EuroZoid
Discover The Most Popular Places In Europe

Pollock's Toy Museum, London | Tourist Information


1 Scala Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 2HL

+44 (0) 20 7636 3452

History Museum Near Pollock's Toy Museum

National Portrait Gallery
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
2 St Martin's Place
London, WC2H 0

+44(0)20 7306 0055

London Transport Museum
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Covent Garden Piazza
London, WC2E 8

020 7379 6344

Broadcasting House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Portland Place
London, W1A 1AA

020 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

The Wallace Collection
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Hertford House, Manchester Square
London, W1U 3

020 7563 9500

National History Museum
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Comwell Road
London, SW7 5BD

+44 (0)20 7942 5000

Churchill War Rooms
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Clive Steps, King Charles Street
London, SW1A 2AQ

0207 930 6961

Follow us on Facebook and join our growing community of fans. Discover in-depth information about Churchill War Rooms, special content, and discuss and share with others.

Bond in Motion, Film Museum
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
45 Wellington street London, WC2E 7BN
London, WC2E 7BN

020 3617 3010

Hunterian Museum, London
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Royal College of Surgeons, 35- 43 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, WC2A 3PE

020 78696560

John Hunter's collection was purchased by the government in 1799, and given to the Company (later The Royal College) of Surgeons. The collection formed the basis for a museum constructed as part of the new Royal College of Surgeons of London's building on the south side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. _____________ Hire the Hunterian: In the evening this fantastic space can be hired for your private event. Ideal for drinks receptions, pre-dinner drinks and canapés, or an intimate networking event; the Hunterian Museum will be a once-in-a-lifetime experience for your guests. For further information, please call the events team on 020 7869 6702 and quote FB13 for 15% off your first event.

The Egyptian Room, the British Museum
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Great Russell Street
London, WC1B 5

020 7323 8299

London Film Museum
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Covent Garden
London, SE1 7

020 7202 7040

The Cartoon Museum
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
35 Little Russell Street
London, WC1A 2HH

02075808155

The Household Cavalry Museum and Shop
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Horse Guards, Whitehall
London, SW1A 2AX

0207 930 3070

Visit the Household Cavalry Museum to learn about the British Army's two senior regiments, The Life Guards and The Blues and Royals, and see their working stables through a large glass screen. Visit our website for opening times and our online shop.

Sir John Soane's Museum
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
13 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, WC2A 3BP

Sir John Soane's Museum was formerly the home of the neo-classical architect John Soane. It holds many drawings and models of Soane's projects and the collections of paintings, drawings and antiquities that he assembled.The museum is located in Holborn, London, adjacent to Lincoln's Inn Fields. It is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.HistoryHousesSoane demolished and rebuilt three houses in succession on the north side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. He began with No. 12 (between 1792 and 1794), externally a plain brick house. After becoming Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy in 1806, Soane purchased No. 13, the house next door, today the Museum, and rebuilt it in two phases in 1808–09 and 1812.In 1808–09 he constructed his drawing office and "museum" on the site of the former stable block at the back, using primarily top lighting. In 1812 he rebuilt the front part of the site, adding a projecting Portland Stone facade to the basement, ground and first floor levels and the centre bay of the second floor. Originally this formed three open loggias, but Soane glazed the arches during his lifetime. Once he had moved into No. 13, Soane rented out his former home at No. 12 (on his death it was left to the nation along with No. 13, the intention being that the rental income would fund the running of the Museum).

The Foundling Museum
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
40 Brunswick Square
London, WC1N 1AX

020 7841 3600

Handel & Hendrix in London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
25 Brook Street
London, W1K 4HB

020 7495 1685

Separated by a wall & 200 years are the homes of two musicians who chose London & changed music. Welcome to Handel & Hendrix in London

Museum of Comedy
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
The Undercroft, St Georges Church, Bloomsbury Way
London, WC1A 2SR

020 7534 1744

Founded by Leicester Square Theatre director Martin Witts, the Museum of Comedy is a brand new, immersive museum and performance venue, featuring iconic props and artefacts from our rich comedic history and housing one of the most comprehensive collections of Comedy memorabilia ever to be amassed in one place. The museum has been lovingly put together by Martin from his collection of over six thousand artefacts and print from some the most iconic comedians and comedy shows both past and present, amassed during his career spanning over three decades in the comedy industry. See comic artefacts from Tommy Cooper’s handmade magic props to Steptoe and Son’s stuffed bear! Plus Leicester Square Theatre favourite Bill Bailey’s iconic 6-neck guitar. Accompanying the collection will be revolving exhibitions, currently Steve Ullathorne’s stylish and contemporary images of current comedy stars The Comic Collection. Museum facilities include The Cooper Room, a state of the art traditional performance space hosting all kinds of comedy performance, from theatre and stand up to silent film. The Museum is also home to The Comedy Academy, an educational facility for comedy writing performance and production. The Museum of Comedy. Shining a light on the stars of British comedy. See What's On: http://bit.ly/25WAU79 @museumofcomedy www.museumofcomedy.com

Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Malet Place
London, WC1E 7

+44 (0) 20 7679 2884

The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology in London is part of University College London Museums & Collections. The museum contains over 80,000 objects and ranks among some of the world's leading collections of Egyptian and Sudanese material. It ranks behind only the collections of the Cairo Museum, The British Museum and the Ägyptisches Museum, Berlin in number and quality of items.HistoryThe museum was established as a teaching resource for the Department of Egyptian Archaeology and Philology at University College at the same time as the department was established in 1892. The initial collection was donated by the writer Amelia Edwards. The first Edwards Professor, William Matthew Flinders Petrie conducted many important excavations, and in 1913 he sold his collections of Egyptian antiquities to University College, transforming the museum into one of the leading collections outside Egypt. Petrie excavated dozens of major sites in the course of his career, including the Roman Period cemeteries at Hawara, famous for the beautiful mummy portraits in classical Roman style; Amarna, the city of king Akhenaten, known as the first king to believe in one God; and the first true pyramid, at Meydum, where he uncovered some of the earliest evidence for mummification.The collection and library were arranged in galleries within the university and a guidebook published in 1915. Initially, the collection's visitors were students and academics; it was not then open to the general public. Petrie retired from UCL in 1933, though his successors continued to add to the collections, excavating in other parts of Egypt and the Sudan. During the Second World War (1939–1945) the collection was packed up and moved out of London for safekeeping. In the early 1950s it was moved into a former stable, where it remains adjacent to the science library of UCL.

