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The British Museum Friends, London | Tourist Information


Great Russell Street
London, United Kingdom WC1B 3DG

0207 323 8195

Historical Place Near The British Museum Friends

Westminster Abbey, London
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Broad Sanctuary
London, SW1P 3PA

020 7222 5152

The Terrace At The Houses Of Parliament
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Palace of Westminster
London, SW1A 0AA

Palace of Westminster
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Westminster
London, SW1A 2

020 7219 3000

The Palace of Westminster is the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Commonly known as the Houses of Parliament after its occupants, it is also known as the 'heart of British politics'. The Palace lies on the north bank of the River Thames in the City of Westminster, in central London.Its name, which derives from the neighbouring Westminster Abbey, may refer to either of two structures: the Old Palace, a medieval building complex destroyed by fire in 1834, and its replacement, the New Palace that stands today. The palace is owned by the monarch in right of the Crown and, for ceremonial purposes, retains its original status as a royal residence. The building is managed by BNP Paribas Real Estate, which reports to the Speaker of the House of Commons and the Lord Speaker.The first royal palace was built on the site in the 11th century, and Westminster was the primary residence of the Kings of England until fire destroyed much of the complex in 1512. After that, it served as the home of the Parliament of England, which had been meeting there since the 13th century, and also as the seat of the Royal Courts of Justice, based in and around Westminster Hall. In 1834, an even greater fire ravaged the heavily rebuilt Houses of Parliament, and the only significant medieval structures to survive were Westminster Hall, the Cloisters of St Stephen's, the Chapel of St Mary Undercroft, and the Jewel Tower.

New Scotland Yard London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Broadway
London,

Westminster Abbey
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, SW1P 3PA

020 7222 5152

Methodist Central Hall Westminster
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Storeys Gate
London, SW1H 9NH

0044 20 7654 3809

St Margaret's, Westminster
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, SW1P 3

+44(0)20 7222 5152

The Church of St Margaret, Westminster Abbey, is situated in the grounds of Westminster Abbey on Parliament Square, and is the Anglican parish church of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom in London. It is dedicated to Margaret of Antioch.History and descriptionOriginally founded in the twelfth century by Benedictine monks, so that local people who lived in the area around the Abbey could worship separately at their own simpler parish church, and historically part of the hundred of Ossulstone in the county of Middlesex, St Margaret's was rebuilt from 1486 to 1523. It became the parish church of the Palace of Westminster in 1614, when the Puritans of the seventeenth century, unhappy with the highly liturgical Abbey, chose to hold Parliamentary services in the more "suitable" St Margaret's: a practice that has continued since that time.The Rector of St Margaret's is a canon of Westminster Abbey.The north-west tower was rebuilt by John James from 1734 to 1738; at the same time, the whole structure was encased in Portland stone. Both the eastern and the western porch were added later by J. L. Pearson. The church's interior was greatly restored and altered to its current appearance by Sir George Gilbert Scott in 1877, although many of the Tudor features were retained.

The House Of Commons
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
The House of Commons, London
London, SW1A 0AA

020 7219 4272

UK Parliament
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Houses of Parliament, Westminster
London, SW1A 0AA

02072193000

The work of Parliament is carried out by the House of Commons, the House of Lords and Select Committees of both Houses. Find out more about how Parliament works: http://www.parliament.uk/about/how/

Inside Buckingham Palace
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace, London SW1A 1AA
London,

Wesminster Abbey, Big Ben, Houses of Parliament
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, SW1P 3PA

+44(0)20 7222 5152

Big Ben
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Westminster Bridge Rd
London, SW1A 2

