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St James's, Spanish Place, London | Tourist Information


22 George Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 3

020 7935 0943

St James's Church, Spanish Place, is a large English Gothic Roman Catholic church in Marylebone, London. Although currently situated in George Street, the church maintains its connection with Spanish Place, the road opposite the current church, because of its historic connection with the Spanish Embassy.SiteThe church is located in George Street, Marylebone, behind the Wallace Collection and close to Marylebone High Street.HistoryIn the reign of Elizabeth I the Bishops of Ely let their palace and chapel in Ely Place to the Spanish Ambassador and, until the reign of Charles I, it was occupied by the High Representative of the Court of Spain. During this period the chapel was freely used by English Roman Catholics and became a sanctuary to some degree for them.After the restoration of Charles II the Spanish Embassy was re-established in London, first on Ormond Street and then at Hertford House, Manchester Square, where the Wallace Collection is now housed. Here, in 1791, shortly after the Roman Catholic Relief Act 1791 repealed some of the laws affecting Catholic worship, a chapel was built on the corner of Spanish Place and Charles Street (now George Street), largely through the efforts of Doctor Thomas Hussey who had been a chaplain at the embassy since his ordination in 1769. Most of the objects of piety in the present church are legacies from this older building. In 1827 the official Spanish connection with the chapel ceased and it was handed over to the London Vicariate.

Catholic Church Near St James's, Spanish Place

The Church of The Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, Mayfair, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
14 Farm Street
London, W1K 3AH

