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The British Museum Friends, London | Tourist Information


Great Russell Street
London, United Kingdom WC1B 3DG

0207 323 8195

Historical Place Near The British Museum Friends

Westminster Abbey, London
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Broad Sanctuary
London, SW1P 3PA

020 7222 5152

The Terrace At The Houses Of Parliament
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Palace of Westminster
London, SW1A 0AA

Palace of Westminster
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Westminster
London, SW1A 2

020 7219 3000

The Palace of Westminster is the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Commonly known as the Houses of Parliament after its occupants, it is also known as the 'heart of British politics'. The Palace lies on the north bank of the River Thames in the City of Westminster, in central London.Its name, which derives from the neighbouring Westminster Abbey, may refer to either of two structures: the Old Palace, a medieval building complex destroyed by fire in 1834, and its replacement, the New Palace that stands today. The palace is owned by the monarch in right of the Crown and, for ceremonial purposes, retains its original status as a royal residence. The building is managed by BNP Paribas Real Estate, which reports to the Speaker of the House of Commons and the Lord Speaker.The first royal palace was built on the site in the 11th century, and Westminster was the primary residence of the Kings of England until fire destroyed much of the complex in 1512. After that, it served as the home of the Parliament of England, which had been meeting there since the 13th century, and also as the seat of the Royal Courts of Justice, based in and around Westminster Hall. In 1834, an even greater fire ravaged the heavily rebuilt Houses of Parliament, and the only significant medieval structures to survive were Westminster Hall, the Cloisters of St Stephen's, the Chapel of St Mary Undercroft, and the Jewel Tower.

New Scotland Yard London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Broadway
London,

Westminster Abbey
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, SW1P 3PA

020 7222 5152

Methodist Central Hall Westminster
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Storeys Gate
London, SW1H 9NH

0044 20 7654 3809

St Margaret's, Westminster
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, SW1P 3

+44(0)20 7222 5152

The Church of St Margaret, Westminster Abbey, is situated in the grounds of Westminster Abbey on Parliament Square, and is the Anglican parish church of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom in London. It is dedicated to Margaret of Antioch.History and descriptionOriginally founded in the twelfth century by Benedictine monks, so that local people who lived in the area around the Abbey could worship separately at their own simpler parish church, and historically part of the hundred of Ossulstone in the county of Middlesex, St Margaret's was rebuilt from 1486 to 1523. It became the parish church of the Palace of Westminster in 1614, when the Puritans of the seventeenth century, unhappy with the highly liturgical Abbey, chose to hold Parliamentary services in the more "suitable" St Margaret's: a practice that has continued since that time.The Rector of St Margaret's is a canon of Westminster Abbey.The north-west tower was rebuilt by John James from 1734 to 1738; at the same time, the whole structure was encased in Portland stone. Both the eastern and the western porch were added later by J. L. Pearson. The church's interior was greatly restored and altered to its current appearance by Sir George Gilbert Scott in 1877, although many of the Tudor features were retained.

The House Of Commons
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
The House of Commons, London
London, SW1A 0AA

020 7219 4272

UK Parliament
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Houses of Parliament, Westminster
London, SW1A 0AA

02072193000

The work of Parliament is carried out by the House of Commons, the House of Lords and Select Committees of both Houses. Find out more about how Parliament works: http://www.parliament.uk/about/how/

Inside Buckingham Palace
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace, London SW1A 1AA
London,

Wesminster Abbey, Big Ben, Houses of Parliament
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, SW1P 3PA

+44(0)20 7222 5152

Big Ben
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Westminster Bridge Rd
London, SW1A 2

