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Fulham Palace, London | Tourist Information


Bishops Avenue (neighbour Bishops Park)
London, United Kingdom SW6 6EA

020 7736 3233

The site of Fulham Palace was occupied during the Neolithic, Iron Age and Roman periods, probably because of its location next to an important Thames crossing. From medieval times or earlier the site was encircled by the longest domestic moat in England. You can see part of the moat as you enter and walk across the bridge at the main entrance of the site. Since 704 AD Fulham Palace has been the property of the Bishops of London. Fulham Palace was the summer home of the bishops. Each bishop had many homes: in the 16th century there were 177 homes for 21 English bishops! This is an indication of the status of bishops in British life. The last bishop to live at the Palace moved out in 1973. Today Fulham Palace is run by Fulham Palace Trust, a registered charity, established in 2011. There is a wealth of things to see and do, from exploring the museum that charts the Palace’s eventful history to having lunch in the Drawing Room Café that looks out onto the beautiful gardens, including the recently restored 18th century Walled Garden. Admission to the Palace and its gardens is free of charge (except for special tours and events). The Palace is available to hire as a stunning venue for weddings, private and corporate events.

Historical Place Near Fulham Palace

Kensington Palace
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
Kensington Gardens
London, United Kingdom W8 4PX

020 3166 6000

The feminine influence of generations of royal women has shaped this stylish palace and elegant gardens. The birthplace and childhood home of Queen Victoria, the palace first became a royal residence for William and Mary in 1689. Mary felt ‘shut in’ at Whitehall and much preferred her new Kensington home, which was enlarged by Sir Christopher Wren. The famous Orangery, was built in 1704 by Queen Anne, and George II’s wife, Queen Caroline, another keen gardener, added further improvements. Today, the palace houses a stunning permanent display of fashionable and formal dresses, the Royal Ceremonial Dress Collection, which includes Queen Victoria’s wedding dress and dresses worn by Diana, Princess of Wales.

Kensington Gardens
Distance: 2.9 mi Tourist Information
1-8 Kensington Gardens Square
London, United Kingdom SW7 5

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Kensington Gardens, once the private gardens of Kensington Palace, are one of the Royal Parks of London, lying immediately to the west of Hyde Park. It is shared between the City of Westminster and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, lying within western central London. The park covers an area of 111ha. The open spaces of Kensington Gardens, Hyde Park, Green Park and St. James's Park together form an almost continuous "green lung" in the heart of London between Kensington and Westminster.Kensington Gardens are Grade I listed on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens.Background and locationKensington Gardens are generally regarded as being the western extent of the neighbouring Hyde Park from which they were originally taken, with West Carriage Drive and the Serpentine Bridge forming the boundary between them. The Gardens are fenced and more formal than Hyde Park. Kensington Gardens are open only during the hours of daylight, whereas Hyde Park is open from 5 am until midnight all year round, which includes many hours of darkness.Kensington Gardens were long regarded as smarter than Hyde Park because of its more private character around Kensington Palace. However, in the late 1800s, Hyde Park was considered the more "fashionable" of the two because of its location nearer to Park Lane and Knightsbridge, adjoining the entrance to central London opposite Wellington Arch and was therefore more crowded.

Kensington Gardens
Distance: 2.9 mi Tourist Information
1-8 Kensington Gardens Square
London, United Kingdom W2 4BH

0907607025

BBC Television Centre
Distance: 2.8 mi Tourist Information
89 Wood Lane
Shepherds Bush, United Kingdom W12 0DG

02087438000

The BBC Television Centre at White City in west London was the headquarters of BBC Television between 1960 and 2013. Officially opened on 29 June 1960, it is one of the most readily recognisable facilities of its type, having appeared as the backdrop for many BBC programmes. Parts of the building are Grade II listed, including the central ring and Studio 1. Most of the BBC's national television and radio news output came from the Television Centre (TVC) with most recorded television output from the nearby Broadcast Centre at 201 Wood Lane, care of Red Bee Media. Live television events from studios and routing of national and international sporting events took place within the Television Centre before being passed to the Broadcast Centre for transmission.It was announced on 21 September 2010 that the BBC would cease broadcasting from Television Centre in 2013. On 13 June 2011 the BBC announced that the Television Centre was on the market, and that it was "inviting bid proposals from people looking for a conventional, freehold property or those interested in a joint venture", suggesting that it may yet remain connected to the BBC.On 16 July 2012 it was announced that the complex had been sold to property developers Stanhope plc for around £200 million and that the BBC would retain a continued presence at Television Centre through its commercial subsidiaries BBC Studios and Post Production, and BBC Worldwide. BBC Studios and Post Production (relocated to Elstree Studios) was due to move back to Television Centre to operate Studio 1, 2 and 3 in 2015, but it was announced in July 2014 that it had agreed with Stanhope to move back in 2017, at the same time as other key tenants, to enable the most efficient overall site construction programme to take place. BBC Worldwide moved into office space in the Stage 6 building following extensive refurbishment in 2015.

