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University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street, London | Tourist Information


uclh.nhs.uk

16-18 Westmoreland Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 8


University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street, named The Heart Hospital until refurbished and renamed in 2015, was a specialist cardiac hospital located in London, United Kingdom until 2015. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London (UCL). After the 2015 refurbishment the hospital provided thoracic surgery, and the UCLH urology department moved there.Before the 2015 refurbishment the Heart Hospital conducted over 1,000 surgical heart operations each year, had 95 in-patient beds, and was one of the largest cardiac centres in the UK. It treated around 1,700 new outpatients, 5,500 follow-up outpatients and 1,200 inpatients each year. It was a centre for cardiac research, home to the UCL Centre for Cardiology in the Young, and part of the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre. It is a teaching hospital for the UCL Medical School.

Hospital/Clinic Near University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street

University College Hospital
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
235 Euston Rd
London, United Kingdom WC1E 6

08451555000

University College Hospital is a teaching hospital located in London, United Kingdom. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London .The hospital has 665 in-patient beds, 12 operating theatres and houses the largest single critical care unit in the NHS. The Accident & Emergency department sees approximately 80,000 patients a year. It is a major teaching hospital and a key location for the UCL Medical School. It is also a major centre for medical research and part of both the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre.The hospital is located on Euston Road in the Fitzrovia area of the London Borough of Camden, adjacent to the main campus of UCL. The nearest London Underground stations are Euston Square and Warren Street, with Goodge Street nearby.

UCLH - University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
250 Euston Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 2PG

020 3456 7890

UCLH provides first-class acute and specialist services in five hospitals in central London. University College Hospital (incorporating the Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Wing University College Hospital Macmillan Cancer Centre and the Institute of Sport and Exercise Health and Westmoreland Street) Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street Eastman Dental Hospital Our mission is to deliver top-quality patient care, excellent education and world-class research. In partnership with University College London (UCL) we are one of the country’s five comprehensive biomedical research centres. We are a member of UCL Partners which brings together some of the UK's world-renowned medical research centres and hospitals.

The London Clinic
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
20 Devonshire Place
London, United Kingdom W1G 6BW

+44 (0) 20 7935 4444

Leading Consultants, Compassionate Care, Traditional Values Founded in 1932, we are a charitable hospital with only the best patient care in mind. We strive to provide world-class medical expertise; combining knowledge and technology with integrity and compassionate care.

UCH Macmillan Cancer Centre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Huntley Street
London, United Kingdom WC1E 6

20-34567016

The Princess Grace Hospital
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
42-52 Nottingham Place
London, United Kingdom W1U 5NY

+44 (0) 20 7486 1234

Western Eye Hospital
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
153-173 Marylebone Rd
London, United Kingdom NW1 5QH

020 3312 6666

Western Eye Hospital is an ophthalmology hospital in west London.The hospital operates an emergency department 24-hours a day, for ambulance and walk-in cases. It features a minor surgical theatre, a triage system, inpatient beds and two ophthalmic operating theatres. It treats a wide range of eye conditions from glaucoma to wet age-related macular degeneration, a major cause of blindness.The lead consultant is Mr Graham Duguid and the hospital is owned and operated by Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust who also run the nearby St Mary's Hospital, Paddington, as well as Charing Cross Hospital, Hammersmith Hospital and Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital. WEH has been providing ophthalmic services since 1856.Notable alumniBashar al-Assad - President of Syria (attended postgraduate studies at the Western Eye Hospital, specializing in ophthalmology.)

The Western Eye Hospital, Marylebone High Street NW1 5QH
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5QH

02033126666

King Edward VII's Hospital Sister Agnes
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
5-10 Beaumont Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 6AA

+44 (0) 20 7486 4411

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
St Mary's Hospital, Praed Street,
London, United Kingdom W2 1NY

020 3313 5000

Imperial College Healthcare is an NHS Trust and Academic Health Science Centre in London, England. The Trust manages five hospitals: Charing Cross Hospital, Hammersmith Hospital, Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital, St Mary's Hospital and Western Eye Hospital. The Trust is one of the largest in England and has an annual turnover of £800 million, treating more than a million patients a year. The Trust's chief executive is Dr Tracey Batten. The chair of the Trust is Sir Richard Sykes. Images and videos in these pages are copyright Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and Imperial College Healthcare Charity. Images of artworks are the copyright of the artist also. The views expressed on this social network by our followers do not necessarily reflect the views of Imperial College Healthcare. Please do not ask for clinical opinion or advice through this network - always contact your GP for health advice. We encourage users to contribute to this page and would like to remind everyone to maintain a friendly and respectful tone.

BMI Weymouth Hospital
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
42-46 Weymouth St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6

020 7935 1200

The Royal Arcade
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
28 Old Bond Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 4BT

The London Welbeck Hospital
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
27 Welbeck Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 9

0207 224 2242

Focus Clinics
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
22 Wimpole Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 8GQ

0207 307 8250

Welcome to focusclinics.com, the website home of FOCUS - our boutique laser eye clinic in London. We are a close knit team of consultant surgeons and optometrists who are dedicated to safe laser eye surgery giving excellent results and aftercare. At Focus you will be looked after as an individual from the moment you book your consultation right through to your treatment and then enjoying life without glasses or contact lenses. We are committed to being the UK leaders in the implementation of new technology and were the first UK clinic to offer the Z-LASIK procedure.

The London Imaging Centre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Lister House 11-12 Wimpole St
London, United Kingdom W1G 9ST

020 7467 8800

The London Imaging Centre offers the following diagnostic services at competitive rates: MRI from £200*, Xray from £40 per view, DXA from £65 and Ultrasound from £250. See our website for more details and exclusions. MRI •All neuro-vascular and musculoskeletal scanning, including specialist spine and Sports Medicine protocols •Abdominal – MRCP, liver MRI, renal angiography •Specialist TMJ coil with open and closed mouth plus all ENT (head and neck) •Breast MRI •Cardiac MRI for anatomy, function and perfusion •Specialist Prostate Scanning •MRI arthrography X-Ray •All general X-Rays •Approved site for immigration chest X-Rays for Canada and the USA •Dental OPG’s and Lat Ceph Ultrasound •Range of general ultrasound exams •Vascular scanning •Breast scans with localization and biopsy •Ultrasound assisted arthrography in conjunction with MRI DXA (DEXA) - Bone Densometry •Scanning to check the density of the bones, particularly looking for indications of osteopenia and osteoporosis Visa Application • Chest X-ray to support Visa applications

The London Imaging Centre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Lister House 11-12 Wimpole St
London, United Kingdom W1G 9ST

020 7467 8800

The London Imaging Centre offers the following diagnostic services at competitive rates: MRI from £200*, Xray from £40 per view, DXA from £65 and Ultrasound from £250. See our website for more details and exclusions. MRI •All neuro-vascular and musculoskeletal scanning, including specialist spine and Sports Medicine protocols •Abdominal – MRCP, liver MRI, renal angiography •Specialist TMJ coil with open and closed mouth plus all ENT (head and neck) •Breast MRI •Cardiac MRI for anatomy, function and perfusion •Specialist Prostate Scanning •MRI arthrography X-Ray •All general X-Rays •Approved site for immigration chest X-Rays for Canada and the USA •Dental OPG’s and Lat Ceph Ultrasound •Range of general ultrasound exams •Vascular scanning •Breast scans with localization and biopsy •Ultrasound assisted arthrography in conjunction with MRI DXA (DEXA) - Bone Densometry •Scanning to check the density of the bones, particularly looking for indications of osteopenia and osteoporosis Visa Application • Chest X-ray to support Visa applications

