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St Dunstan-in-the-East, London | Tourist Information


St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 5


St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

Church Near St Dunstan-in-the-East

Mountain Movers Chapel International
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
186 Walworth Road Chatelaine House, London
London,

English Martyr's Church
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
142 Rodney Road
London, SE17 1

20-77034967

Meistad Eden Church UK
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Harris academy bermondsey 55 Southwark Park Road
London, SE16 3TZ

+44 7846 888896

MEISTAD EDEN CHURCH UK is a member of the international evangelical mission salvation for all assemblies of God with its headquarter in Paris, France and branches in the UK (London, Coventry, Leeds), Germany, Italy. Statement of faith 1. We believe that the Bible (i.e. the Old and New Testaments excluding the Apocrypha), is the inspired Word of God, the infallible, all sufficient rule for faith and practice. (2 Tim. 3:15-16; 2 Peter 1:21) 2. We believe in the unity of the One True and Living God who is the Eternal, Self-Existent “I AM”, Who has also revealed Himself as One being co-existing in three Persons – Father, Son and Holy Spirit (Deut. 6:4; Mark 12:29; Matt 28:19; 2 Cor. 13:14) 3. We believe in the Virgin Birth, Sinless Life, Miraculous Ministry, Substitutionary Atoning Death, Bodily Resurrection, Triumphant Ascension and Abiding Intercession of the Lord Jesus Christ and in His personal, visible, bodily return in power and glory as the blessed hope of all believers (Isa. 7:14; Matt. 1:23; Heb. 7:26; 1 Pet. 2:22; Acts 2:22, 10:38; 2 Cor. 5:21; Heb. 9:12; Luke 24:39; 1 Cor. 15:4; Acts 1:9; Eph. 4:8-10; Rom. 8:34; Heb. 7:25; 1 Cor. 15:22-24, 51-57; 1 Thess. 4:13-18; Rev. 20:1-6) 4. We believe in the fall of man, who was created pure and upright, but fell by voluntary transgression. (Gen. 1:26-31, 3:1-7; Rom. 5:12-21) 5. We believe in salvation through faith in Christ, who, according to the Scriptures, died for our sins, was buried and was raised from the dead on the third day, and that through His Blood we have Redemption. (Titus 2:11, 3:5-7; Rom. 10:8-15; 1 Cor. 15:3-4) 6. This experience is also known as the new birth, and is an instantaneous and complete operation of the Holy Spirit upon initial faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. (John 3:5-6; James 1:18; 1 Pet. 1:23; 1 John 5:1) 7. We believe that all who have truly repented and believed in Christ as Lord and Saviour are commanded to be baptised by immersion in water. (Matt. 28:19; Acts 10:47-48; Acts 2:38-39) 8. We believe in the baptism in the Holy Spirit as an enduement of the believer with power for service, the essential, biblical evidence of which is the speaking with other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance. (Acts 1:4-5, 8, 2:4, 10:44-46, 11:14-16, 19:6) 9. We believe in the operation of the gifts of the Holy Spirit and the gifts of Christ in the Church today. (1 Cor. 12:4-11, 28; Eph. 4:7-16) 10. We believe in holiness of life and conduct in obedience to the command of God. (1 Pet. 1:14-16; Heb. 12:14; 1 Thess. 5:23; 1 John 2:6) 11. We believe that deliverance from sickness, by Divine Healing is provided for in the Atonement. (Isa. 53:4-5; Matt. 8:16-17; James 5:13-16) 12. We believe that all who have truly repented and believe in Christ as Lord and Saviour should regularly participate in Breaking of Bread. (Luke 22:14-20; 1 Cor. 11:20-34) 13. We believe in the bodily resurrection of all men, the everlasting conscious bliss of all who truly believe in our Lord Jesus Christ and the everlasting conscious punishment of all whose names are not written in the Book of Life. (Dan. 12:2-3; John 5:28-29; 1 Cor. 15:22-24; Matt. 25:46; 2 Thess. 1:9; Rev. 20:10-15)

The Church
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
The Coronet, 28 New Kent Road
London, SE1 6TJ

07771 621164

It’s October 1979 and a few Aussie and Kiwi backpackers are groggily waking up to the distant sound of church bells on a Sunday morning. “Must be beer o’clock!” one says to the others and they pull on their RM Williams boots and their Swanndri shirts and stumble down to the local, The Golden Lion in Fulham Broadway. As the proprietor, Sean Sullivan, pulls their pints he tells them how he’s putting on a comedian this week as well as the mandatory Sunday afternoon striptease act. My Sharona by The Knack comes on in the background and the backpackers, beers in hand, move through the smoky pub towards the stage to await the days entertainment. The Church is born.