Museu De Cera Madame Tussauds
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road London NW15LR
London,

Greenwich Queen's House
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Romney Rd Greenwich, London SE10 9NF
London,

Pollock's Toy Museum
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
1 Scala Street
London, W1T 2

0207-636 3452

Pollock's Toy Museum is a small museum in London, England.It was started in 1956 in a single attic room at 44 Monmouth Street, near Covent Garden, above Benjamin Pollock's Toy Shop, where Pollock's Toy Theatres were also sold. As the enterprise flourished, other rooms were taken over for the museum and the ground floor became a toyshop. By 1969 the collection had outgrown the Monmouth Street premises and Pollock's Toy Museum moved to 1 Scala Street, with a museum shop on the ground floor to contribute to its support. The museum continues today to be run by the grandson of the founder Marguerite Fawdry.

The British Museum Friends
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Great Russell Street
London, WC1B 3DG

0207 323 8195

British Museum, Greek and Roman Life
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
48 Great Russell Street
London, WC1B 3PA

BT Archives
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
BT Archives, Holborn Telephone Exchange, 268-270 High Holborn
London, WC1V 7EE

020 7440 4220

BT's history is effectively the story of communications services in the UK and across the world. Our heritage is a fascinating weave of stories of corporate development and individual endeavour, of public service and private enterprise, of invention and technological innovation. It stretches from the birth of the electric telegraph in the 1830s, through state ownership and the reintroduction of competition, to the explosion of the Internet and the rise of Broadband Britain. BT Archives preserves the heritage of British Telecommunications plc and its predecessors from the dawn of telecommunications. Records produced before the date of privatisation are classed as public records under the Public Records Acts, 1958 and 1967. BT Archives undertakes the company's statutory responsibilities under these acts to preserve and make available public records to members of the public after 30 years, and for this purpose has been appointed an "official place of deposit for public records" by the Lord Chancellor. BT Archives is also approved by The National Archives National Advisory Services as meeting their standard for archives repositories. Access information The public search room is open every Tuesday and Thursday, 10.00am - 4.00pm by appointment except for public holidays and on occasions when scheduled events are occurring. There is limited seating in the search room and visitors arriving without an appointment may not be admitted. Book an appointment by e-mailing [email protected] We are unable to undertake research on behalf of customers. Important security information for visitors: First-time visitors are required to bring with them photographic and suitable proof of address identification. This also applies to customers who have visited us before the introduction of these arrangements. We regret that visitors unable to meet these conditions cannot be admitted. Our house rules: Please do - Tell us what you think of the BT Archives Facebook Page posts you read - Add your comments under the right wall posts/tabs to avoid confusion - Use the Help tab to post questions about your BT services. Please don’t - Post personal information, including account, bank contact details. - Use profanities, racist, sexist, abusive, threatening, defamatory, obscene, pornographic or deliberately inflammatory language. - Post the same comment multiple times or post any adverts. Please also see our Terms of Use (http://www.btlife.bt.com/bt-facebook-page-house-rules-and-terms-of-use) and also our Privacy Policy (http://www2.bt.com/privacypolicy).

The On LINE Coal Mining Museum
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Head Office
London, NCB 1234

07563777943

This Page Is For All Miners Past And Present,All Miners,Miners Familys Please Feel Free To Come By And Post Your Mining Memorys....

Museum Near Pollock's Toy Museum

Wellcome Collection
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
183 Euston Road
London, NW1 2BE

020 7611 2222

The Magic Circle
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
12 Stephenson Way
London, NW1 2HD

221B Baker Street (BBC Sherlock)
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
187 North Gower Street
London, W1U 6

Museum of Comedy
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
The Undercroft, St Georges Church, Bloomsbury Way
London, WC1A 2SR

020 7534 1744

Founded by Leicester Square Theatre director Martin Witts, the Museum of Comedy is a brand new, immersive museum and performance venue, featuring iconic props and artefacts from our rich comedic history and housing one of the most comprehensive collections of Comedy memorabilia ever to be amassed in one place. The museum has been lovingly put together by Martin from his collection of over six thousand artefacts and print from some the most iconic comedians and comedy shows both past and present, amassed during his career spanning over three decades in the comedy industry. See comic artefacts from Tommy Cooper’s handmade magic props to Steptoe and Son’s stuffed bear! Plus Leicester Square Theatre favourite Bill Bailey’s iconic 6-neck guitar. Accompanying the collection will be revolving exhibitions, currently Steve Ullathorne’s stylish and contemporary images of current comedy stars The Comic Collection. Museum facilities include The Cooper Room, a state of the art traditional performance space hosting all kinds of comedy performance, from theatre and stand up to silent film. The Museum is also home to The Comedy Academy, an educational facility for comedy writing performance and production. The Museum of Comedy. Shining a light on the stars of British comedy. See What's On: http://bit.ly/25WAU79 @museumofcomedy www.museumofcomedy.com

Cats - the London Palladium
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Argyll Street, London W1F 7TF
London,

Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Malet Place
London, WC1E 7

+44 (0) 20 7679 2884

The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology in London is part of University College London Museums & Collections. The museum contains over 80,000 objects and ranks among some of the world's leading collections of Egyptian and Sudanese material. It ranks behind only the collections of the Cairo Museum, The British Museum and the Ägyptisches Museum, Berlin in number and quality of items.HistoryThe museum was established as a teaching resource for the Department of Egyptian Archaeology and Philology at University College at the same time as the department was established in 1892. The initial collection was donated by the writer Amelia Edwards. The first Edwards Professor, William Matthew Flinders Petrie conducted many important excavations, and in 1913 he sold his collections of Egyptian antiquities to University College, transforming the museum into one of the leading collections outside Egypt. Petrie excavated dozens of major sites in the course of his career, including the Roman Period cemeteries at Hawara, famous for the beautiful mummy portraits in classical Roman style; Amarna, the city of king Akhenaten, known as the first king to believe in one God; and the first true pyramid, at Meydum, where he uncovered some of the earliest evidence for mummification.The collection and library were arranged in galleries within the university and a guidebook published in 1915. Initially, the collection's visitors were students and academics; it was not then open to the general public. Petrie retired from UCL in 1933, though his successors continued to add to the collections, excavating in other parts of Egypt and the Sudan. During the Second World War (1939–1945) the collection was packed up and moved out of London for safekeeping. In the early 1950s it was moved into a former stable, where it remains adjacent to the science library of UCL.

Pollock's Toy Museum
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
1 Scala Street
London, W1T 2

0207-636 3452

Pollock's Toy Museum is a small museum in London, England.It was started in 1956 in a single attic room at 44 Monmouth Street, near Covent Garden, above Benjamin Pollock's Toy Shop, where Pollock's Toy Theatres were also sold. As the enterprise flourished, other rooms were taken over for the museum and the ground floor became a toyshop. By 1969 the collection had outgrown the Monmouth Street premises and Pollock's Toy Museum moved to 1 Scala Street, with a museum shop on the ground floor to contribute to its support. The museum continues today to be run by the grandson of the founder Marguerite Fawdry.