The Wimpole Clinic
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
4th floor, 13-16 Manchester street
London, United Kingdom W1U 4DJ

020 7935 1861

Why The Wimpole Clinic? Excellent results require an excellent team effort and we have the most experienced team in the UK Courteous, knowledgeable staff who provide continued support Definitive consultation we believe that fully informed patients make the best decisions International reputation for excellence we are a dedicated, surgically advanced, hair transplant clinic in London, UK Convenient London location Our Manchester Street clinic, close to London’s Harley Street W1, is accessible and comfortable Exemplary clinic facilities reflecting the excellence of our hair transplant, hair replacement and hair restoration surgery A pleasant and efficient experience each time our clients visit. https://twitter.com/Wimpole1975

Weymouth Street Hospital
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
42-46 Weymouth Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 6NP

020 7935 1200

Snoring Disorders Centre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
150 Harley Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 7LQ

0203 0753 150

The Snoring Disorders Centre is a new and innovative service led by consultant surgeon Mr Michael Oko. We provide an accurate and prompt diagnosis of various sleep problems including sleep apnoea and snoring and help to identify the most appropriate treatment for you.

Snoring Disorders Centre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
150 Harley Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 7LQ

0203 0753 150

The Snoring Disorders Centre is a new and innovative service led by consultant surgeon Mr Michael Oko. We provide an accurate and prompt diagnosis of various sleep problems including sleep apnoea and snoring and help to identify the most appropriate treatment for you.

Middlesex Hospital
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Mortimer Street, London W1
London, United Kingdom W1T 3AA

The Middlesex Hospital was a teaching hospital located in the Fitzrovia area of London, England. First opened in 1745 by Edinburgh Medical School trained surgeon Charles Bell on Windmill Street, it was moved in 1757 to Mortimer Street where it remained until it was finally closed in 2005. Its staff and services were transferred to various sites within the University College London Hospitals NHS Trust. The Middlesex Hospital Medical School, with a history dating back to 1746, merged with the medical school of University College London in 1987.HistoryThe first Middlesex Hospital opened in 1745 as the Middlesex Infirmary in Windmill Street, London W1, named after the county of Middlesex. The infirmary started with 18 beds to provide medical treatment for the poor. Funding came from subscriptions and, in 1747, the hospital became the first in England to add 'lying-in' (maternity) beds.The second Middlesex Hospital, in Mortimer Street, was opened in 1757. The foundation stone was laid in 1755 by the hospital's president, the Earl of Northumberland. The Hospital was Incorporated by Act of Parliament in 1836, allowing it various benefits as a charity.Over the years extra wings were added but, in 1924, it was decided that the building was structurally unsound and an entirely new building would be required. The Duke of York, later King George VI, visited the hospital on 26 June 1928 to lay the foundation stone of the new building. He returned to open the completed building on 29 May 1935. The hospital had been completely rebuilt, on the same site and in stages, without ever being closed, paid for by more than £1 million of donations from members of the public. The nurses' home in Foley Street was connected to the hospital by underground tunnels to allow safe and convenient access for nursing staff at night.

Landmark Near University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street

Madame Tussauds London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LR
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

0871 894 3000

Oxford Circus
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 3A

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Oxford Circus is the busiest intersection of Oxford Street (A40) and Regent Street in the West End of London. It is served by many bus routes and by Oxford Circus tube station, which is directly beneath the junction itself.At the end of the 2000s, Oxford Circus had the highest pedestrian volumes recorded anywhere in London. At the busiest times, over 40,000 pedestrians per hour pass through the junction including those accessing the London Underground station.HistoryThe Circus was constructed at the beginning of the 19th century, and was designed by John Nash.2009 diagonal crossingIn 2009, Westminster City Council started a £4m pedestrianisation scheme for the area, allowing shoppers to cross the intersection diagonally as well as the traditional 'straight ahead', turning it into a "pedestrian scramble", much like Tokyo's Shibuya crossing. Work started in Summer 2009, and the crossing opened on 2 November of the same year, by which time the cost had risen to £5 million. Although London Mayor Boris Johnson declared it "a triumph for British engineering, Japanese innovation and good old common sense", it was noted that a fairly similar crossing in Balham, South London had previously opened in 2005 at a cost of £98,000, approximately 50 times cheaper. One was also created in Wood Green.

Oxford Circus
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 3A

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Oxford Circus is the busiest intersection of Oxford Street (A40) and Regent Street in the West End of London. It is served by many bus routes and by Oxford Circus tube station, which is directly beneath the junction itself.At the end of the 2000s, Oxford Circus had the highest pedestrian volumes recorded anywhere in London. At the busiest times, over 40,000 pedestrians per hour pass through the junction including those accessing the London Underground station.HistoryThe Circus was constructed at the beginning of the 19th century, and was designed by John Nash.2009 diagonal crossingIn 2009, Westminster City Council started a £4m pedestrianisation scheme for the area, allowing shoppers to cross the intersection diagonally as well as the traditional 'straight ahead', turning it into a "pedestrian scramble", much like Tokyo's Shibuya crossing. Work started in Summer 2009, and the crossing opened on 2 November of the same year, by which time the cost had risen to £5 million. Although London Mayor Boris Johnson declared it "a triumph for British engineering, Japanese innovation and good old common sense", it was noted that a fairly similar crossing in Balham, South London had previously opened in 2005 at a cost of £98,000, approximately 50 times cheaper. One was also created in Wood Green.

Regents Park, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Regent's Park
London, United Kingdom NW1

0207 0788 359

Broadcasting House
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
BBC Broadcasting House Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AA

020 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

Baker Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
113 Baker St
Oxford, United Kingdom W1U 6TD

Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid the street out in the 18th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived at a fictional 221B Baker Street address. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises.Baker Street is a busy thoroughfare, lying in postcode areas NW1/W1 and forming part of the A41 there. It runs south from Regent's Park, the junction with Park Road, parallel to Gloucester Place, meeting Marylebone Road, Portman Square and Wigmore Street. At the junction with Wigmore Street, Baker Street turns into Orchard Street, which ends when it meets with Oxford Street. After Portman Square the road continues as Orchard Street.The street is served by the London Underground by Baker Street tube station, one of the world's oldest surviving underground stations. Next door is Transport for London's lost property office.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

Selfridges, Oxford Street is a Grade II listed retail premises, located in Oxford Street, London, England. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

Selfridges, Oxford Street is a Grade II listed retail premises, located in Oxford Street, London, England. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

Harley Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Harley Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1G 9

2076-360838

Harley Street is a street in Marylebone, central London, which has been noted since the 19th century for its large number of private specialists in medicine and surgery.OverviewSince the 19th century, the number of doctors, hospitals, and medical organizations in and around Harley Street has greatly increased. Records show that there were around 20 doctors in 1860, 80 by 1900, and almost 200 by 1914. When the National Health Service was established in 1948, there were around 1,500. Today, there are more than 3,000 people employed in the Harley Street area, in clinics, medical and paramedical practices, and hospitals such as The Harley Street Clinic and The London Clinic.It has been speculated that doctors were originally attracted to the area by the development of commodious housing and central proximity to the important railway stations of Paddington, Kings Cross, St Pancras, Euston and, later, Marylebone. The nearest Tube stations are Regent's Park and Oxford Circus.Land ownershipHarley Street is part of the Howard de Walden Estate.