Christian Ministers Church
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
26 Aberdour Street
London, SE1 4SG

Metropolitan Tabernacle
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Elephant & Castle, SE1 6SD
London, SE1 6

0207 735 7076

The Metropolitan Tabernacle is a large Independent Reformed Baptist church in the Elephant and Castle in London. It was the largest non-conformist church of its day in 1861. The Tabernacle Fellowship have been worshipping together since 1650. Its first pastor was William Rider; other notable pastors and preachers include Benjamin Keach, Dr. John Gill, Dr. John Rippon, and C. H. Spurgeon. The Tabernacle still worships and holds to its Biblical foundations and principles under its present pastor, Dr. Peter Masters.HistoryThe Tabernacle fellowship dates back to 1650, when the English Parliament banned independent Christian organisations from meeting together. This congregation braved persecution until 1688, when the Baptists were once again allowed to worship in freedom. At this point, the group built their first chapel, in the Tower Bridge area.In 1720, Dr. John Gill became pastor and served for 51 years. In 1771, Dr. John Rippon became pastor and served for 63 years. During these times, the church experienced great growth and became one of the largest congregations in the country. Afterwards decline set in and by 1850 the congregation was small.In 1854, the most famous of all the pastors at the Metropolitan Tabernacle started serving at the youthful age of 20. His name was Charles Haddon Spurgeon, and he quickly became the most popular British preacher of his day. The church at the beginning of Spurgeon's pastorate was situated at New Park Street Chapel, but this soon became so full that services had to be held in hired halls such as the Surrey Gardens Music Hall.

Crossway United Reformed Church
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
100 New Kent Rd
London, SE17 1

20-77037803

RCCG Bethel Tabernacle
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Ellen Brown Centre, Spa Garden, 145, Grange road Bermondsey
London, SE1 3EU

0203 633 3837

The Redeemed Christian Church of God (Bethel Tabernacle) Bethel Tabernacle with the leadership of the Lord has seen constant growth over the year

The Salvation Army THQ
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
101 Newington Causeway
London, SE1 6BN

RMM Woman of Worth
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
70 Newington Causeway (Lancaster House)
London, SE1 6DF

07703753975

St Mary Magdalen Church
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Bermondsey Rectory, 193, Bermondsey St
London, SE1 3

020 7407 5273

St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
193 Bermondsey St
London, SE1 3

020 7234 0100

St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey is an Anglican church dedicated to St Mary Magdalen in Bermondsey in the London Borough of Southwark. The present building is late 17th century and is a Grade II* listed building.Its parish extends as far as the Thames (including the south tower of Tower Bridge, City Hall and part of London Bridge Station). The parishes of St Olave Tooley Street, St Luke Grange Road and St John Horsleydown have all been merged into it.HistoryA church of this dedication is first recorded on this site in 1290, serving lay workers at Bermondsey Abbey. The design of that building is not known, but in 1680 the church was demolished and rebuilt, retaining the late medieval tower with a gothic window and arches. This re-building was completed in about 1690, and was followed by the addition of a north gallery in 1705 and a south gallery in 1794. The south gallery retains the complete original boxed pews but those in the north gallery have had the gates removed.Further alterations were made under the supervision of the architect George Porter in 1830. He remodelled the tower and west end in an unacademic Gothic style and restored the medieval west window. The changes also involved removing the portico and school which extended into Bermondsey Street. The interior was redecorated in the Gothic Revival style in 1852 and is described in a document which can be dated to 1865 - 1879 by reference to the then rector. In 1883 the chancel was lengthened and a new stained glass window was installed, as well as other "beautification". Surviving the Blitz, the west end interior was damaged by fire in 1971. The church was first rendered externally in 1829, and was most recently re-rendered in 1994. A detailed description given in the volume of the Victoria County History covering the area, published in 1912. The church is now the oldest building in the locality, and the medieval arches are still visible inside the tower behind the organ (not normally accessible to the public).

