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Coram's Fields, London | Tourist Information



93 Guilford Street
London, United Kingdom WC1N 1DN

020 7837 6138

Coram's Fields is a large urban open space in the London borough of Camden in central London. It occupies seven acres in Bloomsbury and includes a children's playground, sand pits, a duck pond, a pets corner, café and nursery. Adults (defined as anyone over the age of 16) are only permitted to enter if accompanied by children (under 16).It is situated on the former site of the Foundling Hospital, established by Thomas Coram in what was then named Lamb's Conduit Field in 1739. The Foundling Hospital was relocated outside London in the 1920s, and the site was earmarked for redevelopment. However, campaigning and fundraising by local residents and a donation from the Harmsworth family of newspaper proprietors, led to the creation of the current park that opened in 1936. Coram's Fields is a Grade II listed site and is owned and run by an independent registered charity, officially named Coram's Fields and the Harmsworth Memorial Playground.Coram's Fields also offers three eight-a-side football pitches, two tennis courts, a stickball field and a basketball court.

Historical Place Near Coram's Fields

Trafalgar Square
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 5

20-79301565

Trafalgar Square is a public square in the City of Westminster, Central London, built around the area formerly known as Charing Cross. Its name commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, a British naval victory in the Napoleonic Wars with France and Spain that took place on 21 October 1805 off the coast of Cape Trafalgar, Spain.The site of Trafalgar Square had been a significant landmark since the 13th century and originally contained the King's Mews. After George IV moved the mews to Buckingham Palace, the area was redeveloped by John Nash but progress was slow after his death and the square did not open until 1844. The 169ft Nelson's Column at its centre is guarded by four lion statues. A number of commemorative statues and sculptures occupy the square but the Fourth Plinth, left empty since 1840, has been host to contemporary art since 1999.The square has been used for community gatherings and political demonstrations including Bloody Sunday, the first Aldermaston March, anti-war protests, and campaigns against climate change. A Christmas tree has been donated to the square by Norway since 1947 and is erected for twelve days before and after Christmas Day. The square is a centre of annual celebrations on New Year's Eve. It was well known for its feral pigeons until their removal in the early 21st century.

Somerset House
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, United Kingdom WC2R 1LA

+44 (0)20 7845 4600

A unique part of the London cultural scene with a distinctive public programme including Skate, concerts, an open-air film season, a diverse range of temporary exhibitions focusing on contemporary culture, an extensive learning programme, free guided tours and 55 fountains that dance in the The Edmond J. Safra Fountain Court in summer. Somerset House currently attracts approximately 2.5 million visitors every year.

Piccadilly Circus
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Picadilly Circus
London, United Kingdom W1V 9LB

Piccadilly Circus è una celebre piazza di Londra, nonché luogo di ritrovo, cuore morale della città, situata nella City of Westminster.Costruita nel 1819 per collegare Regent Street con l'omonima Piccadilly (importante strada dello shopping) è diventata col passare degli anni uno dei principali punti di snodo del traffico cittadino. La sua felice posizione, nel cuore del West End londinese, e la vicinanza con importanti luoghi di interesse come i teatri di Shaftesbury Avenue o strade come Coventry Street e The Haymarket ricchissime di negozi e locali alla moda, hanno reso Piccadilly Circus un affollato punto di ritrovo, nonché una vera e propria attrattiva turistica tanto da diventare uno dei simboli stessi di Londra.Famosa per i display luminosi e le insegne a LED posizionate su di un edificio posto al lato settentrionale della stessa e per la celebre Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain che rappresenta «l'Angelo della Carità Cristiana» (ma realizzata da Alfred Gilbert come "Anteros" anche se è nota ai più col nome di "Eros"), la piazza è circondata da imponenti edifici quali il London Pavilion (sede di numerosi negozi e del Trocadero) ed il Criterion Theatre. Inoltre direttamente sotto il perimetro della piazza c'è l'omonima stazione della metropolitana di Londra.le banane sono blu e bo poi il kebab fa schifo

Sadler's Wells
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
181 Rosebery Avenue
London, United Kingdom EC1R 4

020 7863 8000

Did you know that Sadler's Wells takes its name from the underground spring found by Dick Sadler in 1683? He opened a music and variety house, inviting people to taste the waters. There has been a theatre on this site ever since. And we're still pumping the water!