221B Baker Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
221B Baker Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 6X

+44(0) 20 7224 3688

221B Baker Street is the London address of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, created by author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In the United Kingdom, postal addresses with a number followed by a letter may indicate a separate address within a larger, often residential building. Baker Street in Holmes' time was a high-class residential district, and Holmes' apartment was probably part of a Georgian terrace.At the time the Holmes stories were published, addresses in Baker Street did not go as high as 221. Baker Street was later extended, and in 1932 the Abbey National Building Society moved into premises at 219–229 Baker Street. For many years, Abbey National employed a full-time secretary to answer mail addressed to Sherlock Holmes. In 1990, a blue plaque signifying 221B Baker Street was installed at the Sherlock Holmes Museum, situated elsewhere on the same block, and there followed a 15-year dispute between Abbey National and the Holmes Museum for the right to receive mail addressed to 221B Baker Street. Since the closure of Abbey House in 2005, ownership of the address by the Holmes Museum has not been challenged, despite its location between 237 and 241 Baker Street.Conan Doyle's intentionsWe met next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B, Baker Street, of which he had spoken at our meeting. They consisted of a couple of comfortable bed-rooms and a single large airy sitting-room, cheerfully furnished, and illuminated by two broad windows.(Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet, 1887)

BBC Radio Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Broadcasting House, Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AA

+44 (0) 20 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

Langham Hotel, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1c Portland Place, Regent Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 1JA

The Langham, London is one of the largest and best known traditional style grand hotels in London. It is in the district of Marylebone on Langham Place and faces up Portland Place towards Regent's Park. It is a member of the Leading Hotels of the World marketing consortium.HistoryThe Langham was designed by John Giles and built between 1863 and 1865 at a cost of £300,000. It was then the largest and most modern hotel in the city, featuring a hundred water closets, thirty-six bathrooms and the first hydraulic lifts in England. The opening ceremony on 16 June was performed by the Prince of Wales. After the original company was liquidated during an economic slump, new management acquired the hotel for little more than half of its construction cost, and it soon became a commercial success. In 1867, a former Union officer named James Sanderson was appointed general manager and the hotel developed an extensive American clientele, which included Mark Twain and the miserly multi-millionairess, Hetty Green. It was also patronised by the likes of Napoleon III, Oscar Wilde, Antonín Dvořák, and Arturo Toscanini. Electric light was installed in the entrance and courtyard at the exceptionally early date of 1879, and Arthur Conan Doyle set Sherlock Holmes stories such as A Scandal in Bohemia and The Sign of Four partly at the Langham.

Daunt Books
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
83 Marylebone High St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6

020 7224 2295

Daunt Books is a chain of bookshops in London, founded by James Daunt. It traditionally specialised in travel books. In 2010 it began publishing.BookshopsThe Marylebone High Street branch is housed in a former Edwardian bookshop with long oak galleries, graceful skylights and William Morris prints. The older section of the Marylebone shop was completed in 1912, and was originally an antiquarian bookshop called Francis Edwards. It is alleged to be the first custom-built bookshop in the world. A large, walk-in safe is visible near the entrance to the travel gallery, and is where expensive volumes were once stored. The shop was bought by former banker James Daunt and renamed Daunt Books in 1990. It now focuses on first-hand titles (especially travel-related material).The company has branches in Chelsea, Holland Park, Cheapside, Hampstead and Belsize Park. The Owl Bookshop in Kentish Town was bought by Daunt Books, but retained its original name. Daunt Books opened its first branch outside London in Saffron Walden, Essex, under the name Hart’s Books. It opened its second branch outside London in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, under the name The Marlow Bookshop.Specialising in travel, Daunt Books arranges its sections geographically, with guides, phrase books, travel writing, history and fiction grouped by their relevant country. Reviews have mentioned its customer service and knowledgeable staff.

Portland Hospital
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
205-209 Great Portland Street
London, United Kingdom W1W 5

20-73833486

The Portland Hospital for Women and Children, is a private hospital located on Great Portland Street, in the West End area of London, England. It belongs to the Hospital Corporation of America, the largest private operator of health care facilities in the world.The hospital has been the place of birth for several well-known people in Britain, such as Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie, Prince Oddysseus-Kimon of Greece and Denmark, as well as children of Jennifer Saunders, Victoria Beckham, Emma Bunton, Geri Halliwell, Melanie Brown, Melanie C, Noel Gallagher, Katie Price, Gillian Anderson, Louise Burfitt-Dons, Claudia Schiffer, Emma Willis and Boris Becker. It should also be noted that it is London's only private hospital dedicated entirely to the care of women and children, and their various health conditions.

South Molton Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
South Molton Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

020 7629 2282

South Molton Street is a street in Mayfair in London which runs from Oxford Street to Brook Street. Bond Street tube station is at the north end of the street.The street was built in the mid-18th century as part of the Conduit Mead Estate. It was extensively rebuilt about 1900 but many of the original Georgian houses remain. It is now a pedestrian precinct and contains many shops selling items such as women's fashion and jewellery. The street is also home to award winning model agency Sapphires Model Management as well as fine art gallery Castle Galleries, and inspired fashion blog South Molton St Style in 2011.Famous residents Ernest Bevin lived in a flat at number 34 for twenty years from 1931. William Blake lived in a flat at number 17 in 1803.

South Molton Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
South Molton Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

020 7629 2282

South Molton Street is a street in Mayfair in London which runs from Oxford Street to Brook Street. Bond Street tube station is at the north end of the street.The street was built in the mid-18th century as part of the Conduit Mead Estate. It was extensively rebuilt about 1900 but many of the original Georgian houses remain. It is now a pedestrian precinct and contains many shops selling items such as women's fashion and jewellery. The street is also home to award winning model agency Sapphires Model Management as well as fine art gallery Castle Galleries, and inspired fashion blog South Molton St Style in 2011.Famous residents Ernest Bevin lived in a flat at number 34 for twenty years from 1931. William Blake lived in a flat at number 17 in 1803.

All Souls Church, Langham Place
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2 All Souls Place
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1B 3DA

020 7580 3522

All Souls Church is an Anglican Evangelical church in central London, situated in Langham Place in Marylebone, at the north end of Regent Street. It was designed in regency style by John Nash and consecrated in 1824.As it is very near BBC Broadcasting House, the BBC often broadcasts from the church. As well as the core church membership, many hundreds of visitors come to All Souls, bringing the average number of those coming through the doors for services on Sundays to around 2,500 every week. All Souls has an international congregation, with all ages represented.HistoryThe church was designed by John Nash, favourite architect of King George IV. Its prominent circular spired vestibule was designed to provide an eye-catching monument at the point where Regent Street, newly-laid out as part of Nash's scheme to link Piccadilly with the new Regent's Park, takes an awkward abrupt bend westward to align with the pre-existing Portland Place.All Souls was a Commissioners' church, a grant of £12,819 being given by the Church Building Commission towards the cost of its construction. The commission had been set up under an act of 1818, and Nash, as one of the three architects employed by the Board of Works, had been asked to supply specimen designs as soon as the act was passed. It was, however, one of only two Commissioners' churches to be built to his designs, the other being the Gothic Revival St Mary, Haggerston. All Souls is the last surviving church by John Nash.