Albert Bridge, London
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
Albert Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SW11 4PL

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The Albert Bridge is a road bridge over the River Thames in West London, connecting Chelsea on the north bank to Battersea on the south bank. Designed and built by Rowland Mason Ordish in 1873 as an Ordish–Lefeuvre system modified cable-stayed bridge, it proved to be structurally unsound, so between 1884 and 1887 Sir Joseph Bazalgette incorporated some of the design elements of a suspension bridge. In 1973 the Greater London Council added two concrete piers, which transformed the central span into a simple beam bridge. As a result, today the bridge is an unusual hybrid of three different design styles. It is an English Heritage Grade II* listed building.Built as a toll bridge, it was commercially unsuccessful. Six years after its opening it was taken into public ownership and the tolls were lifted. The tollbooths remained in place and are the only surviving examples of bridge tollbooths in London. Nicknamed "The Trembling Lady" because of its tendency to vibrate when large numbers of people walked over it, the bridge has signs at its entrances that warned troops to break step whilst crossing the bridge.

The Victoria Pub, Paddington
Distance: 3.5 mi Tourist Information
10A Strathearn Place
London, United Kingdom W2 2NH

020 7724 1191

About The Victoria was built at the same time as Paddington Station (Around 1838). It was always slightly grander than the surrounding pubs and was used by many of the butlers that served in the large houses in the area. Legend has it that Queen Victoria stopped off on her way to Paddington Station, and after that the pub was named in her honour and appointed in it's rather grand style. Charles Dickens spent time writing "Our Mutual Friend" in the pub, and it also appears in two clips from British Pathe news. After the Second World War it was taken over by some theatrical types that converted the upstairs rooms as you see today. In days gone by there have been many celebrities who have either been regulars, or who have just popped in for a drink. Most recently, we have had guests such as Liam Gallagher and his family, Claudio Ranieri, Ronnie Wood, and Damien Hirst. Keira Knightley used to be a regular, and you’d recognise plenty of other faces enjoying a discreet drink.

HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs
Distance: 3.4 mi Tourist Information
Du Cane Road
London, United Kingdom W12 0

020 8588 3200

HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs is a Category B men's prison, located in the Wormwood Scrubs area of the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, in inner west London, England. The prison is operated by Her Majesty's Prison Service.History19th CenturyThe initial steps in the winter of 1874 involved the construction of a small prison made of corrugated iron and a temporary shed to serve as a barracks for the warders. Nine specially picked prisoners, all within a year of release, completed the buildings after which 50 more prisoners were brought in who in turn erected a second temporary prison wing. Building then began on the permanent prison, with bricks being manufactured on site. By the summer of 1875 enough bricks had been prepared to build the prison's first block, whose ground floor was finished as winter began. Construction was completed in 1891.WW2During World War II the prison was taken over by the War Department and the prisoners evacuated. It was used as secure office space for the duration of hostilities and housed MI5 and MI8.Modern eraIn 1979, IRA prisoners staged a rooftop protest over visiting rights. 60 inmates and several prison officers were injured. In 1982, an inquiry blamed much of the difficulties on failings in prison management. The governor, John McCarthy, had quit before the rioting. He had described Wormwood Scrubs as a "penal dustbin" in a letter to The Times.

Leighton House Museum
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
12 Holland Park Road
London, United Kingdom W14 8LZ

+44 (0) 20 7602 3316

Located on the edge of Holland Park in Kensington, Leighton House Museum is the former home of the Victorian artist Frederic, Lord Leighton (1830-1896). The only purpose-built studio-house open to the public in the United Kingdom, it is one of the most remarkable buildings of the nineteenth century, containing a fascinating collection of paintings and sculpture by Leighton and his contemporaries.

Freddy Mercury House
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Garden Lodge, 1 Logan Place
London, United Kingdom W8 6

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Villa di Geggiano
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
66-68 Chiswick High Road
London, United Kingdom W4 1SY

+44 (0) 203 8439 442

The Villa di Geggiano - National Heritage site & Winery in the Chianti region as well as recently opened Villa di Geggiano UK Restaurant & Deli at 66-68 Chiswick High Road, London, W4 1SY

The Boltons
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
9 S Bolton Gardens
London, United Kingdom SW10 9

020 7373 8900

The Boltons is a street located in the Brompton district of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, London, England (postcode SW10). The street is divided into two crescents to the west and east with large expensive houses and communal gardens in the centre.To the northwest via Boltons Place is Old Brompton Road and to the southeast via Gilston Road is Fulham Road. To the west are Redcliffe Square and Redcliffe Gardens.St Mary the Boltons church is located here.American actor Douglas Fairbanks Jr lived at number 28 The Boltons in the 1950s. Novelist and former politician Jeffrey Archer lived at number 24a in the mid 1970s.For some 15 years after WWII, "going to the Boltons" meant to Chelsea dwellers going to school. Indeed, on either side of Boltons Place were two educational establishments, Virgo fidelis, RC Junior Girls School and the state primary Bousfield School, which survives still. 29 The Boltons, on the junction of Tregunter and Gilston Roads, housed the infants' reception and two primary classes with a garden play area, as part of the nearby Lycée Français de Londres. Once the main school in South Kensington had sufficiently expanded in the late 1950s, the classes were moved there. The French Lycée was later renamed Lycée Français Charles de Gaulle.