020 7219 4272

Big Ben is the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London, and often extended to refer to the clock and the clock tower. The tower is officially known as Elizabeth Tower, renamed to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II in 2012; previously it was known simply as the Clock Tower. When completed in 1859, it was, says clockmaker Ian Westworth, “the prince of timekeepers: the biggest, most accurate four-faced striking and chiming clock in the world.” The tower had its 150th anniversary on 31 May 2009, during which celebratory events took place.A British cultural icon, the tower is one of the most prominent symbols of the United Kingdom and is often in the establishing shot of films set in London.TowerThe Elizabeth Tower, more popularly known as Big Ben, was raised as a part of Charles Barry's design for a new palace, after the old Palace of Westminster was largely destroyed by fire on the night of 16 October 1834. The new parliament was built in a neo-gothic style. Although Barry was the chief architect of the palace, he turned to Augustus Pugin for the design of the clock tower, which resembles earlier Pugin designs, including one for Scarisbrick Hall. The design for the tower was Pugin's last design before his final descent into madness and death, and Pugin himself wrote, at the time of Barry's last visit to him to collect the drawings: "I never worked so hard in my life for Mr Barry for tomorrow I render all the designs for finishing his bell tower & it is beautiful." The tower is designed in Pugin's celebrated Gothic Revival style, and is 315ft high.

Big Ben
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
The Clock Tower, Houses of Parliament, Palace of Westminister, London
Westminster, SW1A 0AA

Big Ben is the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London, and often extended to refer to the clock and the clock tower.

Winston Churchill Room, Treasury
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
100 Parliament Street
London, SW1A 2BQ

Victoria Memorial, London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, SW1A 1

The Victoria Memorial is a monument to Queen Victoria, located at the end of The Mall in London, and designed and executed by the sculptor Sir Thomas Brock. Designed in 1901, it was unveiled on 16 May 1911, though it was not completed until 1924. It was the centrepiece of an ambitious urban planning scheme, which included the creation of the Queen’s Gardens to a design by Sir Aston Webb, and the refacing of Buckingham Palace (which stands behind the memorial) by the same architect.Like the earlier Albert Memorial in Kensington Gardens, commemorating Victoria's consort, the Victoria Memorial has an elaborate scheme of iconographic sculpture. The central pylon of the memorial is of Pentelic marble, and individual statues are in Carrara marble and gilt bronze. The memorial weighs 2,300 tonnes and is 104 ft wide. In 1970 it was listed at Grade I.HistoryProposal and announcementsKing Edward VII suggested that a joint Parliamentary committee should be formed to develop plans for a Memorial to Queen Victoria following her death. The first meeting took place on 19 February 1901 at the Foreign Office, Whitehall. The first secretary of the committee was Arthur Bigge, 1st Baron Stamfordham. Initially these meetings were behind closed doors, and the proceedings were not revealed to the public. However the Lord Mayor of London, Sir Joseph Dimsdale, publicly announced that the committee had decided that the Memorial should be "monumental".

Victoria Memorial, London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, SW1A 1

Il Victoria Memorial è una scultura della città di Londra, collocata di fronte alla residenza reale di Buckingham Palace.Fu costruita dallo scultore Sir Thomas Brock, nel 1911. Contribuì nella progettazione e nella realizzazione l'architetto e Presidente della Royal Academy Sir Aston Webb; per la costruzione furono utilizzate all'incirca 2300 tonnellate di marmo bianco.Verso nord est sorge una grande statua della regina Vittoria. Gli altri lati del monumento rappresentano statue di angeli. L'Angelo della Giustizia, l'Angelo della Verità e quello della Carità, quest'ultimo dirimpetto a Buckingham Palace. Sul pinnacolo, è raffigurata la Vittoria attorniata da due figure sedute. Queste due figure "sussidiarie" furono donate dagli abitanti della Nuova Zelanda.Galleria d'immaginiVoci correlate Albert Memorial Vittoria del Regno Unito Buckingham Palace

Churchill War Rooms
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Clive Steps, King Charles Street
London, SW1A 2AQ

0207 930 6961

Follow us on Facebook and join our growing community of fans. Discover in-depth information about Churchill War Rooms, special content, and discuss and share with others.