The Church of The Immaculate Conception, 14 Farm Street, Mayfair, London W1K 3AH, The First Church in The Archdiocese of Westminster consecrated to The Immaculate Conception, The First Church in The Archdiocese of Westminster of The Society of Jesus http://www.jesuit.org.uk http://www.facebook.com/jesuitsinbritain http://www.facebook.com/pages/Society-of-Jesus-the-Jesuits/136742615242 http://www.facebook.com/pages/Gesuiti-Provincia-dItalia/190270457651133 The Church of The Immaculate Conception, 14 Farm Street, Mayfair, London W1K 3AH, Less than 400 meters to the East of the intersection of Park Lane and of South Street http://parish.rcdow.org.uk/farmstreet http://www.farmstreet.org.uk http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jtgRMSIHBLw http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WaoCc-MHr7U "O Maria, Sine Labe Concepta, ora pro nobis qui confugimus ad Te." "O Mary, Conceived Without Sin, pray for us who have recourse to Thee." The Society of Jesus, The British Province http://www.jesuit.org.uk http://www.facebook.com/jesuitsinbritain The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Westminster, Archidioecesis Vestmonasteriensis http://rcdow.org.uk http://www.youtube.com/rcdownews http://www.facebook.com/westminster.diocese The Metropolitan Cathedral of The Most Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, The Seat of The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Westminster and The Mother Church of England and of Wales http://www.westminstercathedral.org.uk http://www.facebook.com/westminstercath "Domine Iesu, Rex et Redemptor, per Sanguinem Tuum, salva nos." "Lord Jesus, King and Redeemer, through Thy Most Precious Blood, save us." ____________ In Honorem, The Reverend Father Wilbert Mireh, Societas Iesu, The 1st Priest of The Society of Jesus in Myanmar, Ordained to The Presbyterate on May 1, 2013, The Reverend Father Titus Tin Maung, Societas Iesu, The 2nd Priest of The Society of Jesus in Myanmar, Ordained to The Presbyterate on April 28, 2014, The Reverend Father Joseph Aik Maung, Societas Iesu, The 3rd Priest of The Society of Jesus in Myanmar, Ordained to The Presbyterate on May 4, 2014, The Society of Jesus, The Roman Catholic Metropolitan Archdiocese of Yangon, Archidioecesis Yangonensis http://www.yangonarchdiocese.org/society-of-jesus-sj http://www.facebook.com/YangonArchdiocese The Society of Jesus, The Asia Pacific Conference http://sjapc.net http://www.facebook.com/JesuitConferenceAsiaPacific In Honorem, María Eduarda Serrano Genuino http://plus.google.com/103561462057904703841 http://www.facebook.com/LaMadonnadelMiracoloColonnaRoma http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151158930861587.439151.729951586 http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151350292582766 http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150739450027025 http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151334587466587 http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151334598836587 In Honorem, The Reverend Father Guillrey Anthony Mallari Andal, Societas Iesu, The Jesuit Communications Foundation http://www.jescom.ph/ http://www.dailymotion.com/jescomprod http://www.youtube.com/jesuitcomm http://www.facebook.com/jescomph The Reverend Father Antonio Martín Basilio, Societas Iesu, The Reverend Father Erik John Jumalon Gerilla, Societas Iesu, The Reverend Father Joseph Emmanuel Almazan Liwanag, Societas Iesu, The Reverend Father Jordan Jubas Orbe, Societas Iesu, The Reverend Father Rubén Bullecer Orbeta, Societas Iesu, The Reverend Father Neupito Japus Saicon, Societas Iesu, The Reverend Brother Edmundo Adolfo de León Fernández, Institutum Fratrum Scholarum Christianarum, The Brother Visitor, The Lasallian East Asia District http://www.facebook.com/LasallianEastAsiaDistrict China and Hong Kong, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, The Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam In Honorem, Monica Panlilio Papa-Eugenio, Paolo Miguel Papa Eugenio, Franco Alejandro Papa Eugenio, María Isabel del Prado Buenaventura-Tambunting, * Ángela Verónica del Prado Cruz-Vogl, Signora Stephan Helmut Vogl, * * Felix Krisztián Cruz Vogl * * http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151160989926587 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151160876351587.439425.729951586 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.644022832286868.1073741825.130198763669280 * Ordo Equestris Sancti Sepulcri Hierosolymitani http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/institutions_connected/oessh http://www.vicariatusurbis.org/?page_id=188&ID=3108 http://www.santosepolcro.custodia.org http://www.santosepulcro.custodia.org http://www.saintsepulcre.custodia.org http://www.holysepulchre.custodia.org * * Ordo Militaris et Hospitalis Sancti Ioannis Hierosolymitani de Rhodo et Malta http://www.orderofmalta.int http://www.facebook.com/OrdineDiMalta http://www.facebook.com/OrdenDeMalta http://www.facebook.com/OrdreDeMalte http://www.facebook.com/DerMalteserorden http://www.facebook.com/OrderofMalta http://www.facebook.com/Orderofmaltaunog http://www.facebook.com/malteserinternational http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151576020381587 http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151576026116587 ____________

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
114 Mount Street
London, W1K 3

02074937811

The Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, also known as Farm Street Church, is a Roman Catholic parish church run by the Society of Jesus in Mayfair, central London. Its main entrance is in Farm Street, though it can also be accessed from the adjacent Mount Street Gardens. Sir Simon Jenkins, in his book England's Thousand Best Churches, describes the church as "Gothic Revival at its most sumptuous".

Farm Street Church
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
114 Mount Street
London, W1K 3AH

02074937811

Farm Street, the Jesuit church in the Mayfair district of London, has a special place in the hearts of many people, Catholics and non-Catholics alike. For over a hundred and fifty years it has served a community drawn to this church by its reputation for spiritual and intellectual vigour. Many have regularly travelled some distance to worship in this church and to seek the help and advice of the succeeding generations of priests who have served here. Since 1966 the church has been at the heart of a parish in the centre of Mayfair. The Jesuit community here has always consisted of Priests and Brothers attached specifically to the church, working in other apostolates or in retirement. The Parish is more than a geographic one, attracting its congregation not only from all over London and its surrounds but visitors from all over the world.