020 7219 4272

Big Ben is the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London, and often extended to refer to the clock and the clock tower. The tower is officially known as Elizabeth Tower, renamed to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II in 2012; previously it was known simply as the Clock Tower. When completed in 1859, it was, says clockmaker Ian Westworth, “the prince of timekeepers: the biggest, most accurate four-faced striking and chiming clock in the world.” The tower had its 150th anniversary on 31 May 2009, during which celebratory events took place.A British cultural icon, the tower is one of the most prominent symbols of the United Kingdom and is often in the establishing shot of films set in London.TowerThe Elizabeth Tower, more popularly known as Big Ben, was raised as a part of Charles Barry's design for a new palace, after the old Palace of Westminster was largely destroyed by fire on the night of 16 October 1834. The new parliament was built in a neo-gothic style. Although Barry was the chief architect of the palace, he turned to Augustus Pugin for the design of the clock tower, which resembles earlier Pugin designs, including one for Scarisbrick Hall. The design for the tower was Pugin's last design before his final descent into madness and death, and Pugin himself wrote, at the time of Barry's last visit to him to collect the drawings: "I never worked so hard in my life for Mr Barry for tomorrow I render all the designs for finishing his bell tower & it is beautiful." The tower is designed in Pugin's celebrated Gothic Revival style, and is 315ft high.

Big Ben
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
The Clock Tower, Houses of Parliament, Palace of Westminister, London
Westminster, SW1A 0AA

Big Ben is the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London, and often extended to refer to the clock and the clock tower.

Winston Churchill Room, Treasury
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
100 Parliament Street
London, SW1A 2BQ

Victoria Memorial, London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, SW1A 1

The Victoria Memorial is a monument to Queen Victoria, located at the end of The Mall in London, and designed and executed by the sculptor Sir Thomas Brock. Designed in 1901, it was unveiled on 16 May 1911, though it was not completed until 1924. It was the centrepiece of an ambitious urban planning scheme, which included the creation of the Queen’s Gardens to a design by Sir Aston Webb, and the refacing of Buckingham Palace (which stands behind the memorial) by the same architect.Like the earlier Albert Memorial in Kensington Gardens, commemorating Victoria's consort, the Victoria Memorial has an elaborate scheme of iconographic sculpture. The central pylon of the memorial is of Pentelic marble, and individual statues are in Carrara marble and gilt bronze. The memorial weighs 2,300 tonnes and is 104 ft wide. In 1970 it was listed at Grade I.HistoryProposal and announcementsKing Edward VII suggested that a joint Parliamentary committee should be formed to develop plans for a Memorial to Queen Victoria following her death. The first meeting took place on 19 February 1901 at the Foreign Office, Whitehall. The first secretary of the committee was Arthur Bigge, 1st Baron Stamfordham. Initially these meetings were behind closed doors, and the proceedings were not revealed to the public. However the Lord Mayor of London, Sir Joseph Dimsdale, publicly announced that the committee had decided that the Memorial should be "monumental".

Victoria Memorial, London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, SW1A 1

Il Victoria Memorial è una scultura della città di Londra, collocata di fronte alla residenza reale di Buckingham Palace.Fu costruita dallo scultore Sir Thomas Brock, nel 1911. Contribuì nella progettazione e nella realizzazione l'architetto e Presidente della Royal Academy Sir Aston Webb; per la costruzione furono utilizzate all'incirca 2300 tonnellate di marmo bianco.Verso nord est sorge una grande statua della regina Vittoria. Gli altri lati del monumento rappresentano statue di angeli. L'Angelo della Giustizia, l'Angelo della Verità e quello della Carità, quest'ultimo dirimpetto a Buckingham Palace. Sul pinnacolo, è raffigurata la Vittoria attorniata da due figure sedute. Queste due figure "sussidiarie" furono donate dagli abitanti della Nuova Zelanda.Galleria d'immaginiVoci correlate Albert Memorial Vittoria del Regno Unito Buckingham Palace

Churchill War Rooms
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Clive Steps, King Charles Street
London, SW1A 2AQ

0207 930 6961

Follow us on Facebook and join our growing community of fans. Discover in-depth information about Churchill War Rooms, special content, and discuss and share with others.