GVC London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Mckinley Commons, Globe Academy
London, SE1 6AF

07947797323

----------- God’s Vineyard Ministries is a God given vision to reach out to all nations with the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ in an atmosphere of warmth, love and excitement. We believe that the power of God through the gospel will give hope to the hopeless, freedom to those in captivity, healing to the hurting, joy and peace to the troubled. We believe in the holistic gospel: ministering to the spiritual, physical, emotional and social needs of man through the incorruptible and indestructible living word of God, with practical application to everyday life. Our goal is to live to the full on earth, to make heaven, and to help others to do the same. Join us in our season of refreshing, as we bask in the glory of God, and enjoy showers of blessing. THE GOALS OF THE CHURCH ----------------------------------- We are a Bible believing church built on the foundation of Jesus Christ, the son of the living God to: · Fulfil the great commission; disciple individuals to Christ to enable them fulfil their God – ordained destiny. · Promote love, integrity and unity among all · Render help to the needy, minister deliverance to the oppressed, ignite the flame of revival and establish God’s kingdom on earth. OUR MISSION ----------------- · To minister to the whole man: spiritually, physically, emotionally and socially · To organise periodic seminars that will enhance people’s knowledge in life with principles based on the word of God · To organise community outreach to the homeless, alcoholic, drug addict etc · To share the gospel with everyone at every opportunity · To organise variety programs, such as musical concerts etc, aimed at the youths. OUR DOCTRINE ------------------- · We believe that the Bible is the word of God: its doctrine is our doctrine. · We believe in God the Father, Jesus the Son and the Holy Spirit. · We believe that Jesus Christ died for the sin of the whole world, and rose up the third day for our justification · We believe in the ministry of the Holy Spirit. · We believe in the great commission: To go into the entire world and preach the gospel to all the people. · We believe salvation is obtained through faith in the atoning work of Jesus Christ on the cross. It is by grace. · We believe in the efficacy of prayers in communicating with God through Jesus Christ.

St George the Martyr Southwark
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Borough High Street London, Greater London SE1 1J
London, SE1 1JL

020 7357 7331

St George the Martyr is a church in the historic Borough district of south London. It lies within the modern day London Borough of Southwark on Borough High Street at the junction with Long Lane, Marshalsea Road, and Tabard Street. St George the Martyr is named after Saint George. The church is a Grade II* listed building.The church has strong associations with Charles Dickens, whose father was imprisoned for debt in the Marshalsea prison. The surviving wall of the prison adjoins the north side of the churchyard. Dickens himself lived nearby, in Lant Street, lodging in a house that belonged to the Vestry Clerk of St George's. This was during the darkest period of his life when, as a teenager, with his father in prison, he had to work in the 'blacking factory', and his literary career must have seemed an impossible dream. Later, he was to set several scenes of the novel Little Dorrit in and around St George's Church. There is a small representation of Little Dorrit in the east window of the church.It is also a recognised church of the City of London Company of Parish Clerks and the guild church of the Guildable Manor. From 2008 the annual Southwark Quit Rents ceremony, before the Queen's Remembrancer has taken place there.

Southwark Cathedral
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, SE1 9DA

+44 20 7367 6700

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for more than 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since the creation of the diocese of Southwark in 1905.Between 1106 and 1538 it was the church of an Augustinian priory, Southwark Priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a parish church, with the new dedication of St Saviour's. The church was in the diocese of Winchester until 1877, when the parish of St Saviour's, along with other South London parishes, was transferred to the diocese of Rochester. The present building retains the basic form of the Gothic structure built between 1220 and 1420, although the nave is a late 19th-century reconstruction.HistoryLegendary originsThe 16th-century London historian John Stow recorded an account of the origins of the Southwark Priory of St Mary that he had heard from Bartholomew Linsted, who had been the last prior when the priory was dissolved. Linsted claimed it had been founded as a nunnery "long before the Conquest" by a maiden named Mary, on the profits of a ferry across the Thames she had inherited from her parents. Later it was converted into a college of priests by "Swithen, a noble lady". Finally in 1106 it was refounded as an Augustinian priory.

St Magnus-the-Martyr
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Lower Thames Street EC3R 6DN
London, EC3R 6DN

+44 20 7626 4481

St Magnus the Martyr, London Bridge is a Church of England church and parish within the City of London. The church, which is located in Lower Thames Street near The Monument to the Great Fire of London, is part of the Diocese of London and under the pastoral care of the Bishop of London and the Bishop of Fulham. It is a Grade I listed building. The rector uses the title "Cardinal Rector", being one of three clerics in the Church of England to use the title Cardinal.St Magnus lies on the original alignment of London Bridge between the City and Southwark. The ancient parish was united with that of St Margaret, New Fish Street, in 1670 and with that of St Michael, Crooked Lane, in 1831. The three united parishes retained separate vestries and churchwardens. Parish clerks continue to be appointed for each of the three parishes.St Magnus is the guild church of the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers and the Worshipful Company of Plumbers, and the ward church of the Ward of Bridge and Bridge Without. It is also twinned with the Church of the Resurrection in New York City.

