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St James's, Spanish Place, London | Tourist Information



22 George Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 3


St James's Church, Spanish Place, is a large English Gothic Roman Catholic church in Marylebone, London. Although currently situated in George Street, the church maintains its connection with Spanish Place, the road opposite the current church, because of its historic connection with the Spanish Embassy.SiteThe church is located in George Street, Marylebone, behind the Wallace Collection and close to Marylebone High Street.HistoryIn the reign of Elizabeth I the Bishops of Ely let their palace and chapel in Ely Place to the Spanish Ambassador and, until the reign of Charles I, it was occupied by the High Representative of the Court of Spain. During this period the chapel was freely used by English Roman Catholics and became a sanctuary to some degree for them.After the restoration of Charles II the Spanish Embassy was re-established in London, first on Ormond Street and then at Hertford House, Manchester Square, where the Wallace Collection is now housed. Here, in 1791, shortly after the Roman Catholic Relief Act 1791 repealed some of the laws affecting Catholic worship, a chapel was built on the corner of Spanish Place and Charles Street (now George Street), largely through the efforts of Doctor Thomas Hussey who had been a chaplain at the embassy since his ordination in 1769. Most of the objects of piety in the present church are legacies from this older building. In 1827 the official Spanish connection with the chapel ceased and it was handed over to the London Vicariate.

Catholic Church Near St James's, Spanish Place

Westminster Cathedral
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
42 Francis Street
London, United Kingdom SW1P 1QW

Westminster Cathedral, or The Metropolitan Cathedral of the Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, in London is the mother church of the Catholic Church in England and Wales.The site on which the cathedral stands in the City of Westminster was purchased by the Archdiocese of Westminster in 1885. Westminster Cathedral is the largest Catholic church in England and Wales and the seat of the Archbishop of Westminster.John Betjeman called it "a masterpiece in striped brick and stone in an intricate pattern of bonding, the domes being all-brick in order to prove that the good craftsman has no need of steel or concrete."HistoryIn the late 19th century, the Catholic Church's hierarchy had only recently been restored in England and Wales, and it was in memory of Cardinal Wiseman (who died in 1865, and was the first Archbishop of Westminster from 1850) that the first substantial sum of money was raised for the new cathedral. The land was acquired in 1884 by Wiseman's successor, Cardinal Manning, having previously been occupied by the second Tothill Fields Bridewell prison.After two false starts in 1867 (under architect Henry Clutton) and 1892 (architect Baron von Herstel), construction started in 1895 under Manning's successor, the third archbishop Cardinal Vaughan with John Francis Bentley as architect, and built in a style heavily influenced by Byzantine architecture.

The Oratory of S Philip Neri in London (Brompton Oratory)
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
Brompton Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 2RP

02078080900

This famous Roman Catholic church was built between 1880 and 1884. It is the church of a community of priests called "The Congregation of the Oratory of Saint Philip Neri" or Oratorians. Popularly but incorrectly known as 'Brompton Oratory' it is the second largest Catholic church in London, with a nave exceeding in width even that of St Paul's Cathedral (Anglican). St. Philip Neri (1515-1595) founded his Congregation in Rome and it has spread throughout the world, now numbering some seventy houses, and some five hundred priests. Soon after converting to Catholicism in 1845, John Henry Newman became an Oratorian and brought St. Philip's Oratory from Rome to England. The first English foundation was in Birmingham, then a further group of converts, including Father Frederick William Faber, founded the London Oratory. They began in converted premises, variously described as a whisky store, a gin shop and a dance hall, in King William Street, just off the Strand. After three years a property was found in Brompton on what was then the outskirts of London. It was a district of fields and lanes. Fr Faber described it as the 'Madeira of London'. The house was built first, with a temporary church on the present site. To mark the silver jubilee of the founding of the Congregation an appeal was launched in 1874 to raise funds to build the present church. By March 1876 a design in the Renaissance style had been received from Herbert Gribble, a twenty-nine year old recent convert from Devon. His design having been judged the winner in a competition he was awarded a prize of £200 by the Fathers. The foundation stone was laid in June 1880 and the present neo-baroque building was privately consecrated on the 16th April 1884. A few days later Cardinal manning officially opened the Church and preached to a congregation which included 16 bishops and 250 priests. The church had cost £93,000 to build and in the following decade a further £14,000 was spent on the building. The façade at the South end was not added until 1893 and the outer dome was completed in 1895-96 to a design of George Sherrin. The last major external work was the erection of the Newman memorial in 1896 (six years after his death). The architectural style and the atmosphere of the church were deliberately Italianate, in order to bring St. Philip's romanità to nineteenth century London. The present church was restored and redecorated to celebrate its centenary in 1984. An Oratory is first and foremost a place of prayer. St. Philip attached great importance to the beauty of divine worship and the power of sacred music to raise our hearts to God, and the Fathers of the London Oratory try to maintain this tradition. St. Philip was particularly devoted to Our Lady. He used to say "My sons, be devoted to the Madonna." This is why the founding Fathers of the London Oratory wanted their new church to be dedicated to the Immaculate Heart of Mary. St. Philip spent his whole priestly life in Rome, working tirelessly to help people of all types and all backgrounds to come closer to God. He devoted much time to helping the poor and the sick, both spiritually and materially. He became known as "the apostle of Rome." May his prayers prosper his continuing work in London.

Our Lady of Victories Catholic Church, Kensington London
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
Church of Our Lady of Victories 235a Kensington High Street London
London, United Kingdom W8 6SA

020 7937 4778

Notre Dame de France
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
5 Leicester Place
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7BX

02074379363

Notre Dame de France is the Roman Catholic Francophone Chaplaincy in London run by the Marist Fathers.

St Peter's Italian Church
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
136 Clerkenwell Road
London, United Kingdom EC1R 5

020 7837 1528

St. Peter's Italian Church is a Basilica-style church located in Holborn, London.HistoryIt was built by request of Saint Vincent Pallotti, and it is still under the control of the Pallotine order which he founded. He had assistance from Giuseppe Mazzini, who was in London at the time, for the growing number of Italian immigrants in the mid 19th century and modelled by Irish architect Sir John Miller-Bryson on the Basilica San Crisogono in Rome.It was consecrated on 16 April 1863 as The Church of St. Peter of all Nations. At the time of consecration, it was the only Basilica-style church in the UK. Its organ was built in 1886 by Belgian Anneesen.The frontal section of the church consists of a loggia and portico with twin arches, above which are three alcoves. The central alcove contains a statue of Christ, whilst the sides contain statues of St. Bede and St. George. Between the alcoves are two large mosaics depicting the miracle of the fishes and Jesus giving the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven to St. Peter.Above the façade is a 33-metre-high bell tower, built in 1891 which houses a bell known as "The Steel Monster".In the loggia are two remembrance plaques, one to veterans (mostly Italian Britons) of World War I and the other to 446 Italians who lost their lives on the Arandora Star.

All Souls Church, Langham Place
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 All Souls Place
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1B 3DA

020 7580 3522

All Souls Church is an Anglican Evangelical church in central London, situated in Langham Place in Marylebone, at the north end of Regent Street. It was designed in regency style by John Nash and consecrated in 1824.As it is very near BBC Broadcasting House, the BBC often broadcasts from the church. As well as the core church membership, many hundreds of visitors come to All Souls, bringing the average number of those coming through the doors for services on Sundays to around 2,500 every week. All Souls has an international congregation, with all ages represented.HistoryThe church was designed by John Nash, favourite architect of King George IV. Its prominent circular spired vestibule was designed to provide an eye-catching monument at the point where Regent Street, newly-laid out as part of Nash's scheme to link Piccadilly with the new Regent's Park, takes an awkward abrupt bend westward to align with the pre-existing Portland Place.All Souls was a Commissioners' church, a grant of £12,819 being given by the Church Building Commission towards the cost of its construction. The commission had been set up under an act of 1818, and Nash, as one of the three architects employed by the Board of Works, had been asked to supply specimen designs as soon as the act was passed. It was, however, one of only two Commissioners' churches to be built to his designs, the other being the Gothic Revival St Mary, Haggerston. All Souls is the last surviving church by John Nash.

St Margaret's, Westminster
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, United Kingdom SW1P 3

020 7222 6382

The Church of St Margaret, Westminster Abbey, is situated in the grounds of Westminster Abbey on Parliament Square, and is the Anglican parish church of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom in London. It is dedicated to Margaret of Antioch.History and descriptionOriginally founded in the twelfth century by Benedictine monks, so that local people who lived in the area around the Abbey could worship separately at their own simpler parish church, and historically part of the hundred of Ossulstone in the county of Middlesex, St Margaret's was rebuilt from 1486 to 1523. It became the parish church of the Palace of Westminster in 1614, when the Puritans of the seventeenth century, unhappy with the highly liturgical Abbey, chose to hold Parliamentary services in the more "suitable" St Margaret's: a practice that has continued since that time.The Rector of St Margaret's is a canon of Westminster Abbey.The north-west tower was rebuilt by John James from 1734 to 1738; at the same time, the whole structure was encased in Portland stone. Both the eastern and the western porch were added later by J. L. Pearson. The church's interior was greatly restored and altered to its current appearance by Sir George Gilbert Scott in 1877, although many of the Tudor features were retained.

The Church of The Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, Mayfair, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
14 Farm Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 3AH