Windsor Castle
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Windsor Castle
Windsor, SL4 1NJ

+44 (0)20 7766 7304

The London Dungeon
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
The London Dungeon, County Hall, Westminster Bridge Road
London, SE1 7PB

Situated in County Hall next to the Coca-Cola London Eye, the London Dungeon is a 110 minute journey through London's darkest history. The London Dungeon brings 1000 years of authentic London history to life with a unique mix of talented live actors, stunning special effects, edge of your seat surprises and two exciting thrill rides. Guests embark on a journey through a dramatic London landscape going back ten centuries. They are guided through ghastly plague-ridden streets, witness Guy Fawkes’ dramatic plot to blow up Parliament, travel back to Jack the Ripper’s bleak Whitechapel and walk beneath London’s foreboding medieval gates. Expect to meet Sweeney Todd, the infamous Barber, and his evil sidekick, Mrs Lovett alongside Jack the Ripper with one of his unfortunate victims Mary Jane Kelly. They will be joined by murderous monarch Henry VIII ‘virtually’ played by boisterous British acting giant, Brian Blessed, gunpowder plotter Guy Fawkes and a supporting cast of torturers, plague victims and dark jesters. Guests can also expect close encounters with non-human ‘talent’ including giant cockroaches and the Dungeon’s resident family of scurrying rats! As well as 19 shows, and innumerable unexpected surprises, the attraction will boast two state-of-the art thrill rides with high-tech surprises guaranteed to get adrenaline pumping. A fast flowing boat ride sees guests condemned by Henry VIII – played virtually by boisterous British acting legend Brian Blessed - to a turbulent journey along the dank River Thames towards execution. Whilst on a deadly dark drop ride they will literally be sentenced to ‘take the drop’ as they plunge three stories in the pitch dark. A chilling, screams-guaranteed, Whitechapel labyrinth will baffle guests as they try to escape ‘Jack’ and find their way out of the East End and a strange but fun journey through Balzelgette’s Victorian Sewer system will leave guests in a disorientated spin. At the end of your tour, join us in the Dungeon Tavern, a Victorian pub experience. Your first drink is on us!

The Cenotaph, Whitehall
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Whitehall
London, SW1A 2BX

The Cenotaph is a war memorial on Whitehall in London, England. Its origin is in a temporary structure erected for a peace parade following the end of the First World War and after an outpouring of national sentiment it was replaced in 1920 by a permanent structure and designated the United Kingdom's primary national war memorial.Designed by Edwin Lutyens, the permanent structure was built from Portland stone between 1919 and 1920 by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts, replacing Lutyens' earlier wood-and-plaster cenotaph in the same location. An annual Service of Remembrance is held at the site on Remembrance Sunday, the closest Sunday to 11 November (Armistice Day) each year. Lutyens' cenotaph design has been reproduced elsewhere in the UK and in other countries including Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Bermuda and Hong Kong.OriginsThe first cenotaph was a wood-and-plaster structure designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and erected in 1919. It was one of a number of temporary structures erected for the London Victory Parade (also called the Peace Day Parade) on 19 July 1919. It marked the formal end of the First World War that had taken place with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on 28 June 1919. As one of a series of temporary wooden monuments constructed along the route of the parade, Whitehall's was not proposed until two weeks before the event. Following deliberations by the Peace Celebrations Committee, Lutyens was invited to Downing Street. There, the British Prime Minister, David Lloyd George, proposed that the monument should be a catafalque, like the one intended for the Arc de Triomphe in Paris for the corresponding Victory Parade in France, but Lutyens proposed instead that the design be based on a cenotaph.