St. Paul's Primary School
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Wellclose Square
London, E1 8

020 7480 6581

St Olave Hart Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
8 Hart St
London, EC3R 7

20-74884318

St Olave Hart Street is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on the corner of Hart Street and Seething Lane near Fenchurch Street railway station.John Betjeman described St Olave's as "a country church in the world of Seething Lane." The church is one of the smallest in the City and is one of only a handful of medieval City churches that escaped the Great Fire of London in 1666. In addition to being a local parish church, St Olave's is the Ward Church of the Tower Ward of the City of London.HistoryThe church is first recorded in the 13th century as St Olave-towards-the-Tower, a stone building replacing the earlier construction. It is dedicated to the patron saint of Norway, King Olaf II of Norway, who fought alongside the Anglo-Saxon King Ethelred the Unready against the Danes in the Battle of London Bridge in 1014. He was canonised after his death and the church of St Olave's was built apparently on the site of the battle. The Norwegian connection was reinforced during the Second World War when King Haakon VII of Norway worshipped there while in exile.Saint Olave's was rebuilt in the 13th century and then again in the 15th century. The present building dates from around 1450. According to John Stow's Survey of London, a major benefactor of the church in the late 15th century was wool merchant Richard Cely Sr., who held the advowson on the church . On his death, Cely bequeathed money for making the steeple and an altar in the church. The merchant mark of the Cely family was carved in two of the corbels in the nave . No memorial to the Celys now remains in the church.

St Clement's, Eastcheap
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Clement's Lane
London, EC4N 7HR

020 7623 5454

St Clement Eastcheap is a Church of England parish church in Candlewick Ward of the City of London. It is located on Clement's Lane, off King William Street and close to London Bridge and the River Thames.Clement was a disciple of St Peter the Apostle and was ordained as Bishop of Rome in the year 93 AD. By legend, Clement was martyred by being tied to an anchor and thrown into the Black Sea, which led to his adoption as a patron saint of sailors. The dedication to St Clement is unusual in London, with only one other ancient church there dedicated to this saint, namely St Clement Danes, Westminster. It is also located a little north of the Thames, but further west from Eastcheap and outside the old City boundary, just beyond the Temple Bar on the Strand.HistoryMedieval periodEastcheap was one of the main streets of medieval London. The name 'Eastcheap' derives from the Saxon word 'cheap', meaning a market, and Eastcheap was so called to distinguish it from Westcheap, later to become Cheapside. The southern end of Clement's Lane opened onto Eastcheap until the 1880s when the construction of King William Street separated Clement's Lane from Eastcheap, which still remains nearby as a street.

St Mary Abchurch
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Abchurch Lane
London, EC4N 5

20-76260306

St Mary Abchurch is a Church of England church off Cannon Street in the City of London. Dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, it is first mentioned in 1198–1199. The medieval church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666, and replaced by the present building.HistoryMedieval churchThe church dates back to the twelfth century and is dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The additional name "Abchurch" may be a variant of "Upchurch", referring to its position on comparatively high ground.The patronage of the church belonged to the convent of St Mary Overy, Southwark, until around 1455, when it passed to the master and chaplains of the college of Corpus Christi at the church of St Laurence Pountney. After the Reformation, Archbishop Parker persuaded Elizabeth I to grant the church to his college, Corpus Christi, Cambridge, which has appointed the incumbent ever since."Restored and beautified" in 1611 at the cost of the parishioners, St Mary's was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666.RebuildingThe church was rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren in 1681–1686. The parish was united with that of the nearby church of St Laurence Pontney, also destroyed in the Great Fire but not rebuilt.Wartime damage and repairA bomb hit the church in September 1940 during the London Blitz. The greatest damage was to the dome. W. Godfrey Allen repaired the church between 1948–1953.

The Salvation Army International
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
101 Queen Victoria Street
London, EC4V 4EH

+44 (0) 20 7332 0101

The Salvation Army is currently officially at work in 128 countries worldwide.

St Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
St Andrew's Hill & Queen Victoria Street
London, EC4V 5DE

+44 20 7329 3632

St. Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe is a Church of England church located on Queen Victoria Street, London in the City of London, near Blackfriars station.HistoryFirst mentioned around 1170, St. Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe was almost certainly founded considerably earlier. During the 13th century the church was a part of Baynard's Castle, an ancient royal residence. In 1361, Edward III moved his Royal Wardrobe (a storehouse for Royal accoutrements, housing arms and clothing among other personal items of the Crown) from the Tower of London to just north of the church. It was from this association that the church acquired its unique name.The Wardrobe and the church, however, were both lost in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Of the 51 churches designed by Sir Christopher Wren after the Great Fire, St. Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe is among the simplest of his designs; it was rebuilt in 1695.The church was again destroyed during the London blitz by German bombing; only the tower and walls survived. It was rebuilt and rededicated in 1961.AdvowsonThe advowson of St Andrew's was anciently held by the family of FitzWalter to which it probably came from the holding by Robert Fitzwalter (d.1235) of the office of Constable of Baynard's Castle. In 1417 it was held by Thomas de Berkeley, 5th Baron Berkeley (d.1417), as his charter dated 24 June 1417 appointing feoffees to his estate records. Berkeley's Inn, the town house of that family stood nearby, at the south end of Adle Street, against Puddle Wharf, as reported by John Stow in his "Survey of London" (1598)

Apostrophe, St Paul's
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
10 St Paul's Churchyard
London, EC4M 8

St Botolph without Aldgate
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Aldgate High Street
London, EC3N 1

02072831670

Landmark and Historical Place Near St Dunstan-in-the-East

St George the Martyr Southwark
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Borough High Street London, Greater London SE1 1J
London, United Kingdom SE1 1JL

020 7357 7331

St George the Martyr is a church in the historic Borough district of south London. It lies within the modern day London Borough of Southwark on Borough High Street at the junction with Long Lane, Marshalsea Road, and Tabard Street. St George the Martyr is named after Saint George. The church is a Grade II* listed building.The church has strong associations with Charles Dickens, whose father was imprisoned for debt in the Marshalsea prison. The surviving wall of the prison adjoins the north side of the churchyard. Dickens himself lived nearby, in Lant Street, lodging in a house that belonged to the Vestry Clerk of St George's. This was during the darkest period of his life when, as a teenager, with his father in prison, he had to work in the 'blacking factory', and his literary career must have seemed an impossible dream. Later, he was to set several scenes of the novel Little Dorrit in and around St George's Church. There is a small representation of Little Dorrit in the east window of the church.It is also a recognised church of the City of London Company of Parish Clerks and the guild church of the Guildable Manor. From 2008 the annual Southwark Quit Rents ceremony, before the Queen's Remembrancer has taken place there.

The Shard London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group. HOUSE RULES Welcome to The Shard, in the heart of London Bridge. We hope our Facebook page can be a place where our community can feel free to express their feelings and opinions about The Shard or share their experiences with our building, our businesses or our neighbourhood. We welcome feedback, both positive and negative, and we aim to respond to comments that necessitate an answer promptly. Our Facebook house rules are designed to serve as a guideline to ensure our online community can enjoy our Facebook page in a pleasant environment. Guidelines First of all, we ask that you please use polite language and tone at all times. Please be mindful that our page attracts a wide audience and we ask that your comments are respectful and on-topic. It’s the policy of The Shard’s Facebook team that we don’t normally moderate Facebook posts, but we won’t tolerate abusive language, disruptive behaviour or illegal or objectionable content. This includes any material which might be defamatory, offensive, infringing, obscene, lewd, pornographic, violent, abusive, insulting, threatening, harassing, discriminatory, blasphemous, indecent or otherwise unlawful or objectionable. It also includes any material which is aggressive, argumentative or likely to be construed as bullying. No spamming or repetition, please, nor off-topic material in subject-specific threads or areas. We also will not tolerate language, content, postings or links that we consider racist, sexist, homophobic or grossly off-topic. If we consider a posting to fit any of these categories, it will be removed from our Facebook page. Get in Touch There’s a chance we might miss something, so if you are concerned that a user is breaking these rules on our Facebook page, please do let us know. Or if you feel we’ve hidden your post unnecessarily, we’re happy to provide an explanation. You can message us directly via this Facebook page or you can email us via [email protected] And do please keep in mind that the comments expressed within our Facebook page, unless an official post from The Shard, come from you – our community of fans – and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Shard.

City Hall, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
110 The Queens Walk, LONDON, SE1 2AA
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

20-79834100

City Hall is the headquarters of the Greater London Authority (GLA), which comprises the Mayor of London and the London Assembly. It is located in Southwark, on the south bank of the River Thames near Tower Bridge. It was designed by Norman Foster and opened in July 2002, two years after the Greater London Authority was created.BackgroundFor the first two years of its existence, the Greater London Authority was based at Romney House, Marsham Street in Westminster. Meetings of the London Assembly took place at Emmanuel Centre, also on Marsham Street.City Hall was constructed at a cost of £43 million on a site formerly occupied by wharves serving the Pool of London. The building does not belong to the GLA but is leased under a 25-year rent. Despite its name, City Hall is not in and does not serve a city (as recognised by English constitutional law), which often adds to the confusion of Greater London with the City of London, which has its headquarters at Guildhall. In June 2011, Mayor Boris Johnson announced that for the duration of the London 2012 Olympic Games, the building would be called London House.