Great Russell Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
22 bloomsbury street
London, WC1B 3QJ

Victoria Miro Mayfair
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
14 St George Street, London
London, W1S 1FH

Vikings Exhibition, British Museum
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
King's R
London,

Art Workers Guild
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
6 Queen Square
London, WC1N 3AT

+44 (0) 20 7278 3009

Book launch event 'From Kuch to Tashkunt- Indo Pak War 1965' by Dr.Farooq Bajwa.

Wellcome Collection: the Institute of Sexology
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
183 Euston Road
London, NW1 2BE

02076112222

New London Architecture
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
26 Store St
London, WC1E 6HP

020 7636 4044

Clipstone Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Clipstone Mews
London, W1T 6

Saatchi Gallery New Sensations Exhibition
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Bloomsbury Square
London, WC1A 2

Woolff Gallery
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
89 Charlotte St
London, W1T 4PU

+44 (0) 20 7631 0551

Ridgmount Gardens
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Chenies Street
London, WC1E 6

GBS Theatre, RADA
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Malet Street, WC1E 7JN
London, WC1E 7HX

Harrie Massey Lecture Theater
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
25 Gordon Street
London, WC1H 0AY

Rose Issa Projects
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
82 Great Portland St
London, W1W 7NW

0207 243 3250

Rose Issa is a curator, writer and producer who has championed visual art and film from the Middle East for more than 30 years. She has lived in London since the 1980s showcasing upcoming and established artists, producing exhibitions with public and private institutions worldwide, and running a publishing programme. Through curating numerous exhibitions and film festivals, she introduced Western audiences to many artists who have since become stars of the international scene, including: Chant Avedissian, Ayman Baalbaki, Shadi Ghadirian, Monir Farmanfarmaian, Bahman Ghobadi, Hassan Hajjaj, Farhad Moshiri, Abbas Kiarostami, Rashid Koraichi and Nja Mahdaoui among many more. As well as holding exhibitions at her own project space in London, Rose Issa collaborates as a co-curator with private and public institutions such as the Beirut Exhibition Center (2010-11); the Bluecoat Arts Centre, Liverpool (2010); Tate Britain, London (2008); the European Parliament, Brussels (2008); the State Museum of Oriental Art, Moscow (2007); the Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg (2007); ING Bank, Geneva (2007); the Victoria & Albert Museum, London (2006); the Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW), Berlin (2004); The CCCB (Contemporary Cultural Centre), Barcelona (2003); the IFA - Institut fur Auslandsbezeihungen (2002-3), Stuttgart; the Tropenmuseum, Amsterdam (1996-1997); the Barbican Art Centre, London (2001, 1995); and Leighton House Museum, London (ongoing, since 1992). She also advises and lends works to public and private institutions, including the CAB Art Centre, Brussels (2013); the Boghossian Foundation, Brussels (2012); the Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane, Australia (2009); Paul Klee Museum, Bern (2009); Belvedere Museum, Vienna (2009); The British Museum; the Imperial War Museum; The Museum of Mankind; the Victoria & Albert Museum; The Written Art Foundation, Wiesbaden; The National Museums of Scotland; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Smithsonian Institution (Sackler/Freer Gallery and National Museum of African Arts); the World Bank, Washington DC; and The National Gallery of Jordan. Rose Issa was a Jury member for the National Pavillions at the 50th Venice Biennale (2003) and sat on the Jury for the Arab British Centre (2013) and MOPCAP (the Magic of Persia, 2013). Publications Founder of the publishing unit Rose Issa Projects and Beyond Art Production, Rose publishes monographs and comprehensive catalogues addressing the current concerns and trends of the visual arts scene from the Arab world, Iran and Turkey. Recent titles include: Maliheh Afnan: Familiar Faces (2013); Nermine Hammam: Cairo Year One (2012); Raeda Saadeh: Reframing Palestine (2012), Farhad Ahrarnia: Canary in a Coal Mine (2011), Ayman Baalbaki: Beirut Again and Again (2011), Selma Gurbuz: Shadow of My Self (2011), Omid Salehi: a Photographer’s Journey Through Iran (2011), Fathi Hassan (2010); Parastou Forouhar: Art, Life and Death in Iran (2010) and Maliheh Afnan: Traces, Faces, Places (2009). Rose has also co-published the two major overviews on contemporary photography from the Middle East: Arab Photography Now (with Kehrer Verlag, 2011) and Iranian Photography Now (with Hatjie Kantz, 2008). Film from the Arab World and Iran In 1982 Rose Issa launched the first-ever Arab Film Festival in Paris and worked with the Delegations Etrangères at the Cannes Film Festival (1983-1985). For a further 26 years until 2008, she curated Arab and Iranian film seasons in Britain and abroad. She was special advisor to The Berlinale (2003-2007); the International Rotterdam Film Festival (1996-2002); the London International Film Festival (1987-2003); and The British Film Institute (1988-1995). She also curated Arab and Iranian film seasons at The National Film Theatre (“Hollywood on the Nile”, 2003; “Art and Life: The New Iranian Cinema”, 1999; “First Arab Film Festival”, 1987); the Barbican (“Unveiled Lives: Women and Iranian Cinema”, 2001; “Melodramas, Comedies, and Mysteries: North African Film”, 1995). In addition she curated a season of Iranian films for Britain’s Channel 4 (2005) and collaborated with them on “Cinema Iran”, a series of documentaries on Iranian cinema. She also realised the documentary, “Moving Pictures: Tunisian Women Film Directors”, for BBC2 TV (1995).