The Church of The Immaculate Conception, 14 Farm Street, Mayfair, London W1K 3AH, The First Church in The Archdiocese of Westminster consecrated to The Immaculate Conception, The First Church in The Archdiocese of Westminster of The Society of Jesus http://www.jesuit.org.uk http://www.facebook.com/jesuitsinbritain http://www.facebook.com/pages/Society-of-Jesus-the-Jesuits/136742615242 http://www.facebook.com/pages/Gesuiti-Provincia-dItalia/190270457651133 The Church of The Immaculate Conception, 14 Farm Street, Mayfair, London W1K 3AH, Less than 400 meters to the East of the intersection of Park Lane and of South Street http://parish.rcdow.org.uk/farmstreet http://www.farmstreet.org.uk http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jtgRMSIHBLw http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WaoCc-MHr7U "O Maria, Sine Labe Concepta, ora pro nobis qui confugimus ad Te." "O Mary, Conceived Without Sin, pray for us who have recourse to Thee." The Society of Jesus, The British Province http://www.jesuit.org.uk http://www.facebook.com/jesuitsinbritain The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Westminster, Archidioecesis Vestmonasteriensis http://rcdow.org.uk http://www.youtube.com/rcdownews http://www.facebook.com/westminster.diocese The Metropolitan Cathedral of The Most Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, The Seat of The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Westminster and The Mother Church of England and of Wales http://www.westminstercathedral.org.uk http://www.facebook.com/westminstercath "Domine Iesu, Rex et Redemptor, per Sanguinem Tuum, salva nos." "Lord Jesus, King and Redeemer, through Thy Most Precious Blood, save us." ____________ In Honorem, The Reverend Father Wilbert Mireh, Societas Iesu, The 1st Priest of The Society of Jesus in Myanmar, Ordained to The Presbyterate on May 1, 2013, The Reverend Father Titus Tin Maung, Societas Iesu, The 2nd Priest of The Society of Jesus in Myanmar, Ordained to The Presbyterate on April 28, 2014, The Reverend Father Joseph Aik Maung, Societas Iesu, The 3rd Priest of The Society of Jesus in Myanmar, Ordained to The Presbyterate on May 4, 2014, The Society of Jesus, The Roman Catholic Metropolitan Archdiocese of Yangon, Archidioecesis Yangonensis http://www.yangonarchdiocese.org/society-of-jesus-sj http://www.facebook.com/YangonArchdiocese The Society of Jesus, The Asia Pacific Conference http://sjapc.net http://www.facebook.com/JesuitConferenceAsiaPacific In Honorem, María Eduarda Serrano Genuino http://plus.google.com/103561462057904703841 http://www.facebook.com/LaMadonnadelMiracoloColonnaRoma http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151158930861587.439151.729951586 http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151350292582766 http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150739450027025 http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151334587466587 http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151334598836587 In Honorem, The Reverend Father Guillrey Anthony Mallari Andal, Societas Iesu, The Jesuit Communications Foundation http://www.jescom.ph/ http://www.dailymotion.com/jescomprod http://www.youtube.com/jesuitcomm http://www.facebook.com/jescomph The Reverend Father Antonio Martín Basilio, Societas Iesu, The Reverend Father Erik John Jumalon Gerilla, Societas Iesu, The Reverend Father Joseph Emmanuel Almazan Liwanag, Societas Iesu, The Reverend Father Jordan Jubas Orbe, Societas Iesu, The Reverend Father Rubén Bullecer Orbeta, Societas Iesu, The Reverend Father Neupito Japus Saicon, Societas Iesu, The Reverend Brother Edmundo Adolfo de León Fernández, Institutum Fratrum Scholarum Christianarum, The Brother Visitor, The Lasallian East Asia District http://www.facebook.com/LasallianEastAsiaDistrict China and Hong Kong, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, The Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam In Honorem, Monica Panlilio Papa-Eugenio, Paolo Miguel Papa Eugenio, Franco Alejandro Papa Eugenio, María Isabel del Prado Buenaventura-Tambunting, * Ángela Verónica del Prado Cruz-Vogl, Signora Stephan Helmut Vogl, * * Felix Krisztián Cruz Vogl * * http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151160989926587 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151160876351587.439425.729951586 http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.644022832286868.1073741825.130198763669280 * Ordo Equestris Sancti Sepulcri Hierosolymitani http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/institutions_connected/oessh http://www.vicariatusurbis.org/?page_id=188&ID=3108 http://www.santosepolcro.custodia.org http://www.santosepulcro.custodia.org http://www.saintsepulcre.custodia.org http://www.holysepulchre.custodia.org * * Ordo Militaris et Hospitalis Sancti Ioannis Hierosolymitani de Rhodo et Malta http://www.orderofmalta.int http://www.facebook.com/OrdineDiMalta http://www.facebook.com/OrdenDeMalta http://www.facebook.com/OrdreDeMalte http://www.facebook.com/DerMalteserorden http://www.facebook.com/OrderofMalta http://www.facebook.com/Orderofmaltaunog http://www.facebook.com/malteserinternational http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151576020381587 http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151576026116587 ____________

St Dominic's Priory
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
Southampton Road
London, United Kingdom NW5 4LB

02074829210

St. Marylebone Parish Church
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
17 Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5LT

+44 (0) 20 7935 7315

With history stretching back more than 800 years we seek to offer God worship that has long been renowned for its musical and liturgical excellence. St Marylebone is just a few metres from Harley Street, and for 30 years has pioneered the work of Christian healing. As well as being home to the internationally respected Healing and Counselling Centre, which offers low-cost psychotherapy and spiritual direction, the Crypt at St Marylebone also houses an innovative NHS doctor’s surgery. Our work is enhanced by close links with some of medicine’s Royal Colleges and chaplaincy at The London Clinic and King Edward VII’s Hospital Sister Agnes. St Marylebone has a flourishing Young Church which complements our schools: The St Marylebone Church of England School, an Outstanding Academy, National Teaching School and Maths Hub, and The St Marylebone Church of England Bridge School, a Free Special School working with secondary school age students who have speech, language and communication difficulties. Alongside our two schools St Marylebone works closely with the Royal Academy of Music, the University of Westminster and Regent’s University. As a parish church in the Diocese of London, we share a vision of a Church for this great world city that is Christ-centred and outward looking. We seek to be more confident in speaking and living the Gospel of Jesus Christ, more compassionate in serving others with the love of God the Father and more creative in reaching new people and places in the power of the Spirit.

St James Roman Catholic Church
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
22 George St
London, United Kingdom W1U 3QY

020 7935 0943

St Patrick's, Soho
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
21A Soho Square
London, United Kingdom W1D 4HN

02074372010

St. Patrick’s was built with the love and the pennies of the poor. The poor, both spiritually and materially, are very much part of this community and the parish in its two hundred and twenty years of history, continues to serve them as best it can. It does so in an area where the prosperous, rich and fashionable share the streets with the desperate and disenfranchised, just as they did when the first Mass was celebrated here back in 1792.

St Etheldreda's Church
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
14 Ely Place
London, United Kingdom EC1N 6

0207 405 1061

St Etheldreda's Church is in Ely Place, off Charterhouse Street in Holborn, London. The Roman Catholic church is dedicated to Æthelthryth, or Etheldreda, the Anglo-Saxon saint who founded the monastery at Ely in 673. It was the chapel of the London residence of the Bishops of Ely.It is one of the oldest Roman Catholic churches in England, and one of two surviving buildings in London dating from Edward I's reign. The chapel was purchased by the Roman Catholic church in 1874 and opened in 1878.DescriptionSt Etheldreda's consists of a chapel, or upper church, and a crypt or undercroft and is active and used for Masses, baptisms, weddings, and funerals. Because Etheldreda was often invoked for help with infections of the throat, the Blessing of the Throats is held annually at the chapel.The Catholic chapel at the United States Military Academy, West Point, is modelled on St Etheldreda's.

St Etheldreda's, Ely place
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
14 Ely Place
London, United Kingdom

0207 405 1061

St. George's Bloomsbury
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
6-7 Little Russell St
London, United Kingdom WC1A 2HR

We try to open the church between 1 - 4pm every day. (12pm to 4pm on Sundays) Please note however, that as we are dependant on volunteers the church may not be open if you visit us. If you are travelling from a long distance please do call ahead so we can guarantee access.

Church Of Our Lady Of The Rosary Marylebone
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
211 Old Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5

20-77235101

St. Mary of the Angels
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Artesian Road
London, United Kingdom W2 5

020 7229 0487

St. James's, Spanish Place
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
22 George Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 3QY

020 7935 0943

The visitor to St James's Church is often puzzled to know why a church which stands in George Street, W1, should have derived a kind of secondary title from a street called Spanish Place which can be found opposite the Presbytery door. The explanation is that St James's, Spanish Place, like so many of the older parishes in the Westminster diocese, can trace its origin to the penal times and to the benefactions of a friendly Catholic embassy. And this is perhaps the reason why, despite the magnificence of the church, there is within an atmosphere that breathes our Catholic past. In the reign of Elizabeth I the Bishops of Ely let their palace and chapel in Ely Place to the Spanish Ambassador, and until the reign of Charles I it was occupied by the representative of the Court of Spain. During this period the chapel was freely used by English Catholics and became a place of sanctuary for them. After the restoration of Charles II the Spanish Embassy was re-established in London, first on Ormond Street and then at Hartford house, Manchester Square, where the Wallace Collection is now housed. Here, in 1791, shortly after the first repeal of some of the laws affecting Catholic worship, a chapel was built on the corner of Spanish Place and Charles Street (now George Street), largely through the efforts of Doctor Thomas Hussey who had been a chaplain at the Embassy since his ordination in 1769. Most of the objects of piety in the present church are legacies from this older building which was famous enough in its day to be mentioned by Thackeray in Vanity Fair as the church attended by the Marchioness of Steyne. Dr Hussey, to whom this mission owes so much and who was for so long associated with it, later became Bishop of Waterford and Lismore. Deep religious impressions and a desire for solitude had led him, soon after ordination, to the renowned Abbey La Trappe with the desire to take the habit of that order. This determination would certainly have been carried out had it not been for the influence of lijs confessor who, feeling that the talents of Dr Hussey would in that case be lost to the Church, wrote to Rome for a mandate restraining his penitent from carrying out his intention of taking monastic vows. It was in obedience, then, to the Holy See that Dr Hussey returned to the active scene and he now ranks as the founder of Spanish Place. In the year 1827 the official Spanish connection with the chapel ceased and it was handed over to the London Vicariate. However, there is much in the present church to remind us of our Spanish heritage including Alfonso XIII's personal standard which is in a frame over the sacristy door, and the parishioners of Spanish Place have never forgotten their debt to Spain for having established and maintained the mission in the dark days. An unofficial connection with the Embassy of Spain has continued and is still cherished by the Church of St James today. A recurring anxiety from 1827 was the fact that the chapel was on leasehold property and the lease was not renewable. Funds were raised with a view to purchasing a site and building a new church, but as the neighbourhood was almost entirely divided up into large estates, it seemed impossible to find a site anywhere near the old chapel. One tradition has it, however, that the Rector towards the end of the lease, Canon William Barry, had a great devotion to the Holy Souls and he promised a hundred Masses for their repose in petition for a site. Soon after he had redeemed his promise the site of the present church, immediately opposite the old chapel, came up for sale at £30,000, the exact sum which Barry and his predecessors had collected towards a new church. The site was purchased and the design for a new church was made an open competition. Edward Goldie, great grandson of the architect of the old chapel, Signor Joseph Bonomi, won the competition and the present edifice, partially completed, was opened on Michaelmas Day, 1890. The Church was consecrated on 28th Juneil, 1949, by His Lordship Bishop Craven: a rare privilege for at that time he was parish priest and rector, and thus consecrated his own church. The consecration had been planned on two previous occasions but had had to be postponed - in 1935 because of the death of Cardinal Bourne, and in 1940 because of the second World War. Most of the archives of the old Spanish Chapel have gone to Spain, but there are preserved in the Church both Baptismal and Marriage Registers dating back to 1732.

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
114 Mount St
London, United Kingdom W1K 3

02074937811

The Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, also known as Farm Street Church, is a Roman Catholic parish church run by the Society of Jesus in Mayfair, central London. Its main entrance is in Farm Street, though it can also be accessed from the adjacent Mount Street Gardens. Sir Simon Jenkins, in his book England's Thousand Best Churches, describes the church as "Gothic Revival at its most sumptuous".