Gate Cinema
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
87 Notting Hill Gate
London, United Kingdom W11

0871 902 5731

Leighton House Museum
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
12 Holland Park Road
London, United Kingdom W14 8NA

020 7602 3316

The Leighton House Museum is a museum in the Holland Park district of Kensington and Chelsea in London. The former home of the painter Frederic, Lord Leighton, it has been open to the public since 1929.The houseBuilt for Leighton by the architect and designer George Aitchison, it is a Grade II* listed building. It is noted for its elaborate Orientalist and aesthetic interiors. It is open to the public daily except Tuesdays, and is a companion museum to 18 Stafford Terrace, another Victorian artist's home in Kensington.The first part of the house (2 Holland Park Road, later renumbered as 12) was designed in 1864 by the architect George Aitchison, although Leighton was not granted a lease on the land until April 1866. Building commenced shortly afterwards, and the house, which cost £4500, was ready for occupation by the end of the year. The building is of red Suffolk bricks with Caen Stone dressings in a restrained classical style.The architect extended the building over 30 years; the first phase was only three windows wide. The main room was the first floor studio, facing north, originally 45 by 25 feet, with a large central window to provide plenty of light for painting. There was also a gallery at the east end, and a separate staircase for use by models. The house was extended to the east in 1869–70. Additionally, a major extension was made in 1877–79: the two-storey "Arab Hall," built to house Leighton's collection of tiles collected during visits to the Middle East.

Chiswick House
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
Burlington Lane
London, United Kingdom W4 2

020 8995 0508

Chiswick House is a Palladian villa in Burlington Lane, Chiswick, west London. Arguably the finest remaining example of Neo-Palladian architecture in London, the house was designed by Lord Burlington, and completed in 1729. The house and gardens, which occupy 26.33ha, mainly created by architect and landscape designer William Kent, is one of the earliest examples of the English landscape garden.After the death of its builder and original occupant in 1753 and the subsequent deaths of his last surviving daughter, Charlotte Boyle, in 1754 and his widow in 1758, the property was ceded to William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire, the husband of Charlotte. After William's death in 1764, the villa passed to his and Charlotte's orphaned young son, William, the 5th Duke of Devonshire. His wife, Georgiana Spencer, a prominent and controversial figure in fashion and politics whom he married in 1774, used the house as a retreat and as a Whig stronghold for many years; it was the place of death of Charles James Fox in 1806. Tory Prime Minister George Canning also died there, in 1827 (in a bedroom in the John White wing buildings).During the 19th century the house fell into decline, and was rented out by the Cavendish family. It was used as an asylum (mental hospital), the Chiswick Asylum from 1892. In 1929, the 9th Duke of Devonshire sold Chiswick House to Middlesex County Council, and it became a fire station. The villa suffered damage during World War II, and in 1944 a V-2 rocket damaged one of the two wings. The wings were demolished in 1956. Today the house is a Grade I listed building, and is maintained by English Heritage.

10 Pembridge Gardens .. London
Distance: 2.8 mi Tourist Information
6-14 Pembridge Gardens
London, United Kingdom W2 4DU

020 7993 9096

Police Telephone Box
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Earl’s Court Rd, London, Greater London SW5 9RB, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom

07700 900461

Esta página é destinada a todo fã de Dr. Who, para que saiba que Tardis está no mapa... sempre quis marcar este local Universalmente conhecido... Vamos compartilhem! Whovians! Allons-y! links: Interior(clicar na imagem) - https://maps.google.com.br/maps?expflags=enable_star_based_justifications:true&ie=UTF8&cid=12502927659667388442&q=Police+Telephone+Box&iwloc=A&gl=BR&hl=pt-BR Exterior - https://maps.google.com.br/maps?expflags=enable_star_based_justifications:true&ie=UTF8&cid=12502927659667388442&q=Police+Telephone+Box&iwloc=A&gl=BR&hl=pt-BR

Blythe House
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
23 Blythe Road London W14 0QX
London, United Kingdom W14 0

02076020281

Blythe House is a listed building located at 23 Blythe Road, West Kensington, London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, UK. Originally built as the headquarters of the Post Office Savings Bank, it is now used as a store and archive by the Victoria and Albert, Science and British Museums.

Hogarth's House
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
Hogarth Lane, Great West Road
London, United Kingdom W4 2

