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City Hall, Dublin | Tourist Information


dublincity.ie/recreationandculture/museumsgalleriesandtheatres/cityhall/pages/city_hall_hub.aspx

Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

(01)2222204

Historical Place Near City Hall

Croke Park
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
3 St James Avenue
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 3

+353 1 819 2300

Guinness Brewery
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
St James Gate
Dublin, Ireland

St. James's Gate Brewery is a brewery founded in 1759 in Dublin, Ireland, by Arthur Guinness. The company is now a part of Diageo, a company formed from the merger of Guinness and Grand Metropolitan in 1997. The main product of the brewery is Guinness Draught.Originally leased in 1759 to Arthur Guinness at IR£45 (Irish pounds) per year for 9,000 years, St. James's Gate has been the home of Guinness ever since. It became the largest brewery in Ireland in 1838, and the largest in the world by 1886, with an annual output of 1.2 million barrels. Although no longer the largest brewery in the world, it is still the largest brewer of stout in the world. The company has since bought out the originally leased property, and during the 19th and early 20th centuries the brewery owned most of the buildings in the surrounding area, including many streets of housing for brewery employees, and offices associated with the brewery. The brewery also made all of its own power using its own power plant.There is an attached exhibition on the 250-year-old history of Guinness, called the Guinness Storehouse.HistoryArthur Guinness started brewing ales in Leixlip, County Kildare, and then from 1759 at the St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin. On 31 December he signed a 9,000-year lease at £45 per annum for the unused brewery. However, the lease is no longer in effect because the brewery property has been bought out when it expanded beyond the original 4-acre site.

Old Jameson Distillery
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street, Smithfield Village, Dublin 7
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

The Old Jameson Distillery is an Irish whiskey tourist attraction located just off Smithfield Square in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening as an attraction in 1997, it receives between 300,000 and 350,000 guests per year. The Old Jameson Distillery is the original site where Jameson Irish Whiskey was distilled until 1971. It is now a visitors centre that provides guided tours, tutored whiskey tastings, bars, a restaurant, and a gift shop.HistoryThe original distillery on this site was called the Bow Street Distillery and was established in 1780. John Jameson took full ownership (he was previously the general manager) and expanded the distillery in 1805. By 1810, the operation was officially renamed to John Jameson & Son’s Bow Street Distillery. The distillery grew to an upwards of 5 acres by 1886.At this time, it was described by many as a "city within a city". The distillery also housed a Smithy, Cooperage, saw mills, engineers, carpenters, painters and coppersmiths’ shops. Water for the distillery came from two deep wells dug underneath the site. Cellars were also dug underneath nearby streets to store maturing whiskey, while four stills and two wash stills, each holding 24,000 gallons, were heated by both fire and steam coils above.Following a difficult period that included American Prohibition, Ireland’s trade war with Great Britain, and the introduction of Scotch blended whiskey, the Jameson distillery fell on hard times and decided to form the Irish Distillers Group with their previous rivals, the Cork Distillery Company and John Power & Son in 1966. Eventually, it became one of the last distilleries in Ireland to close in 1971. The operation was then moved out of Dublin to the New Midleton Distillery.

Dublin Castle
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

+353 1 645 8813

In continuous occupation since its establishment in 1204 AD, Dublin Castle has played a prominent role in Ireland's history.The State Apartments are among the most prestigious State Rooms in the country and are home to St. Patrick's Hall and the James Connolly Room. They can be visited both as part of a guided tour and as part of a self guided visit. The thirteenth century remains of the Gunpowder Tower and the 19th Century baroque style Chapel Royal can also be visited as part of the Guided Tour.