Our Lady of the Assumption & Saint Gregory, Warwick Street
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Warwick Street
London, W1F 9JR

020 7284 0033

Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral of the Holy Family in Exile
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
21-22, Binney Street Mayfair, London W1K 5BQ
London, W1K 5

020 7629 1073

The Cathedral of the Holy Family in Exile is the cathedral of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Eparchy of Holy Family of London. Though independent from the authority of the Latin Rite hierarchy in England and Wales, and instead under the jurisdiction of the Ukrainian Catholic Eparchial bishop, territorially, the cathedral is considered to be part of the Marylebone deanery of the Latin Rite Catholic Archdiocese of Westminster.It is the named after the Holy Family, during their flight into Egypt. It is located at Duke Street, Mayfair, London, England. It is open for worship daily. It was closed temporarily in 2007 when part of the ceiling collapsed, but has since been refurbished. The iconostasis created by a Ukrainian monk, Juvenalij Mokrytsky, was not affected by the ceiling's collapse.The building it occupies was designed by Alfred Waterhouse in 1891 for occupation by the Congregational King's Weigh House. They sold it to the Ukrainian Catholics in 1967.

St James Roman Catholic Church
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Spanish Place, 22 George Street
London, W1U 3QY

020 7935 0943

St. James's, Spanish Place
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
22 George Street
London, W1U 3QY

020 7935 0943

The visitor to St James's Church is often puzzled to know why a church which stands in George Street, W1, should have derived a kind of secondary title from a street called Spanish Place which can be found opposite the Presbytery door. The explanation is that St James's, Spanish Place, like so many of the older parishes in the Westminster diocese, can trace its origin to the penal times and to the benefactions of a friendly Catholic embassy. And this is perhaps the reason why, despite the magnificence of the church, there is within an atmosphere that breathes our Catholic past. In the reign of Elizabeth I the Bishops of Ely let their palace and chapel in Ely Place to the Spanish Ambassador, and until the reign of Charles I it was occupied by the representative of the Court of Spain. During this period the chapel was freely used by English Catholics and became a place of sanctuary for them. After the restoration of Charles II the Spanish Embassy was re-established in London, first on Ormond Street and then at Hartford house, Manchester Square, where the Wallace Collection is now housed. Here, in 1791, shortly after the first repeal of some of the laws affecting Catholic worship, a chapel was built on the corner of Spanish Place and Charles Street (now George Street), largely through the efforts of Doctor Thomas Hussey who had been a chaplain at the Embassy since his ordination in 1769. Most of the objects of piety in the present church are legacies from this older building which was famous enough in its day to be mentioned by Thackeray in Vanity Fair as the church attended by the Marchioness of Steyne. Dr Hussey, to whom this mission owes so much and who was for so long associated with it, later became Bishop of Waterford and Lismore. Deep religious impressions and a desire for solitude had led him, soon after ordination, to the renowned Abbey La Trappe with the desire to take the habit of that order. This determination would certainly have been carried out had it not been for the influence of lijs confessor who, feeling that the talents of Dr Hussey would in that case be lost to the Church, wrote to Rome for a mandate restraining his penitent from carrying out his intention of taking monastic vows. It was in obedience, then, to the Holy See that Dr Hussey returned to the active scene and he now ranks as the founder of Spanish Place. In the year 1827 the official Spanish connection with the chapel ceased and it was handed over to the London Vicariate. However, there is much in the present church to remind us of our Spanish heritage including Alfonso XIII's personal standard which is in a frame over the sacristy door, and the parishioners of Spanish Place have never forgotten their debt to Spain for having established and maintained the mission in the dark days. An unofficial connection with the Embassy of Spain has continued and is still cherished by the Church of St James today. A recurring anxiety from 1827 was the fact that the chapel was on leasehold property and the lease was not renewable. Funds were raised with a view to purchasing a site and building a new church, but as the neighbourhood was almost entirely divided up into large estates, it seemed impossible to find a site anywhere near the old chapel. One tradition has it, however, that the Rector towards the end of the lease, Canon William Barry, had a great devotion to the Holy Souls and he promised a hundred Masses for their repose in petition for a site. Soon after he had redeemed his promise the site of the present church, immediately opposite the old chapel, came up for sale at £30,000, the exact sum which Barry and his predecessors had collected towards a new church. The site was purchased and the design for a new church was made an open competition. Edward Goldie, great grandson of the architect of the old chapel, Signor Joseph Bonomi, won the competition and the present edifice, partially completed, was opened on Michaelmas Day, 1890. The Church was consecrated on 28th Juneil, 1949, by His Lordship Bishop Craven: a rare privilege for at that time he was parish priest and rector, and thus consecrated his own church. The consecration had been planned on two previous occasions but had had to be postponed - in 1935 because of the death of Cardinal Bourne, and in 1940 because of the second World War. Most of the archives of the old Spanish Chapel have gone to Spain, but there are preserved in the Church both Baptismal and Marriage Registers dating back to 1732.