020 8994 6757

Hogarth's House is the former country home of the 18th century English artist William Hogarth in Chiswick, adjacent to the A4. The House now belongs to the London Borough of Hounslow and is open to visitors as a historic house museum free of charge. Chiswick is now one of London's western suburbs, but in the 18th century it was a large village or small town quite separate from the metropolis, but within easy reach of it. Today the house is a Grade 1 listed building.Construction and early occupationThe house was built between 1713 and 1717 in the corner of an orchard belonging to the Downes family. Its first occupant was Rev George Andreas Ruperti, the pastor of St Mary's Lutheran church in the Savoy, London, who used it as his country home. He cared for the thousands of refugees from the Rhineland who arrived in London following a famine in 1708-9. They hoped to be able to reach America - with Ruperti's help many did, and some settled in the south of Ireland. Ruperti's lists of the refugees, which record their trades, have been invaluable to family historians. He was appointed to the Lutheran Church at St James's Palace in 1728 at a salary of £200 a year. After his death in 1731 his widow retained the House; the Hogarths bought it from his son in 1749.According to the increased valuations in the parish rate books, the Hogarths extended it in 1750 and Mrs Hogarth added another single storey extension in 1769. It was the artist's country retreat from 1749 until his death in 1764; he had a "painting room" over his coach-house at the bottom of the garden. He shared it with his wife, mother-in-law, his wife's cousin, Mary Lewis (who assisted with his business) and his sister. His town house was in Leicester Square, and was demolished in 1870. William Hogarth is buried in the graveyard of the nearby St. Nicholas Church, Chiswick; his fine tomb-monument carries an obituary by his great friend, the actor David Garrick. The family's connections with the House continued until Mary Lewis' death in 1808.

Buckingham Palace
Distance: 2.5 mi Tourist Information
London SW1A 1AA
London, United Kingdom

18 Stafford Terrace
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
18 Stafford Terrace
London, United Kingdom W8 7

020 7602 3316

18 Stafford Terrace, formerly known as Linley Sambourne House, was the home of the Punch illustrator Edward Linley Sambourne (1844–1910) in Kensington, London. The house is currently open to the public as a museum.18 Stafford Terrace was an almost new townhouse when the Sambournes moved in, in 1875. It was Linley Sambourne who set about re-decorating the house in the Aesthetic style. Today the house is a fine example of middle-class Aestheticism; its influences can still be seen permeating throughout the house, from decorative Sunflower motifs in the stained glass windows to the fine selection of William Morris wallpapers that hang within the rooms through to the displayed collection of blue-and-white Chinese import porcelain.LegacyLinley Sambourne died in 1910 but it wasn't until his wife Marion's death four years later that the house passed to their bachelor son Roy. Roy kept the house's interior largely unchanged until his own death in 1946. The house then passed to Roy's sister Maud Messel. Maud already had a large London residence therefore 18 Stafford remained mostly unoccupied and unchanged. In the years leading up to Maud's death in 1960, the house had become increasingly fascinating to her daughter Anne, Countess of Rosse. This fascination led to Anne proposing the foundation of The Victorian Society in 1957, and in turn the continued preservation of the house largely as it had been lived in by Linley.Lady Rosse negotiated the sale of the house to the Greater London Council and the lease to the Victorian Society in 1980; the house was then opened to the public as a museum which included the furniture, art, and decorative schemes retained from its original inhabitants, Linley Sambourne and his household. Following the demise of the Greater London Council the ownership of the house transferred to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1989. The Royal Borough continued to work with the Victorian Society until 2000, when the lease to the Victorian Society wasn't renewed.

History Museum Near Fulham Palace

Natural History Museum, London
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
Cromwell Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 5BD

+44 (0)20 7942 5000

The Natural History Museum in London is a treasure in every way. Join us for updates on our science, collections and all our activities. Read our blogs: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/blogs Get help from our ID experts: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/identification Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NHM_London Watch our films on YouTube: http://youtube.com/naturalhistorymuseum

Natural History Museum Ice Rink
Distance: 2.5 mi Tourist Information
Cromwell Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 5BD

+44 (0)20 7942 5000

National History Muesem
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
Exhibition Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 2

020 7942 5000

Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum
Distance: 2.5 mi Tourist Information
All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club
London, United Kingdom SW19 5

+44 (0) 20 8946 6131

Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum is the largest tennis museum in the world. The museum was inaugurated at The Championships centenary event in 1977. On the 12 April 2006, HRH The Duke of Kent declared the brand new Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum open to the public inside the grounds of the All England Lawn Tennis Club. This museum has exhibits and artefacts dating back to 1555 as well as touch screen computer consoles for visitors to interact with. Memorabilia from many famous players from Victorian times up to present day are included in several different exhibits, which change seasonally. The Museum also has a viewing platform called CentreCourt360 allowing guests to sample the atmosphere of Centre Court, except for the period around The Championships. Guided tours are also available which take visitors behind the scenes of the All England Lawn Tennis Club and includes admission into the Museum. Audio guides are available in 8 languages: English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Russian, Croatian and Brazilian. WLTM is opened year round to the public except during The Championships week where entry is possible for tournament ticket holders only.

Leighton House Museum
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
12 Holland Park Road
London, United Kingdom W14 8NA

020 7602 3316

The Leighton House Museum is a museum in the Holland Park district of Kensington and Chelsea in London. The former home of the painter Frederic, Lord Leighton, it has been open to the public since 1929.The houseBuilt for Leighton by the architect and designer George Aitchison, it is a Grade II* listed building. It is noted for its elaborate Orientalist and aesthetic interiors. It is open to the public daily except Tuesdays, and is a companion museum to 18 Stafford Terrace, another Victorian artist's home in Kensington.The first part of the house (2 Holland Park Road, later renumbered as 12) was designed in 1864 by the architect George Aitchison, although Leighton was not granted a lease on the land until April 1866. Building commenced shortly afterwards, and the house, which cost £4500, was ready for occupation by the end of the year. The building is of red Suffolk bricks with Caen Stone dressings in a restrained classical style.The architect extended the building over 30 years; the first phase was only three windows wide. The main room was the first floor studio, facing north, originally 45 by 25 feet, with a large central window to provide plenty of light for painting. There was also a gallery at the east end, and a separate staircase for use by models. The house was extended to the east in 1869–70. Additionally, a major extension was made in 1877–79: the two-storey "Arab Hall," built to house Leighton's collection of tiles collected during visits to the Middle East.