Blackfriars Bridge
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Blackfriars Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9UD

020 7928 8998

Blackfriars Bridge is a road and foot traffic bridge over the River Thames in London, between Waterloo Bridge and Blackfriars Railway Bridge, carrying the A201 road. The north end is near the Inns of Court and Temple Church, along with Blackfriars station. The south end is near the Tate Modern art gallery and the Oxo Tower.HistoryThe first fixed crossing at Blackfriars was a 995ft long toll bridge designed in an Italianate style by Robert Mylne and constructed with nine semi-elliptical arches of Portland stone. Beating designs by John Gwynn and George Dance, it took nine years to build, opening to the public in 1769. It was the third bridge across the Thames in the then built-up area of London, supplementing the ancient London Bridge, which dated from several centuries earlier, and Westminster Bridge. It was originally named "William Pitt Bridge" (after the Prime Minister William Pitt the Elder) as a dedication, but its informal name relating to the precinct within the City named after the Blackfriars Monastery, a Dominican priory which once stood nearby, was generally adopted. It was later made toll free.

BT Tower
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
60 Cleveland Mews
London, United Kingdom W1T 6

020 7432 5050

The BT Tower is a communications tower located in Fitzrovia, London, owned by BT Group. It has been previously known as the GPO Tower, the Post Office Tower and the Telecom Tower. The main structure is 177m high, with a further section of aerial rigging bringing the total height to 191m. It should not be confused with the BT Centre (the global headquarters of BT). Its Post Office code was YTOW.Upon completion it overtook the Millbank Tower to become the tallest building in both London and the United Kingdom, titles it held until 1980, when it in turn was overtaken by the NatWest Tower.History20th centuryThe tower was commissioned by the General Post Office (GPO). Its primary purpose was to support the microwave aerials then used to carry telecommunications traffic from London to the rest of the country, as part of Britain's microwave network.It replaced a much shorter steel lattice tower which had been built on the roof of the neighbouring Museum telephone exchange in the late 1940s to provide a television link between London and Birmingham. The taller structure was required to protect the radio links' "line of sight" against some of the tall buildings in London then in the planning stage. These links were routed via other GPO microwave stations at Harrow Weald, Bagshot, Kelvedon Hatch and Fairseat, and to places like the London Air Traffic Control Centre at West Drayton.

Shakespeare's Head Pub
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Carnaby St
London, United Kingdom W1F 7

+4420 7734 2911

The Official Facebook Page for The Shakespeares Head, Oxford Circus, London.

Royal Courts of Justice
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Strand
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2R 1

+44 (0) 20 7947 6000

The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a court building in London which houses both the High Court and Court of Appeal of England and Wales. Designed by George Edmund Street, who died before it was completed, it is a large grey stone edifice in the Victorian Gothic style built in the 1870s and opened by Queen Victoria in 1882. It is one of the largest courts in Europe. It is located on the Strand within the City of Westminster, near the border with the City of London (Temple Bar). It is surrounded by the four Inns of Court, King's College London and the London School of Economics. The nearest London Underground stations are Chancery Lane and Temple.The courts within the building are open to the public, although there may be some restrictions depending upon the nature of the cases being heard. Those in court who do not have legal representation may receive some assistance within the building. There is a citizens' advice bureau based within the Main Hall which provides free, confidential and impartial advice by appointment to anyone who is a litigant in person in the courts. There is also a Personal Support Unit where litigants in person can receive emotional support and practical information about court proceedings.

Trafalgar Studios
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
14 Whitehall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

Trafalgar Studios, formerly the Whitehall Theatre until 2004, is a West End theatre in Whitehall, near Trafalgar Square, in the City of Westminster, London.Also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation, the building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. Studio 1, the larger of the two spaces with 380 seats, opened on 3 June 2004 with the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Othello. Studio 2, with 100 seats, opened in October 2005 with the play Cyprus.History1930 to 1996The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. It had 634 seats. The theatre opened on 29 September 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre's licensee. In November 1933 Henry Daniell appeared there as Portman in Afterwards. Hackett presented several other plays of his own before leaving in 1934, and the theatre built its reputation for modern comedies throughout the rest of the decade. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the West End. In 1942, The Whitehall Follies, featuring Phyllis Dixey, the first stripper to perform in the theatre district, opened with great fanfare and became an immediate success. Dixey leased the theatre and remained in it for the next five years.