NLA: London's Centre for the Built Environment
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
26 Store Street
London,

National Print Gallery
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
56 Maple Street
London, W1T 6HW

+44(0)207 323 1109

The National Print Gallery is located in the modest drawing room of a house in Fitzrovia. It is a concept, not a marble edifice. In April, 1997 art dealer and organiser of The Contemporary Print Show, Clive Jennings, realised that very few original artists prints could be seen in the national or provincial art institutions, and organised a Symposium entitled “Towards a National Print Gallery” at the Barbican Arts Centre. Sadly, fourteen years on, the situation has not changed enormously, and prints are still largely marginalised and misunderstood by the art establishment, Great artists have always considered prints an important part of their oeuvre. From Durer to Goya to Picasso to the Chapman Brothers, but it is still very rare to see prints on display in the Tate or The National Gallery. The National Print Gallery deals on the secondary market in contemporary prints and also publishes new editions. It has all the facilities that a visitor might expect in a major public space, but in a vastly reduced size. These include an Exhibition Space, Permanent Collection, Project Space, Library, Archive, Friends Room (the sofa), Internet Centre (the macbook) and of course a Cafe, Cloakroom, Gift Shop, Information Desk, and an Audio Guide (a vintage walkman). The National Print Gallery is a moveable feast and has organised exhibitions at several London Venues. The National Print Gallery is proud to be associated with the forthcoming exhibition by Darren Coffield, Masters of Reality, at: Pertwee Anderson & Gold, 15 Bateman Street, London W1D 3AQ. April 12 - 30, 2013. Open Mon - Fri: 11-6; Sat: 12-5 In their exploration of the themes of celebrity, identity, the function of representation and how we perceive each other, these works subvert the viewer's instinctive faculties for reading human features to create some of the most stimulating and provocative portraits of recent years. Initially the eyes and the brain struggle to interpret the information that is presented in reconfigured format, prompting a personal reassessment of one of the most basic and instinctive human reflexes: the ability to read another human face. Coffield explains: "There is now an excessive exposure to faces in the media. We see in the media faces that have been idealised, manipulated and touched up. When viewed, the face creates in the mind a kind of Orwellian doublethink. We know that we are viewing a manipulated 'untruth' and yet we hold the image to be true, a notion of beauty to obtain or aspire to. The face has a strong social, cultural and historical role. An inverted face is not only difficult to recognise but repositions our sensitivity to the spatial relationships between human features. Here, facial features become strange constellations of communication, whilst new facial recognition patterns emerge." These works are not a simple, formulaic inversion of the features, but a sensitive reinterpretation of the physiognomy. Like any intelligent portrait they have a dynamic aesthetic, individually tailored to reflect the personality of the subject. Even in their reordered state, the features retain the character of the sitter - muddled features, that hang down like a bizarre veil. Some are famous and iconic celebrities, who are instantly recognisable by their pose, and the viewer is lulled into a false sense of security by the shape of the head or a familiar hairstyle; others are obscure actors staring out from forgotten publicity stills. It is impossible not to become enmeshed in the process of identifying the subject. In the 175 years or so since the invention of photography, the function of the painted portrait has evolved from its purpose as accurate documentary representation to a more fluid, interpretive role. Technology has progressed but it is facial recognition, the way in which our features are arranged, that still forms the basis of digital and security systems. We intuitively identify faces from birth, expressing ourselves and monitoring others by the slightest change of expression. We interpret any two random circles with a line underneath as a face, the ubiquitous "smiley" for example. It is these primeval conventions that Coffield questions and reinterprets to great effect. Critic David Sylvester, known for his championing of his close friends Alberto Giacometti, Francis Bacon and Lucien Freud, and described in his Guardian obituary as "one of the finest writers on art in the second half of the twentieth century," described Coffield as "Another of those magicians who (probably without knowing) know how to imbue pieces of matter with light". In the early nineties Coffield worked closely with Joshua Compston on the formation of Factual Nonsense, a gallery in Shoreditch that became the centre of the emerging Young British Artists scene. The list of participants reads like a Who's Who of young British art, including: Matt Collishaw, Tracey Emin, Angus Fairhurst, Gilbert & George, Damien Hirst, Gary Hume, Sarah Lucas, Gavin Turk, Jessica Voorsanger, Gillian Wearing, Sue Webster and Tim Noble. A new book by Coffield about this exciting period in British Art, "Factual Nonsense: The Art and Death of Joshua Compston" is to published in the UK in 2012. Darren Coffield was born in London in 1969 and studied at Goldsmiths College, Camberwell School of Art and the Slade School of Art in London. He has exhibited widely in the company of many leading artists including Damien Hirst, Howard Hodgkin, Patrick Caulfield and Gilbert and George at venues ranging from the Courtauld Institute, Somerset House to Voloshin Museum, Crimea. Coffield was the only artist to be shortlisted for these three major UK Art competitions in 2010: The John Moores Contemporary Painting Prize; The BP Portrait Award at The National Portrait Gallery and The Threadneedle Prize. His work can be found in collections around the world. Coffield lives and works in London. "The Stately Aquariums of England" 1 - 13 December, 2011 The National Print Gallery is proud to present The Stately Aquariums o f England by David Ferry. This is a stunning new suite of prints that explore an imagined collision of two very different worlds: the commercial efforts of the asset rich, cash poor aristocrats of the 1960’s who grudgingly opened the doors of their ancestral homes to the great British public; and the desire by aquarists to furnish their fish tanks with increasingly bizarre and inappropriate aquarium ornaments from the human world that bear no relation to the natural domain of fish. In Ferry’s luscious images, bemused fish navigate a strange under water kingdom where state rooms adorned with fine tapestries and paintings are furnished with submerged London buses, and pirate galleons are becalmed in the drives of turreted stately homes. Fish fanciers consider their hobby to be a creative pursuit, the piscine tenants of their fantastic environments bec oming moving elements in a work of art. Ferry has celebrated this conceit and gently acknowledged both the kitsch world of “aquarium ornaments” and the upwardly mobile aspirations of the creators of these miniature environments, a fantasy world in a tank bubbling away on the sideboard. The scale of the images also suggest an alternative interpretation: a sci-fi future in which England is submerged, and giant mutant fancy fish swim freely through the deserted rooms of our great houses. His medium of montage is both a physical and an intellectual pursuit: the interventions he makes in the images, and the juxtaposition of unlikely and disparate aspects of our culture to deconstruct the notion of British national identity and heritage. Ferry’s Book Arts and Printmaking create a very individual footprint in contemporary art, and bear witness to th e influences of John Heartfield and the classic photomontage tradition. The creative process starts with his defilement of existing books (over 20 in as many years), usually tourist guides from the innocent post war years of the 1950’s and 1960’s, which he deftly subverts using highly selected donor material. In this case, the re-titled “English Aquariums in Country Houses in Colour” whose 28 colour plates Ferry defiled with piscine interlopers. (This unique book was purchased by The National Art Library housed in the Victoria & Albert Museum, for their permanent collection, earlier this year.) Ferry explains, “The search for donor material is part of the process of creative recycling, adding a new ingredient, a cycle of change and appropriation”. These ideas are then completely rebuilt, reworked and re-interpreted to inform a capsule collection of original prints that convey the spirit of the unique book. Ferry has exhibited extensively in the UK and throughout the world, including solo exhibitions in Berlin, New York, Poznan and Seoul. His work can be found in public and corporate collections including Museum of Modern Art, New York; Ashmolean, Oxford; Art Institute of Chicago; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, National Museum of Wales, Cardiff and The Victoria and Albert Museum, London. He is a past recipient of a Pollock / Krasner major award, and a new seat as Professor of Printmaking and Book Arts was created for him at the Cardiff Metropolitan University earlier this year.