Windsor Castle
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Windsor Castle
Windsor, SL4 1NJ

+44 (0)20 7766 7304

The London Dungeon
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
The London Dungeon, County Hall, Westminster Bridge Road
London, SE1 7PB

Situated in County Hall next to the Coca-Cola London Eye, the London Dungeon is a 110 minute journey through London's darkest history. The London Dungeon brings 1000 years of authentic London history to life with a unique mix of talented live actors, stunning special effects, edge of your seat surprises and two exciting thrill rides. Guests embark on a journey through a dramatic London landscape going back ten centuries. They are guided through ghastly plague-ridden streets, witness Guy Fawkes’ dramatic plot to blow up Parliament, travel back to Jack the Ripper’s bleak Whitechapel and walk beneath London’s foreboding medieval gates. Expect to meet Sweeney Todd, the infamous Barber, and his evil sidekick, Mrs Lovett alongside Jack the Ripper with one of his unfortunate victims Mary Jane Kelly. They will be joined by murderous monarch Henry VIII ‘virtually’ played by boisterous British acting giant, Brian Blessed, gunpowder plotter Guy Fawkes and a supporting cast of torturers, plague victims and dark jesters. Guests can also expect close encounters with non-human ‘talent’ including giant cockroaches and the Dungeon’s resident family of scurrying rats! As well as 19 shows, and innumerable unexpected surprises, the attraction will boast two state-of-the art thrill rides with high-tech surprises guaranteed to get adrenaline pumping. A fast flowing boat ride sees guests condemned by Henry VIII – played virtually by boisterous British acting legend Brian Blessed - to a turbulent journey along the dank River Thames towards execution. Whilst on a deadly dark drop ride they will literally be sentenced to ‘take the drop’ as they plunge three stories in the pitch dark. A chilling, screams-guaranteed, Whitechapel labyrinth will baffle guests as they try to escape ‘Jack’ and find their way out of the East End and a strange but fun journey through Balzelgette’s Victorian Sewer system will leave guests in a disorientated spin. At the end of your tour, join us in the Dungeon Tavern, a Victorian pub experience. Your first drink is on us!

The Cenotaph, Whitehall
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Whitehall
London, SW1A 2BX

The Cenotaph is a war memorial on Whitehall in London, England. Its origin is in a temporary structure erected for a peace parade following the end of the First World War and after an outpouring of national sentiment it was replaced in 1920 by a permanent structure and designated the United Kingdom's primary national war memorial.Designed by Edwin Lutyens, the permanent structure was built from Portland stone between 1919 and 1920 by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts, replacing Lutyens' earlier wood-and-plaster cenotaph in the same location. An annual Service of Remembrance is held at the site on Remembrance Sunday, the closest Sunday to 11 November (Armistice Day) each year. Lutyens' cenotaph design has been reproduced elsewhere in the UK and in other countries including Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Bermuda and Hong Kong.OriginsThe first cenotaph was a wood-and-plaster structure designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and erected in 1919. It was one of a number of temporary structures erected for the London Victory Parade (also called the Peace Day Parade) on 19 July 1919. It marked the formal end of the First World War that had taken place with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on 28 June 1919. As one of a series of temporary wooden monuments constructed along the route of the parade, Whitehall's was not proposed until two weeks before the event. Following deliberations by the Peace Celebrations Committee, Lutyens was invited to Downing Street. There, the British Prime Minister, David Lloyd George, proposed that the monument should be a catafalque, like the one intended for the Arc de Triomphe in Paris for the corresponding Victory Parade in France, but Lutyens proposed instead that the design be based on a cenotaph.

Downing Street
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
st. Downing
London, SW1A 2

020 7270 3000

Downing Street in London, United Kingdom, has for more than three hundred years housed the official residences of two of the most senior British Cabinet ministers: the First Lord of the Treasury, an office now synonymous with that of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom; and the Second Lord of the Treasury, an office held by the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The Prime Minister's official residence is 10 Downing Street; the Chancellor's official residence is next door at Number 11. The government's Chief Whip has an official residence at Number 12, although the current Chief Whip's residence is at Number 9.Downing Street is in Whitehall in central London, a few minutes' walk from the Houses of Parliament and a little further from Buckingham Palace. The street was built in the 1680s by Sir George Downing on the site of a mansion, Hampden House. The houses on the south side of the street were demolished in the 19th century to make way for government offices now occupied by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. "Downing Street" is used as a metonym for the Government of the United Kingdom.