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

+44 (0)20 7403 3761

An iconic London landmark and one of Britain's best loved historic sites, Tower Bridge is open to the public 363 days a year. Within the Bridge's iconic structure and magnificent Victorian Engine rooms, the Tower Bridge Exhibition is the best way of exploring the most famous bridge in the world! Come learn about this incredible feat of Victorian engineering, discover how the Bridge is raised and enjoy stunning panoramic views across London from our high-level walkways, 42 metres above the River Thames. Opening Times: 10:00 - 18:30 (last admission 17:30) Facebook is a public page. Please bear this in mind when posting your comments, especially regarding personal information. Further information on the City of London Corporation can be found at www.cityoflondon.gov.uk. The City of London Corporation is always happy to hear from you but please keep posts relevant. All comments will be monitored by Facebook and the City and any comments that are offensive or inappropriate will be removed. People who persistently cause conflict or offence to others will be removed and blocked from our social media pages.

The Shard
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2TH

The View from The Shard
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Joiner Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9QU

+44(0)844 499 7111

The View from The Shard is situated at the top of The Shard – the tallest building in Western Europe, and is London’s newest visitor attraction. At almost twice the height of any other viewing platform in London, The View from The Shard offers visitors a 360 degree view of London for up to 40 miles. Advanced tickets are £25.95 for adults and £19.95 for children. Visits are queue and crowd free, and visitors are allowed to stay and enjoy the view for as long as they like. www.theviewfromtheshard.com

London Bridge bus station
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge Station Unit 10
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SP

020 7357 0069

London Bridge bus station serves the London Bridge area of the city of London and is situated at the London Bridge tube and rail station.There are three stands at the station which are situated on the station forecourt.London Buses routes 17, 43, 48, 141, 149 and 521 and night routes N21 and N343 serve the station.New bus stationA new bus station was built as part of the new Shard London Bridge "Gem" development which was open in 2012.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Unit 22, Hays Galleria, Tooley Street,
London, United Kingdom SE1 2HD

020 7407 4301

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property – then a brewhouse – in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7940 6300

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HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Morgan's Lane
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

HMS „Belfast” – krążownik lekki brytyjskiej marynarki Royal Navy z okresu II wojny światowej.BudowaWraz z siostrzanym HMS „Edinburgh”, krążownik należał do typu Edinburgh, określanego też jako trzecia seria typu Town. Oba krążowniki zamówione przez Admiralicję w roku 1936 miały być brytyjską odpowiedzią na zwodowanie dwóch włoskich krążowników typu Giuseppe Garibaldi o wyporności 9591 ton. Do służby w Royal Navy HMS „Belfast” wcielony w sierpniu 1939 roku.Okres II wojny światowej„Belfast” rozpoczął wojnę w składzie 18 Eskadry Krążowników Home Fleet pod dowództwem kapitana J. Scotta. 9 października 1939 HMS „Belfast” przechwycił na północ od Orkadów niemiecki liniowiec „Cap Norte” o pojemności 13 615 BRT. Wkrótce potem przeniesiony został do bazy w Rosyth, gdzie 21 listopada 1939 podczas wychodzenia z portu krążownik wszedł na niemiecką minę magnetyczną postawioną przez U-21. Eksplodująca pod dnem mina spowodowała na tyle poważne uszkodzenia kadłuba, że HMS „Belfast” został wyłączony z działań na okres 3 lat.Po remoncie okręt ponownie został wcielony do służby 8 grudnia 1942, zostając w styczniu następnego roku okrętem flagowym 10 Eskadry Krążowników Home Fleet pod komendą kontradmirała Burnetta. Pierwszą operacją HMS „Belfast” na Morzu Arktycznym była osłona konwoju JW-53 w lutym 1943 roku. Również kolejny konwój JW-54 płynący w dwóch częściach w listopadzie 1943 roku był osłaniany przez 10 Eskadrę Krążowników.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (A3)
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

St Mary Abchurch
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Abchurch Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