O'Connell Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland

O'Connell Street is Dublin's main thoroughfare. It measures 49 m (54 yds) in width at its southern end, 46 m (50 yds) at the north, and is 500 m (547 yds) in length. During the 17th century it was a narrow street known as Drogheda Street (named after Henry Moore, Earl of Drogheda). It was widened, and renamed 'Sackville Street' (named after Lionel Sackville, 1st Duke of Dorset) in the late 1700s until 1924, when it was renamed in honour of Daniel O'Connell, a nationalist leader of the early 19th century, whose statue stands at the lower end of the street, facing O'Connell Bridge.IntroductionLocated in the heart of Dublin city, O'Connell Street forms part of a grand thoroughfare created in the 18th century that runs through the centre of the capital, O'Connell Bridge, Westmoreland Street, College Green and Dame Street, terminating at City Hall and Dublin Castle. Situated just north of the River Liffey, the street has a fine axial positioning, running close to a north-south orientation. Lined with many handsome buildings, O'Connell Street is the most monumental of Dublin's commercial streets, having been largely rebuilt in the early 20th century following extensive destruction in the struggle for Irish independence and subsequent civil war. It has the air of an imposing 1920s boulevard, with signature stone-faced neoclassical buildings such as Clerys department store complemented by the more subtle grain of elegant bank and retail premises. O'Connell Street Upper by contrast retains something of its original 18th century character, with the western side conforming to original plot widths and some original fabric still intact.

Guinness Storehouse
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

Guinness Storehouse is a Guinness-themed tourist attraction at St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening in 2000, it has received over four million visitors.The Storehouse covers seven floors surrounding a glass atrium shaped in the form of a pint of Guinness. The ground floor introduces the beer's four ingredients (water, barley, hops and yeast), and the brewery's founder, Arthur Guinness. Other floors feature the history of Guinness advertising and include an interactive exhibit on responsible drinking. The seventh floor houses the Gravity Bar with views of Dublin and where visitors may drink a pint of Guinness included in the price of admission, which was €18 in March 2015, described as "overpriced" by Condé Nast Traveler. In 2006, a new wing opened incorporating a live installation of the present-day brewing process.HistoryThe building in which the Storehouse is located was constructed in 1902 as a fermentation plant for the St. James's Gate Brewery (where yeast is added to the brew). The building was designed in the style of the Chicago School of Architecture and was the first multi-storey steel-framed building to be constructed in Ireland. The building was used continuously as the fermentation plant of the Brewery until its closure in 1988, when a new fermentation plant was completed near the River Liffey.In 1997, it was decided to convert the building into the Guinness Storehouse, replacing the Guinness Hop Store as the Brewery's visitor centre. The redesign of the building was undertaken by the UK-based design firm Imagination in conjunction with the Dublin-based architects firm RKD, and the Storehouse opened to the public on 2 December 2000. In 2006 a new wing was developed at a cost of €2.5 million, including a live installation demonstrating the modern brewing process.

Dublin City Center
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Dublin City Centre
Dublin, Ireland Dub

Mix Like a pro is a professional DJ course running in Dublin City Centre.

Kilmainham Gaol
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Inchicore Road, Kilmainham
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

+353 1 453 5984

Kilmainham Gaol is a former prison in Kilmainham, Dublin, Ireland. It is now a museum run by the Office of Public Works, an agency of the Government of Ireland. Many Irish revolutionaries, including the leaders of the 1916 Easter Rising, were imprisoned and executed in the prison by the British.HistoryWhen it was first built in 1796, Kilmainham Gaol was called the "New Gaol" to distinguish it from the old prison it was intended to replace - a noisome dungeon, just a few hundred metres from the present site. It was officially called the County of Dublin Gaol, and was originally run by the Grand Jury for County Dublin.Originally, public hangings took place at the front of the prison. However, from the 1820s onward very few hangings, public or private, took place at Kilmainham. A small hanging cell was built in the prison in 1891. It is located on the first floor, between the west wing and the east wing.There was no segregation of prisoners; men, women and children were incarcerated up to 5 in each cell, with only a single candle for light and heat. Most of their time was spent in the cold and the dark, and each candle had to last for two weeks. Its cells were roughly 28 square metres in area.Children were sometimes arrested for petty theft, the youngest said to be a seven-year-old child, while many of the adult prisoners were transported to Australia.At Kilmainham the poor conditions in which women prisoners were kept provided the spur for the next stage of development. Remarkably, for an age that prided itself on a protective attitude for the "weaker sex", the conditions for women prisoners were persistently worse than for men. As early as his 1809 report the Inspector had observed that male prisoners were supplied with iron bedsteads while females 'lay on straw on the flags in the cells and common halls.' Half a century later there was little improvement. The women's section, located in the west wing, remained overcrowded.