Lates at the Natural History Museum
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
Cromwell Road, SW7 5BD London, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom SW7 5

18 Stafford Terrace
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
18 Stafford Terrace
London, United Kingdom W8 7

020 7602 3316

18 Stafford Terrace, formerly known as Linley Sambourne House, was the home of the Punch illustrator Edward Linley Sambourne (1844–1910) in Kensington, London. The house is currently open to the public as a museum.18 Stafford Terrace was an almost new townhouse when the Sambournes moved in, in 1875. It was Linley Sambourne who set about re-decorating the house in the Aesthetic style. Today the house is a fine example of middle-class Aestheticism; its influences can still be seen permeating throughout the house, from decorative Sunflower motifs in the stained glass windows to the fine selection of William Morris wallpapers that hang within the rooms through to the displayed collection of blue-and-white Chinese import porcelain.LegacyLinley Sambourne died in 1910 but it wasn't until his wife Marion's death four years later that the house passed to their bachelor son Roy. Roy kept the house's interior largely unchanged until his own death in 1946. The house then passed to Roy's sister Maud Messel. Maud already had a large London residence therefore 18 Stafford remained mostly unoccupied and unchanged. In the years leading up to Maud's death in 1960, the house had become increasingly fascinating to her daughter Anne, Countess of Rosse. This fascination led to Anne proposing the foundation of The Victorian Society in 1957, and in turn the continued preservation of the house largely as it had been lived in by Linley.Lady Rosse negotiated the sale of the house to the Greater London Council and the lease to the Victorian Society in 1980; the house was then opened to the public as a museum which included the furniture, art, and decorative schemes retained from its original inhabitants, Linley Sambourne and his household. Following the demise of the Greater London Council the ownership of the house transferred to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1989. The Royal Borough continued to work with the Victorian Society until 2000, when the lease to the Victorian Society wasn't renewed.

Natural History Museum London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
12 Billing Road
London, United Kingdom

18 Stafford Terrace
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
18 Stafford Terrace
London, United Kingdom W8 7BH

020 7602 3316

From 1875, 18 Stafford Terrace was the home of Punch cartoonist Edward Linley Sambourne, his wife Marion, their two children and their live-in servants. The house gives an insight into the personal lives of the Sambourne family, and also provides a rare example of what was known as an 'Aesthetic interior' or 'House Beautiful' style. The Aesthetic Movement of the late nineteenth century advocated the use of foreign or 'exotic' influences in the decoration of the home'. This can be seen by the various Japanese, Middle-Eastern and Chinese objects throughout the Sambournes' home. After the deaths of Linley and Marion Sambourne, the house was preserved by their descendants. In 1980 it was opened to the public by the Victorian Society. This organisation had been inaugurated at 18 Stafford Terrace in 1958 by the Sambourne's grand-daughter, Anne, 6th Countess of Rosse. In 1989, its ownership passed to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea who now manage this museum

Polish Institute & Sikorsi Museum
Distance: 2.9 mi Tourist Information
20 Prince's Gate
London, United Kingdom SW7 1PT

+44 (0) 20 7589 9249

V&A Shop
Distance: 2.6 mi Tourist Information
Cromwell Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 2

020 7942 2696

The Polish Institute and Sikorski Museum
Distance: 2.8 mi Tourist Information
20 Prince's Gate
London, United Kingdom SW7 1

020 7589 9249

The Sikorski Museum is located in Princes Gate in London and is a museum that was created by Polish exiles living in London who didn’t want to go back to Poland after World War Two, as it was now under Russian control. The Sikorski Museum contain thousands and thousands of artefacts from the war, and has recently undergone a renovation which has seen all the labels and signage printed in English as well as Polish for the first time ever. The museum is only open for two hours a day during the week (except for Mondays), between two and four in the afternoon, but is well worth a visit, especially for those interested in the Polish contribution to World War Two. Those who are unable to visit in the week can visit on the first Saturday of each month when the museum is open between ten and four. For information in museum opening hours you can call the museum on 0207 589 9249, or visit this webpage for a map of where the museum is based: Polish Institute and Sikorski Museum in London

Kurdish Museum
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
241 King Street
London, United Kingdom W6 9

20-87487874

Tourist Attraction Near Fulham Palace

Natural History Museum, London
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
Cromwell Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 5BD

+44 (0)20 7942 5000

The Natural History Museum in London is a treasure in every way. Join us for updates on our science, collections and all our activities. Read our blogs: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/blogs Get help from our ID experts: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/identification Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NHM_London Watch our films on YouTube: http://youtube.com/naturalhistorymuseum

Royal Albert Hall
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
Kensington Gore, Kensington Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 2AP