Muaeum of Comedy
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Museum of Comedy, The Undercroft, St George's Church. Bloomsbury Way, WC1A 2SR
London,

Public Places and Attractions Near Pollock's Toy Museum

Madame Tussauds London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, NW1 4

0871 894 3000

Chinatown
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
17 Whitcomb Street
London, WC2H 7

The British Library
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
96 Euston Road
London, NW1 2

+44 (0)330 333 1144

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and one of the world's greatest libraries. We hold over 13 million books, 920,000 journal and newspaper titles, 57 million patents and 3 million sound recordings. Open to everyone, the Library offers events, temporary exhibitions and a Treasures Gallery that displays over 200 items, including Magna Carta, a Gutenberg Bible and lyrics by The Beatles.

Ripley's Believe It or Not! London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
The London Pavilion, 1 Piccadilly Circus
London, W1J 0DA

+44(0)20 3238 0022

With more than 700 amazing artefacts, the attraction celebrates the weird, wonderful and bizarre in all its forms. With everything you can imagine (and plenty more you can’t), Ripley’s Believe It or Not! London is a family day out that’s definitely out of the ordinary

Piccadilly Theatre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly Theatre, 16 Denman Street
London, W1D 7DY

02089692308

This breathtaking musical staging of one of the most popular films of all time promises to be a gripping roller-coaster ride of romance, drama and excitement.

Broadcasting House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Portland Place
London, W1A 1AA

020 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

Noel Coward Theatre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
85-87 St Martin's Lane
London, WC2N 4AU

+44 (0) 20 7759 8010

Queen's Theatre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, W1D 6BA

0844 482 5160

Tramp
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
40 Jermyn Street
London, SW1Y 6DN

020 7734 0565

Institute Of Education
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
20 Bedford Way
London, WC1H 0AL

+44 (0) 20 7612 6136

The Harold Pinter Theatre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
6 Panton St
City of Westminster, SW1Y 4

0207 321 5300

The Harold Pinter Theatre opened on 15 October 1881 as the Royal Comedy Theatre. The theatre's reputation grew through the First World War when C B Cochran and André Charlot presented their famous review shows. The range of work at The Harold Pinter Theatre has been far reaching, from musical comedies to revival and experimental theatre and includes hugely successful shows such as Savages starring Paul Scofield in 1973 and The Rocky Horror Show making its West End debut in 1979. Alan Bennett has appeared with Patricia Routledge in his Talking Heads and Stockard Channing appeared in Six Degrees of Separation, which won best play at the 1993 Olivier Awards. The Homecoming, No-man's Land, Moonlight, The Hothouse and The Caretaker have all been presented in recent years. Maureen Lipman has also graced The Harold Pinter Theatre stage starring in Alan Plater's highly acclaimed comedy, Peggy For You, but The Harold Pinter Theatre's two biggest successes must be The Caretaker starring Michael Gambon in 2000 and an eight week sell out of Little Malcolm and his Struggle Against the Eunuchs in 1999, starring Ewan McGregor and directed by Denis Lawson, which smashed all box office records. More recently, Francesca Annis and Anthony Andrews have starred in Ibsen's Ghosts and 2004 saw the much lauded revival of RC Sherriff's Journey's End and a successful run of The Old Masters by Simon Gray, starring Edward Fox and Peter Bowles. This production was directed by Harold Pinter. In January 2005, Kim Cattrall starred in Peter Hall's production of Whose Life Is It Anyway? by Brian Clark, followed by Tom Courtenay in Brian Friel's The Home Place and Joseph Fiennes and Francesca Annis starred in Epitaph for George Dillon by John Osborne and Anthony Creighton. The Harold Pinter Theatre has also played host to Steptoe and Son, Michael Frayn's Donkey's Years, the Rocky Horror Show, the hilarious high-flying comedy, Boeing-Boeing and many more. Most recently MOJO, Relative Values and the Importance of Being Ernest. Currently home to the Kinks Musical - Sunny Afternoon.

Golden Square
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Golden Square, Soho
London, W1R 3AD

020 7437 4508

Golden Square, in the City of Westminster, Soho, London, is one of the historic squares of Central London. The square is just east of Regent Street and north of Piccadilly Circus. The square has featured prominently in literature, and today is a sought-after corporate address for the media-related companies that populate the Soho area.HistoryGolden Square is a historic square in the Soho neighbourhood of the City of Westminster.Possibly laid down by Sir Christopher Wren, the plan bears Wren's signature, but the patent does not state whether it was submitted by the petitioners or whether it originated in Wren's office. This west London square was brought into being from the 1670s onwards. It very rapidly became the political and ambassadorial district of the late 17th and early 18th centuries, housing the Portuguese embassy among others.The town house of the first Viscount Bolingbroke, much favoured by Queen Anne, was situated on the square. The statue of George II sculpted by John Nost in 1724 came from Cannons House in March 1753. William Pitt the Elder was born in the Square in 1708. There is confusion about whether the statue represents King George II of Great Britain, or King Charles II, as noted on the signage in Golden Square. Folklore states that the statue was accidentally won at auction, when the winning bidder raised his hand to greet a friend. The amount of money he paid was so low that he decided not to contest and gave the statue as a gift to the people of Golden Square.

BBC Broadcasting House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Portland Place
London, W1B 3

Sir John Soane's Museum
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
13 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, WC2A 3BP

Sir John Soane's Museum was formerly the home of the neo-classical architect John Soane. It holds many drawings and models of Soane's projects and the collections of paintings, drawings and antiquities that he assembled.The museum is located in Holborn, London, adjacent to Lincoln's Inn Fields. It is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.HistoryHousesSoane demolished and rebuilt three houses in succession on the north side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. He began with No. 12 (between 1792 and 1794), externally a plain brick house. After becoming Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy in 1806, Soane purchased No. 13, the house next door, today the Museum, and rebuilt it in two phases in 1808–09 and 1812.In 1808–09 he constructed his drawing office and "museum" on the site of the former stable block at the back, using primarily top lighting. In 1812 he rebuilt the front part of the site, adding a projecting Portland Stone facade to the basement, ground and first floor levels and the centre bay of the second floor. Originally this formed three open loggias, but Soane glazed the arches during his lifetime. Once he had moved into No. 13, Soane rented out his former home at No. 12 (on his death it was left to the nation along with No. 13, the intention being that the rental income would fund the running of the Museum).