St Georges Roman Catholic Cathedral
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
33 Westminster Bridge Road
Southwark, United Kingdom SE1 7JB

+44 20 7525 9250

Landmark Near St James's, Spanish Place

Madame Tussauds London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LR
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

0871 894 3000

Oxford Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street, London
London, United Kingdom W1K 1NA

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Oxford Street is a major road in the City of Westminster in the West End of London. It is Europe's busiest shopping street, with around half a million daily visitors, and as of 2012 had approximately 300 shops. It is designated as part of the A40, a major road between London and Fishguard, though it is not signed as such, and traffic is regularly restricted to buses and taxis.The road was originally a Roman road, part of the Via Trinobantina between Essex and Hampshire via London. It was known as Tyburn Road through the Middle Ages and was once notorious as a street where prisoners from Newgate Prison would be transported towards a public hanging. It became known as Oxford Road and then Oxford Street in the 18th century, and began to change character from a residential street to commercial and retail purposes by the late 19th century, also attracting street traders, confidence tricksters and prostitution. The first department stores in Britain opened on Oxford Street in the early 20th century, including Selfridges, John Lewis and HMV. Unlike nearby shopping streets such as Bond Street, it has retained an element of downmarket street trading alongside more prestigious retail stores. The street suffered heavy bombing during World War II, and several longstanding stores including John Lewis were completely destroyed and rebuilt from scratch.

Broadcasting House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
BBC Broadcasting House Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AA

020 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

Baker Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
113 Baker St
Oxford, United Kingdom W1U 6TD

Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid the street out in the 18th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived at a fictional 221B Baker Street address. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises.Baker Street is a busy thoroughfare, lying in postcode areas NW1/W1 and forming part of the A41 there. It runs south from Regent's Park, the junction with Park Road, parallel to Gloucester Place, meeting Marylebone Road, Portman Square and Wigmore Street. At the junction with Wigmore Street, Baker Street turns into Orchard Street, which ends when it meets with Oxford Street. After Portman Square the road continues as Orchard Street.The street is served by the London Underground by Baker Street tube station, one of the world's oldest surviving underground stations. Next door is Transport for London's lost property office.

Marble Arch
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1H 7

870-2427114

Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch and London landmark. The structure was designed by John Nash in 1827 to be the state entrance to the cour d'honneur of Buckingham Palace; it stood near the site of what is today the three bayed, central projection of the palace containing the well known balcony. In 1851 it was relocated and following the widening of Park Lane in the early 1960s is now sited, isolated and incongruously, on a large traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street, Park Lane, and Edgware Road.Historically, only members of the Royal Family and the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery are permitted to pass through the arch; this happens only in ceremonial processions.The arch gives its name to the vicinity of its site, particularly, the southern portion of Edgware Road and also to the nearby underground station.Design and constructionThe design of the arch is based on that of the Arch of Constantine in Rome and the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel in Paris. The arch is faced with Carrara marble with embellishments of marble extracted near Seravezza. John Flaxman was chosen to make the commemorative sculpture. After his death in 1826 the commission was divided between Sir Richard Westmacott, Edward Hodges Baily and J.C.F. Rossi. In 1829, a bronze equestrian statue of George IV was commissioned from Sir Francis Chantrey, with the intention of placing it on top of the arch.

Marble Arch
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1H 7

870-2427114

Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch and London landmark. The structure was designed by John Nash in 1827 to be the state entrance to the cour d'honneur of Buckingham Palace; it stood near the site of what is today the three bayed, central projection of the palace containing the well known balcony. In 1851 it was relocated and following the widening of Park Lane in the early 1960s is now sited, isolated and incongruously, on a large traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street, Park Lane, and Edgware Road.Historically, only members of the Royal Family and the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery are permitted to pass through the arch; this happens only in ceremonial processions.The arch gives its name to the vicinity of its site, particularly, the southern portion of Edgware Road and also to the nearby underground station.Design and constructionThe design of the arch is based on that of the Arch of Constantine in Rome and the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel in Paris. The arch is faced with Carrara marble with embellishments of marble extracted near Seravezza. John Flaxman was chosen to make the commemorative sculpture. After his death in 1826 the commission was divided between Sir Richard Westmacott, Edward Hodges Baily and J.C.F. Rossi. In 1829, a bronze equestrian statue of George IV was commissioned from Sir Francis Chantrey, with the intention of placing it on top of the arch.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

Selfridges, Oxford Street is a Grade II listed retail premises, located in Oxford Street, London, England. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

Selfridges, Oxford Street is a Grade II listed retail premises, located in Oxford Street, London, England. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

Harley Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Harley Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1G 9

2076-360838

Harley Street is a street in Marylebone, central London, which has been noted since the 19th century for its large number of private specialists in medicine and surgery.OverviewSince the 19th century, the number of doctors, hospitals, and medical organizations in and around Harley Street has greatly increased. Records show that there were around 20 doctors in 1860, 80 by 1900, and almost 200 by 1914. When the National Health Service was established in 1948, there were around 1,500. Today, there are more than 3,000 people employed in the Harley Street area, in clinics, medical and paramedical practices, and hospitals such as The Harley Street Clinic and The London Clinic.It has been speculated that doctors were originally attracted to the area by the development of commodious housing and central proximity to the important railway stations of Paddington, Kings Cross, St Pancras, Euston and, later, Marylebone. The nearest Tube stations are Regent's Park and Oxford Circus.Land ownershipHarley Street is part of the Howard de Walden Estate.

221B Baker Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
221B Baker Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 6X

+44(0) 20 7224 3688

221B Baker Street is the London address of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, created by author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In the United Kingdom, postal addresses with a number followed by a letter may indicate a separate address within a larger, often residential building. Baker Street in Holmes' time was a high-class residential district, and Holmes' apartment was probably part of a Georgian terrace.At the time the Holmes stories were published, addresses in Baker Street did not go as high as 221. Baker Street was later extended, and in 1932 the Abbey National Building Society moved into premises at 219–229 Baker Street. For many years, Abbey National employed a full-time secretary to answer mail addressed to Sherlock Holmes. In 1990, a blue plaque signifying 221B Baker Street was installed at the Sherlock Holmes Museum, situated elsewhere on the same block, and there followed a 15-year dispute between Abbey National and the Holmes Museum for the right to receive mail addressed to 221B Baker Street. Since the closure of Abbey House in 2005, ownership of the address by the Holmes Museum has not been challenged, despite its location between 237 and 241 Baker Street.Conan Doyle's intentionsWe met next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B, Baker Street, of which he had spoken at our meeting. They consisted of a couple of comfortable bed-rooms and a single large airy sitting-room, cheerfully furnished, and illuminated by two broad windows.(Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet, 1887)

BBC Radio Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Broadcasting House, Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AA

+44 (0) 20 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

Langham Hotel, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
1c Portland Place, Regent Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 1JA

The Langham, London is one of the largest and best known traditional style grand hotels in London. It is in the district of Marylebone on Langham Place and faces up Portland Place towards Regent's Park. It is a member of the Leading Hotels of the World marketing consortium.HistoryThe Langham was designed by John Giles and built between 1863 and 1865 at a cost of £300,000. It was then the largest and most modern hotel in the city, featuring a hundred water closets, thirty-six bathrooms and the first hydraulic lifts in England. The opening ceremony on 16 June was performed by the Prince of Wales. After the original company was liquidated during an economic slump, new management acquired the hotel for little more than half of its construction cost, and it soon became a commercial success. In 1867, a former Union officer named James Sanderson was appointed general manager and the hotel developed an extensive American clientele, which included Mark Twain and the miserly multi-millionairess, Hetty Green. It was also patronised by the likes of Napoleon III, Oscar Wilde, Antonín Dvořák, and Arturo Toscanini. Electric light was installed in the entrance and courtyard at the exceptionally early date of 1879, and Arthur Conan Doyle set Sherlock Holmes stories such as A Scandal in Bohemia and The Sign of Four partly at the Langham.

Savile Club
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
69 Brook St
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

+44 (0)20 7629 5462

The Savile Club is a traditional London gentlemen's club founded in 1868. Though located somewhat out of the way from the main centre of London's gentlemen's clubs, closer to the residences of Mayfair than the clubs of Pall Mall and St James's Street, it still contains prominent names among its members. It was originally formed after a division of opinion within the old Eclectic Club as to whether to accept an offer of rooms by the Medical Club and cease to be simply a "night club" (in its 19th-century sense).Changing premisesInitially calling itself the New Club, it grew rapidly, outgrowing its first floor rooms overlooking Trafalgar Square at 9 Spring Gardens and moving to the second floor. It then moved to 15 Savile Row in 1871, where it changed its name to the Savile Club, before lack of space forced the club to move again in 1882, this time to 107 Piccadilly, a building owned by Lord Rosebery. With its views over Green Park it was described by the members as the "ideal clubhouse". However, after 50 years' residence, demolition of the building next door to create the Park Lane Hotel caused the old clubhouse such structural problems that, in 1927, the club moved to its present home at 69 Brook Street, part of the Grosvenor Estate in Mayfair. This was the former home of "Loulou" Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt, a Liberal cabinet minister who had taken his life on the premises to avert a scandal when his double life as a paedophile and sex offender was in danger of being uncovered. The building, a combination of Nos 69 and 71 Brook Street, owes its extravagant dix-huitième interior to Walter Burns, the brother-in-law of financier J.P. Morgan, who adapted it for his wife Fanny to entertain in suitable style. It thus includes an elegant hall, a grand staircase and a lavish ballroom.

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Westmoreland Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 8

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street, named The Heart Hospital until refurbished and renamed in 2015, was a specialist cardiac hospital located in London, United Kingdom until 2015. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London (UCL). After the 2015 refurbishment the hospital provided thoracic surgery, and the UCLH urology department moved there.Before the 2015 refurbishment the Heart Hospital conducted over 1,000 surgical heart operations each year, had 95 in-patient beds, and was one of the largest cardiac centres in the UK. It treated around 1,700 new outpatients, 5,500 follow-up outpatients and 1,200 inpatients each year. It was a centre for cardiac research, home to the UCL Centre for Cardiology in the Young, and part of the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre. It is a teaching hospital for the UCL Medical School.

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Westmoreland Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 8

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street, named The Heart Hospital until refurbished and renamed in 2015, was a specialist cardiac hospital located in London, United Kingdom until 2015. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London (UCL). After the 2015 refurbishment the hospital provided thoracic surgery, and the UCLH urology department moved there.Before the 2015 refurbishment the Heart Hospital conducted over 1,000 surgical heart operations each year, had 95 in-patient beds, and was one of the largest cardiac centres in the UK. It treated around 1,700 new outpatients, 5,500 follow-up outpatients and 1,200 inpatients each year. It was a centre for cardiac research, home to the UCL Centre for Cardiology in the Young, and part of the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre. It is a teaching hospital for the UCL Medical School.