St James's Palace
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

St James's Palace
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Marlborough Rd, St James's SW1A 1DD
London, SW1A 1BS

The Banqueting House
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Whitehall House, 41 Whitehall
London, SW1A 2ER

+44 (0) 844 482 7777

This revolutionary building, the first in England to be designed in a Palladian style by Inigo Jones, was finished in 1622 for James I. Intended for the splendour and exuberance of court masques, the Banqueting House is probably most famous for one real life drama: the execution of Charles I which took place here in 1649 to the ‘dismal, universal groan’ of the crowd. One of Charles’ last sights was he walked through the Banqueting House to his death was the magnificent ceiling, painted by Peter Paul Rubens in 1630-4.

Horse Guards
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Horse Guards Parade
London, SW1A 2

020 7930 4832

Horse Guards is a large Grade I listed building in the Palladian style between Whitehall and Horse Guards Parade in London. The first Horse Guards building was built on the site of the former tiltyard of Westminster Palace in 1664. It was demolished in 1749 and was replaced by the current building which was built between 1750 and 1753 by John Vardy after the death of original architect in 1748 William Kent. Horse Guards Road runs north-south on the western boundary of the parade ground, while Horse Guards Avenue runs east from Whitehall on other side of the building, to Victoria Embankment.The building served as the offices of the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces until 1904 when the post was abolished and replaced by the Chief of the General Staff. The Chief of the General staff moved to the Old War Office Building in 1906 and Horse Guards subsequently became the headquarters of two major Army commands: the London District and the Household Cavalry. The building is the formal entrance to St James's Palace via St. James's Park (though this is now entirely symbolic). Only the monarch is allowed to drive through its central archway, or those given a pass (formerly made of ivory).

Queen's Chapel
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Savoy Hill
London,

+44 20 7836 7221

The Queen's Chapel is a chapel in central London, England, that was designed by Inigo Jones and built between 1623 and 1625 as an external adjunct to St. James's Palace for Roman Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. It is one of the facilities of the British monarch's personal religious establishment, the Chapel Royal, and should not be confused with the 1540 building known as the Chapel Royal within the palace and just across Marlborough road.HistoryIt was built as a Roman Catholic chapel at a time when the construction of Catholic churches was prohibited in England, and was used by Charles I's Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. From the 1690s it was used by Continental Protestant courtiers. It was built as an integral part of St James's Palace, but when the adjacent private apartments burned down in 1809 they were not replaced and in 1856-57 Marlborough Road was built between the palace and the Queen's Chapel. The result is that physically the chapel now appears to be more part of the Marlborough House complex than of St James's Palace. It became a Chapel Royal again in 1938.Having been taken from the Royal Chapel of All Saints in Windsor Great Park, the body of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother lay at the Queen's Chapel for several days during the preparations for her lying-in-state in Westminster Hall before her ceremonial funeral.

Marlborough House
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, SW1Y 5

+44 (0) 20 7747 6491

Marlborough House is a Grade I listed mansion in the City of Westminster, in The Mall, London, east of St James's Palace. It was built for Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, the favourite and confidante of Queen Anne. For over a century it served as the London residence of the Dukes of Marlborough. It is now the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat.ConstructionThe Duchess wanted her new house to be "strong, plain and convenient and good". The architect Christopher Wren and his son of the same name designed a brick building with rusticated stone quoins (cornerstones) that was completed in 1711.The house was taken up by the Crown in 1817. In the 1820s plans were drawn up to demolish Marlborough House and replace it with a terrace of similar dimensions to the two in neighbouring Carlton House Terrace, and this idea even featured on some contemporary maps, including Christopher and John Greenwood's large-scale London map of 1830, but the proposal was not implemented.