St Marylebone Parish Church
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5LT

St Marylebone Parish Church is an Anglican church on the Marylebone Road in London. It was built to the designs of Thomas Hardwick in 1813–17. The present site is the third used by the parish for its church. The first was further south, near Oxford Street. The church there was demolished in 1400 and a new one erected further north. This was completely rebuilt in 1740–42, and converted into a chapel-of-ease when Hardwick's church was constructed. The Marylebone area takes its name from the church. Located behind the church is St Marylebone School, a Church of England school for girls.Previous churchesFirst churchThe first church for the parish was built in the vicinity of the present Marble Arch c.1200, and dedicated to St John the Evangelist.Second churchIn 1400 the Bishop of London gave the parishioners permission to demolish the church of St John and build a new one in a more convenient position, near a recently completed chapel, which could be used until the new church was completed. The bishop stipulated that the old churchyard should be preserved, but also gave permission to enclose a new burial ground at the new site, The church was dedicated to the Virgin Mary. It was closer to the village, at the north end of Marylebone High Street. Having fallen into a state of decay, it was demolished in 1740.

Manchester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
20 Manchester Square
London, United Kingdom W1u 3PZ

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Manchester Square is an 18th-century garden square in the Marylebone area in London, England, a short distance north of Oxford Street. It is one of the smaller but better preserved Georgian squares in central London. The central section of the northern side of the square is occupied by a mansion once known as Manchester House and later as Hertford House, which is now the home of the Wallace Collection, a major collection of fine and decorative arts. The house and square form part of Marylebone's Portman Estate. Construction on both was underway by around 1776.Famous residents in the square have included Julius Benedict, the German-born composer, who lived at no. 2, John Hughlings Jackson, the English neurologist, who lived at no. 3, and Alfred, Lord Milner, the British statesman and colonial administrator, at no. 14. Admiral Sir Thomas Foley and his wife (later widow) Lady Lucy Anne FitzGerald occupied no. 1 as their London townhouse during the first half of the nineteenth century. In 1814 and 1815 Manchester Square became briefly famous, when newspapers reported that a pig-faced woman was living there.The cover photograph for Please Please Me, the first LP by The Beatles, was taken by Angus McBean in 1963. It showed the group looking down over the stairwell inside EMI House in Manchester Square, EMI's London headquarters at the time (now demolished). A repeat photo was taken in 1969 for the cover of their then-intended Get Back album; it was not used when the project saw release as Let It Be, but was eventually used on the retrospective albums 1962–1966 and 1967–1970.

King Edward VII's Hospital
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
5-10 Beaumont St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6AA

020 7486 4411

King Edward VII's Hospital is a charity-registered private hospital in the City of Westminster in London, known as King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers from 1904 to 2000.HistoryEarly historyThe hospital was established in 1899 at the suggestion of the Prince of Wales . Agnes Keyser, a mistress of the Prince, and her sister Fanny used their house at 17 Grosvenor Crescent to help sick and wounded British Army officers who had returned from the Boer War. King Edward VII became the hospital's first patron. In 1904 it officially became King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers.20th centuryDuring the First World War, the hospital was at 9 Grosvenor Gardens, where officers would be nursed; the young novelist Stuart Cloete was one of them, as was the future British Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan, who underwent a series of long operations followed by recuperation there from 1916–18, from serious wounds sustained in conflict during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. In 1930, the hospital was awarded a Royal Charter "to operate an acute Hospital where serving and retired officers of the Services and their spouses can be treated at preferential rates."In 1941 the interior of the building was badly damaged by bombing, and Sister Agnes died from natural causes. In 1948 the hospital moved to Beaumont Street. It was officially opened on 15 October by Queen Mary.

Landmark Near University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street

Madame Tussauds London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LR
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

0871 894 3000

Oxford Circus
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 3A

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Oxford Circus is the busiest intersection of Oxford Street (A40) and Regent Street in the West End of London. It is served by many bus routes and by Oxford Circus tube station, which is directly beneath the junction itself.At the end of the 2000s, Oxford Circus had the highest pedestrian volumes recorded anywhere in London. At the busiest times, over 40,000 pedestrians per hour pass through the junction including those accessing the London Underground station.HistoryThe Circus was constructed at the beginning of the 19th century, and was designed by John Nash.2009 diagonal crossingIn 2009, Westminster City Council started a £4m pedestrianisation scheme for the area, allowing shoppers to cross the intersection diagonally as well as the traditional 'straight ahead', turning it into a "pedestrian scramble", much like Tokyo's Shibuya crossing. Work started in Summer 2009, and the crossing opened on 2 November of the same year, by which time the cost had risen to £5 million. Although London Mayor Boris Johnson declared it "a triumph for British engineering, Japanese innovation and good old common sense", it was noted that a fairly similar crossing in Balham, South London had previously opened in 2005 at a cost of £98,000, approximately 50 times cheaper. One was also created in Wood Green.

Oxford Circus
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 3A

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Oxford Circus is the busiest intersection of Oxford Street (A40) and Regent Street in the West End of London. It is served by many bus routes and by Oxford Circus tube station, which is directly beneath the junction itself.At the end of the 2000s, Oxford Circus had the highest pedestrian volumes recorded anywhere in London. At the busiest times, over 40,000 pedestrians per hour pass through the junction including those accessing the London Underground station.HistoryThe Circus was constructed at the beginning of the 19th century, and was designed by John Nash.2009 diagonal crossingIn 2009, Westminster City Council started a £4m pedestrianisation scheme for the area, allowing shoppers to cross the intersection diagonally as well as the traditional 'straight ahead', turning it into a "pedestrian scramble", much like Tokyo's Shibuya crossing. Work started in Summer 2009, and the crossing opened on 2 November of the same year, by which time the cost had risen to £5 million. Although London Mayor Boris Johnson declared it "a triumph for British engineering, Japanese innovation and good old common sense", it was noted that a fairly similar crossing in Balham, South London had previously opened in 2005 at a cost of £98,000, approximately 50 times cheaper. One was also created in Wood Green.

Regents Park, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Regent's Park
London, United Kingdom NW1

0207 0788 359

Broadcasting House
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
BBC Broadcasting House Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AA

020 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

Baker Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
113 Baker St
Oxford, United Kingdom W1U 6TD

Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid the street out in the 18th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived at a fictional 221B Baker Street address. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises.Baker Street is a busy thoroughfare, lying in postcode areas NW1/W1 and forming part of the A41 there. It runs south from Regent's Park, the junction with Park Road, parallel to Gloucester Place, meeting Marylebone Road, Portman Square and Wigmore Street. At the junction with Wigmore Street, Baker Street turns into Orchard Street, which ends when it meets with Oxford Street. After Portman Square the road continues as Orchard Street.The street is served by the London Underground by Baker Street tube station, one of the world's oldest surviving underground stations. Next door is Transport for London's lost property office.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

Selfridges, Oxford Street is a Grade II listed retail premises, located in Oxford Street, London, England. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

Selfridges, Oxford Street is a Grade II listed retail premises, located in Oxford Street, London, England. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

Harley Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Harley Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1G 9

2076-360838

Harley Street is a street in Marylebone, central London, which has been noted since the 19th century for its large number of private specialists in medicine and surgery.OverviewSince the 19th century, the number of doctors, hospitals, and medical organizations in and around Harley Street has greatly increased. Records show that there were around 20 doctors in 1860, 80 by 1900, and almost 200 by 1914. When the National Health Service was established in 1948, there were around 1,500. Today, there are more than 3,000 people employed in the Harley Street area, in clinics, medical and paramedical practices, and hospitals such as The Harley Street Clinic and The London Clinic.It has been speculated that doctors were originally attracted to the area by the development of commodious housing and central proximity to the important railway stations of Paddington, Kings Cross, St Pancras, Euston and, later, Marylebone. The nearest Tube stations are Regent's Park and Oxford Circus.Land ownershipHarley Street is part of the Howard de Walden Estate.