The Savile Club
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
69 Brook Street
London, W1K 4ER

+44 (0)20 7629 5462

Eastman Dental Hospital
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
256 Gray's Inn Road
London, WC1X 8LD

+44 (0) 20 7915 1000

Chatham House
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
10 St James's Square
London, SW1Y 4L

The Royal Institute of International Affairs, commonly known as Chatham House, is a non-profit, non-governmental organisation based in London whose mission is to analyse and promote the understanding of major international issues and current affairs. It is the originator of the Chatham House Rule and takes its name from the building where it is based, a Grade I listed 18th-century house in St. James's Square, designed in part by Henry Flitcroft and occupied by three British prime ministers, including William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham.In the University of Pennsylvania’s 2015 Global Go To Think Tanks Report, Chatham House is ranked the second most influential think tank in the world after the Brookings Institution, and the world's most influential non-U.S. think tank. In 2009, Chatham House was also named the top non-U.S. think tank by Foreign Policy magazine, which listed it as one of the top "scholars" for being among a handful of stars of the think-tank world who are regularly relied upon to set agendas and craft new initiatives.The current chairman of the Council of Chatham House is Stuart Popham and its director is Robin Niblett. The research directors are Rob Bailey, Patricia Lewis, Paola Subacchi and Alex Vines.

Red Lion Square
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Red Lion Square
London, WC1R 4QG

020 7974 1693

Red Lion Square is a small square in Holborn, London. The square was laid out in 1684 by Nicholas Barbon, taking its name from the Red Lion Inn. According to some sources the bodies of three regicides - Oliver Cromwell, John Bradshaw and Henry Ireton - were placed in a pit on the site of the Square.By 1720 it was a fashionable part of London: the eminent judge Bernard Hale was a resident of Red Lion Square. In the 1860s, on the other hand, it had clearly become decidedly unfashionable: the writer Anthony Trollope in his novel Orley Farm (1862) humorously reassures his readers that one of his characters is perfectly respectable, despite living in Red Lion Square.The centre-piece of the garden today is a statue by Ian Walters of Fenner Brockway, which was installed in 1986. There is also a memorial bust of Bertrand Russell. Conway Hall—which is the home of the South Place Ethical Society and the National Secular Society—opens on to the Square. On 15 June 1974 a meeting by the National Front in Conway Hall resulted in a protest by anti-fascist groups. The following disorder and police action left one student - Kevin Gately from the University of Warwick - dead.

Jermyn Street Theatre
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
16B Jermyn Street
London, SW1Y 6ST

Box Office: 020 7287 2875

Ziggy Stardust Plaque
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
23 Heddon Street
London,

Picadlly Circus
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
London,

The Royal Arcade
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
28 Old Bond Street
London, W1S 4BT

Conway Hall Ethical Society
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
25 Red Lion Square
London, WC1R 4RL

020 7242 8031

The Conway Hall Ethical Society, formerly the South Place Ethical Society, based in London at Conway Hall, is thought to be the oldest surviving freethought organisation in the world, and is the only remaining ethical society in the United Kingdom. It now advocates secular humanism and is a member of the International Humanist and Ethical Union.HistoryThe Society can trace back its origins to February 14th 1793 in a congregation of nonconformists known as Philadelphians or Universalists. William Johnson Fox became their minister in 1817. In 1824 the congregation built a chapel at South Place, in the district of central London known as Finsbury. The chapel was repaired by John Wallen, of a family of London architects and builders.In 1929 they built new premises, Conway Hall, at 37 (now numbered 25) Red Lion Square, in nearby Bloomsbury, on the site of a tenement, previously a factory belonging to James Perry, a pen and ink maker. Conway Hall is named after an American, Moncure D. Conway, who led the Society from 1864–1885 and 1892–1897, during which time it moved further away from Unitarianism. Conway spent the break in his tenure in the United States, writing a biography of Thomas Paine. In 1888 the name of the Society was changed from South Place Religious Society to South Place Ethical Society (SPES) under Stanton Coit's leadership. In 1950 the SPES joined the Ethical Union. In 1969 another name change was mooted, to The South Place Humanist Society, a discussion that sociologist Colin Campbell suggests symbolized the death of the ethical movement in England.

Middlesex Hospital
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Mortimer Street, London W1
London, W1T 3AA

The Middlesex Hospital was a teaching hospital located in the Fitzrovia area of London, England. First opened in 1745 by Edinburgh Medical School trained surgeon Charles Bell on Windmill Street, it was moved in 1757 to Mortimer Street where it remained until it was finally closed in 2005. Its staff and services were transferred to various sites within the University College London Hospitals NHS Trust. The Middlesex Hospital Medical School, with a history dating back to 1746, merged with the medical school of University College London in 1987.HistoryThe first Middlesex Hospital opened in 1745 as the Middlesex Infirmary in Windmill Street, London W1, named after the county of Middlesex. The infirmary started with 18 beds to provide medical treatment for the poor. Funding came from subscriptions and, in 1747, the hospital became the first in England to add 'lying-in' (maternity) beds.The second Middlesex Hospital, in Mortimer Street, was opened in 1757. The foundation stone was laid in 1755 by the hospital's president, the Earl of Northumberland. The Hospital was Incorporated by Act of Parliament in 1836, allowing it various benefits as a charity.Over the years extra wings were added but, in 1924, it was decided that the building was structurally unsound and an entirely new building would be required. The Duke of York, later King George VI, visited the hospital on 26 June 1928 to lay the foundation stone of the new building. He returned to open the completed building on 29 May 1935. The hospital had been completely rebuilt, on the same site and in stages, without ever being closed, paid for by more than £1 million of donations from members of the public. The nurses' home in Foley Street was connected to the hospital by underground tunnels to allow safe and convenient access for nursing staff at night.

Gieves & Hawkes
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, W1A 1AB

+44 (0) 20 7318 3994

Ash
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
39 Marylebone High Street
London, W1U 4QQ

+44 (0) 20 7486 5278

The Lounge Leicester Square Theatre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
6 Leicester Place
London, WC2H 7BX

University College Hospital
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
235 Euston Road
London,

Public Services and Government Near Pollock's Toy Museum

Oxford Street - Central London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
London, W1

020 7462 0680

Fitzrovia Goodge Street
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
18 Goodge Street
London, W1T 2QD

0207 6360721

Situated only five minutes walk to the West End. It was once home to such writers as Virginia Would, George Bernard Shaw and Arthur Rimbaud. Fitzrovia area is probably named after the Fitzroy Tavern, a public house situated on the corner of Charlotte Street and Windmill Street within the district. The name was adopted during the inter-war years initially by, and later in recognition of, the artistic and bohemian community habitually found at the public house. The name Fitzrovia was recorded in print for the first time by Tom Driberg MP in the William Hickey gossip column of the Daily Express in 1940. The pub is all on one level and is wheelchair friendly. Children are welcome when accompanied by an adult and are dining. We’re proud to say our menu is packed with Great British pub food classics, including iconic dishes like our hand-battered fish and chips, pie and mash and succulent burgers. Our drinks include a great range of real ales and an extensive wine list. Our cask ales range has some of the best in British beers, including the new 1730, our very own special pale ale. The team at the Fitzrovia look forward to welcoming you soon at this fantastic traditional London pub in Bloomsbury.