Church Of Our Lady Of The Rosary Marylebone
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
211 Old Marylebone Road
London, NW1 5

20-77235101

Our Lady of The Rosary Catholic Church.
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
211 Old Marylebone Road
London,

St Charles Borromeo
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
8 Ogle Street
London, W1W 6HS

020 7636 2883

St Marylebone Parish Church
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, NW1 5LT

St Marylebone Parish Church is an Anglican church on the Marylebone Road in London. It was built to the designs of Thomas Hardwick in 1813–17. The present site is the third used by the parish for its church. The first was further south, near Oxford Street. The church there was demolished in 1400 and a new one erected further north. This was completely rebuilt in 1740–42, and converted into a chapel-of-ease when Hardwick's church was constructed. The Marylebone area takes its name from the church. Located behind the church is St Marylebone School, a Church of England school for girls.Previous churchesFirst churchThe first church for the parish was built in the vicinity of the present Marble Arch c.1200, and dedicated to St John the Evangelist.Second churchIn 1400 the Bishop of London gave the parishioners permission to demolish the church of St John and build a new one in a more convenient position, near a recently completed chapel, which could be used until the new church was completed. The bishop stipulated that the old churchyard should be preserved, but also gave permission to enclose a new burial ground at the new site, The church was dedicated to the Virgin Mary. It was closer to the village, at the north end of Marylebone High Street. Having fallen into a state of decay, it was demolished in 1740.

St. Marylebone Parish Church
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
17 Marylebone Rd
London, NW1 5LT

+44 (0) 20 7935 7315

St Marylebone Parish Church is a place of active and engaged Christian witness, set at the very heart of central London. With a history stretching back nearly 900 years, we seek to offer God worship that has long been renowned for musical and liturgical excellence and to serve the diverse community in which we are set. For more than 30 years, St Marylebone, just a few metres from Harley Street, has pioneered the work of Christian healing and, as well as being home to the internationally respected St Marylebone Healing and Counselling Centre, which offers low-cost analytical psychotherapy and spiritual direction, the Crypt at St Marylebone also houses an innovative NHS doctor’s surgery - the Marylebone Health Centre. Our work is enhanced by maintaining close and active links with some of medicine’s Royal Colleges and through our provision of chaplaincy to The London Clinic and King Edward VII’s Hospital. St Marylebone has a flourishing Young Church which complements our two schools: The St Marylebone Church of England School, an Outstanding Academy, National Teaching School and Maths Hub, and The St Marylebone Church of England Bridge School, a Free Special School working with secondary school age students who have speech, language and communication difficulties. Alongside our two schools St Marylebone works closely with the Royal Academy of Music and the University of Westminster, providing chaplaincy services to both, and also with Regent’s University. As a parish church in the Diocese of London, we share a vision of a Church for this great world city that is Christ-centred and outward looking. By God’s grace we seek to be more confident in speaking and living the Gospel of Jesus Christ, more compassionate in serving others with the love of God the Father and more creative in reaching new people and places in the power of the Spirit.