Downing Street
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
st. Downing
London, SW1A 2

020 7270 3000

Downing Street in London, United Kingdom, has for more than three hundred years housed the official residences of two of the most senior British Cabinet ministers: the First Lord of the Treasury, an office now synonymous with that of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom; and the Second Lord of the Treasury, an office held by the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The Prime Minister's official residence is 10 Downing Street; the Chancellor's official residence is next door at Number 11. The government's Chief Whip has an official residence at Number 12, although the current Chief Whip's residence is at Number 9.Downing Street is in Whitehall in central London, a few minutes' walk from the Houses of Parliament and a little further from Buckingham Palace. The street was built in the 1680s by Sir George Downing on the site of a mansion, Hampden House. The houses on the south side of the street were demolished in the 19th century to make way for government offices now occupied by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. "Downing Street" is used as a metonym for the Government of the United Kingdom.

St James's Palace
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

St James's Palace
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Marlborough Rd, St James's SW1A 1DD
London, SW1A 1BS

The Banqueting House
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Whitehall House, 41 Whitehall
London, SW1A 2ER

+44 (0) 844 482 7777

This revolutionary building, the first in England to be designed in a Palladian style by Inigo Jones, was finished in 1622 for James I. Intended for the splendour and exuberance of court masques, the Banqueting House is probably most famous for one real life drama: the execution of Charles I which took place here in 1649 to the ‘dismal, universal groan’ of the crowd. One of Charles’ last sights was he walked through the Banqueting House to his death was the magnificent ceiling, painted by Peter Paul Rubens in 1630-4.

Horse Guards
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Horse Guards Parade
London, SW1A 2

020 7930 4832

Horse Guards is a large Grade I listed building in the Palladian style between Whitehall and Horse Guards Parade in London. The first Horse Guards building was built on the site of the former tiltyard of Westminster Palace in 1664. It was demolished in 1749 and was replaced by the current building which was built between 1750 and 1753 by John Vardy after the death of original architect in 1748 William Kent. Horse Guards Road runs north-south on the western boundary of the parade ground, while Horse Guards Avenue runs east from Whitehall on other side of the building, to Victoria Embankment.The building served as the offices of the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces until 1904 when the post was abolished and replaced by the Chief of the General Staff. The Chief of the General staff moved to the Old War Office Building in 1906 and Horse Guards subsequently became the headquarters of two major Army commands: the London District and the Household Cavalry. The building is the formal entrance to St James's Palace via St. James's Park (though this is now entirely symbolic). Only the monarch is allowed to drive through its central archway, or those given a pass (formerly made of ivory).

Queen's Chapel
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Savoy Hill
London,

+44 20 7836 7221

The Queen's Chapel is a chapel in central London, England, that was designed by Inigo Jones and built between 1623 and 1625 as an external adjunct to St. James's Palace for Roman Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. It is one of the facilities of the British monarch's personal religious establishment, the Chapel Royal, and should not be confused with the 1540 building known as the Chapel Royal within the palace and just across Marlborough road.HistoryIt was built as a Roman Catholic chapel at a time when the construction of Catholic churches was prohibited in England, and was used by Charles I's Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. From the 1690s it was used by Continental Protestant courtiers. It was built as an integral part of St James's Palace, but when the adjacent private apartments burned down in 1809 they were not replaced and in 1856-57 Marlborough Road was built between the palace and the Queen's Chapel. The result is that physically the chapel now appears to be more part of the Marlborough House complex than of St James's Palace. It became a Chapel Royal again in 1938.Having been taken from the Royal Chapel of All Saints in Windsor Great Park, the body of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother lay at the Queen's Chapel for several days during the preparations for her lying-in-state in Westminster Hall before her ceremonial funeral.

Marlborough House
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, SW1Y 5

+44 (0) 20 7747 6491

Marlborough House is a Grade I listed mansion in the City of Westminster, in The Mall, London, east of St James's Palace. It was built for Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, the favourite and confidante of Queen Anne. For over a century it served as the London residence of the Dukes of Marlborough. It is now the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat.ConstructionThe Duchess wanted her new house to be "strong, plain and convenient and good". The architect Christopher Wren and his son of the same name designed a brick building with rusticated stone quoins (cornerstones) that was completed in 1711.The house was taken up by the Crown in 1817. In the 1820s plans were drawn up to demolish Marlborough House and replace it with a terrace of similar dimensions to the two in neighbouring Carlton House Terrace, and this idea even featured on some contemporary maps, including Christopher and John Greenwood's large-scale London map of 1830, but the proposal was not implemented.