Daunt Books
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
83 Marylebone High St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6

020 7224 2295

Daunt Books is a chain of bookshops in London, founded by James Daunt. It traditionally specialised in travel books. In 2010 it began publishing.BookshopsThe Marylebone High Street branch is housed in a former Edwardian bookshop with long oak galleries, graceful skylights and William Morris prints. The older section of the Marylebone shop was completed in 1912, and was originally an antiquarian bookshop called Francis Edwards. It is alleged to be the first custom-built bookshop in the world. A large, walk-in safe is visible near the entrance to the travel gallery, and is where expensive volumes were once stored. The shop was bought by former banker James Daunt and renamed Daunt Books in 1990. It now focuses on first-hand titles (especially travel-related material).The company has branches in Chelsea, Holland Park, Cheapside, Hampstead and Belsize Park. The Owl Bookshop in Kentish Town was bought by Daunt Books, but retained its original name. Daunt Books opened its first branch outside London in Saffron Walden, Essex, under the name Hart’s Books. It opened its second branch outside London in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, under the name The Marlow Bookshop.Specialising in travel, Daunt Books arranges its sections geographically, with guides, phrase books, travel writing, history and fiction grouped by their relevant country. Reviews have mentioned its customer service and knowledgeable staff.

South Molton Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
South Molton Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

020 7629 2282

South Molton Street is a street in Mayfair in London which runs from Oxford Street to Brook Street. Bond Street tube station is at the north end of the street.The street was built in the mid-18th century as part of the Conduit Mead Estate. It was extensively rebuilt about 1900 but many of the original Georgian houses remain. It is now a pedestrian precinct and contains many shops selling items such as women's fashion and jewellery. The street is also home to award winning model agency Sapphires Model Management as well as fine art gallery Castle Galleries, and inspired fashion blog South Molton St Style in 2011.Famous residents Ernest Bevin lived in a flat at number 34 for twenty years from 1931. William Blake lived in a flat at number 17 in 1803.

South Molton Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
South Molton Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

020 7629 2282

South Molton Street is a street in Mayfair in London which runs from Oxford Street to Brook Street. Bond Street tube station is at the north end of the street.The street was built in the mid-18th century as part of the Conduit Mead Estate. It was extensively rebuilt about 1900 but many of the original Georgian houses remain. It is now a pedestrian precinct and contains many shops selling items such as women's fashion and jewellery. The street is also home to award winning model agency Sapphires Model Management as well as fine art gallery Castle Galleries, and inspired fashion blog South Molton St Style in 2011.Famous residents Ernest Bevin lived in a flat at number 34 for twenty years from 1931. William Blake lived in a flat at number 17 in 1803.

All Souls Church, Langham Place
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 All Souls Place
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1B 3DA

020 7580 3522

All Souls Church is an Anglican Evangelical church in central London, situated in Langham Place in Marylebone, at the north end of Regent Street. It was designed in regency style by John Nash and consecrated in 1824.As it is very near BBC Broadcasting House, the BBC often broadcasts from the church. As well as the core church membership, many hundreds of visitors come to All Souls, bringing the average number of those coming through the doors for services on Sundays to around 2,500 every week. All Souls has an international congregation, with all ages represented.HistoryThe church was designed by John Nash, favourite architect of King George IV. Its prominent circular spired vestibule was designed to provide an eye-catching monument at the point where Regent Street, newly-laid out as part of Nash's scheme to link Piccadilly with the new Regent's Park, takes an awkward abrupt bend westward to align with the pre-existing Portland Place.All Souls was a Commissioners' church, a grant of £12,819 being given by the Church Building Commission towards the cost of its construction. The commission had been set up under an act of 1818, and Nash, as one of the three architects employed by the Board of Works, had been asked to supply specimen designs as soon as the act was passed. It was, however, one of only two Commissioners' churches to be built to his designs, the other being the Gothic Revival St Mary, Haggerston. All Souls is the last surviving church by John Nash.

St Marylebone Parish Church
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5LT

St Marylebone Parish Church is an Anglican church on the Marylebone Road in London. It was built to the designs of Thomas Hardwick in 1813–17. The present site is the third used by the parish for its church. The first was further south, near Oxford Street. The church there was demolished in 1400 and a new one erected further north. This was completely rebuilt in 1740–42, and converted into a chapel-of-ease when Hardwick's church was constructed. The Marylebone area takes its name from the church. Located behind the church is St Marylebone School, a Church of England school for girls.Previous churchesFirst churchThe first church for the parish was built in the vicinity of the present Marble Arch c.1200, and dedicated to St John the Evangelist.Second churchIn 1400 the Bishop of London gave the parishioners permission to demolish the church of St John and build a new one in a more convenient position, near a recently completed chapel, which could be used until the new church was completed. The bishop stipulated that the old churchyard should be preserved, but also gave permission to enclose a new burial ground at the new site, The church was dedicated to the Virgin Mary. It was closer to the village, at the north end of Marylebone High Street. Having fallen into a state of decay, it was demolished in 1740.

Landmark Near St James's, Spanish Place

Madame Tussauds London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LR
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

0871 894 3000

Oxford Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street, London
London, United Kingdom W1K 1NA

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Oxford Street is a major road in the City of Westminster in the West End of London. It is Europe's busiest shopping street, with around half a million daily visitors, and as of 2012 had approximately 300 shops. It is designated as part of the A40, a major road between London and Fishguard, though it is not signed as such, and traffic is regularly restricted to buses and taxis.The road was originally a Roman road, part of the Via Trinobantina between Essex and Hampshire via London. It was known as Tyburn Road through the Middle Ages and was once notorious as a street where prisoners from Newgate Prison would be transported towards a public hanging. It became known as Oxford Road and then Oxford Street in the 18th century, and began to change character from a residential street to commercial and retail purposes by the late 19th century, also attracting street traders, confidence tricksters and prostitution. The first department stores in Britain opened on Oxford Street in the early 20th century, including Selfridges, John Lewis and HMV. Unlike nearby shopping streets such as Bond Street, it has retained an element of downmarket street trading alongside more prestigious retail stores. The street suffered heavy bombing during World War II, and several longstanding stores including John Lewis were completely destroyed and rebuilt from scratch.

Broadcasting House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
BBC Broadcasting House Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AA

020 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

Baker Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
113 Baker St
Oxford, United Kingdom W1U 6TD

Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid the street out in the 18th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived at a fictional 221B Baker Street address. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises.Baker Street is a busy thoroughfare, lying in postcode areas NW1/W1 and forming part of the A41 there. It runs south from Regent's Park, the junction with Park Road, parallel to Gloucester Place, meeting Marylebone Road, Portman Square and Wigmore Street. At the junction with Wigmore Street, Baker Street turns into Orchard Street, which ends when it meets with Oxford Street. After Portman Square the road continues as Orchard Street.The street is served by the London Underground by Baker Street tube station, one of the world's oldest surviving underground stations. Next door is Transport for London's lost property office.

Marble Arch
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1H 7

870-2427114

Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch and London landmark. The structure was designed by John Nash in 1827 to be the state entrance to the cour d'honneur of Buckingham Palace; it stood near the site of what is today the three bayed, central projection of the palace containing the well known balcony. In 1851 it was relocated and following the widening of Park Lane in the early 1960s is now sited, isolated and incongruously, on a large traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street, Park Lane, and Edgware Road.Historically, only members of the Royal Family and the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery are permitted to pass through the arch; this happens only in ceremonial processions.The arch gives its name to the vicinity of its site, particularly, the southern portion of Edgware Road and also to the nearby underground station.Design and constructionThe design of the arch is based on that of the Arch of Constantine in Rome and the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel in Paris. The arch is faced with Carrara marble with embellishments of marble extracted near Seravezza. John Flaxman was chosen to make the commemorative sculpture. After his death in 1826 the commission was divided between Sir Richard Westmacott, Edward Hodges Baily and J.C.F. Rossi. In 1829, a bronze equestrian statue of George IV was commissioned from Sir Francis Chantrey, with the intention of placing it on top of the arch.

Marble Arch
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1H 7

870-2427114

Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch and London landmark. The structure was designed by John Nash in 1827 to be the state entrance to the cour d'honneur of Buckingham Palace; it stood near the site of what is today the three bayed, central projection of the palace containing the well known balcony. In 1851 it was relocated and following the widening of Park Lane in the early 1960s is now sited, isolated and incongruously, on a large traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street, Park Lane, and Edgware Road.Historically, only members of the Royal Family and the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery are permitted to pass through the arch; this happens only in ceremonial processions.The arch gives its name to the vicinity of its site, particularly, the southern portion of Edgware Road and also to the nearby underground station.Design and constructionThe design of the arch is based on that of the Arch of Constantine in Rome and the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel in Paris. The arch is faced with Carrara marble with embellishments of marble extracted near Seravezza. John Flaxman was chosen to make the commemorative sculpture. After his death in 1826 the commission was divided between Sir Richard Westmacott, Edward Hodges Baily and J.C.F. Rossi. In 1829, a bronze equestrian statue of George IV was commissioned from Sir Francis Chantrey, with the intention of placing it on top of the arch.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

Selfridges, Oxford Street is a Grade II listed retail premises, located in Oxford Street, London, England. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

Selfridges, Oxford Street is a Grade II listed retail premises, located in Oxford Street, London, England. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

Harley Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Harley Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1G 9

2076-360838

Harley Street is a street in Marylebone, central London, which has been noted since the 19th century for its large number of private specialists in medicine and surgery.OverviewSince the 19th century, the number of doctors, hospitals, and medical organizations in and around Harley Street has greatly increased. Records show that there were around 20 doctors in 1860, 80 by 1900, and almost 200 by 1914. When the National Health Service was established in 1948, there were around 1,500. Today, there are more than 3,000 people employed in the Harley Street area, in clinics, medical and paramedical practices, and hospitals such as The Harley Street Clinic and The London Clinic.It has been speculated that doctors were originally attracted to the area by the development of commodious housing and central proximity to the important railway stations of Paddington, Kings Cross, St Pancras, Euston and, later, Marylebone. The nearest Tube stations are Regent's Park and Oxford Circus.Land ownershipHarley Street is part of the Howard de Walden Estate.