National Botanic Gardens of Ireland
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
National Botanic Gardens, 300 Botanic Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 9

353 1 804 0300

Guided tours of the Gardens all year round- Sundays at 12.00pm & 2.30pm, admission free. Monday-Saturday 11.30am & 3.00pm, €5 pp. Pre-booked tours by arrangement. Ireland's premier garden is a green oasis situated in the leafy suburb of Glasnevin, not far from Dublin city centre. It is just under 50 acres in size and home to over 17,000 different plant species. Famous for its Victorian glasshouses: the Curvilinear Range, designed by Richard Turner, and the Great Palm House, Ireland's only tropical rainforest. Outdoor features include the rose and rock gardens, double herbaceous borders, the pond and river walks, the organic fruit and vegetable garden and wild Ireland, the native conservation area.

Spire of Dublin
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

The Spire of Dublin, alternatively titled the Monument of Light, is a large, stainless steel, pin-like monument 121.2m in height, located on the site of the former Nelson's Pillar on O'Connell Street in Dublin, Ireland.DescriptionThe spire was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects, who sought an "Elegant and dynamic simplicity bridging art and technology". The contract was awarded to SIAC-Radley JV and it was manufactured by Radley Engineering of Dungarvan, County Waterford, and erected by SIAC Construction Ltd & GDW Engineering Ltd. The first section was installed on 18 December 2002. Five additional 20m sections were added with the last one installed on 21 January 2003. The spire is an elongated cone of diameter 3m at the base, narrowing to 15cm at the top. Construction of the world's tallest sculpture was delayed because of difficulty in obtaining planning permission and environmental regulations. It is constructed from eight hollow tubes of stainless steel and features a tuned mass damper, designed by engineers Arup, to counteract sway. The steel underwent shot peening to alter the quality of light reflected from it.The pattern around the base of the Spire is based on a core sample of earth and rock formation taken from the ground where the spire stands. The pattern was applied by bead blasting the steel through rubber stencil masks whose patterns were created by water jet cutting based on core sample drawings supplied by the contractor.

National Botanic Gardens
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Glasnevin
Glasnevin, Ireland Dublin 9

353 1 804 0300

Mansion House, Dublin
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
2, Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

The Mansion House on Dawson Street, Dublin, has been the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin since 1715.FeaturesThe Mansion House's most famous features include the "Round Room", where the First Dáil assembled on 21 January 1919 to proclaim the Irish Declaration of Independence. On 21 January 1969 a special fiftieth anniversary joint session of Dáil Éireann and Seanad Éireann assembled there and was addressed by the then President of Ireland, Éamon de Valera.Externally, the distinctive metal portico over the main door was erected for the visit of Queen Victoria in 1900.Visitors and occupantsIts most famous occupants included Lord Mayors: Daniel O'Connell, nineteenth century nationalist leader Alfie Byrne (1930s), longest serving Lord Mayor in the 800-year history of the office Jim Mitchell (1976–77), the youngest Lord Mayor of Dublin, aged 29, in the history of the office Famous visitors to the mayoral residence include: Prince Rainier III and Princess Grace of Monaco Pope John Paul II Queen Victoria Mother Teresa Nelson Mandela

GPO,O'Connell Street, Dublin
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
O’Connell St Lower
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

01 705 7000

Grafton Street - Dublin, Ireland.
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland

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City Hall, Dublin
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D

The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.OverviewLocated at the top of Parliament Street on the city's southern side, it stands next to Dublin Castle, the centre of the British government in Ireland until 1922. The street had been built in 1753, providing a continuation of Capel Street on the north bank of the Liffey, across the newly widened Essex Bridge, and so the exchange ended (and still ends) a long streetscape.The external structure is primarily made out of white Portland stone from a quarry in Dorset. The large size and fine fittings of the Royal exchange, with carved capitals by Simon Vierpyl, and plasterwork by the leading stuccodore Charles Thorpe, reflect the standing and prestige of Dublin in the 18th Century. The neo-classical building contains a central entrance hall or Rotunda, with a large dome supported by twelve columns which are surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants strolled and discussed business meetings.The function of the building was to provide a meeting place for Dublin's businessmen, where they could buy and sell goods and trade bills of exchange. It was also close to the then Customs House that stood on the site of today's Clarence Hotel, making it convenient for overseas merchants. The cost of building the exchange was met by the Parliament of Ireland, and this is reflected by the initials "SPQH", standing for "Senatus PopulusQue Hibernicus", meaning "The senate and people of Ireland" (an Irish version of SPQR).

Ha'penny Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Wellington Quay/Bachelors Walk
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

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Grafton Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Kilmainham Jail Museum
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Kilmainham Jail 8
Dublin, Ireland D8

+353 1 453 5984

St. Teresa's Gardens
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
donore avenue
Dublin, Ireland

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Rathfarnham Castle
Distance: 3.2 mi Tourist Information
Rathfarnham Road
Dublin, Ireland D1

Rathfarnham Castle is a 16th-century castle in Rathfarnham, South Dublin, Ireland.OriginsThe earlier Anglo-Norman castle which was replaced by the present building was built on lands which were confiscated from the Eustace family of Baltinglass because of their involvement in the Second Desmond Rebellion. It defended the Pale from the Irish clans in the nearby Wicklow Mountains. It is believed the present castle was built around 1583 for Yorkshireman, Adam Loftus, then Lord Chancellor of Ireland and Protestant Archbishop of Dublin. Originally a semi-fortified and battlemented structure, extensive alterations in the 18th century give it the appearance of a Georgian house.The castle consisted of a square building four stories high with a projecting tower at each corner, the walls of which were an average of 5ft thick. On the ground level are two vaulted apartments divided by a wall nearly 10ft thick which rises to the full height of the castle. On a level with the entrance hall are the 18th century reception rooms and above this floor the former ballroom, later converted into a chapel.

Local Business Near City Hall

The Bank
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 1 6770677

Market Bar
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
16A Fade Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0)1 6139094

Bar
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
3 Fade Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

(01) 764 5681

Smock Alley Theatre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Exchange Street Lower
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

+353 01 677 0014

The Mezz
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
23/24 Eustace Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0)1 6707655

Dublin Temple Bar
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
47/48 Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland D02 N725

01 672 5286

Cliffs of Moher, Co. Clare, Ireland
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Cliffs of Moher
Dublin, Ireland lahinch

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Killeshin Hotel, Portlaoise
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Dublin road
Port Laoighise, Ireland Laois

No Name Bar, Fade Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
3 Fade St
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

01 648 0010

Starbucks Temple Bar
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
5 Crown Alley
Dublin, Ireland 2

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Mercantile Hotel, 28 Dame Street, Temple Bar, Dublin D2
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
28 Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland

1 670 7100

The Workmans Club
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
10 Wellington Quay
Dublin, Ireland 2

The Fumbally Exchange
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
5 Dame Lane
Dublin, Ireland

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Hangar
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Andrews Lane
Dublin, Ireland 2

St. Stephens's Green - Dublin/Ireland
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland

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Silk Road Cafe
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Chester Beatty Library
Dublin, Ireland Dub

01 407 0770

The Silk Road Café is often considered one of Dublin’s best hidden treasures.