221B Baker Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
221B Baker Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 6X

+44(0) 20 7224 3688

221B Baker Street is the London address of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, created by author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In the United Kingdom, postal addresses with a number followed by a letter may indicate a separate address within a larger, often residential building. Baker Street in Holmes' time was a high-class residential district, and Holmes' apartment was probably part of a Georgian terrace.At the time the Holmes stories were published, addresses in Baker Street did not go as high as 221. Baker Street was later extended, and in 1932 the Abbey National Building Society moved into premises at 219–229 Baker Street. For many years, Abbey National employed a full-time secretary to answer mail addressed to Sherlock Holmes. In 1990, a blue plaque signifying 221B Baker Street was installed at the Sherlock Holmes Museum, situated elsewhere on the same block, and there followed a 15-year dispute between Abbey National and the Holmes Museum for the right to receive mail addressed to 221B Baker Street. Since the closure of Abbey House in 2005, ownership of the address by the Holmes Museum has not been challenged, despite its location between 237 and 241 Baker Street.Conan Doyle's intentionsWe met next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B, Baker Street, of which he had spoken at our meeting. They consisted of a couple of comfortable bed-rooms and a single large airy sitting-room, cheerfully furnished, and illuminated by two broad windows.(Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet, 1887)

BBC Radio Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Broadcasting House, Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AA

+44 (0) 20 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

Langham Hotel, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1c Portland Place, Regent Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 1JA

The Langham, London is one of the largest and best known traditional style grand hotels in London. It is in the district of Marylebone on Langham Place and faces up Portland Place towards Regent's Park. It is a member of the Leading Hotels of the World marketing consortium.HistoryThe Langham was designed by John Giles and built between 1863 and 1865 at a cost of £300,000. It was then the largest and most modern hotel in the city, featuring a hundred water closets, thirty-six bathrooms and the first hydraulic lifts in England. The opening ceremony on 16 June was performed by the Prince of Wales. After the original company was liquidated during an economic slump, new management acquired the hotel for little more than half of its construction cost, and it soon became a commercial success. In 1867, a former Union officer named James Sanderson was appointed general manager and the hotel developed an extensive American clientele, which included Mark Twain and the miserly multi-millionairess, Hetty Green. It was also patronised by the likes of Napoleon III, Oscar Wilde, Antonín Dvořák, and Arturo Toscanini. Electric light was installed in the entrance and courtyard at the exceptionally early date of 1879, and Arthur Conan Doyle set Sherlock Holmes stories such as A Scandal in Bohemia and The Sign of Four partly at the Langham.

Daunt Books
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
83 Marylebone High St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6

020 7224 2295

Daunt Books is a chain of bookshops in London, founded by James Daunt. It traditionally specialised in travel books. In 2010 it began publishing.BookshopsThe Marylebone High Street branch is housed in a former Edwardian bookshop with long oak galleries, graceful skylights and William Morris prints. The older section of the Marylebone shop was completed in 1912, and was originally an antiquarian bookshop called Francis Edwards. It is alleged to be the first custom-built bookshop in the world. A large, walk-in safe is visible near the entrance to the travel gallery, and is where expensive volumes were once stored. The shop was bought by former banker James Daunt and renamed Daunt Books in 1990. It now focuses on first-hand titles (especially travel-related material).The company has branches in Chelsea, Holland Park, Cheapside, Hampstead and Belsize Park. The Owl Bookshop in Kentish Town was bought by Daunt Books, but retained its original name. Daunt Books opened its first branch outside London in Saffron Walden, Essex, under the name Hart’s Books. It opened its second branch outside London in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, under the name The Marlow Bookshop.Specialising in travel, Daunt Books arranges its sections geographically, with guides, phrase books, travel writing, history and fiction grouped by their relevant country. Reviews have mentioned its customer service and knowledgeable staff.

Portland Hospital
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
205-209 Great Portland Street
London, United Kingdom W1W 5

20-73833486

The Portland Hospital for Women and Children, is a private hospital located on Great Portland Street, in the West End area of London, England. It belongs to the Hospital Corporation of America, the largest private operator of health care facilities in the world.The hospital has been the place of birth for several well-known people in Britain, such as Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie, Prince Oddysseus-Kimon of Greece and Denmark, as well as children of Jennifer Saunders, Victoria Beckham, Emma Bunton, Geri Halliwell, Melanie Brown, Melanie C, Noel Gallagher, Katie Price, Gillian Anderson, Louise Burfitt-Dons, Claudia Schiffer, Emma Willis and Boris Becker. It should also be noted that it is London's only private hospital dedicated entirely to the care of women and children, and their various health conditions.

South Molton Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
South Molton Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

020 7629 2282

South Molton Street is a street in Mayfair in London which runs from Oxford Street to Brook Street. Bond Street tube station is at the north end of the street.The street was built in the mid-18th century as part of the Conduit Mead Estate. It was extensively rebuilt about 1900 but many of the original Georgian houses remain. It is now a pedestrian precinct and contains many shops selling items such as women's fashion and jewellery. The street is also home to award winning model agency Sapphires Model Management as well as fine art gallery Castle Galleries, and inspired fashion blog South Molton St Style in 2011.Famous residents Ernest Bevin lived in a flat at number 34 for twenty years from 1931. William Blake lived in a flat at number 17 in 1803.

South Molton Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
South Molton Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

020 7629 2282

South Molton Street is a street in Mayfair in London which runs from Oxford Street to Brook Street. Bond Street tube station is at the north end of the street.The street was built in the mid-18th century as part of the Conduit Mead Estate. It was extensively rebuilt about 1900 but many of the original Georgian houses remain. It is now a pedestrian precinct and contains many shops selling items such as women's fashion and jewellery. The street is also home to award winning model agency Sapphires Model Management as well as fine art gallery Castle Galleries, and inspired fashion blog South Molton St Style in 2011.Famous residents Ernest Bevin lived in a flat at number 34 for twenty years from 1931. William Blake lived in a flat at number 17 in 1803.

All Souls Church, Langham Place
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2 All Souls Place
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1B 3DA

020 7580 3522

All Souls Church is an Anglican Evangelical church in central London, situated in Langham Place in Marylebone, at the north end of Regent Street. It was designed in regency style by John Nash and consecrated in 1824.As it is very near BBC Broadcasting House, the BBC often broadcasts from the church. As well as the core church membership, many hundreds of visitors come to All Souls, bringing the average number of those coming through the doors for services on Sundays to around 2,500 every week. All Souls has an international congregation, with all ages represented.HistoryThe church was designed by John Nash, favourite architect of King George IV. Its prominent circular spired vestibule was designed to provide an eye-catching monument at the point where Regent Street, newly-laid out as part of Nash's scheme to link Piccadilly with the new Regent's Park, takes an awkward abrupt bend westward to align with the pre-existing Portland Place.All Souls was a Commissioners' church, a grant of £12,819 being given by the Church Building Commission towards the cost of its construction. The commission had been set up under an act of 1818, and Nash, as one of the three architects employed by the Board of Works, had been asked to supply specimen designs as soon as the act was passed. It was, however, one of only two Commissioners' churches to be built to his designs, the other being the Gothic Revival St Mary, Haggerston. All Souls is the last surviving church by John Nash.