+44 (0) 845 401 5019

Science Museum
Distance: 2.6 mi Tourist Information
Exhibition Road, South Kensington
London, United Kingdom SW7 2DD

020 7942 4000

Kensington Palace
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
Kensington Gardens
London, United Kingdom W8 4PX

020 3166 6000

The feminine influence of generations of royal women has shaped this stylish palace and elegant gardens. The birthplace and childhood home of Queen Victoria, the palace first became a royal residence for William and Mary in 1689. Mary felt ‘shut in’ at Whitehall and much preferred her new Kensington home, which was enlarged by Sir Christopher Wren. The famous Orangery, was built in 1704 by Queen Anne, and George II’s wife, Queen Caroline, another keen gardener, added further improvements. Today, the palace houses a stunning permanent display of fashionable and formal dresses, the Royal Ceremonial Dress Collection, which includes Queen Victoria’s wedding dress and dresses worn by Diana, Princess of Wales.

Riverside Studios
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
65 Aspenlea Road, Hammersmith
London, United Kingdom W6 8LH

020 8237 1111

Battersea Bridge
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Battersea Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SW11 3AF

Battersea Bridge is a five-span arch bridge with cast-iron girders and granite piers crossing the River Thames in London, England. It is situated on a sharp bend in the river, and links Battersea south of the river with Chelsea to the north. The bridge replaced a ferry service that had operated near the site since at least the middle of the 16th century.The first Battersea Bridge was a toll bridge commissioned by John, Earl Spencer, who had recently acquired the rights to operate the ferry. Although a stone bridge was planned, difficulties in raising investment meant that a cheaper wooden bridge was built instead. Designed by Henry Holland, it was initially opened to pedestrians in November 1771, and to vehicle traffic in 1772. The bridge was poorly designed and dangerous both to its users and to passing shipping, and boats often collided with it. To reduce the dangers to shipping, two piers were removed and the sections of the bridge above them were strengthened with iron girders.Although dangerous and unpopular, the bridge was the last surviving wooden bridge on the Thames in London, and was the subject of paintings by many significant artists such as J. M. W. Turner, John Sell Cotman and James McNeill Whistler, including Whistler's Nocturne: Blue and Gold – Old Battersea Bridge, and his controversial Nocturne in Black and Gold – The Falling Rocket.

Electric Cinema, Notting Hill
Distance: 3.1 mi Tourist Information
191 Portobello Road
London, United Kingdom W11 2ED

020 7908 9696

The Electric Cinema is a movie theatre in Notting Hill, London, and is one of the oldest working cinemas in the country.HistoryThe Electric Cinema first opened in London's Portobello Road on 24 February 1910 and was one of the first buildings in Britain to be designed specifically for motion picture exhibition. It was built shortly after its namesake the Electric Cinema in Birmingham, which predates it by around two months. The cinema was soon eclipsed by the huge picture palaces that became fashionable during the 1930s but, despite being shuttered for brief periods, it has remained in almost continual use until the present day.Designed by architect Gerald Seymour Valentin in the Edwardian Baroque style, it originally opened as the Electric Cinema Theatre. During World War I an angry mob attacked the Electric, believing that its German-born manager was signalling to Zeppelin raiders from the roof, after nearby Arundel Gardens was hit by a bomb dropped from a Zeppelin.Later, in 1932, the Electric became the Imperial Playhouse cinema, though by this time the Portobello Road area had become rather run down, along with the rest of Notting Hill.

Royal College of Art
Distance: 2.6 mi Tourist Information
kensington gore
London, United Kingdom SW7 2EU

020 7590 4444

The Royal College of Art or RCA is a public research university in London, in the United Kingdom. It offers postgraduate degrees in art and design to students from over 60 countries; it is the only entirely postgraduate art and design university in the world. In the 2016 QS World University Rankings by Subject, the RCA was placed first in the Art and Design subject area. This was the second consecutive year that QS had awarded it the number 1 position for Art & Design.HistoryThe RCA was founded in Somerset House in 1837 as the Government School of Design or Metropolitan School of Design. Richard Burchett became head of the school in 1852. In 1853 it was expanded and moved to Marlborough House, and then, in 1853 or 1857, to South Kensington, on the same site as the South Kensington Museum. It was renamed the Normal Training School of Art in 1857 and the National Art Training School in 1863. During the later 19th century it was primarily a teacher training college; pupils during this period included George Clausen, Christopher Dresser, Luke Fildes, Kate Greenaway and Gertrude Jekyll.

Museum of Brands, Packaging and Advertising
Distance: 3.2 mi Tourist Information
111-117 Lancaster Road
London, United Kingdom W11 1QT

+44(0)20 7243 9611

Unwrap 200 years of consumer society at the Museum of Brands. Travel through the Museum’s time tunnel of 12,000 objects and unwrap 150 years of consumer society, decade by decade. From Cadbury’s to Coca-Cola, Monster Munch to Matey Bubble Bath, so many brand stories are here. Rediscover design classics, forgotten childhood toys and products long since consigned to history. The fascinating changes in style, design, fashion, entertainment, communications, travel, transport and behaviour can all be traced through our unique collection. Located just off the famous Portobello Road in London’s Notting Hill, the Museum is regularly described as one of London’s quirkiest Museums. Our award-winning gift shop sells brand-inspired items created from images in the Collection and the café offers light lunches, tea, coffee and refreshments.