Trafalgar Studios
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
14 Whitehall
London, SW1A 2

Trafalgar Studios, formerly the Whitehall Theatre until 2004, is a West End theatre in Whitehall, near Trafalgar Square, in the City of Westminster, London.Also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation, the building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. Studio 1, the larger of the two spaces with 380 seats, opened on 3 June 2004 with the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Othello. Studio 2, with 100 seats, opened in October 2005 with the play Cyprus.History1930 to 1996The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. It had 634 seats. The theatre opened on 29 September 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre's licensee. In November 1933 Henry Daniell appeared there as Portman in Afterwards. Hackett presented several other plays of his own before leaving in 1934, and the theatre built its reputation for modern comedies throughout the rest of the decade. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the West End. In 1942, The Whitehall Follies, featuring Phyllis Dixey, the first stripper to perform in the theatre district, opened with great fanfare and became an immediate success. Dixey leased the theatre and remained in it for the next five years.

The Reform Club, Pall Mall
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall Street 104
London, SW1Y 5EW

020 7930 9374

Organization Near The British Museum Friends

Westminster Abbey
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, United Kingdom SW1P 3PA

020 7222 5152

Webber Street
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
6-8 Webber Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 0

020 7928 1677

SpankComedy
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Udderbelly Festival at Southbank Centre
London, United Kingdom SE1 7LT

Royal Automobile Club
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
89 Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 5NQ

020 7930 2345

The Royal Automobile Club is a British private club and is not to be confused with RAC, an automotive services company, which it formerly owned.It has two club houses: one in London at 89–91 Pall Mall, and the other in the countryside at Woodcote Park, Surrey, next to the City of London Freemen's School. Like many other gentlemen's clubs in London today, the Royal Automobile Club has recently allowed women to be members.HistoryIt was founded on 10 August 1897 as the Automobile Club of Great Britain . The headquarters was originally in a block of flats at 4 Whitehall Court, moving to 119 Piccadilly in 1902.During 1902 the organisation, together with the recently formed Association of Motor Manufactures and Traders campaigned vigorously for the relaxation of speed limits claiming that the 14 mph speed limit imposed by the Locomotives on Highways Act 1896 was 'absurd' and was seldom observed. The organisations, with support from the Prime Minister Arthur Balfour, had considerable influence over the forthcoming Motor Car Act 1903 which originally proposed to remove all speed limits for cars while introducing the offence of driving recklessly. In the face of considerable opposition a speed limit of 20 mph was retained in addition to the creation of the offence of driving recklessly, dangerously or negligently.

EuroCosplay
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
MCM London Comic Con
London, United Kingdom

EuroCosplay organises a costume oriented contest with countries from all over Europe sending a representative hoping to be crowned European Cosplay Champion. The Final is held annually at the MCM London Comic Con at the London ExCel in October.

Romanus Anyanwu Foundation
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
55 Devon Road
London, United Kingdom 1g 117qx

34634105597

One World. One Vision. One Voice
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Global
London, United Kingdom

I will take you to the heights no one ever imagined. Want an Angel beside you? I WILL ALWAYS SEND AN ANGEL BY YOUR SIDE.

Redburn Events
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
9 Redburn Street
London, United Kingdom SW3 4DA

020 7581 0112

Redburn Events is a young and dynamic event organising company who will help to turn your dream party into a reality and give your guests something to talk about for years to come. We would be delighted to help whatever the occasion.