St Marylebone Parish Church
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5LT

St Marylebone Parish Church is an Anglican church on the Marylebone Road in London. It was built to the designs of Thomas Hardwick in 1813–17. The present site is the third used by the parish for its church. The first was further south, near Oxford Street. The church there was demolished in 1400 and a new one erected further north. This was completely rebuilt in 1740–42, and converted into a chapel-of-ease when Hardwick's church was constructed. The Marylebone area takes its name from the church. Located behind the church is St Marylebone School, a Church of England school for girls.Previous churchesFirst churchThe first church for the parish was built in the vicinity of the present Marble Arch c.1200, and dedicated to St John the Evangelist.Second churchIn 1400 the Bishop of London gave the parishioners permission to demolish the church of St John and build a new one in a more convenient position, near a recently completed chapel, which could be used until the new church was completed. The bishop stipulated that the old churchyard should be preserved, but also gave permission to enclose a new burial ground at the new site, The church was dedicated to the Virgin Mary. It was closer to the village, at the north end of Marylebone High Street. Having fallen into a state of decay, it was demolished in 1740.

Manchester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
20 Manchester Square
London, United Kingdom W1u 3PZ

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Manchester Square is an 18th-century garden square in the Marylebone area in London, England, a short distance north of Oxford Street. It is one of the smaller but better preserved Georgian squares in central London. The central section of the northern side of the square is occupied by a mansion once known as Manchester House and later as Hertford House, which is now the home of the Wallace Collection, a major collection of fine and decorative arts. The house and square form part of Marylebone's Portman Estate. Construction on both was underway by around 1776.Famous residents in the square have included Julius Benedict, the German-born composer, who lived at no. 2, John Hughlings Jackson, the English neurologist, who lived at no. 3, and Alfred, Lord Milner, the British statesman and colonial administrator, at no. 14. Admiral Sir Thomas Foley and his wife (later widow) Lady Lucy Anne FitzGerald occupied no. 1 as their London townhouse during the first half of the nineteenth century. In 1814 and 1815 Manchester Square became briefly famous, when newspapers reported that a pig-faced woman was living there.The cover photograph for Please Please Me, the first LP by The Beatles, was taken by Angus McBean in 1963. It showed the group looking down over the stairwell inside EMI House in Manchester Square, EMI's London headquarters at the time (now demolished). A repeat photo was taken in 1969 for the cover of their then-intended Get Back album; it was not used when the project saw release as Let It Be, but was eventually used on the retrospective albums 1962–1966 and 1967–1970.

King Edward VII's Hospital
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
5-10 Beaumont St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6AA

020 7486 4411

King Edward VII's Hospital is a charity-registered private hospital in the City of Westminster in London, known as King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers from 1904 to 2000.HistoryEarly historyThe hospital was established in 1899 at the suggestion of the Prince of Wales . Agnes Keyser, a mistress of the Prince, and her sister Fanny used their house at 17 Grosvenor Crescent to help sick and wounded British Army officers who had returned from the Boer War. King Edward VII became the hospital's first patron. In 1904 it officially became King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers.20th centuryDuring the First World War, the hospital was at 9 Grosvenor Gardens, where officers would be nursed; the young novelist Stuart Cloete was one of them, as was the future British Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan, who underwent a series of long operations followed by recuperation there from 1916–18, from serious wounds sustained in conflict during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. In 1930, the hospital was awarded a Royal Charter "to operate an acute Hospital where serving and retired officers of the Services and their spouses can be treated at preferential rates."In 1941 the interior of the building was badly damaged by bombing, and Sister Agnes died from natural causes. In 1948 the hospital moved to Beaumont Street. It was officially opened on 15 October by Queen Mary.

Landmark Near University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street

King Edward VII's Hospital
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
5-10 Beaumont St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6AA

020 7486 4411

King Edward VII's Hospital is a charity-registered private hospital in the City of Westminster in London, known as King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers from 1904 to 2000.HistoryEarly historyThe hospital was established in 1899 at the suggestion of the Prince of Wales . Agnes Keyser, a mistress of the Prince, and her sister Fanny used their house at 17 Grosvenor Crescent to help sick and wounded British Army officers who had returned from the Boer War. King Edward VII became the hospital's first patron. In 1904 it officially became King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers.20th centuryDuring the First World War, the hospital was at 9 Grosvenor Gardens, where officers would be nursed; the young novelist Stuart Cloete was one of them, as was the future British Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan, who underwent a series of long operations followed by recuperation there from 1916–18, from serious wounds sustained in conflict during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. In 1930, the hospital was awarded a Royal Charter "to operate an acute Hospital where serving and retired officers of the Services and their spouses can be treated at preferential rates."In 1941 the interior of the building was badly damaged by bombing, and Sister Agnes died from natural causes. In 1948 the hospital moved to Beaumont Street. It was officially opened on 15 October by Queen Mary.

Harley Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Harley Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1G 9

2076-360838

Harley Street is a street in Marylebone, central London, which has been noted since the 19th century for its large number of private specialists in medicine and surgery.OverviewSince the 19th century, the number of doctors, hospitals, and medical organizations in and around Harley Street has greatly increased. Records show that there were around 20 doctors in 1860, 80 by 1900, and almost 200 by 1914. When the National Health Service was established in 1948, there were around 1,500. Today, there are more than 3,000 people employed in the Harley Street area, in clinics, medical and paramedical practices, and hospitals such as The Harley Street Clinic and The London Clinic.It has been speculated that doctors were originally attracted to the area by the development of commodious housing and central proximity to the important railway stations of Paddington, Kings Cross, St Pancras, Euston and, later, Marylebone. The nearest Tube stations are Regent's Park and Oxford Circus.Land ownershipHarley Street is part of the Howard de Walden Estate.

Marylebone Gardens
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
35 Marylebone High Street
London, United Kingdom w1u 4qa

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Marylebone or Marybone Gardens was a London pleasure garden sited in the grounds of the old manor house of Marylebone and frequented from the mid-17th century, when Marylebone was a village separated from London by fields and market gardens, to the third quarter of the 18th century.Early historyIt was situated in the area which is now between Marylebone Road, Marylebone High Street, Weymouth Street, and Harley Street; its site was developed as Beaumont Street and part of Devonshire Street.Originally consisting of two bowling greens adjoining the Rose of Normandy tavern on the east side of Marylebone High Street, its size was increased to about eight acres by acquisition of land from Marylebone Manor House, which had been converted into a hunting lodge by Henry VIII and was later used as a boarding school, eventually being demolished in 1791. The Marylebone Gardens, surrounded by a high brick wall and set about with fruit trees, had a carriage entrance in the High Street of Marylebone village and another entrance from the fields at the back. Its center was an open oval bowling green encompassed by a wide gravelled walk and many smaller walks and greens surrounded by clipped quickset hedges, "kept in good order, and indented like town walls."