221B Baker Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
221B Baker Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 6X

+44(0) 20 7224 3688

221B Baker Street is the London address of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, created by author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In the United Kingdom, postal addresses with a number followed by a letter may indicate a separate address within a larger, often residential building. Baker Street in Holmes' time was a high-class residential district, and Holmes' apartment was probably part of a Georgian terrace.At the time the Holmes stories were published, addresses in Baker Street did not go as high as 221. Baker Street was later extended, and in 1932 the Abbey National Building Society moved into premises at 219–229 Baker Street. For many years, Abbey National employed a full-time secretary to answer mail addressed to Sherlock Holmes. In 1990, a blue plaque signifying 221B Baker Street was installed at the Sherlock Holmes Museum, situated elsewhere on the same block, and there followed a 15-year dispute between Abbey National and the Holmes Museum for the right to receive mail addressed to 221B Baker Street. Since the closure of Abbey House in 2005, ownership of the address by the Holmes Museum has not been challenged, despite its location between 237 and 241 Baker Street.Conan Doyle's intentionsWe met next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B, Baker Street, of which he had spoken at our meeting. They consisted of a couple of comfortable bed-rooms and a single large airy sitting-room, cheerfully furnished, and illuminated by two broad windows.(Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet, 1887)

BBC Radio Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Broadcasting House, Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AA

+44 (0) 20 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

Langham Hotel, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
1c Portland Place, Regent Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 1JA

The Langham, London is one of the largest and best known traditional style grand hotels in London. It is in the district of Marylebone on Langham Place and faces up Portland Place towards Regent's Park. It is a member of the Leading Hotels of the World marketing consortium.HistoryThe Langham was designed by John Giles and built between 1863 and 1865 at a cost of £300,000. It was then the largest and most modern hotel in the city, featuring a hundred water closets, thirty-six bathrooms and the first hydraulic lifts in England. The opening ceremony on 16 June was performed by the Prince of Wales. After the original company was liquidated during an economic slump, new management acquired the hotel for little more than half of its construction cost, and it soon became a commercial success. In 1867, a former Union officer named James Sanderson was appointed general manager and the hotel developed an extensive American clientele, which included Mark Twain and the miserly multi-millionairess, Hetty Green. It was also patronised by the likes of Napoleon III, Oscar Wilde, Antonín Dvořák, and Arturo Toscanini. Electric light was installed in the entrance and courtyard at the exceptionally early date of 1879, and Arthur Conan Doyle set Sherlock Holmes stories such as A Scandal in Bohemia and The Sign of Four partly at the Langham.

Savile Club
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
69 Brook St
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

+44 (0)20 7629 5462

The Savile Club is a traditional London gentlemen's club founded in 1868. Though located somewhat out of the way from the main centre of London's gentlemen's clubs, closer to the residences of Mayfair than the clubs of Pall Mall and St James's Street, it still contains prominent names among its members. It was originally formed after a division of opinion within the old Eclectic Club as to whether to accept an offer of rooms by the Medical Club and cease to be simply a "night club" (in its 19th-century sense).Changing premisesInitially calling itself the New Club, it grew rapidly, outgrowing its first floor rooms overlooking Trafalgar Square at 9 Spring Gardens and moving to the second floor. It then moved to 15 Savile Row in 1871, where it changed its name to the Savile Club, before lack of space forced the club to move again in 1882, this time to 107 Piccadilly, a building owned by Lord Rosebery. With its views over Green Park it was described by the members as the "ideal clubhouse". However, after 50 years' residence, demolition of the building next door to create the Park Lane Hotel caused the old clubhouse such structural problems that, in 1927, the club moved to its present home at 69 Brook Street, part of the Grosvenor Estate in Mayfair. This was the former home of "Loulou" Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt, a Liberal cabinet minister who had taken his life on the premises to avert a scandal when his double life as a paedophile and sex offender was in danger of being uncovered. The building, a combination of Nos 69 and 71 Brook Street, owes its extravagant dix-huitième interior to Walter Burns, the brother-in-law of financier J.P. Morgan, who adapted it for his wife Fanny to entertain in suitable style. It thus includes an elegant hall, a grand staircase and a lavish ballroom.

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Westmoreland Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 8

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street, named The Heart Hospital until refurbished and renamed in 2015, was a specialist cardiac hospital located in London, United Kingdom until 2015. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London (UCL). After the 2015 refurbishment the hospital provided thoracic surgery, and the UCLH urology department moved there.Before the 2015 refurbishment the Heart Hospital conducted over 1,000 surgical heart operations each year, had 95 in-patient beds, and was one of the largest cardiac centres in the UK. It treated around 1,700 new outpatients, 5,500 follow-up outpatients and 1,200 inpatients each year. It was a centre for cardiac research, home to the UCL Centre for Cardiology in the Young, and part of the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre. It is a teaching hospital for the UCL Medical School.

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Westmoreland Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 8

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street, named The Heart Hospital until refurbished and renamed in 2015, was a specialist cardiac hospital located in London, United Kingdom until 2015. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London (UCL). After the 2015 refurbishment the hospital provided thoracic surgery, and the UCLH urology department moved there.Before the 2015 refurbishment the Heart Hospital conducted over 1,000 surgical heart operations each year, had 95 in-patient beds, and was one of the largest cardiac centres in the UK. It treated around 1,700 new outpatients, 5,500 follow-up outpatients and 1,200 inpatients each year. It was a centre for cardiac research, home to the UCL Centre for Cardiology in the Young, and part of the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre. It is a teaching hospital for the UCL Medical School.

Daunt Books
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
83 Marylebone High St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6

020 7224 2295

Daunt Books is a chain of bookshops in London, founded by James Daunt. It traditionally specialised in travel books. In 2010 it began publishing.BookshopsThe Marylebone High Street branch is housed in a former Edwardian bookshop with long oak galleries, graceful skylights and William Morris prints. The older section of the Marylebone shop was completed in 1912, and was originally an antiquarian bookshop called Francis Edwards. It is alleged to be the first custom-built bookshop in the world. A large, walk-in safe is visible near the entrance to the travel gallery, and is where expensive volumes were once stored. The shop was bought by former banker James Daunt and renamed Daunt Books in 1990. It now focuses on first-hand titles (especially travel-related material).The company has branches in Chelsea, Holland Park, Cheapside, Hampstead and Belsize Park. The Owl Bookshop in Kentish Town was bought by Daunt Books, but retained its original name. Daunt Books opened its first branch outside London in Saffron Walden, Essex, under the name Hart’s Books. It opened its second branch outside London in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, under the name The Marlow Bookshop.Specialising in travel, Daunt Books arranges its sections geographically, with guides, phrase books, travel writing, history and fiction grouped by their relevant country. Reviews have mentioned its customer service and knowledgeable staff.

South Molton Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
South Molton Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

020 7629 2282

South Molton Street is a street in Mayfair in London which runs from Oxford Street to Brook Street. Bond Street tube station is at the north end of the street.The street was built in the mid-18th century as part of the Conduit Mead Estate. It was extensively rebuilt about 1900 but many of the original Georgian houses remain. It is now a pedestrian precinct and contains many shops selling items such as women's fashion and jewellery. The street is also home to award winning model agency Sapphires Model Management as well as fine art gallery Castle Galleries, and inspired fashion blog South Molton St Style in 2011.Famous residents Ernest Bevin lived in a flat at number 34 for twenty years from 1931. William Blake lived in a flat at number 17 in 1803.

South Molton Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
South Molton Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

020 7629 2282

South Molton Street is a street in Mayfair in London which runs from Oxford Street to Brook Street. Bond Street tube station is at the north end of the street.The street was built in the mid-18th century as part of the Conduit Mead Estate. It was extensively rebuilt about 1900 but many of the original Georgian houses remain. It is now a pedestrian precinct and contains many shops selling items such as women's fashion and jewellery. The street is also home to award winning model agency Sapphires Model Management as well as fine art gallery Castle Galleries, and inspired fashion blog South Molton St Style in 2011.Famous residents Ernest Bevin lived in a flat at number 34 for twenty years from 1931. William Blake lived in a flat at number 17 in 1803.

All Souls Church, Langham Place
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 All Souls Place
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1B 3DA

020 7580 3522

All Souls Church is an Anglican Evangelical church in central London, situated in Langham Place in Marylebone, at the north end of Regent Street. It was designed in regency style by John Nash and consecrated in 1824.As it is very near BBC Broadcasting House, the BBC often broadcasts from the church. As well as the core church membership, many hundreds of visitors come to All Souls, bringing the average number of those coming through the doors for services on Sundays to around 2,500 every week. All Souls has an international congregation, with all ages represented.HistoryThe church was designed by John Nash, favourite architect of King George IV. Its prominent circular spired vestibule was designed to provide an eye-catching monument at the point where Regent Street, newly-laid out as part of Nash's scheme to link Piccadilly with the new Regent's Park, takes an awkward abrupt bend westward to align with the pre-existing Portland Place.All Souls was a Commissioners' church, a grant of £12,819 being given by the Church Building Commission towards the cost of its construction. The commission had been set up under an act of 1818, and Nash, as one of the three architects employed by the Board of Works, had been asked to supply specimen designs as soon as the act was passed. It was, however, one of only two Commissioners' churches to be built to his designs, the other being the Gothic Revival St Mary, Haggerston. All Souls is the last surviving church by John Nash.

St Marylebone Parish Church
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5LT

St Marylebone Parish Church is an Anglican church on the Marylebone Road in London. It was built to the designs of Thomas Hardwick in 1813–17. The present site is the third used by the parish for its church. The first was further south, near Oxford Street. The church there was demolished in 1400 and a new one erected further north. This was completely rebuilt in 1740–42, and converted into a chapel-of-ease when Hardwick's church was constructed. The Marylebone area takes its name from the church. Located behind the church is St Marylebone School, a Church of England school for girls.Previous churchesFirst churchThe first church for the parish was built in the vicinity of the present Marble Arch c.1200, and dedicated to St John the Evangelist.Second churchIn 1400 the Bishop of London gave the parishioners permission to demolish the church of St John and build a new one in a more convenient position, near a recently completed chapel, which could be used until the new church was completed. The bishop stipulated that the old churchyard should be preserved, but also gave permission to enclose a new burial ground at the new site, The church was dedicated to the Virgin Mary. It was closer to the village, at the north end of Marylebone High Street. Having fallen into a state of decay, it was demolished in 1740.

Park Near St James's, Spanish Place

Green Park
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Green Park, The Royal Parks, London
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1J 7

0300 061 2350

Although situated so close to St James's Park, The Green Park is quite different in character. It is more peaceful with mature trees and grassland and is surrounded by Constitution Hill, Piccadilly and the Broad Walk. The Green Park was first recorded in 1554 as the place where a rebellion took place against the marriage of Mary I to Philip II of Spain. It was a famous duelling site until 1667 when Charles II bought an extra 40 acres and it became known as upper St James's Park. The Green Park is a peaceful refuge for people living, working or visiting central London, and is particularly popular for sunbathing and picnics in fine weather. It is also popular as a healthy walking route to work for commuters. The paths are used extensively by joggers and runners. - See more at: http://www.royalparks.org.uk/parks/green-park/about-green-park#sthash.WEFJqi0k.dpuf

Regents Park, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Regent's Park
London, United Kingdom NW1

0207 0788 359

Regent's Park Open Air Theatre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Inner Circle, Regent's Park
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

Box Office 0844 826 4242

The award-winning Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre is a London landmark – a firm fixture of summer in the city, providing a cultural hub in the beautiful surroundings of a Royal Park.

Regents Park Rose Garden
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Inner Circle
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

Hilton Green Park Hotel Mayfair
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Half Moon Street, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

0207 629 7522

Berkeley Square
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Berkeley Square, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

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Berkeley Square is a town square in Mayfair in the West End of London, in the City of Westminster. It was originally laid out in the mid 18th century by architect William Kent.The gardens in the centre are open to the public, and their very large London Plane trees are among the oldest in central London, planted in 1789.DescriptionWhilst Berkeley Square was originally a mostly residential area, there now remains only one residential block on the square – number 48. The square is mostly offices, including a number of hedge funds and wealth management businesses.The square features a sculptural fountain by Alexander Munro, a Pre-Raphaelite sculptor, made in 1865.The buildings around the square include several by other notable architects including Robert Adam, who designed Lansdowne House (since 1935 home of the Lansdowne Club) in the southwest corner of the square on Fitzmaurice Place. The daring staircase-hall of No. 44 is sometimes considered William Kent's masterpiece. Gunter's Tea Shop, founded under a different name in 1757, is also located here.