St Aloysius Roman Catholic Church
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
20 Phoenix Road
London, NW1 1

20-73871971

Landmark and Historical Place Near St James's, Spanish Place

Embassy of Indonesia, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
38 Grosvenor Square
London, United Kingdom W1K 2HW

The Embassy of Indonesia in London is the diplomatic mission of Indonesia in the United Kingdom. It is located on Grosvenor Square in Mayfair, close to the American embassy. Indonesia also maintain a Consular Department & Visa Section at 38A Adam’s Row, Mayfair.HistoryThe first diplomatic representative of Indonesia in the United Kingdom was Dr. Subandrio who served in 1949 until 1954. There have been 18 Ambassadors in the past years, including two air marshals, a lieutenant and Raden Mohammad Marty Muliana Natalegawa who is currently serving as the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Indonesia.DepartmentsThere are currently 10 Departments in the embassy including 2 Defence Attachés, 1 Transportation Attaché, 1 Trade Attaché and 1 Educational Attaché.

Bond Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Old Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 2SA

0207 708 4181

Bond Street es una de las principales calles de compras de Londres, atraviesa Mayfair desde Piccadilly en el sur, hasta Oxford Street en el norte. Es una de las principales calles del distrito comercial del West End, aunque las tiendas ubicadas en ellas son más elitistas que las de las cercanas Regent Street y Oxford Street. Esta calle se encuentra en el distrito londinense de Mayfair, y lleva siendo una calle de compras desde el siglo XVIII. Técnicamente “Bond Street” no existe; la parte sur de la calle se conoce como Old Bond Street, y la parte norte, que es más de la mitad de la calle, es conocida como New Bond Street. Sin embargo esta distinción no se usa en el día a día.HistoriaBond Street toma su nombre de Sir Thomas Bond, el presidente de un sindicato de promotores que compró una mansión en Piccadilly -llamada Clarendon House- a Christopher Monck, 2º Duque de Albergarle en 1683, y la derribó para desarrollar la zona. También construyeron las cercanas Dover Street y Albermale Street. En aquella época la casa daba a campo abierto y el desarrollo de la zona de Mayfair apenas había comenzado. La calle se dispuso principalmente de sur a norte, siendo la parte sur Old Bond Street, y la parte norte New Bond Street, esta última parte se añadió a medida que Londres iba creciendo. El mapa de Londres publicado en 1746 por John Rocque muestra la calle en su totalidad y todas las calles aledañas completamente construidas.La calle en la actualidadEn un principio Bond Street era conocida por sus marchantes de arte y sus tiendas de antigüedades, aglutinadas alrededor de la sede londinense de la casa de subastas Sotheby’s, que ha estado en Bond Street durante unos cien años, y de la Sociedad de Bellas Artes, presente en la calle desde su fundación en 1876. Quedan pocas de esas tiendas, pero muchas de ellas han sido ocupadas por boutiques de moda, incluyendo sedes de las más famosas firmas de diseñadores en el mundo. También hay muchas joyerías. En esta calle se encuentra “Aliados”, una peculiar estatua realizada por Lawrence Holofcener que inmortaliza a Winston Churchill y Franklin D. Roosevelt sentados en un banco conversando.

Bond Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Old Bond Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 2SA

0207 708 4181

Bond Street is a major shopping street in the West End of London. It links Piccadilly in the south to Oxford Street in the north and has been popular for retail since the 18th century, being the home of many fashion outlets that sell prestigious and expensive items. The southern section is Old Bond Street and the longer northern section New Bond Street—a distinction not generally made in everyday usage.The street was built on fields surrounding Clarendon House on Piccadilly, which were developed by Sir Thomas Bond. It was built up in the 1720s, and by the end of the 18th century was a popular place for the upper-class residents of Mayfair to socialise. Prestigious and expensive shops were established along the street, but it declined as a centre of social activity in the 19th century, although it held its reputation as a fashionable place for retail, and is home to the auction houses Sotheby's and Bonhams (formerly Phillips) and the department stores Fenwick and Tiffany's. It is one of the most expensive and sought after strips of real estate in Europe.GeographyBond Street is the only street that runs between Oxford Street and Piccadilly. Old Bond Street is at the southern end between Piccadilly and Burlington Gardens. The northern section, New Bond Street, extends as far as Oxford Street. The entire street is around 0.5mi long. Many of the shop frontages are less than 20ft wide.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