20-76260306

St Mary Abchurch is a Church of England church off Cannon Street in the City of London. Dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, it is first mentioned in 1198–1199. The medieval church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666, and replaced by the present building.HistoryMedieval churchThe church dates back to the twelfth century and is dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The additional name "Abchurch" may be a variant of "Upchurch", referring to its position on comparatively high ground.The patronage of the church belonged to the convent of St Mary Overy, Southwark, until around 1455, when it passed to the master and chaplains of the college of Corpus Christi at the church of St Laurence Pountney. After the Reformation, Archbishop Parker persuaded Elizabeth I to grant the church to his college, Corpus Christi, Cambridge, which has appointed the incumbent ever since."Restored and beautified" in 1611 at the cost of the parishioners, St Mary's was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666.RebuildingThe church was rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren in 1681–1686. The parish was united with that of the nearby church of St Laurence Pontney, also destroyed in the Great Fire but not rebuilt.Wartime damage and repairA bomb hit the church in September 1940 during the London Blitz. The greatest damage was to the dome. W. Godfrey Allen repaired the church between 1948–1953.

Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 4

Fenchurch Street is a street in London linking Aldgate at its eastern end with Lombard Street and Gracechurch Street in the west. It is a well-known thoroughfare in the City of London financial district and is the site of a large number of corporate offices and headquartersTo the south of Fenchurch Street and towards its eastern end is Fenchurch Street railway station, a mainline terminus with services towards east London and Essex. Other notable sites include the commercial buildings at 20 Fenchurch Street and Plantation Place.StreetscapeFenchurch Street is home to a large number of shops, pubs and offices, including 20 Fenchurch Street, a 525 ft tall skyscraper completed in 2014.Located at No. 71 is Lloyd's Register, where the annual journal Lloyd's Registry was previously published. The frontage on Fenchurch Street was built in 1901 by Thomas Edward Collcutt and is a Grade II* listed building. The more modern building behind was designed by Richard Rogers and towers above it. This was completed in 1999 and was shortlisted for the RIBA Stirling prize in 2002.At the street's eastern end and junction with Aldgate is the Aldgate Pump, a historic water pump which has been designated a Grade II listed structure. Further west, Fenchurch Street's junction with Lime Street was formerly the location of a Christopher Wren church, St Dionis Backchurch. First built in the 13th century dedicated to the patron saint of France, it was destroyed during the Great Fire in 1666, later rebuilt by Wren, and then demolished in 1878.

St Stephen's, Walbrook
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
38 Walbrook
London, United Kingdom EC4N 4

20-76269000

St Stephen Walbrook is a church in the City of London, part of the Church of England's Diocese of London. The present domed building was erected to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren following the destruction of its medieval predecessor in the Great Fire of London in 1666. It is located in Walbrook, next to the Mansion House, and near to Bank and Monument Underground stations.Early historyThe original church of St Stephen stood on the west side of the Walbrook, a stream running southwards across the City of London from the City Wall near Moorfields to the Thames.The church was moved to its present site, on the east side of the Walbrook (later concealed in a culvert), in the 15th century. In 1429 Robert Chichely, acting as executor of will of the former Lord Mayor, Sir William Stondon, bought a piece of land on the east side of the Walbrook, and presented it to the parish. Several foundation stones were laid at a ceremony on 11 May 1429, and the church was consecrated ten years later, on 30 April 1439. At 125ft long and 67ft wide, it was considerably larger than the present building.The church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. It contained a memorial to the composer John Dunstaple. The wording of the epitaph had been recorded in the early 17th century, and was reinstated in the church in 1904, some 450 years after his death. The nearby church of St Benet Sherehog, also destroyed in the Great Fire, was not rebuilt; instead its parish was united with that of St Stephen.

Aldgate
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Aldgate High Street
London, United Kingdom

020 7636 8309

Aldgate was the eastern-most gateway through the London Wall leading from the City of London to Whitechapel and the East End of London. It gives its name to a City ward bounded by White Kennet Street in the north and Crutched Friars in the south, taking in Leadenhall and Fenchurch Streets, which remain principal thoroughfares through the City, each splitting from the short street named Aldgate that connects to Aldgate High Street. The road is situated 2.3mi east north-east of Charing Cross.John Cass's school, where a plaque records the former placement of London Wall, is sited on the north side of Aldgate (the street).EtymologyThe etymology of the name "Aldgate" is disputed. It is first recorded in 1052 as Æst geat ("east gate") but had become Alegate by 1108. Writing in the 16th century, John Stow derived the name from "Old Gate" (Aeld Gate). However, Henry Harben, writing in 1918, contended that this was wrong and that documents show that the "d" is missing in documents written before 1486–7. Alternative meanings include "Ale Gate" in connection with a putative ale-house or "All Gate" meaning the gate was free to all. Other possibilities canvassed by Harben include reference to a Saxon named "Ealh," or reference to foreigners ("el") or oil ("ele") or "awl". Gillian Bebbington, writing in 1972, suggests Alegate, Aelgate ("public gate") or Aeldgate" (Old Gate") as equally viable alternatives whilst Weinreb and Hibbert, writing in 1983, revert to Stow's theory that the name means "Old Gate".