Regent's University London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Inner Circle Regent's Park
London, United Kingdom NW1 4NS

+44 (0)20 7487 7505

Regent’s University London is London’s only independent, not-for-profit university, with a highly cosmopolitan community based in royal Regent’s Park and Marylebone. The University is a hive for innovative thinkers – students who want to learn in a supportive, personal environment and who will enter the world of work as entrepreneurs and leaders who think and operate globally. Our main campus in Regent’s Park, set in 11 acres of private garden, is a quiet, secluded haven in which to live and study. A short walk away, our Marylebone campus sits in a neighbourhood known for its upmarket designer boutiques, cafés and design shops. The campuses are within easy reach of all that this exciting European city has to offer. We are close to the centre of London and the city’s famous theatres, galleries and museums, as well as major sporting and entertainment venues. Regent’s is small and intimate enough to feel like a home away from home to our students – with just under 5,000 students on campus, our staff and students get to know each other by name, and students benefit from plenty of one-to-one contact with their tutors. This is a meeting place for people from all over the world. We are proud to have students of more than 140 nationalities on campus. With more than 15,000 alumni in 155 countries, Regent’s graduates remain members of our community, wherever they may be in the world.

Meliá White House Hotel
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Albany Street, Regents Park
London, United Kingdom NW1 3UP

+44 20 7391 3000

Cavendish Square Gardens
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Cavendish Square, London
London, United Kingdom W1G 0

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Speakers' Corner
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Marble Arch, Hyde Park
London, United Kingdom W1K 1QB

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A Speakers' Corner is an area where open-air public speaking, debate and discussion are allowed. The original and most noted is in the northeast corner of Hyde Park in London, UK. Speakers here may talk on any subject, as long as the police consider their speeches lawful, although this right is not restricted to Speakers' Corner only. Contrary to popular belief, there is no immunity from the law, nor are any subjects proscribed, but in practice the police tend to be tolerant and therefore intervene only when they receive a complaint. On some occasions in the past, they have intervened on grounds of profanity. Historically there were a number of other areas designated as Speakers' Corners in other parks in London (e.g., Lincoln's Inn Fields Finsbury Park, Clapham Common, Kennington Park, and Victoria Park). More recently they have been set up in other British cities, and there are also Speakers' Corners in other countries.Hyde ParkThough Hyde Park Speakers' Corner is considered the paved area closest to Marble Arch, legally the public speaking area extends beyond the Reform Tree and covers a large area from Marble Arch to Victoria Gate, then along the Serpentine to Hyde Park Corner and the Broad Walk running from Hyde Park Corner to Marble Arch.Public riots broke out in the park in 1855, in protest over the Sunday Trading Bill, which forbade buying and selling on a Sunday, the only day working people had off. The riots were described by Karl Marx as the beginning of the English revolution.

Berkeley Square
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1 Berkeley Square
London, United Kingdom W1J 6EA

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Regents Park Mosque
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
146 Park Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

020 7724 3363

Regent's Place
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
10 Brock Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 3

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Regent's Place is a mixed use business and retail and residential quarter on the north side of Euston Road in the London Borough of Camden. The site is also bounded by Osnaburgh Street to the west, Longford and Drummond Streets to the north, and Hampstead Road to the east.Regent's Place was developed by British Land from an earlier speculative property development 'Euston Centre' that included Euston Tower one of the first high-rise office developments in the West End. The tower is at the south western corner of the Regent's Place estate. The 'Euston Centre' scheme was developed between 1962 and 1972 designed by Sidney Kaye. Originally the scheme was for a series of medium rise blocks but to create space for underpass and road junction the LCC gave approval for the high-rise Euston Tower.Work by British Land commenced in 1996. The first stage involved the demolition of the head office and studios of the former ITV company Thames Television and the subsequent development of the central part of the site and much of the Euston Road frontage, with four new office buildings and a pedestrian plaza called Triton Square. One of these buildings called 2-3 Triton Square was a new headquarters for what was then the UK's fifth largest bank by gross assets, Abbey National. The lower levels of Euston Tower were modernised at the same time. The development includes a shopping mall and an open space Triton Square that includes art features by Langlands and Bell. The developers also commissioned a large mural by Michael Craig-Martin a lighting scheme by Liam Gillick and a smaller sculptural installation by Antony Gormley.

Hayd Park
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Bayswater Road
London, United Kingdom W2 2

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Hyde Park Mansions
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Old Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5DZ

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Abbey Court Hotel (Hyde Park)
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
172 SUSSEX GARDENS
London, United Kingdom W2 1TP

020 7402 0202

Berkeley Square Gardens
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Berkeley Square Gardens
London, United Kingdom W1J 5AX

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St James Roman Catholic Church
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
22 George St
London, United Kingdom W1U 3QY

020 7935 0943

Tiger Brassarie Hilton Green Park
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Half Moon St, London W1J 7BN, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom W1J 7BN

+44 20 7629 7522

Jummah At Regents Park Mosque. Central London
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
146 Park Rd,
London, United Kingdom

Religious Center Near St James's, Spanish Place

Madame Tussauds London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LR
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

0871 894 3000

Marble Arch
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1H 7

870-2427114

Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch and London landmark. The structure was designed by John Nash in 1827 to be the state entrance to the cour d'honneur of Buckingham Palace; it stood near the site of what is today the three bayed, central projection of the palace containing the well known balcony. In 1851 it was relocated and following the widening of Park Lane in the early 1960s is now sited, isolated and incongruously, on a large traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street, Park Lane, and Edgware Road.Historically, only members of the Royal Family and the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery are permitted to pass through the arch; this happens only in ceremonial processions.The arch gives its name to the vicinity of its site, particularly, the southern portion of Edgware Road and also to the nearby underground station.Design and constructionThe design of the arch is based on that of the Arch of Constantine in Rome and the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel in Paris. The arch is faced with Carrara marble with embellishments of marble extracted near Seravezza. John Flaxman was chosen to make the commemorative sculpture. After his death in 1826 the commission was divided between Sir Richard Westmacott, Edward Hodges Baily and J.C.F. Rossi. In 1829, a bronze equestrian statue of George IV was commissioned from Sir Francis Chantrey, with the intention of placing it on top of the arch.

Apollo Theatre
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
31 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 7

020 7494 5070

The Apollo Theatre is a Grade II listed West End theatre, on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster, in central London. Designed by the architect Lewin Sharp for owner Henry Lowenfeld, it became the fourth legitimate theatre to be constructed on the street when it opened its doors on 21 February 1901, with the American musical comedy The Belle of Bohemia.HistoryConstructionBecause Henry Lowenfeld had bought land on the newly created Shaftesbury Avenue at the turn of the 20th century – next door to the Lyric Theatre which opened in 1888 – the Apollo is one of the few theatres in London to be freehold.The only complete theatre design of architect Lewin Sharp, the Apollo was specifically designed for musical theatre and named after the Greek god of the arts and leader of the muses. Constructed by builder Walter Wallis of plain London brick in keeping with the neighbouring streets, the front piece is in the Renaissance style with sculpted stone fascia by T. Simpson. The structure encloses a four-level auditorium, with three cantilevered balconies and a first floor central loggia, decorated in the Louis XIV Style by Hubert van Hooydonk. In keeping with then European style, each level has its own foyer and promenade.

Sofra
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 St Christopher's Place
London, United Kingdom W1U 1

+44 (0) 20 7224 4080

Abercrombie and Fitch
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
40 Savile Row
London, United Kingdom W1S 3ES

+44 844 412 5750

Regents Park Mosque
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
146 Park Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

020 7724 3363

St. James's Square
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
St. James's, London, SW1
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4JU

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St. James's Square is the only square in the exclusive St James's district of the City of Westminster. It has predominantly Georgian and Neo-Georgian architecture and a garden in the centre. For its first two hundred or so years it was one of the three or four most fashionable residential address in London. It is now home to the headquarters of a number of well-known businesses, including BP and Rio Tinto Group; to three private members' clubs, the East India Club, the Canning Club and the Naval and Military Club; to the High Commission of Cyprus; and to the London Library. Also based in the square is the premises of the think tank Chatham House. The square's main feature is an equestrian statue of William III erected in 1808.HistoryIn 1662 Charles II extended a lease over the 45 acres of Pall Mall (St James's) Field held by Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans to 1720 and soon afterwards the earl began to lay out the property for development. The earl petitioned the king that the class of occupants they both hoped to attract to the new district would not take houses without the prospect of eventually acquiring them outright, and in 1665 the king granted the freehold of the site of St. James's Square and some closely adjacent parts of the field to the earl's trustees. The location was convenient for the royal palaces of Whitehall and St James. The houses on the east, north and west sides of the square were soon developed, each of them being constructed separately as was usual at that time.

The Swedish Church
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
6-11 Harcourt St
London, United Kingdom W1H 4

+44 20 7723 5681

Shaftesbury Avenue
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
65 - 73 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 6

020 7031 4300

Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, that runs in a north-easterly direction from Piccadilly Circus to New Oxford Street, crossing Charing Cross Road at Cambridge Circus. From Piccadilly Circus to Cambridge Circus it is in the City of Westminster and from Cambridge Circus to New Oxford Street it is in the London Borough of Camden.Shaftesbury Avenue was built in the late 19th century (1877–86) by the architect George Vulliamy and the engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette to provide a north-south traffic artery through the crowded districts of St. Giles and Soho. It was also part of a slum clearance measure, to push impoverished workers out of the city centre although the street's construction was stalled by legislation requiring rehousing some of these displaced residents, overcrowding persisted. Charles Booth's Poverty Map shows the neighbourhood makeup shortly after Shaftesbury Avenue opened. It is generally considered the heart of London's West End theatre district, with the Lyric, Apollo, Gielgud and Queen's theatres clustered together on the north side of the road between Piccadilly Circus and Charing Cross Road. At the intersection of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road there is also the large Palace Theatre. Finally, the north-eastern end of the road has another large theatre, called the Shaftesbury Theatre.

Chatham House
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
10 St James's Square
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4L

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The Royal Institute of International Affairs, commonly known as Chatham House, is a non-profit, non-governmental organisation based in London whose mission is to analyse and promote the understanding of major international issues and current affairs. It is the originator of the Chatham House Rule and takes its name from the building where it is based, a Grade I listed 18th-century house in St. James's Square, designed in part by Henry Flitcroft and occupied by three British prime ministers, including William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham.In the University of Pennsylvania’s 2015 Global Go To Think Tanks Report, Chatham House is ranked the second most influential think tank in the world after the Brookings Institution, and the world's most influential non-U.S. think tank. In 2009, Chatham House was also named the top non-U.S. think tank by Foreign Policy magazine, which listed it as one of the top "scholars" for being among a handful of stars of the think-tank world who are regularly relied upon to set agendas and craft new initiatives.The current chairman of the Council of Chatham House is Stuart Popham and its director is Robin Niblett. The research directors are Rob Bailey, Patricia Lewis, Paola Subacchi and Alex Vines.