Trafalgar Studios
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
14 Whitehall
London, SW1A 2

Trafalgar Studios, formerly the Whitehall Theatre until 2004, is a West End theatre in Whitehall, near Trafalgar Square, in the City of Westminster, London.Also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation, the building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. Studio 1, the larger of the two spaces with 380 seats, opened on 3 June 2004 with the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Othello. Studio 2, with 100 seats, opened in October 2005 with the play Cyprus.History1930 to 1996The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. It had 634 seats. The theatre opened on 29 September 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre's licensee. In November 1933 Henry Daniell appeared there as Portman in Afterwards. Hackett presented several other plays of his own before leaving in 1934, and the theatre built its reputation for modern comedies throughout the rest of the decade. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the West End. In 1942, The Whitehall Follies, featuring Phyllis Dixey, the first stripper to perform in the theatre district, opened with great fanfare and became an immediate success. Dixey leased the theatre and remained in it for the next five years.

The Reform Club, Pall Mall
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall Street 104
London, SW1Y 5EW

020 7930 9374

Organization Near The British Museum Friends

Jermyn Street Theatre
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
16B Jermyn Street
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6ST

020 7287 2875

London Press Club
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
7-10 Adam St
London, United Kingdom WC2N 6AA

020 7520 9082

the sorrell foundation
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
The Sorrell foundation, Somerset House, strand
London, United Kingdom WC2R 1LA

020 7845 5860

BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
5 Southampton Street
London, United Kingdom WC2E 7H

+44 1793 417417

High Rising Club
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, United Kingdom SW1

Simular to a Gentleman club ,a Club for all importance ,of Lord Ladies etc we organised meetings of Social events , such as Hospitaly finder and hld Auctions for Charities

Hartshorn - Hook Productions
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
The Arts Theatre, Great Newport Street,
London, United Kingdom WC2H7JB

Founded by Louis Hartshorn and Brian Hook in 2007, Hartshorn - Hook Productions is a commercial entertainment production and management company. Louis and Brian also provide consultancy services to theatre companies across the UK. Hartshorn - Hook Productions are set to be recognised by the Guiness Book of World Records as being the youngest producers ever to set foot in the West End.

Once The Musical (London)
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
110 Charing Cross Road
London, United Kingdom WC2H 0JH

0844 871 7629

A bittersweet and funny love story that celebrates the power of music, performed live on stage by an extraordinary cast of actor-musicians, Once dazzles with invention, wit and unforgettable songs. Winner of 8 Tony® Awards, a 2013 Grammy® Award and the 2014 Olivier Award for Outstanding Achievement in Music, this is the show everyone wants to see more than once. Come and find out why…

United Engineers Chapter
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Great Queen Street
London, United Kingdom

Welcome to the official Facebook page for the United Engineers Chapter No.3862, meeting at Freemasons Hall, Great Queen Street, London. A Founding Chapter of the Metropolitan Grand Chapter of London. Aldersgate Ritual.

Museum of Comedy
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
The Undercroft, St Georges Church, Bloomsbury Way
London, United Kingdom WC1A 2SR

020 7534 1744

Founded by Leicester Square Theatre director Martin Witts, the Museum of Comedy is a brand new, immersive museum and performance venue, featuring iconic props and artefacts from our rich comedic history and housing one of the most comprehensive collections of Comedy memorabilia ever to be amassed in one place. The museum has been lovingly put together by Martin from his collection of over six thousand artefacts and print from some the most iconic comedians and comedy shows both past and present, amassed during his career spanning over three decades in the comedy industry. See comic artefacts from Tommy Cooper’s handmade magic props to Steptoe and Son’s stuffed bear! Plus Leicester Square Theatre favourite Bill Bailey’s iconic 6-neck guitar. Accompanying the collection will be revolving exhibitions, currently Steve Ullathorne’s stylish and contemporary images of current comedy stars The Comic Collection. Museum facilities include The Cooper Room, a state of the art traditional performance space hosting all kinds of comedy performance, from theatre and stand up to silent film. The Museum is also home to The Comedy Academy, an educational facility for comedy writing performance and production. The Museum of Comedy. Shining a light on the stars of British comedy. See What's On: http://bit.ly/25WAU79 @museumofcomedy www.museumofcomedy.com