Bull And Castle Gastro Pub And Beerhall Chtristchurch
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Lord Edwards Street
Dublin, Ireland

David Marshall School Of Hairdressing
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
27 South Great Georges Street
Dublin, Ireland Dub

(01)6770598

Rothar Bike Café
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
16 Fade street
Dublin, Ireland 2

01 6772233

TOG, Dublin Hackerspace
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Warehouse Unit C, Chancery Lane
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

Tourist Attraction Near City Hall

Temple Bar
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland 2

Trinity College, Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
College Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+35318961812

The Church Cafe Bar, Restaurant and Club
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Junction of Mary St & Jervis St
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

+353 1 828 0102

Guinness Storehouse, St Jame's Gate, Dublin
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
St. Jame's Gate
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 408 4800

ThunderRoad Cafe
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
52-57 Fleet Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

+353 1 6794057

Thunder Road Café is Dublin's hippest theme restaurant, slap bang in the heart of trendy Temple Bar. We offer a very extensive menu which contains a very generous selection of appetising dishes. Great music and party atmosphere 7 days/nights a week. DJ's every Friday & Saturday from 7pm, playing all your favourite music. Got as request? You can now text your request to the DJ. Thunderroad Cafe, Home of the Thunder text.

Trinity College Library
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Trinity College Dublin, College Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 1 8961127

The Library of Trinity College Dublin serves Trinity College and the University of Dublin. It is the largest library in Ireland and, as a legal deposit or "copyright library", it has rights to receive material published in the Republic of Ireland free of charge; it is also the only Irish library to hold such rights for the United Kingdom. The Library is the permanent home to the famous Book of Kells. Two of the four volumes are on public display, one opened to a major decorated page and the other to a typical page of text. The volumes and pages shown are regularly changed. Members of the University of Dublin also have access to the libraries of Tallaght Hospital and the Irish School of Ecumenics, Milltown.

Guiness Brewery- Dublin, Ireland
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

01 408 4800

Hard Rock Café
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
12 Fleet Street
Dublin, Ireland

(01) 671 7777

St. Patrick's Cathedral
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Saint Patrick's Close, Dublin 8, Irlanda
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

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Brown Thomas
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
88-95 Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

01 605 6666

Brown Thomas has long been established as a landmark destination for both Irish & international fashionistas – it proudly takes its place on the international stage of luxury retailing. Brown Thomas is part of a global retail family that attracts the best luxury brands and the most innovative designers. Featuring the world's most prestigious luxury boutiques such as Hermés, Chanel and Louis Vuitton, Brown Thomas is also home to over 200 labels, which are carefully selected from around the globe and edited specifically to our customers tastes and lifestyles. Brown Thomas has achieved pre-eminent status, a store that is listed among the best in the world, yet one that remains quintessentially Irish. Experience the Extraordinary. BROWN THOMAS DUBLIN 88-95 Grafton Street Dublin 2, Ireland T. +353 1 605 6666 BROWN THOMAS CORK 18-21 Patrick Street Cork, Ireland T. +353 21 480 5555 BROWN THOMAS LIMERICK 14 - 16 O'Connell Street Limerick, Ireland T. +353 61 417 222 BROWN THOMAS GALWAY 18-21 Eglinton Buildings Galway, Ireland T. +353 91 565 254

Arlington Temple Bar
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Lord Edward Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2,

+353 1 6708777

Legends bar offers an excellent choice of food and drink, friendly service and a variety of entertainment. Our Award Winning Celtic night Dinner and show features some of Dublin’s finest musicians and is performed every night by the highly acclaimed celtic rhythm dance troop. Our very talented chefs pride themselves on their traditional Irish menu including famous Irish stew and delicious sea food served daily until 9pm. We offer a taste of tradition with Modern flair…… The bar is located on the ground floor of the Arlington Hotel in the heart of Dublin’s medieval city. Simply email [email protected] for more information or call the Hotel to book your dinner and show Follow us on Twitter @arlohotelsdub Like us on Facebook; Arlington Temple bar