Svenska kyrkan i London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
6 Harcourt Street
London, United Kingdom W1H 4AG

+44 (0)20 7723 5681

The Advent Centre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
12 Crawford Pl
London, United Kingdom W1H 5JE

020 7724 2987

Church Of Scientology
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
68 Tottenham Court Road
London, United Kingdom W1T 2EZ

+44 (0) 20 7636 9874

St Marylebone Parish Church
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5LT

St Marylebone Parish Church is an Anglican church on the Marylebone Road in London. It was built to the designs of Thomas Hardwick in 1813–17. The present site is the third used by the parish for its church. The first was further south, near Oxford Street. The church there was demolished in 1400 and a new one erected further north. This was completely rebuilt in 1740–42, and converted into a chapel-of-ease when Hardwick's church was constructed. The Marylebone area takes its name from the church. Located behind the church is St Marylebone School, a Church of England school for girls.Previous churchesFirst churchThe first church for the parish was built in the vicinity of the present Marble Arch c.1200, and dedicated to St John the Evangelist.Second churchIn 1400 the Bishop of London gave the parishioners permission to demolish the church of St John and build a new one in a more convenient position, near a recently completed chapel, which could be used until the new church was completed. The bishop stipulated that the old churchyard should be preserved, but also gave permission to enclose a new burial ground at the new site, The church was dedicated to the Virgin Mary. It was closer to the village, at the north end of Marylebone High Street. Having fallen into a state of decay, it was demolished in 1740.

Costa Praed St Paddington
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
137-139 Praed Street
London, United Kingdom W2 1RL

Jummah At Regents Park Mosque. Central London
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
146 Park Rd,
London, United Kingdom

Friends Meeting House
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
173-177 Euston Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 2BJ

Animals in War Memorial
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Brook Gate, Park Lane
London, United Kingdom W1K 7

020 7641 6000

The Animals in War Memorial is a war memorial in Hyde Park, London. It is located on Park Lane, at the junction with Upper Brook Street, on the eastern edge of the park.The memorial was designed by English sculptor David Backhouse to commemorate the countless animals that have served and died under British military command throughout history. It was unveiled in November 2004 by Princess Anne, the Princess Royal.HistoryThe memorial was inspired by Jilly Cooper's book Animals in War, and was made possible by a specially created fund of £1.4 million from public donations of which Cooper was a co-trustee. The memorial consists of a 55 ft by 58 ft (16.8 m by 17.7 m) curved Portland stone wall: the symbolic arena of war, emblazoned with images of various struggling animals, along with two heavily-laden bronze mules progressing up the stairs of the monument, and a bronze horse and bronze dog beyond it looking into the distance.The Animals in War Memorial was officially opened on 24 November 2004 by Anne, Princess Royal.In May 2013, it was one of two London war memorials vandalised on the same night. The word 'Islam' was spray-painted on it and the nearby RAF Bomber Command Memorial.InscriptionsBeneath the main header, "Animals in War", the memorial has two separate inscriptions; the first and larger reads:"This monument is dedicated to all the animals that served and died alongside British and allied forces in wars and campaigns throughout time."

St James's Street
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
11 Hamilton Place
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

20-74951771

St James's Street is the principal street in the district of St James's, central London. It runs from Piccadilly downhill to St James's Palace and Pall Mall. The main gatehouse of the palace is at the southern end of the road, and in the 17th century Clarendon House faced down the street across Piccadilly on the site of most of Albemarle Street.St James's Street was built up without an over-all plan but received a boost with Lord St Albans' planned construction of St. James's Square. Today St James's Street contains several of London's best known gentlemen's clubs, such as Brooks's, the Carlton Club and White's, some exclusive shops and various offices. A series of small side streets on its western side lead to some extremely expensive properties overlooking Green Park, including Spencer House and the Royal Over-Seas League at the end of Park Place.Two 18th-century yards survive behind the noble frontages and giant orders of columns or pilasters of the street. One is Blue Ball Yard, with stables built in 1742. The other is Pickering Place, with four informal Georgian brick houses of 1731. Jermyn Street leads off St James's Street to the east. The nearest tube station is Green Park to the west on Piccadilly.

Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
30 Charles Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

020-79173000

The Embassy of Saudi Arabia in London (officially the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia) (السفارة السعودية الملكية في لندن) is the diplomatic mission of Saudi Arabia in the United Kingdom. Saudi Arabia also maintains a Defence Attaché’s Office at 26 Queen's Gate, South Kensington, a Diplomatic Office of the Cultural Bureau at 630 Chiswick High Road, Gunnersbury, a Medical Section at 60 Queen Anne Street, Marylebone, a Commercial Section at 15/16 Queen Street, Mayfair, an Islamic Affairs Section at 2nd Floor, Park Lorne, 111 Park Road, Lisson Grove and an Information Section at 18 Seymour Street, Marylebone.The embassy is situated in Crewe House, a detached mansion designed and constructed by Edward Sheppard in 1730, set in its own grounds. Built in the Georgian style, it is a Grade II* listed building. The house was considerably altered in the late 18th and early 19th-century. Much of its neo-classical interior dates from the early 19th-century, and some of Shepard's original plasterwork ceilings may survive.

Landmark Near St James's, Spanish Place

Manchester Square
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
20 Manchester Square
London, United Kingdom W1u 3PZ

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Manchester Square is an 18th-century garden square in the Marylebone area in London, England, a short distance north of Oxford Street. It is one of the smaller but better preserved Georgian squares in central London. The central section of the northern side of the square is occupied by a mansion once known as Manchester House and later as Hertford House, which is now the home of the Wallace Collection, a major collection of fine and decorative arts. The house and square form part of Marylebone's Portman Estate. Construction on both was underway by around 1776.Famous residents in the square have included Julius Benedict, the German-born composer, who lived at no. 2, John Hughlings Jackson, the English neurologist, who lived at no. 3, and Alfred, Lord Milner, the British statesman and colonial administrator, at no. 14. Admiral Sir Thomas Foley and his wife (later widow) Lady Lucy Anne FitzGerald occupied no. 1 as their London townhouse during the first half of the nineteenth century. In 1814 and 1815 Manchester Square became briefly famous, when newspapers reported that a pig-faced woman was living there.The cover photograph for Please Please Me, the first LP by The Beatles, was taken by Angus McBean in 1963. It showed the group looking down over the stairwell inside EMI House in Manchester Square, EMI's London headquarters at the time (now demolished). A repeat photo was taken in 1969 for the cover of their then-intended Get Back album; it was not used when the project saw release as Let It Be, but was eventually used on the retrospective albums 1962–1966 and 1967–1970.

Chiltern Firehouse
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Chiltern Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 7

020 7073 7676

The Chiltern Firehouse is a restaurant and hotel located at 1 Chiltern Street, Marylebone, London, England occupying the Grade II listed building of the former Marylebone Fire Station, also known as Manchester Square Fire Station. It is owned by André Balazs, a hotel chain owner, who also owns the Chateau Marmont Hotel in Los Angeles, California and The Mercer Hotel in New York City. The head chef is Nuno Mendes.Manchester Square Fire StationThe Manchester Square Fire Station was built in 1889, by the London County Council Architect's Department, "in the Vulliamy manner". "Red brick with stone dressings; tiled roof. Free Tudor-Gothic style". It initially served as a fire station, and was one of the first fire stations in London. The original architect was Robert Pearsall. Originally known as Manchester Square Fire Station (Manchester Square is nearby), it was decommissioned in June 2005 by the London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority. For some years subsequently, it had been in occasional use as an exhibition space for local artists, as there was a long and complex planning process to convert it to a luxury hotel and restaurant. David Archer of Archer Humphryes Architects acted as lead architect for the project.

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Westmoreland Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 8

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street, named The Heart Hospital until refurbished and renamed in 2015, was a specialist cardiac hospital located in London, United Kingdom until 2015. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London (UCL). After the 2015 refurbishment the hospital provided thoracic surgery, and the UCLH urology department moved there.Before the 2015 refurbishment the Heart Hospital conducted over 1,000 surgical heart operations each year, had 95 in-patient beds, and was one of the largest cardiac centres in the UK. It treated around 1,700 new outpatients, 5,500 follow-up outpatients and 1,200 inpatients each year. It was a centre for cardiac research, home to the UCL Centre for Cardiology in the Young, and part of the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre. It is a teaching hospital for the UCL Medical School.

King Edward VII's Hospital
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
5-10 Beaumont St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6AA

020 7486 4411

King Edward VII's Hospital is a charity-registered private hospital in the City of Westminster in London, known as King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers from 1904 to 2000.HistoryEarly historyThe hospital was established in 1899 at the suggestion of the Prince of Wales . Agnes Keyser, a mistress of the Prince, and her sister Fanny used their house at 17 Grosvenor Crescent to help sick and wounded British Army officers who had returned from the Boer War. King Edward VII became the hospital's first patron. In 1904 it officially became King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers.20th centuryDuring the First World War, the hospital was at 9 Grosvenor Gardens, where officers would be nursed; the young novelist Stuart Cloete was one of them, as was the future British Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan, who underwent a series of long operations followed by recuperation there from 1916–18, from serious wounds sustained in conflict during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. In 1930, the hospital was awarded a Royal Charter "to operate an acute Hospital where serving and retired officers of the Services and their spouses can be treated at preferential rates."In 1941 the interior of the building was badly damaged by bombing, and Sister Agnes died from natural causes. In 1948 the hospital moved to Beaumont Street. It was officially opened on 15 October by Queen Mary.

Baker Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
113 Baker St
Oxford, United Kingdom W1U 6TD

Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid the street out in the 18th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived at a fictional 221B Baker Street address. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises.Baker Street is a busy thoroughfare, lying in postcode areas NW1/W1 and forming part of the A41 there. It runs south from Regent's Park, the junction with Park Road, parallel to Gloucester Place, meeting Marylebone Road, Portman Square and Wigmore Street. At the junction with Wigmore Street, Baker Street turns into Orchard Street, which ends when it meets with Oxford Street. After Portman Square the road continues as Orchard Street.The street is served by the London Underground by Baker Street tube station, one of the world's oldest surviving underground stations. Next door is Transport for London's lost property office.

High Commission of the Maldives, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
22 Nottingham Pl
London, United Kingdom W1U 5

02072242135

The High Commission of the Maldives in London is the diplomatic mission of the Maldives in the United Kingdom. It was established in 1995 by upgrading the existing Maldives Government Trade Representative's Office; it was formally opened by former Maldivian President Maumoon Abdul Gayoom.