Selfridges is a Grade II listed retail premises on Oxford Street in London. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York City. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Westmoreland Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 8PH

020 3456 7890

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street, named The Heart Hospital until refurbished and renamed in 2015, was a specialist cardiac hospital located in London, United Kingdom until 2015. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London (UCL). After the 2015 refurbishment the hospital provided thoracic surgery, and the UCLH urology department moved there.Before the 2015 refurbishment the Heart Hospital conducted over 1,000 surgical heart operations each year, had 95 in-patient beds, and was one of the largest cardiac centres in the UK. It treated around 1,700 new outpatients, 5,500 follow-up outpatients and 1,200 inpatients each year. It was a centre for cardiac research, home to the UCL Centre for Cardiology in the Young, and part of the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre. It is a teaching hospital for the UCL Medical School.

King Edward VII's Hospital
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
5-10 Beaumont St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6AA

020 7486 4411

King Edward VII's Hospital is a charity-registered private hospital in the City of Westminster in London, known as King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers from 1904 to 2000.HistoryEarly historyThe hospital was established in 1899 at the suggestion of the Prince of Wales . Agnes Keyser, a mistress of the Prince, and her sister Fanny used their house at 17 Grosvenor Crescent to help sick and wounded British Army officers who had returned from the Boer War. King Edward VII became the hospital's first patron. In 1904 it officially became King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers.20th centuryDuring the First World War, the hospital was at 9 Grosvenor Gardens, where officers would be nursed; the young novelist Stuart Cloete was one of them, as was the future British Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan, who underwent a series of long operations followed by recuperation there from 1916–18, from serious wounds sustained in conflict during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. In 1930, the hospital was awarded a Royal Charter "to operate an acute Hospital where serving and retired officers of the Services and their spouses can be treated at preferential rates."In 1941 the interior of the building was badly damaged by bombing, and Sister Agnes died from natural causes. In 1948 the hospital moved to Beaumont Street. It was officially opened on 15 October by Queen Mary.

High Commission of the Maldives, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
22 Nottingham Place
London, United Kingdom W1U 5

02072242135

The High Commission of the Maldives in London is the diplomatic mission of the Maldives in the United Kingdom. It was established in 1995 by upgrading the existing Maldives Government Trade Representative's Office; it was formally opened by former Maldivian President Maumoon Abdul Gayoom.

St Cyprian's, Clarence Gate
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Glentworth St
London, United Kingdom NW1 6AX

020 7258 0724

St Cyprian's Church is an Anglican church in the Marylebone district of London, UK, founded in 1866 by Father Charles Gutch. It is dedicated to Saint Cyprian, a third-century martyr and Bishop of Carthage and is located by the south-western corner of Regent's Park, next to Clarence Gate Gardens just off Baker Street.HistoryFather Charles Gutch, who was previously curate at St Matthias', Stoke Newington, St Paul's, Knightsbridge, and All Saints, Margaret Street, was anxious to acquire a church of his own in London, so that he could manage it in his own style. He proposed to build a mission church in a poor and neglected northeastern corner of Marylebone, which would require a portion of the parishes of St Marylebone and St Paul, Rossmore Road to be handed over. However, neither the Rector of St Marlebone nor the Vicar of St Paul's approved of the churchmanship of Father Gutch. Further, he proposed to dedicate the mission to St Cyprian of Carthage, explaining:This caused further difficulties, and only a few weeks before the mission was due to be opened, the Bishop of London protested, claiming that the dedication would be against his and his predecessor's rules, and suggested that the district be named after one of the Apostles instead. Farther Gurch pointed out that a number of other churches in the Diocese had recently been dedicated to other saints, and the dedication to St Cyprian was allowed to remain. It celebrated its first Eucharist on 29 March 1866.