Guinness Skybar
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
St James Gate, Dublin 8
Dublin, Ireland DUBLIN 8

+353 (0) 1 4084800

The National Wax Museum plus
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
4 Foster Place, Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D2

(01) 671 8373

About The National Wax Museum Plus The National Wax Museum Plus is an exciting interactive visitor attraction located in the heart of Dublin's city centre Temple Bar district and just off Dame Street. The museum is housed over four floors and 13,000 square feet in a historic Foster Place landmark building, previously the home for Ireland's gold store and arms at the turn of the last century! The museum is an outstandingly original visitor attraction and has been designed to deliver an interactive experience taking you on a journey through Irish cultural heritage, an enchanting children's zone of discovery, Ireland's only dedicated tribute to our top scientific inventors, a green screen video room, a fully functioning recording studio and all the exceptional life like wax work characters you can expect at the national wax museum. The National Wax Museum Plus offers a museum experience unlike any other, whether you are young or old, a culture vulture or fun seeker, male or female, star struck or star studded, The National Wax Museum Plus is the ultimate entertainment experience for all.

Cliff Of Moher
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Co. Clare
Galway, Ireland

Viking Splash Tours
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
St Stephens Green North
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

01 707 6000

Viking Splash Tours offers an engaging, interactive experience for all kinds of groups! Not only are we Dublin’s only amphibious tour, showcasing our city by land and water, we are also a real, living theatre. With flexible and customised tours for groups or individuals, Viking Splash Tours can provide a platform for a range of occasions from team-building to birthdays, hen parties to family reunions.

Teeling Whiskey Distillery
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
17 Newmarket , Dublin 8
Dublin, Ireland

+35315310888

Come and visit the first new distillery in Dublin in over 125 years and experience the only operational distillery in the city. From the local artist exhibition space, the tour of the distillery and premium whiskey tasting at the end – come experience the Spirit of Dublin for yourself. The new Teeling Whiskey Distillery has just opened its doors to the public and all of #TeamTeeling are looking forward to welcoming you and showing you all we have to offer!

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (01) 4780888

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre is a large indoor shopping centre located at the top of Grafton Street in the Southside of Dublin City. It is named after St. Stephen's Green, a nearby park (its street address is Stephens Green West).HistoryThe Dandelion Market, well known as the site of U2's earliest gigs and its array of stalls selling punk badges, clothes and posters was situated in the area the shopping centre now resides in. The site had been assembled over the years by the Slazanger family.The market, which closed in 1981, is commemorated with a plaque, while Sinnotts Bar on South King Street is the only part of the original site that remains. Work began on the St. Stephen's Green Shopping Centre in 1985, with the whole project taking three years to complete. The centre officially opened its doors on 8 November 1988.ShopsThe centre has over 100 outlets. Major franchises include Dunnes Stores, Boots, Gamestop and TK Maxx. Examples of other, more independent shops include the gothic and alternative clothes shop Asha, leading Irish men's branded fashion clothing store 'Counterpropaganda' and the wrestling devoted shop Wrestling Mania. It also houses a 'Big & Tall' mans shop called Kingsize Menswear and has a large food court.

Dublinia
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Winetavern Street
Dublin, Ireland 8

+353 (0) 1 6794611

Dublinia is one of Dublin’s top visitor attractions with three exciting exhibitions, Viking Dublin, Medieval Dublin and History Hunters! All located at the historic crossroads of old Dublin. The Viking and Medieval Dublin exhibitions bring the city to life in an exciting and contemporary way for all ages. Unearth the city’s past at the History Hunters exhibition and see Dublin from a new perspective. Come away knowing more about the citizens of Dublin throughout the ages!