The Blue Door, Notting Hill
Distance: 3.2 mi Tourist Information
280 Westbourne Park Road
London, United Kingdom W11 1EH

Kensington Temple
Distance: 2.8 mi Tourist Information
1 Kensington Park Road
London, United Kingdom W11 3BY

02087996100

Kensington Temple is a large Pentecostal church in the Notting Hill area of London, England. It is pastored by Reverend Colin Dye, and is the largest church in its denomination, the Elim Pentecostal Church.HistoryThe present church building was founded as Horbury Chapel, and used by the Hornton Street Congregational church, Notting Hill, in 1849. The building was used from 1935 by the Bible-Pattern Church Fellowship (an Elim Pentecostal Church offshoot founded by George Jeffreys), and also known as the Church of the Foursquare Gospel (not to be confused with the International Church of the Foursquare Gospel), when it became known as Kensington Temple.The use of the building reverted to the Elim Church in the early 1960s, and the church as it is known today was founded in 1965 by the Elim minister Rev. Eldin Corsie. Under his ministry in the late 1960s - 1970s the congregation grew to 600, and then to several thousand under Rev. Wynne Lewis (later to become the Elim Church's General Superintendent) during the 1980s.Since the 1980s, nicknamed by members of the church as 'KT', Kensington Temple has planted 150 churches across London . Today, It has around 29 churches in its Kensington Temple London City Church (KTLCC) network and 4 regional Elim churches linked to it. Over the years, many churches KT has planted have opted to become independent churches or to have an official status as a self-standing Elim church.

Freddy Mercury House
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Garden Lodge, 1 Logan Place
London, United Kingdom W8 6

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Prince Albert Memorial
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
Kensington Gardens
London, United Kingdom

Windsor Castle
Distance: 2.6 mi Tourist Information
114 CAMPDEN HILL ROAD
London, United Kingdom W8 7AR

Police Telephone Box
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Earl’s Court Rd, London, Greater London SW5 9RB, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom

07700 900461

Esta página é destinada a todo fã de Dr. Who, para que saiba que Tardis está no mapa... sempre quis marcar este local Universalmente conhecido... Vamos compartilhem! Whovians! Allons-y! links: Interior(clicar na imagem) - https://maps.google.com.br/maps?expflags=enable_star_based_justifications:true&ie=UTF8&cid=12502927659667388442&q=Police+Telephone+Box&iwloc=A&gl=BR&hl=pt-BR Exterior - https://maps.google.com.br/maps?expflags=enable_star_based_justifications:true&ie=UTF8&cid=12502927659667388442&q=Police+Telephone+Box&iwloc=A&gl=BR&hl=pt-BR

Blythe House
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
23 Blythe Road London W14 0QX
London, United Kingdom W14 0

02076020281

Blythe House is a listed building located at 23 Blythe Road, West Kensington, London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, UK. Originally built as the headquarters of the Post Office Savings Bank, it is now used as a store and archive by the Victoria and Albert, Science and British Museums.

Paris, Tour Eiffel
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Champ de Mars, 5 Avenue Anatole France
London, United Kingdom

Kayaking London
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
Cremorne Riverside Centre
London, United Kingdom SW10 0QH

0208 968 4500

Try your hand at kayaking on the River Thames, one of the most iconic stretches of water in the world. See London as you've never seen it before Whether you want to treat someone special, enjoy a unique experience with your mates, or challenge your colleagues, we'll have an adventure for you! From one of our stable kayaks you get to see London as you've never seen it before. Even complete beginners can safely take on the Thames, as all our trips are led by highly qualified coaches. We run various set trips, sessions and courses, and we can also create a bespoke package for your needs. Visit our website for our full range of adventures and bookings. www.kayakinglondon.com www.twitter.com/KayakingLondon

Freddie Mercury
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Garden Lodge 1Logan Place
London, United Kingdom W8 6

18 Stafford Terrace
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
18 Stafford Terrace
London, United Kingdom W8 7

020 7602 3316

18 Stafford Terrace, formerly known as Linley Sambourne House, was the home of the Punch illustrator Edward Linley Sambourne (1844–1910) in Kensington, London. The house is currently open to the public as a museum.18 Stafford Terrace was an almost new townhouse when the Sambournes moved in, in 1875. It was Linley Sambourne who set about re-decorating the house in the Aesthetic style. Today the house is a fine example of middle-class Aestheticism; its influences can still be seen permeating throughout the house, from decorative Sunflower motifs in the stained glass windows to the fine selection of William Morris wallpapers that hang within the rooms through to the displayed collection of blue-and-white Chinese import porcelain.LegacyLinley Sambourne died in 1910 but it wasn't until his wife Marion's death four years later that the house passed to their bachelor son Roy. Roy kept the house's interior largely unchanged until his own death in 1946. The house then passed to Roy's sister Maud Messel. Maud already had a large London residence therefore 18 Stafford remained mostly unoccupied and unchanged. In the years leading up to Maud's death in 1960, the house had become increasingly fascinating to her daughter Anne, Countess of Rosse. This fascination led to Anne proposing the foundation of The Victorian Society in 1957, and in turn the continued preservation of the house largely as it had been lived in by Linley.Lady Rosse negotiated the sale of the house to the Greater London Council and the lease to the Victorian Society in 1980; the house was then opened to the public as a museum which included the furniture, art, and decorative schemes retained from its original inhabitants, Linley Sambourne and his household. Following the demise of the Greater London Council the ownership of the house transferred to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1989. The Royal Borough continued to work with the Victorian Society until 2000, when the lease to the Victorian Society wasn't renewed.