St James's, Spanish Place
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
22 George Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 3

St James's Church, Spanish Place, is a large English Gothic Roman Catholic church in Marylebone, London. Although currently situated in George Street, the church maintains its connection with Spanish Place, the road opposite the current church, because of its historic connection with the Spanish Embassy.SiteThe church is located in George Street, Marylebone, behind the Wallace Collection and close to Marylebone High Street.HistoryIn the reign of Elizabeth I the Bishops of Ely let their palace and chapel in Ely Place to the Spanish Ambassador and, until the reign of Charles I, it was occupied by the High Representative of the Court of Spain. During this period the chapel was freely used by English Roman Catholics and became a sanctuary to some degree for them.After the restoration of Charles II the Spanish Embassy was re-established in London, first on Ormond Street and then at Hertford House, Manchester Square, where the Wallace Collection is now housed. Here, in 1791, shortly after the Roman Catholic Relief Act 1791 repealed some of the laws affecting Catholic worship, a chapel was built on the corner of Spanish Place and Charles Street (now George Street), largely through the efforts of Doctor Thomas Hussey who had been a chaplain at the embassy since his ordination in 1769. Most of the objects of piety in the present church are legacies from this older building. In 1827 the official Spanish connection with the chapel ceased and it was handed over to the London Vicariate.

High Commission of the Maldives, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
22 Nottingham Pl
London, United Kingdom W1U 5

02072242135

The High Commission of the Maldives in London is the diplomatic mission of the Maldives in the United Kingdom. It was established in 1995 by upgrading the existing Maldives Government Trade Representative's Office; it was formally opened by former Maldivian President Maumoon Abdul Gayoom.

Embassy of Poland, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
15 Devonshire St
London, United Kingdom W1G 7AP

020 7580 5481

The Embassy of Poland in London (Ambasada Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej w Londynie) is the diplomatic mission of Poland in the United Kingdom. It is located on Portland Place next to the High Commission of Kenya building. It forms part of a group of Grade II* listed buildings in Portland Place.History Involving the Embassy of Poland in London, Main Chancery BuildingShortly after regaining independence in 1918, there seemed to be a general feeling of ambivalence towards Britain demonstrated by most Polish statesmen, as if they were neglecting British relations, who played a major role in helping to re-establish the post-World War I - Second Polish Republic. However, with newly-restored independence, the country's government instead concentrated on shoring up good relations with traditional ally France, and immediate neighbour Germany.As a result of this focus, it was not until 1929 that the first Polish legation was sent to establish a permanent embassy in London. The establishment of this Polish embassy building in London would go on to play one of the most important roles of Poland's history.By the late 1930s when world war was once again becoming inevitable, the government of the Second Polish Republic requested the necessary military aid from the British government; as Poland was still rebuilding civilian infrastructure from the aftermath of World War I. The government also signed a three-way mutual defence pact with the United Kingdom and France with the original intent being to make sure an independent and sovereign, democratic Poland would never again have to stand alone against a German invasion. Thus, much of the bureaucracy surrounding these pre-war pacts found itself centred in the halls and corridors of number 47, Portland Place.

High Commission of Kenya, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
45 Portland Pl
London, United Kingdom W1B 1QH

020 7636 2371

The Kenya High Commission in London was established in 1963 to pursue Kenya’s national interest in the United Kingdom, the International Maritime Organization and the commonwealth. The Mission has the mandate to forge closer relations between the people of Kenya and the people of United Kingdom in pursuit of deeper bilateral and multilateral cooperation in trade and investments, culture, science and technology as well as other fields for mutual benefit.The High Commission is housed in one of a group of Grade II* listed buildings in Portland Place.

Embassy of China, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
49 Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1B 1

20-72994049

The Embassy of China in London is the diplomatic mission of China in the United Kingdom. The Embassy in London is China's only embassy in the UK, alongside two Consulates-General in Edinburgh and Manchester.Established in 1877 as the Chinese Legation, the London mission was China's first permanent overseas diplomatic mission. It has served as the diplomatic mission of the Qing Empire, Republic of China and (since 1950) the People's Republic of China. It was the location of the Qing Empire's detention of Sun Yat-sen, an important episode in the Chinese revolution of 1911. It remains today the focal point for events relating to China held in the United Kingdom, including celebrations in 2012 to commemorate 40 years of diplomatic relations between the UK and the People's Republic of China.Most applications by UK citizens for visas to China are not handled by the embassy, however, but are instead processed by the China Visa Applications Centre, also located in London. There is a constant police presence outside the embassy.China also maintains several other buildings in London: a Defence Section at 25 Lyndhurst Road, Hampstead, a Commercial Section at 16 Lancaster Gate, Paddington, a Cultural Section at 11 West Heath Road, Hampstead and a Science & Technology Section at 10 Greville Place, Maida Vale.

Chiltern Firehouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Chiltern Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 7

020 7073 7676

The Chiltern Firehouse is a restaurant and hotel located at 1 Chiltern Street, Marylebone, London, England occupying the Grade II listed building of the former Marylebone Fire Station, also known as Manchester Square Fire Station. It is owned by André Balazs, a hotel chain owner, who also owns the Chateau Marmont Hotel in Los Angeles, California and The Mercer Hotel in New York City. The head chef is Nuno Mendes.Manchester Square Fire StationThe Manchester Square Fire Station was built in 1889, by the London County Council Architect's Department, "in the Vulliamy manner". "Red brick with stone dressings; tiled roof. Free Tudor-Gothic style". It initially served as a fire station, and was one of the first fire stations in London. The original architect was Robert Pearsall. Originally known as Manchester Square Fire Station (Manchester Square is nearby), it was decommissioned in June 2005 by the London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority. For some years subsequently, it had been in occasional use as an exhibition space for local artists, as there was a long and complex planning process to convert it to a luxury hotel and restaurant. David Archer of Archer Humphryes Architects acted as lead architect for the project.

Manchester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
20 Manchester Square
London, United Kingdom W1u 3PZ

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Manchester Square is an 18th-century garden square in the Marylebone area in London, England, a short distance north of Oxford Street. It is one of the smaller but better preserved Georgian squares in central London. The central section of the northern side of the square is occupied by a mansion once known as Manchester House and later as Hertford House, which is now the home of the Wallace Collection, a major collection of fine and decorative arts. The house and square form part of Marylebone's Portman Estate. Construction on both was underway by around 1776.Famous residents in the square have included Julius Benedict, the German-born composer, who lived at no. 2, John Hughlings Jackson, the English neurologist, who lived at no. 3, and Alfred, Lord Milner, the British statesman and colonial administrator, at no. 14. Admiral Sir Thomas Foley and his wife (later widow) Lady Lucy Anne FitzGerald occupied no. 1 as their London townhouse during the first half of the nineteenth century. In 1814 and 1815 Manchester Square became briefly famous, when newspapers reported that a pig-faced woman was living there.The cover photograph for Please Please Me, the first LP by The Beatles, was taken by Angus McBean in 1963. It showed the group looking down over the stairwell inside EMI House in Manchester Square, EMI's London headquarters at the time (now demolished). A repeat photo was taken in 1969 for the cover of their then-intended Get Back album; it was not used when the project saw release as Let It Be, but was eventually used on the retrospective albums 1962–1966 and 1967–1970.

Embassy of Latvia, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
45 Nottingham Pl
London, United Kingdom W1U 5

20-73120040

The Embassy of Latvia in London is the diplomatic mission of Latvia in the United Kingdom.