The Gerkin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
30 St Mary Axe
London, United Kingdom EC3A 8

020 7071 5029

St Margaret Lothbury
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Lothbury
London, United Kingdom EC2R 7HH

020 7726 4878

St Margaret Lothbury is a Church of England parish church in the City of London; it spans the boundary between Coleman Street Ward and Broad Street Ward. Recorded since the 12th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. St Margaret Lothbury still serves as a parish church, as well as being the official church of five Livery Companies, two Ward Clubs and two Professional Institutes. It also has connections with many local finance houses, all of which hold special services each year.HistoryThe earliest mention of St Margaret Lothbury is from 1185. The patronage of the church belonged to the abbess and convent of Barking, Essex until the Dissolution, when it passed to the Crown.It was rebuilt in 1440, mostly at the expense of Robert Large, who was Lord Mayor that year and is remembered as the Master of whom Caxton served his apprenticeship. It suffered as did so many of London's churches in the Great Fire of London of 1666 and was rebuilt by Christopher Wren from 1686 to 1690.In 1781 the parish of the church of St Christopher le Stocks, demolished to make way for an extension for the Bank of England, was united with that of St Margaret Lothbury.

Heron Tower
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
110 Bishopsgate
London, United Kingdom EC2M 3

+442035359015

The Heron Tower is a commercial skyscraper in London. It stands 230m tall including its 28-metre mast making it the tallest building in the City of London financial district and the third tallest in Greater London and the United Kingdom, after the Shard in Southwark and One Canada Square at Canary Wharf. The Heron Tower is located on Bishopsgate and is bordered by Camomile Street, Outwich Street and Houndsditch.Construction of the building started in 2007 and was completed in 2011. It is owned by Heron International and is generally known as the Heron Tower, though following a naming dispute in 2014 involving the tenant Salesforce.com the City of London ruled in favour of the property being officially named 110 Bishopsgate. The tower initially struggled to attract tenants in the depths of the Great Recession, but is now fully let.Design and planningDesigned by architects Kohn Pedersen Fox, the height of the Heron Tower was planned to be only 183 m, identical to that of Tower 42, the City of London's then tallest building since 1980.It attracted some controversy when first announced due to its proximity to St Paul's Cathedral when viewed from Waterloo Bridge. English Heritage was notably vocal in expressing concerns. A public inquiry was subsequently held, the outcome of which was decided by deputy prime minister John Prescott, who ruled in the developers' favour. The tower was given final approval for construction in July 2002.

Petticoat Lane Market
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Wentworth Street
London, United Kingdom E1 7TS

207-2622533

Petticoat Lane Market is a fashion and clothing market in the East End of London. It consists of two adjacent street markets. Wentworth Street Market is open six days a week and Middlesex Street Market is open on Sunday only.The modern marketIt is one of a number of traditional markets located to the east of the City of London. A few hundred yards to the north is Old Spitalfields market, which has been refurbished, and across Commercial Street, to the east, lies Brick Lane Market. A half mile further east is the Columbia Road Flower Market. Petticoat Lane Market was not formally recognised until an Act of Parliament in 1936, but its long history as an informal market makes it possibly one of the oldest surviving markets in Britain.The market is open Monday to Friday on Wentworth Street; on Sunday it extends over many of the surrounding streets, with over a thousand stalls. It is closed on Saturday, and on Sunday closes at about 2 pm. The markets are well signed from local stations. Petticoat Lane market is listed as a tourist attraction on VisitLondon.com, the official visitor guide for London. The name Petticoat Lane came from not only the sale of petticoats but from the fable that "they would steal your petticoat at one end of the market and sell it back to you at the other."History of the marketIn Tudor times, Middlesex Street was known as Hogs Lane, a pleasant lane lined by hedgerows and elms. It is thought city bakers were allowed to keep pigs in the lane, outside the city wall; or possibly that it was an ancient droving trail. The lane's rural nature changed, and by 1590, country cottages stood by the city walls. By 1608, it had become a commercial district where second-hand clothes and bric-à-brac were sold and exchanged, known as 'Peticote Lane'. This was also where the Spanish ambassador had his house, and the area attracted many Spaniards from the reign of James I. Peticote Lane was severely affected by the Great Plague of 1665; the rich fled, and London lost a fifth of its population.

The Salisbury
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Finsbury Circus
London, United Kingdom Ec2m 5qq