Telit
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
7th Floor, 90 High Holborn,
London, United Kingdom WC1V 6XX

+39 040 4192 200

Telit offers the industry’s broadest portfolio of IoT products and services, combined with unmatched IoT expertise and developer resources, that enable end-to-end IoT solutions across virtually any market or industry around the world. Telit products and services include cellular communication modules in all technologies, GNSS, short-to-long range wireless modules, IoT connectivity plans and IoT platform services. Through the IoT Portal, Telit makes IoT onboarding easy, reduces risk, time to market, complexity and costs for asset tracking, remote monitoring and control, telematics, industrial automation and others, across many industries and vertical markets worldwide. Through collaboration with an extensive ecosystem of technology partners, system integrators, and mobile network operators, Telit helps companies, large and small, with IoT concept ideation, system architecture, prototype development and commercial deployment, resulting in business transformation, improved operational efficiencies and innovation.

Bedford Estate
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
19 bedford place
London, United Kingdom WC1B 5JA

020 7636 2885

The Bedford Estate is an estate in central London, owned by the Russell family who possess the peerage of Duke of Bedford. The estate was originally based in Covent Garden, then stretched to include Bloomsbury in 1669. The Covent Garden property was sold for £2 million in 1913, by Herbrand Russell, 11th Duke of Bedford to the MP and land speculator Harry Mallaby-Deeley, who sold his option to the Beecham family for £250,000; the sale being finalised in 1918.HistoryIn 1669, the Bloomsbury Estate came into ownership of the Russell family when William, son of William Russell, 1st Duke and 5th Earl of Bedford (1616–1700), married Lady Rachel Vaughan, one of the daughters of Thomas Wriothesley, 4th Earl of Southampton (1607–1667). She had recently inherited the agricultural fields now known as Bloomsbury from her father.Francis Russell, 5th Duke of Bedford (1765–1802) came of age in 1786. He was a spendthrift gambler, with an interest in farming on the Woburn estate. However, he was not interested in Bedford House in Bloomsbury, instead living in the West End. In 1800, the contents of Bedford House were put up for auction and the house was demolished. It was replaced by a wide avenue, Bedford Place, leading north to the large Russell Square, with Montague Street running parallel to the west. Francis Russell commissioned James Burton (1761–1837) to develop the land into a residential area with Russell Square forming the focal point, landscaped by Humphrey Repton after the success of his work for Francis Russell on his Woburn estate.

Conway Hall Ethical Society
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
25 Red Lion Square
London, United Kingdom WC1R 4RL

020 7242 8031

The Conway Hall Ethical Society, formerly the South Place Ethical Society, based in London at Conway Hall, is thought to be the oldest surviving freethought organisation in the world, and is the only remaining ethical society in the United Kingdom. It now advocates secular humanism and is a member of the International Humanist and Ethical Union.HistoryThe Society can trace back its origins to February 14th 1793 in a congregation of nonconformists known as Philadelphians or Universalists. William Johnson Fox became their minister in 1817. In 1824 the congregation built a chapel at South Place, in the district of central London known as Finsbury. The chapel was repaired by John Wallen, of a family of London architects and builders.In 1929 they built new premises, Conway Hall, at 37 (now numbered 25) Red Lion Square, in nearby Bloomsbury, on the site of a tenement, previously a factory belonging to James Perry, a pen and ink maker. Conway Hall is named after an American, Moncure D. Conway, who led the Society from 1864–1885 and 1892–1897, during which time it moved further away from Unitarianism. Conway spent the break in his tenure in the United States, writing a biography of Thomas Paine. In 1888 the name of the Society was changed from South Place Religious Society to South Place Ethical Society (SPES) under Stanton Coit's leadership. In 1950 the SPES joined the Ethical Union. In 1969 another name change was mooted, to The South Place Humanist Society, a discussion that sociologist Colin Campbell suggests symbolized the death of the ethical movement in England.

