nın başlangıç noktası olan Thomas Farryner'ın ekmek fırını bu sokakta yer almıştır. Londra Köprüsü'ne yakın bir alandadır. Tarihçi John Stow'un söylediklerine göre sokak adını, eski İngilizcede iç organ demek olan Pudding sözcüğünden almıştır. Bu da söylenceye göre Thames Nehri'ndeki çöp kayıklarına kasapların atmış olduğu sakatatı taşıyan at arabalarından düşen hayvan iç organlarıdır.