Marylebone Gardens
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
35 Marylebone High Street
London, United Kingdom w1u 4qa

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Marylebone or Marybone Gardens was a London pleasure garden sited in the grounds of the old manor house of Marylebone and frequented from the mid-17th century, when Marylebone was a village separated from London by fields and market gardens, to the third quarter of the 18th century.Early historyIt was situated in the area which is now between Marylebone Road, Marylebone High Street, Weymouth Street, and Harley Street; its site was developed as Beaumont Street and part of Devonshire Street.Originally consisting of two bowling greens adjoining the Rose of Normandy tavern on the east side of Marylebone High Street, its size was increased to about eight acres by acquisition of land from Marylebone Manor House, which had been converted into a hunting lodge by Henry VIII and was later used as a boarding school, eventually being demolished in 1791. The Marylebone Gardens, surrounded by a high brick wall and set about with fruit trees, had a carriage entrance in the High Street of Marylebone village and another entrance from the fields at the back. Its center was an open oval bowling green encompassed by a wide gravelled walk and many smaller walks and greens surrounded by clipped quickset hedges, "kept in good order, and indented like town walls."

Harley Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Harley Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1G 9

2076-360838

Harley Street is a street in Marylebone, central London, which has been noted since the 19th century for its large number of private specialists in medicine and surgery.OverviewSince the 19th century, the number of doctors, hospitals, and medical organizations in and around Harley Street has greatly increased. Records show that there were around 20 doctors in 1860, 80 by 1900, and almost 200 by 1914. When the National Health Service was established in 1948, there were around 1,500. Today, there are more than 3,000 people employed in the Harley Street area, in clinics, medical and paramedical practices, and hospitals such as The Harley Street Clinic and The London Clinic.It has been speculated that doctors were originally attracted to the area by the development of commodious housing and central proximity to the important railway stations of Paddington, Kings Cross, St Pancras, Euston and, later, Marylebone. The nearest Tube stations are Regent's Park and Oxford Circus.Land ownershipHarley Street is part of the Howard de Walden Estate.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

Selfridges, Oxford Street is a Grade II listed retail premises, located in Oxford Street, London, England. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

Embassy of Latvia, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
45 Nottingham Pl
London, United Kingdom W1U 5

20-73120040

The Embassy of Latvia in London is the diplomatic mission of Latvia in the United Kingdom.

Oxford Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street, London
London, United Kingdom W1K 1NA

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Oxford Street is a major road in the City of Westminster in the West End of London. It is Europe's busiest shopping street, with around half a million daily visitors, and as of 2012 had approximately 300 shops. It is designated as part of the A40, a major road between London and Fishguard, though it is not signed as such, and traffic is regularly restricted to buses and taxis.The road was originally a Roman road, part of the Via Trinobantina between Essex and Hampshire via London. It was known as Tyburn Road through the Middle Ages and was once notorious as a street where prisoners from Newgate Prison would be transported towards a public hanging. It became known as Oxford Road and then Oxford Street in the 18th century, and began to change character from a residential street to commercial and retail purposes by the late 19th century, also attracting street traders, confidence tricksters and prostitution. The first department stores in Britain opened on Oxford Street in the early 20th century, including Selfridges, John Lewis and HMV. Unlike nearby shopping streets such as Bond Street, it has retained an element of downmarket street trading alongside more prestigious retail stores. The street suffered heavy bombing during World War II, and several longstanding stores including John Lewis were completely destroyed and rebuilt from scratch.

Embassy of Sweden, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
11 Montagu Pl
London, United Kingdom W1H 2

+44 20 7917 6400

The Embassy of Sweden in London is the diplomatic mission of Sweden in the United Kingdom. It is located by Montagu Square in Marylebone, just down the road from the embassy of Switzerland, and has housed the Swedish embassy since 1983.The Swedish ambassador's residence is located is a separate building at 27 Portland Place. Sweden also maintains a Trade Council at 259-269 Old Marylebone Road, Marylebone.

Embassy of Poland, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
15 Devonshire St
London, United Kingdom W1G 7AP

020 7580 5481

The Embassy of Poland in London (Ambasada Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej w Londynie) is the diplomatic mission of Poland in the United Kingdom. It is located on Portland Place next to the High Commission of Kenya building. It forms part of a group of Grade II* listed buildings in Portland Place.History Involving the Embassy of Poland in London, Main Chancery BuildingShortly after regaining independence in 1918, there seemed to be a general feeling of ambivalence towards Britain demonstrated by most Polish statesmen, as if they were neglecting British relations, who played a major role in helping to re-establish the post-World War I - Second Polish Republic. However, with newly-restored independence, the country's government instead concentrated on shoring up good relations with traditional ally France, and immediate neighbour Germany.As a result of this focus, it was not until 1929 that the first Polish legation was sent to establish a permanent embassy in London. The establishment of this Polish embassy building in London would go on to play one of the most important roles of Poland's history.By the late 1930s when world war was once again becoming inevitable, the government of the Second Polish Republic requested the necessary military aid from the British government; as Poland was still rebuilding civilian infrastructure from the aftermath of World War I. The government also signed a three-way mutual defence pact with the United Kingdom and France with the original intent being to make sure an independent and sovereign, democratic Poland would never again have to stand alone against a German invasion. Thus, much of the bureaucracy surrounding these pre-war pacts found itself centred in the halls and corridors of number 47, Portland Place.

High Commission of Kenya, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
45 Portland Pl
London, United Kingdom W1B 1QH

020 7636 2371

The Kenya High Commission in London was established in 1963 to pursue Kenya’s national interest in the United Kingdom, the International Maritime Organization and the commonwealth. The Mission has the mandate to forge closer relations between the people of Kenya and the people of United Kingdom in pursuit of deeper bilateral and multilateral cooperation in trade and investments, culture, science and technology as well as other fields for mutual benefit.The High Commission is housed in one of a group of Grade II* listed buildings in Portland Place.

Embassy of China, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
49 Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1B 1

20-72994049

The Embassy of China in London is the diplomatic mission of China in the United Kingdom. The Embassy in London is China's only embassy in the UK, alongside two Consulates-General in Edinburgh and Manchester.Established in 1877 as the Chinese Legation, the London mission was China's first permanent overseas diplomatic mission. It has served as the diplomatic mission of the Qing Empire, Republic of China and (since 1950) the People's Republic of China. It was the location of the Qing Empire's detention of Sun Yat-sen, an important episode in the Chinese revolution of 1911. It remains today the focal point for events relating to China held in the United Kingdom, including celebrations in 2012 to commemorate 40 years of diplomatic relations between the UK and the People's Republic of China.Most applications by UK citizens for visas to China are not handled by the embassy, however, but are instead processed by the China Visa Applications Centre, also located in London. There is a constant police presence outside the embassy.China also maintains several other buildings in London: a Defence Section at 25 Lyndhurst Road, Hampstead, a Commercial Section at 16 Lancaster Gate, Paddington, a Cultural Section at 11 West Heath Road, Hampstead and a Science & Technology Section at 10 Greville Place, Maida Vale.

Savile Club
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
69 Brook St
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

+44 (0)20 7629 5462

The Savile Club is a traditional London gentlemen's club founded in 1868. Though located somewhat out of the way from the main centre of London's gentlemen's clubs, closer to the residences of Mayfair than the clubs of Pall Mall and St James's Street, it still contains prominent names among its members. It was originally formed after a division of opinion within the old Eclectic Club as to whether to accept an offer of rooms by the Medical Club and cease to be simply a "night club" (in its 19th-century sense).Changing premisesInitially calling itself the New Club, it grew rapidly, outgrowing its first floor rooms overlooking Trafalgar Square at 9 Spring Gardens and moving to the second floor. It then moved to 15 Savile Row in 1871, where it changed its name to the Savile Club, before lack of space forced the club to move again in 1882, this time to 107 Piccadilly, a building owned by Lord Rosebery. With its views over Green Park it was described by the members as the "ideal clubhouse". However, after 50 years' residence, demolition of the building next door to create the Park Lane Hotel caused the old clubhouse such structural problems that, in 1927, the club moved to its present home at 69 Brook Street, part of the Grosvenor Estate in Mayfair. This was the former home of "Loulou" Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt, a Liberal cabinet minister who had taken his life on the premises to avert a scandal when his double life as a paedophile and sex offender was in danger of being uncovered. The building, a combination of Nos 69 and 71 Brook Street, owes its extravagant dix-huitième interior to Walter Burns, the brother-in-law of financier J.P. Morgan, who adapted it for his wife Fanny to entertain in suitable style. It thus includes an elegant hall, a grand staircase and a lavish ballroom.

221B Baker Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
221B Baker Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 6X

+44(0) 20 7224 3688

221B Baker Street is the London address of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, created by author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In the United Kingdom, postal addresses with a number followed by a letter may indicate a separate address within a larger, often residential building. Baker Street in Holmes' time was a high-class residential district, and Holmes' apartment was probably part of a Georgian terrace.At the time the Holmes stories were published, addresses in Baker Street did not go as high as 221. Baker Street was later extended, and in 1932 the Abbey National Building Society moved into premises at 219–229 Baker Street. For many years, Abbey National employed a full-time secretary to answer mail addressed to Sherlock Holmes. In 1990, a blue plaque signifying 221B Baker Street was installed at the Sherlock Holmes Museum, situated elsewhere on the same block, and there followed a 15-year dispute between Abbey National and the Holmes Museum for the right to receive mail addressed to 221B Baker Street. Since the closure of Abbey House in 2005, ownership of the address by the Holmes Museum has not been challenged, despite its location between 237 and 241 Baker Street.Conan Doyle's intentionsWe met next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B, Baker Street, of which he had spoken at our meeting. They consisted of a couple of comfortable bed-rooms and a single large airy sitting-room, cheerfully furnished, and illuminated by two broad windows.(Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet, 1887)

Regent Hall
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
275 Oxford St
London, United Kingdom W1C 2

020 7629 5424

The Regent Hall is a Salvation Army centre on London's Oxford Street. It is one of the oldest centres in London having been founded by the founder of the army, William Booth in 1882. The church is known across the world as the "Rink", because it was formerly a skating rink.The hall is known for its music, both for its own brass band which tours internationally, and as a venue for visiting artists.The present officers are Majors Graham and Dawn Mizon, who succeeded Major Ray and Major Pat Brown. in 2012.

Lancashire Court
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
4-12 Lancashire Court, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1S 1EY

0207 518 9388

Welcome to Lancashire Court Tucked away behind the bustling streets of shoppers on New Bond Street lies a hidden treasure waiting to be explored. Lancashire Court is a uniquely charming haven offering visitors a sampling of some of London's finest restaurants, bars and stores. Whether browsing the shops by day, or sampling the indulgent delights by night, Lancashire Court provides the perfect setting for any occasion.

Gimpel Fils
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
30 Davies Street
London, United Kingdom

Gimpel Fils is a London art gallery based at 30 Davies Street in Westminster just off Grosvenor Square. The gallery was founded by Charles and Peter Gimpel, sons of the celebrated Parisian art dealer, René Gimpel, author of the Diary of an Art Dealer. Throughout its history it has maintained a commitment to contemporary British and International art.