Petrickoo
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom bl3 4rq

0044-745 6690 957. 0098 937 1393592

my act: 1.wheel of death 2.whip show 3.juggler+roola roola 4.comic classic 5.flying 6.trappiz 7.magic

Let Them Call it Mischief
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Kings Head Theatre
London, United Kingdom

0207 226 8561

Dracula is running at The Kings Head Theatre November 9th -26th at 8:45 pm. Get your tickets at https://kingsheadtheatre.ticketsolve.com/#/shows/873564411 or on 02072268561

Skills and training network
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
36-44 S Mall
London, United Kingdom N9 0TN

00447507614843

Chatham House
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
10 St James's Square
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4L

The Royal Institute of International Affairs, commonly known as Chatham House, is a non-profit, non-governmental organisation based in London whose mission is to analyse and promote the understanding of major international issues and current affairs. It is the originator of the Chatham House Rule and takes its name from the building where it is based, a Grade I listed 18th-century house in St. James's Square, designed in part by Henry Flitcroft and occupied by three British prime ministers, including William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham.In the University of Pennsylvania’s 2015 Global Go To Think Tanks Report, Chatham House is ranked the second most influential think tank in the world after the Brookings Institution, and the world's most influential non-U.S. think tank. In 2009, Chatham House was also named the top non-U.S. think tank by Foreign Policy magazine, which listed it as one of the top "scholars" for being among a handful of stars of the think-tank world who are regularly relied upon to set agendas and craft new initiatives.The current chairman of the Council of Chatham House is Stuart Popham and its director is Robin Niblett. The research directors are Rob Bailey, Patricia Lewis, Paola Subacchi and Alex Vines.

Fortnum & Mason
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
181 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1A1ER

0845 300 1707

Fortnum & Mason is an upmarket department store in Piccadilly, London, with additional stores at St Pancras railway station and Heathrow Airport in London, as well as Dubai and various stockists worldwide. Its headquarters is located at 181 Piccadilly, where it was established in 1707 by William Fortnum and Hugh Mason. Today it is privately owned by Wittington Investments Ltd.Founded as a grocery store, Fortnum's reputation was built on supplying quality food, and saw rapid growth throughout the Victorian era. Though Fortnum's developed into a department store, it continues to focus on stocking a variety of exotic, speciality and also 'basic' provisions.The store has since opened several other departments, such as the Gentlemen's department on the third floor. It is also the location of a celebrated tea shop and several restaurants.HistoryWilliam Fortnum was a footman in the royal household of Queen Anne. The Royal Family’s insistence on having new candles every night meant a lot of half-used wax which William Fortnum promptly resold for a tidy profit. The enterprising William Fortnum also had a sideline business as a grocer. He convinced his landlord, Hugh Mason, to be his associate, and they founded the first Fortnum & Mason store in Mason's small shop in St James's Market in 1707. In 1761, William Fortnum's grandson Charles went into the service of Queen Charlotte and the Royal Court affiliation led to an increase in business. Fortnum & Mason claims to have invented the Scotch egg in 1738. The store began to stock speciality items, namely ready-to-eat luxury meals such as fresh poultry or game served in aspic jelly.

LINKS
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Adam House, 7-10 Adam Street,
London, United Kingdom WC2 N 6AA

+ 44 2075209308

BAFTA
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
195 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 9L

020 7734 0022

Concerts at St James's Piccadilly
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
197 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 9LL

Enviro Waste
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Unit 41 Argall Avenue
London, United Kingdom E10 7QP

020 8556 5056

Enviro Waste provides a junk clearance service for both homes and businesses. Having a balance of both customer service and the environment at the forefront of our values, we guarantee you an easy, professional and hassle free waste removal service that most importantly saves you the time to get on with the rest of your day.

Jermyn Street Theatre
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
16B Jermyn Street
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6ST

020 7287 2875

London Press Club
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
7-10 Adam St
London, United Kingdom WC2N 6AA

020 7520 9082

International Modern Masters
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
The Gallery in Cork Street, Cork Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 3NG

01789 261212