Attractions/Things to Do Near Fulham Palace

Gambado Chelsea
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
7 Station Street
London, United Kingdom SW6 2PY

02073841635

Gambado Chelsea is the UK's ultimate indoor play and party centre. Our mission is to be the greatest, quality family indoor play provider in the UK. Through our expertise, we offer children the opportunity to play, run free and explore in a fun, safe and stimulating environment whilst providing a comfortable and relaxed haven for adults. Visit our website for more information: http://www.gambado.com/centres/indoor-play-centre-chelsea/

TOKEN INTERIOR
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
694 Fulham Road
London, United Kingdom SW6 5SA

02034908910

Salute to Style
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
The Hurlingham Club
London, United Kingdom SW6 3PR

07734936821

Photo Tours London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Michael Road
London, United Kingdom SW6 2AD

07957 165317

Photo Tours London will take you on several tours throughout London, where we will teach you simple tricks and techiniques that will make your photos stand out. With London as a backdrop, we will show you the best places, tell you the stories about some of London's most famous landmarks and ake sure you know how to take fascinating photos!

Samsung World Cyber Games at Eurogamer Expo
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Earls Court Exhibition Centre, Warwick Road
London, United Kingdom SW5 9TA

The Samsung stand at Eurogamer Expo will showcase the gaming capability of specific products as well as demo how their integration offers the ultimate gaming experience, whether playing from home or on the move. Visitors can experience: Samsung’s 7 and 8 Series televisions, which deliver outstanding 2D and 3D pictures; 3D gaming notebooks; Series 7 and 9 computer monitors, which combine cutting-edge design, 3D gaming and HDTV; Mobile devices such as the Galaxy Tab 10.1 and Galaxy SII plus a vast number of games. To complete the offering the HT-D6750, HT-D5530 and HW-D570 Home Theatre systems will add an incredible 3D surround sound experience to gameplay. They will also be exclusively showcasing the Call of Duty cinematic preview on the stand.

La Bottega Del Gusto
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
1A Fitz-George Avenue
London, United Kingdom W140SY

Vision London
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
Hammersmith Rd
London, United Kingdom W14 8UX

+44 (0)20 3633 2237

Vision focuses on innovative building products, materials and technology. Vision provides ideas for new and inventive ways to achieve better building design and comply with changing legislation. Vision provides the meeting place for professionals connected to the built environment. The event provides a unique opportunity for suppliers to showcase their innovative building solutions. A high level conference, a series of seminars, live debates and interactive show features alongside a carefully curated exhibition of cutting edge products.

100% Design
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Olympia, Hammersmith Road
London, United Kingdom W14 8UX

020 3225 5200

100% Design is the largest and longest running contemporary design event for industry professionals in the UK, with 28,534 visitors in 2014*. First staged in 1995, the show has been run by leading independent publishing and events company Media 10 since 2012 For 2015, the show will take over a new venue, moving up the road to Olympia London. Staged over 20,000m2 and across 2 floors of the venue, 100% Design is the commercial cornerstone event of the London Design Festival. The award-winning layout of the show is defined by four key industry sections; Interiors, Workplace, Kitchen & Bathrooms and Design & Build. New for 2015 are the Luxury and Modern British sections. The show also features specially commissioned editorial hubs across the floors. Topped off by the critically acclaimed Talks with 100% Design programme running across the four days of the show, 100% Design is a diverse, inspirational design experience. Exhibitors are carefully selected, reflecting the show’s focus on design quality, innovation and relevance to the architecture and design community. Used as an influential platform, the show saw over 1,000 new products launched at the show in 2014. These companies and products, alongside a comprehensive roster of the best media and specialist industry partners, contribute to make 100% Design an essential destination. Show Director, Will Knight said: "It's an exciting time for everyone involved in 100% Design; exhibitors, content providers, designers and the show team at Media 10. Since taking the show on in 2012 we've worked to refine and develop the exhibition in September, but also the year-round activity in the form of events, talks, marketing and promotion. We're focused on delivering success though innovation and curation, bringing you the best in design in its many forms." The show reached a landmark 20th edition in 2014 and continues to grow. * ABC verified

Eddie Catz Earlsfield
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
279 Magdalen Road
London, United Kingdom SW18 3NZ

02087390909

Hello and welcome to Eddie Catz Earlsfield. London's original award-winning children's activity centre. Exciting 2-tier play structure Great choice of daily activities (from birth) Lovely cafe with a full menu including home-made dishes and organic options Legendary parties specialising in exclusive hire Open play for 0-7 year olds. Parties for 1-8 year olds.