Powerscourt Townhouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
South William Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

353 1 6794144

GPO Witness History
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 (0)1 8169538

An Post's GPO Witness History is an engaging, interactive visitor attraction bringing history to life through technology, video, sound and authentic artefacts - many previously unseen. GPO Witness History, an immersive experience will give visitors plenty to think about, to digest and to discuss while they relax in the café, browse the giftshop or take time to savour the unique atmosphere of the rooftop courtyard. Most of all it will be a national visitor attraction of which we can all be proud and we look forward to welcoming you there from next Easter onwards.

Local Business Near City Hall

Killeshin Hotel, Portlaoise
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Dublin road
Port Laoighise, Ireland Laois

Citywest Hotel & Golf Resort
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Citywest Hotel and Golf Resort, Saggart, Co. South Dublin, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland

Brogan's Bar
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
CASTLE Street
Dublin, Ireland

Mother
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Copper Alley Night Club, Arlington Hotel, Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland

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Brogans Bar
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Dame St
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

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Conference Organisers
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
20C The Courtyard, Castle Street, Dalkey
Dublin, Ireland

(01)2859033

The Olympia Theatre
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
72 Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland

01 679 3323

Porterhouse Brewing Co.
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Parliament Street
Dublin, Ireland

01 679 8847

Zaytoon Restaurant
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Pier 17 14 Parliament Street
Dublin, Ireland

(01)6773595

Sin Nightclub
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Sycamore Street, Templebar
Dublin, Ireland

(01) 6334232

The Gutter Bookshop, Dublin
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Cows Lane (also Dalkey!)
Dublin, Ireland D8

(01) 6799206 Cow's Lane / (01) 2859633 Dalkey

Welcome to The Gutter Bookshop, an independent bookshop situated in the Old City part of Dublin's popular Temple Bar area, and since 2013 at 20 Railway Road in Dalkey as well. We sell all kinds of books, including some great children's books, as well as gifts and stationery. We aim to provide you with something a little bit different than you'll find in the big chain bookshops so do please pop in to us and say hello!

Cow's Lane
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Essex Street West, Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland

0872455565

The New Theatre: Dublin
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
43 East Essex Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 1 6703361

The New Theatre is a 66 seat theatre housed in Dublin’s old Temple bar area. Productions have been met with critical acclaim both regionally and nationally. The New Theatre supports new writing and endeavours to provide a theatre experience to those who wish to develop their artistic ability by giving them a space to create and produce in a professional setting. We aim to work as Ireland's only new writing theatre and to support the development of new and emerging writers. Over the last 18 years The New Theatre has grown in reputation. It is associated with artistic support and creativity, and has built an impressive catalogue of work. The state-of-the-art theatre is part funded by the Dublin City Council, The Arts Council, UNESCO - Dublin City of Literature and by private funding. As well as professional theatre companies, we host the Gay Film Qlub and Progressive Film Club in the theatre on one Saturday of each month. We also stage rehearsed readings of new plays on the first Saturday of each month providing new writers with the opportunity to showcase their work in development. Our involvement with the Youthreach initiative continues to work extremely well. The outcome is that all of the CDETB Youth Reach centres are now seriously considering changing direction: that is, greater emphasis on a theatre-based programme, as this is of greater benefit to the young participants than some of their current programmes. Clearly, this more-inspired direction has a positive impact on our TNT audiences and on other venues. Mission Statement The New Theatre is committed to providing young artists, performers, writers, directors and technicians with a first-rate venue and with the professional and technical expertise that will enable them to develop artistically and achieve their potential. We seek to do this in a collegiate, respectful and cooperative environment that supports innovation, imagination and shared learning. Across the range of our endeavours and through a varied programme of contemporary and classical theatre, we seek to provoke debate and to stimulate engagement and interest among our audiences. We strive to question, to entertain, to enliven and to enlighten our audiences; and in doing this, we seek to give both our artists and our audiences access to Irish theatre – particularly young people who might not otherwise have access to this rich heritage.

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