School of Oriental and African Studies
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Thornhaugh Street
London, WC1H 0XG

020 7637 2388

Kaplan International English London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
3-4 Southampton Place
London, WC1A 2DA

0044 207 404 3080

Fashion Retail Academy
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
15 Gresse St
London, W1T 1QL

0300 247 4000

The Fashion Retail Academy is a unique, employer led college with charitable status. It was founded in 2005 as a result of Sir Philip Green’s realisation that the industry faced an overwhelming skills gap for entry level jobs. As a result, a private-public partnership was formed between Arcadia, Next, Marks and Spencer, Tesco and Experian who funded its start-up, matched by investment from the Government. Located in the heart of London, the FRA is just moments away from Oxford Street and Tottenham Court road and a number of national rail stations. Our state of the art campus has recently befitted from a £2m upgrade, offering an inspirational learning environment. We offer a wide range of specialist fashion courses, many of these exclusive to the FRA, for students of all ages with start dates throughout the year. Our courses are developed to provide the student with a combination of an in-depth knowledge of Fashion Retail and hands on practical experience of the work environment. Most full-time courses provide a guaranteed work placement with a major high street brand, ensuring graduates leave with a wide range of skills and experience to take them into the workplace. Our success lies in providing the fastest route to work, eliminating the need to go to University and incur large debts whilst giving students vocational experience and support to find a job role on graduation. We work with over 130 brands to provide unrivalled access to industry through master classes, live industry projects, workshops and placements to ensure our graduates meet the current recruitment needs of the industry. Our tutors are dual professionals; a combination of experienced teachers and industry experts, providing the student with the most current information and skills needed to work in the ever changing environment of Fashion Retail. We offer courses suitable for all ages, time-frames, budgets and levels. Full time courses run from one to two years. Our fast track courses are 2 days per week over 22 weeks, and our intensive courses are designed to get you into the workplace in the shortest time possible by learning full-time five days per week for 10 weeks. Short courses are ideal as an entry point or skills top-up and run from one to five days and our apprenticeships provide work based learning. Our success speaks for itself: Over 90% of former FRA students go on to full time employment or further studies, and those choosing to go directly into employment from the FRA start their working life at the same level as university graduates, only many years quicker and without high levels of student debt.

Little Titchfield Street Library, University of Westminster
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
4-12 Little Titchfield Street
London, W1W 7

NYU in London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
6 Bedford Square, London WC1B 3RA,
London,

CATS - Children's Acute Transport Service
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Ormond Court
London, WC1N 3JZ

020 7430 5850

Paediatric Retrieval Service for North Thames region and also covering Essex, Cambridgeshire, Suffolk and Norfolk.

Population Matters
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
135-137 Station Road
London, E4 6AG

+44(0)20 8123 9116

Population growth is a major contributor to climate change, dwindling natural resources, pollution, social inequality, unemployment, and many other grave challenges facing humankind. We promote changed attitudes to family size and consumption so as to achieve a more sustainable future for all.

Marylebone Gardens
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
35 Marylebone High Street
London, w1u 4qa

Lion Court Conference Centre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
25 Procter Street
London, WC1V 6NY

+44 (0) 20 7067 1126

Gmb Union Hq
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
22 Stephenson Way, Euston,
London, NW1 2

020 7391 6700

Portland Place School
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
58 Portland Place, London
London, W1B 1NJ

dunno

Westminster Cavendish Library
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
115 New Cavendish Street
London, W1W 6UW

Chabad Lubavitch of Bloomsbury
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
357 Euston Road
London, NW1 3AL

020 7060 9770

Class: Centre for Labour and Social Studies
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
128 Theobald's Road, Holborn
London, WC1X 8TN

0207 611 2569

The Centre for Labour and Social Studies (CLASS) is a think tank established in 2012 to act as a centre for left debate and discussion. Originating in the labour movement, CLASS works with a broad coalition of supporters, academics and experts to develop and advance alternative policies for today. Through high quality, intellectually compelling publications and events, CLASS seeks to shape ideas that can inspire the trade union movement, cement a broad alliance of social forces, and influence policy development to ensure the political agenda is on the side of working people.

Unit 9
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, 140 Hampstead Road
London, NW1 2BX

Ash
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
39 Marylebone High Street
London, W1U 4QQ

+44 (0) 20 7486 5278

RMT Credit Union
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
39 Chalton Street
London, NW1 1JD

0207 529 8835

Springboard's FutureChef
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
44 Copperfield Street, London
London, SE1 0DY

020 7921 0420

Springboard’s FutureChef helps young people aged 12-16 to learn to cook. It inspires them to explore food and cooking as a life skill by developing their culinary talent and informing them about entry routes into the hospitality industry.

Fusion Graphic Design Ltd
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
26 Minster Chambers, Church Street
Hucknall, NG25 0HD

01636 816 899

COBIS - Council of British International Schools
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
55-56 Russell Square, Bloomsbury
London, WC1B 4HP

+44 203 826 7190

Representing over 400 member organisations, COBIS exists to serve, support and represent its member schools, their leaders, governors, staff and students by Representing member schools with the British Government, educational bodies, and the corporate sector Providing effective professional development for senior leaders, governors, teachers and support staff Facilitating, coordinating and supporting professional networking opportunities for British International schools Processing Disclosure Barring Service checks to promote child protection and safer recruitment and employment practices Providing access to information about trends and developments in UK education Facilitating mentoring and support programmes for Heads and school leaders Promoting career opportunities within the global COBIS network Brokering a cost-effective consultancy service between schools and approved educational support service providers

News Express / Post Office
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
14 Bedford Square, Houghton Regis
London,

01582865505

New Horizons Education Consultancy
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
34 - 35 D'Arblay Street, Soho
London, W1F 8EY

+44 (0) 2079 936 793

New Horizons Education Consultancy Ltd places international students to the most appropriate boarding schools, summer schools and language courses and works for their welfare throughout their stay in the UK. New Horizons has created strong relationships with partner schools and accumulated broad knowledge about British education system, and the integration of students from different systems. New Horizons is a member agent of ‘British Boarding Schools Connected”.