The Nuisance Calls Forum
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
120 Kingston Road
London, United Kingdom SW19 1LY

The Nuisance Calls Forum is the place to chat and compare opinions about the firms contacting you. Seek free advice and customer reviews from other consumers now. Please contribute to the discussions with your stories, opinions and experiences. You can join in discussions as a guest without registering with us but will only have limited access to some of our features. To unlock all of our features, simply register with us now. Registration is free, quick and easy. Responding to posts and starting new discussions is easy. Simply select the 'Join in Discussion' / 'Start New Discussion' links and type your message and it will then be immediately uploaded. You do not need to register with this site to upload any messages.

Chartered Institute of Public Relations
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
CIPR Public Relations Centre, 52-53 Russell Square
London, United Kingdom WC1B 4HP

020 7631 6900

Founded in 1948, the Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR) is the only Royal Chartered professional body for public relations practitioners in the UK and overseas. With over 10,000 members involved in all aspects of public relations, it is the largest body of its type in Europe. The CIPR advances professionalism in public relations by making its members accountable to their employers and the public through a code of conduct and searchable public register, setting standards through training, qualifications and the production of best practice and skills guidance, facilitating Continuing Professional Development (CPD), and awarding Chartered Public Relations Practitioner status (Chart.PR). The CIPR was granted its Royal Charter by the Privy Council in February 2005.

London Knowledge Lab
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
London Knowledge Lab, 23-29 Emerald Street
London, United Kingdom WC1N 3QS

020 7763 2137

London Knowledge Lab was a transhumanist research centre in Bloomsbury, London. It was founded in 2004 as a collaboration between the Institute of Education and Birkbeck, University of London. It was an interdisciplinary research centre, bringing together over 50 researchers from both social sciences and computer science backgrounds. The Institute of Education and Birkbeck announced the end of their collaboration in February 2016. Both institutions are continuing the work in their own separate Knowledge Lab research centres.FundingThe London Knowledge Lab was mainly funded by £6 million grant from the Science Research Investment Fund. In addition, it ran over 120 research projects, funded by a variety of funding bodies, including EPSRC, ESRC, Jisc, and the EU, amongst others. The Technology Enhanced Learning research programme, a major UK educational research programme, was directed from the Knowledge Lab.Research themesResearch at London Knowledge Lab focused upon three themes:'London Knowledge Lab / Research' page. London Knowledge Lab website. Available online at: http://www.lkl.ac.uk/cms/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogcategory&id=41&Itemid=109 Automating support for learning, collaboration and knowledge buildingUnderstanding how digital technologies and media affect educational practice, work, culture and societyDeveloping innovative methodologies for investigation of the use and effect of digital technologies

Ramadan Tent Project
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Malet Street Gardens
London, United Kingdom WC1E 6DP

SOAS Students' Union
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
10 Thornhaugh St
London, United Kingdom WC1H 0XG

020 7898 4992

Inkpact
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
20 Air Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 5AN

02381103192

Inkpact is communication for thoughtful companies. Driven to create meaningful relationships Inkpact connects online technology with offline communication allowing companies to send beautiful handwritten, letters, notes and cards to their customers in a mature of minutes. Inkpact brings together the power of the written word and technology to; - Provide companies the personal touch at scale - Offer marketing that has a 100% read rate Our drive for meaningful relationships goes beyond creating value for companies, Inkpact is currently working with stay at home mother’s to deliver our handwritten service, giving them the opportunity to work from home, look after their children and earn an income.

Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Charles Clore House, 17 Russell Square
London, United Kingdom WC1B 5DR

020 7862 5800

British Shooting
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
British Shooting, Ascot Room, Bisham Abbey National Sports Centre, Marlow Road
Marlow, United Kingdom SL7 1RR