Baker Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
113 Baker St
Oxford, United Kingdom W1U 6TD

Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid the street out in the 18th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived at a fictional 221B Baker Street address. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises.Baker Street is a busy thoroughfare, lying in postcode areas NW1/W1 and forming part of the A41 there. It runs south from Regent's Park, the junction with Park Road, parallel to Gloucester Place, meeting Marylebone Road, Portman Square and Wigmore Street. At the junction with Wigmore Street, Baker Street turns into Orchard Street, which ends when it meets with Oxford Street. After Portman Square the road continues as Orchard Street.The street is served by the London Underground by Baker Street tube station, one of the world's oldest surviving underground stations. Next door is Transport for London's lost property office.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

Selfridges, Oxford Street is a Grade II listed retail premises, located in Oxford Street, London, England. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

221B Baker Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
221B Baker Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 6X

+44(0) 20 7224 3688

221B Baker Street is the London address of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, created by author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In the United Kingdom, postal addresses with a number followed by a letter may indicate a separate address within a larger, often residential building. Baker Street in Holmes' time was a high-class residential district, and Holmes' apartment was probably part of a Georgian terrace.At the time the Holmes stories were published, addresses in Baker Street did not go as high as 221. Baker Street was later extended, and in 1932 the Abbey National Building Society moved into premises at 219–229 Baker Street. For many years, Abbey National employed a full-time secretary to answer mail addressed to Sherlock Holmes. In 1990, a blue plaque signifying 221B Baker Street was installed at the Sherlock Holmes Museum, situated elsewhere on the same block, and there followed a 15-year dispute between Abbey National and the Holmes Museum for the right to receive mail addressed to 221B Baker Street. Since the closure of Abbey House in 2005, ownership of the address by the Holmes Museum has not been challenged, despite its location between 237 and 241 Baker Street.Conan Doyle's intentionsWe met next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B, Baker Street, of which he had spoken at our meeting. They consisted of a couple of comfortable bed-rooms and a single large airy sitting-room, cheerfully furnished, and illuminated by two broad windows.(Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet, 1887)

Regent Hall
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
275 Oxford St
London, United Kingdom W1C 2

020 7629 5424

The Regent Hall is a Salvation Army centre on London's Oxford Street. It is one of the oldest centres in London having been founded by the founder of the army, William Booth in 1882. The church is known across the world as the "Rink", because it was formerly a skating rink.The hall is known for its music, both for its own brass band which tours internationally, and as a venue for visiting artists.The present officers are Majors Graham and Dawn Mizon, who succeeded Major Ray and Major Pat Brown. in 2012.

Embassy of Sweden, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
11 Montagu Pl
London, United Kingdom W1H 2

+44 20 7917 6400

The Embassy of Sweden in London is the diplomatic mission of Sweden in the United Kingdom. It is located by Montagu Square in Marylebone, just down the road from the embassy of Switzerland, and has housed the Swedish embassy since 1983.The Swedish ambassador's residence is located is a separate building at 27 Portland Place. Sweden also maintains a Trade Council at 259-269 Old Marylebone Road, Marylebone.

Oxford Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street, London
London, United Kingdom W1K 1NA

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Oxford Street is a major road in the City of Westminster in the West End of London. It is Europe's busiest shopping street, with around half a million daily visitors, and as of 2012 had approximately 300 shops. It is designated as part of the A40, a major road between London and Fishguard, though it is not signed as such, and traffic is regularly restricted to buses and taxis.The road was originally a Roman road, part of the Via Trinobantina between Essex and Hampshire via London. It was known as Tyburn Road through the Middle Ages and was once notorious as a street where prisoners from Newgate Prison would be transported towards a public hanging. It became known as Oxford Road and then Oxford Street in the 18th century, and began to change character from a residential street to commercial and retail purposes by the late 19th century, also attracting street traders, confidence tricksters and prostitution. The first department stores in Britain opened on Oxford Street in the early 20th century, including Selfridges, John Lewis and HMV. Unlike nearby shopping streets such as Bond Street, it has retained an element of downmarket street trading alongside more prestigious retail stores. The street suffered heavy bombing during World War II, and several longstanding stores including John Lewis were completely destroyed and rebuilt from scratch.

Cleveland Street Workhouse
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
44 Cleveland Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 4JT

020 7580 6254

The Cleveland Street Workhouse is a Georgian property in Cleveland Street, Marylebone, built between 1775 and 1778 for the care of the sick and poor of the parish of St Paul Covent Garden under the Old Poor Law. From 1836, it became the workhouse of the Strand Union of parishes. The building remained in operation until 2005 after witnessing the complex evolution of the healthcare system in England. After functioning as a workhouse, the building became a workhouse infirmary before being acquired by the Middlesex Hospital and finally falling under the NHS. It the last century it was known as the Middlesex Hospital Annexe and the Outpatient Department. It closed to the public in 2005 and it has since been vacated. On 14 March 2011 the entire building became Grade II Listed.OriginThe Cleveland Street Workhouse was built on an H plan on the eastern side of Cleveland Street between 1775 and 1778 by the parish of St Paul Covent Garden, on land leased from the Bedford Estate. The construction of the building resulted from the intercession of the Duke of Bedford’s steward Robert Palmer, who together with Duchess Gertrude planned and realized the construction of Bedford Square and Gower Street.The original Act of Parliament was obtained in May 1775. The building was initially designed to accommodate 200 paupers, but the plan was modified prior to construction to accommodate a greater number.

Savile Club
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
69 Brook St
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

+44 (0)20 7629 5462

The Savile Club is a traditional London gentlemen's club founded in 1868. Though located somewhat out of the way from the main centre of London's gentlemen's clubs, closer to the residences of Mayfair than the clubs of Pall Mall and St James's Street, it still contains prominent names among its members. It was originally formed after a division of opinion within the old Eclectic Club as to whether to accept an offer of rooms by the Medical Club and cease to be simply a "night club" (in its 19th-century sense).Changing premisesInitially calling itself the New Club, it grew rapidly, outgrowing its first floor rooms overlooking Trafalgar Square at 9 Spring Gardens and moving to the second floor. It then moved to 15 Savile Row in 1871, where it changed its name to the Savile Club, before lack of space forced the club to move again in 1882, this time to 107 Piccadilly, a building owned by Lord Rosebery. With its views over Green Park it was described by the members as the "ideal clubhouse". However, after 50 years' residence, demolition of the building next door to create the Park Lane Hotel caused the old clubhouse such structural problems that, in 1927, the club moved to its present home at 69 Brook Street, part of the Grosvenor Estate in Mayfair. This was the former home of "Loulou" Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt, a Liberal cabinet minister who had taken his life on the premises to avert a scandal when his double life as a paedophile and sex offender was in danger of being uncovered. The building, a combination of Nos 69 and 71 Brook Street, owes its extravagant dix-huitième interior to Walter Burns, the brother-in-law of financier J.P. Morgan, who adapted it for his wife Fanny to entertain in suitable style. It thus includes an elegant hall, a grand staircase and a lavish ballroom.

Lancashire Court
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
4-12 Lancashire Court, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1S 1EY

0207 518 9388

Welcome to Lancashire Court Tucked away behind the bustling streets of shoppers on New Bond Street lies a hidden treasure waiting to be explored. Lancashire Court is a uniquely charming haven offering visitors a sampling of some of London's finest restaurants, bars and stores. Whether browsing the shops by day, or sampling the indulgent delights by night, Lancashire Court provides the perfect setting for any occasion.