AA Private Tutors
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
309 Regent Street
London, W1B 2HW

07883621412

Global Payroll Association
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
49 Greek Street
London, W1D 4EG

+44 (0) 20 3871 8870

Global Payroll Association is the first international payroll association of its kind. We are a central hub for ‘all-things payroll’. A one-stop-shop supplying comprehensive directories, interactive training and in-depth country resources. We are here to help you with your global payroll needs, no matter how complex, connecting you with the world’s leading experts and offering a forum to network with other like-minded global professionals. Global Payroll Association welcomes international payroll, HR and financial professionals of all levels.

Go-Rise SCAM
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
71-75 SHELTON STREET
London, WC2 H9JQ

0207 1124901

Toy Store Near Pollock's Toy Museum

Hamleys
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
188-196 Regent Street
London, London W1B 5BT

0871 704 1977

Hamleys is the oldest and largest toy shop in the world and one of the world's best-known retailers of toys. Founded by William Hamley as "Noah's Ark" in High Holborn, London, in 1760, it moved to its current site on Regent Street in 1881. This flagship store is set over seven floors, with more than 50,000 toys on sale. It is considered one of the city's prominent tourist attractions, receiving around five million visitors each year. The chain has ten other outlets in the United Kingdom and nearly 50 franchises worldwide.Hamleys was bought by the Icelandic investment company Baugur Group in 2003 but was taken over by Baugur's main investor, Landsbanki, when the group defaulted. In 2012, the French toy retailer Groupe Ludendo bought the business for £60 million. In 2015 it was reported that Groupe Ludendo was negotiating the sale of Hamleys, possibly to a Hong Kong company owned by a relative of the owner of department store House of Fraser. Subsequently, it was sold to the Chinese footwear company C.banner for an estimated $154 million.HistoryHamleys is the oldest and largest toy shop in the world. It is named after William Hamley, who founded a toy shop called "Noah's Ark" at No. 231 High Holborn, London, in 1760. Ownership of the shop passed through the family, and by the time it was operated by Hamley's grandsons in 1837, the store had become famous, counting royalty and nobility among its customers.

King's Cross Platform 9 and 3/4
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
London
London, N1 9

The Disney Store
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
London, W1C 1

020 7491 9136

Hamleys Regent Street, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
188-196 Regent Street
London, W1B 5BT

0371 704 1977

Disney Store
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
350-352 Oxford St
London, W1C 1JH

020 7491 9136

The Toy Store UK
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
West One 381 Oxford St
London, W1C 2JS

Links of London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
110 Marylebone High Street
London, W1U 4RY

+44 (0) 20 3230 2049

Scificollector
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
79 Strand
London, WC2R 0DE

0207 836 2341

Scificollector is a producer of collectibles with most aimed at Classic & Cult TV shows such as Doctor Who, Torchwood, Merlin, Red Dwarf, Thunderbirds and other Gerry Anderson Shows. Our merchandise takes many forms such as a signed collectible, generally limited in edition such as a Commemorative Stamp Cover or exclusive Print, or other pieces such as our Action Figures which we have created for both Torchwood and latterly The Adventures of Merlin. We also have several 'Scificollector' exclusive commissions by Corgi and Product Enterprise and craft many pieces in Pewter to support the desires of collectors. As the company is run by collectors, we understand the needs and aim to support this with our creations. Scificollector also carries all the mainstream Doctor Who products available from our retail shop at 79 Strand in Central London and via our website www.scificollectorshop.co.uk

IUEG
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
59 Cranborne Waye
London, UB4 0HP

02079988994

Welcome to iUeg Ltd. for Electrical & Electronic Products, Home Appliances, Kitchen Products, Toys and Games, Jewellery Boxes, Beauty Products, Mobile Phone Accessories, Gifts and Gadgets... We source our products from well known Brands such as Mele & Co., Carmen, Metaltex, TDK, Mpulse, Orange, Nokia, Samsung, HTC, Sony Ericsson, LG, Sony, Blackberry, Motorola, Alcatel, Huawei, Bluechip, Jabra, Jawbone, Nixon, Griffin, Phillips, Warmlite and many more. We dispatch orders within 1 working day with Free UK standard service, optional services for express delivery (additional charges apply) and also provide Worldwide Shipping on all products.(additional charges apply) For any queries please contact us via E-mail or Telephone. All E-mails will have a response time within 1 working day. Contact Number: 020 7998 8994

Mosaic House
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
13 Coventry Street
London, W1D 7DH

Tronic Parts UK
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Islington
London, N7

07539411405

Local Business Near Pollock's Toy Museum

The Hope
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
15 Tottenham Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 2AW

British Olympic Association
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
60 Charlotte St
London, United Kingdom W1T 4RL

020 7842 5700

Adjust Your Set HQ
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
7-10 Charlotte Mews
London, United Kingdom

+44 20 7580 5933

Dabbous
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
39 Whitfield Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 2

020 7323 1544

This small, energetic place is a youthful antidote to the frippery of old-school fine dining with its stark, industrial interiors and sensational cooking.

The Gaucho Grill
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
60A Charlotte Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 2NU

020 7580 6252

Fitzrovia Restaurant
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
29 Tottenham Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 4RP

Gigs Fish N Chips
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
12 Tottenham Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 4R

+44 (0) 20 7636 1424

Cole Kitchenn
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
ROAR House, 46 Charlotte Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 2GS

02074275681

Splash Goodge St
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
24 Goodge Street, London
London, United Kingdom

Central Bikes
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
68 Charlotte Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 4QF

020 7637 0046

Pescatori Italian Seafood Restaurant
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
57 Charlotte St
London, United Kingdom W1T 4PD

020 7580 3289

Sanxia Renjia
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
29 Goodge Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 2PP

SanXia RenJia is the authentic Hubei and Sichuan cuisine

Church Of Scientology
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
68 Tottenham Court Road
London, United Kingdom W1T 2EZ

+44 (0) 20 7636 9874

Goodge Street London Underground Station
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
75 Tottenham Court Road
London, United Kingdom W1P 9PA

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Bang Bang
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
21 Goodge St
London, United Kingdom W1T 2

+44 (0) 20 7631 4191

Pod Tottenham Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
5-7 Tottenham Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 2AG

(44)020-7631-5386

Pescatori Fitzrovia
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
57 Charlotte St
London, United Kingdom W1T 4

020 7580 3289

Crazy Bear
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
26-28 Whitfield Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 2RG

02076310088

Italia Uno
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
91 Charlotte Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 4PX

020 7637 5326

Napoli Fans Club - London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
91 Charlotte Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 4PX

020 7637 5326