Hatton Garden
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
44 Hatton Garden
London, United Kingdom EC1N 8ER

020 7404 3812

Hatton Garden is a street and area in the district of Holborn in the London Borough of Camden. It is most noted for being London's jewellery quarter and centre of the UK diamond trade, but the area is also now home to a diverse range of media and creative businesses.The name 'Hatton Garden' is derived from the garden of the London residence of the Bishop of Ely called Ely Place, which was given to Sir Christopher Hatton by Elizabeth I in 1581, during a vacancy of the see.The area surrounding Hatton Garden has been the centre of London's jewellery trade since medieval times. The old City of London had certain streets, or quarters, dedicated to types of business, and the area around Hatton Garden became a centre for jewellers and jewellery.Nearly 300 of the businesses in Hatton Garden are in the jewellery industry and over 55 shops represent the largest cluster of jewellery retailers in the UK. The largest of these companies is De Beers, the international family of companies that dominate the international diamond trade. De Beers has its headquarters in a complex of offices and warehouses just behind the main Hatton Garden shopping street. The area also plays host to a large number of media, publishing and creative businesses, including Blinkbox and Grey Advertising.Hatton Garden has an extensive underground infrastructure of vaults, tunnels, offices and workshops.Hatton Garden was also the home to the invention of the machine gun. Sir Hiram Maxim had a small factory at 57 Hatton Garden and in 1881 invented and started to produce the Maxim Gun, capable of firing 666 rounds a minute.

Middle Temple
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Middle Temple Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4Y 9AT

020 7427 4820

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, commonly known simply as Middle Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court exclusively entitled to call their members to the English Bar as barristers, the others being the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn. It is located in the wider Temple area of London, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.HistoryIn the 13th century, the Inns of Court originated as hostels and schools for student lawyers. The Middle Temple is the western part of "The Temple", the headquarters of the Knights Templar until they were dissolved in 1312. The Temple Church still stands as a "peculiar" (extra-diocesan) church of the Inner and Middle Temples.The Inns stopped being responsible for legal education in 1852, although they continue to provide training in areas such as advocacy and ethics for students, pupil barristers and newly qualified barristers. Most of the Inn is occupied by barristers' offices, known as chambers. One of the Middle Temple's main functions now is to provide education and support for new members to the profession. This is done through advocacy training, the provision of scholarships (over £1 million in 2011), subsidised accommodation both in the Temple and in Clapham, and by providing events where junior members may meet senior colleagues for help and advice.

Smithfield, London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
31-32 Watling St
London, United Kingdom EC1A 2

020 7248 3151

Smithfield is a locality in the ward of Farringdon Without situated at the City of London's northwest in central London, England. The principal street of the area is West Smithfield.A number of valued City institutions are located in the area, such as St Bartholomew's Hospital, the Charterhouse, and Livery Halls notably those of the Butchers' and Haberdashers' Companies, but Smithfield is best known for its ancient meat market, dating from the 10th century, which is now London's only remaining wholesale market in continuous operation since medieval times. The area also contains London's oldest surviving church, St Bartholomew-the-Great, founded in 1123 AD.Smithfield has borne witness to many bloody executions of heretics and political rebels over the centuries, including major historical figures such as Scottish patriot Sir William Wallace and Wat Tyler, leader of the Peasants' Revolt, among many other religious reformers and dissenters.

Coram's Fields
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
93 Guilford Street
London, United Kingdom WC1N 1DN

020 7837 6138

Coram's Fields is a unique seven acre playground and park for children and young people living in or visiting London. It includes a Youth Centre, Children's Centre, Community Nursery, Sports Programme, play areas and animals. Coram's Fields is a registered charity (#302963) established in 1936.

St Pancras Old Church
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Pancras Rd
London, United Kingdom NW1 1UL

020 7424 0724

St Pancras Old Church is a Church of England parish church in Somers Town, central London. It is dedicated to the Roman martyr Saint Pancras, and is believed by many to be one of the oldest sites of Christian worship in England. The church is situated on Pancras Road in the London Borough of Camden, with the surrounding area and its international railway station taking its name. St Pancras Old Church, which was largely rebuilt in the Victorian era, should not be confused with St Pancras New Church about a kilometre away, on the Euston Road.HistoryParishOriginally, the parish of St Pancras stretched from close to Oxford Street almost to Highgate. In the early Middle Ages there was a centre of population in the vicinity of what is now known as the old church. However, in the 14th century the population abandoned the site and moved to what is now Kentish Town. The reasons for this were probably the vulnerability of the plain around the church to flooding (the River Fleet, which is now underground, runs through it) and the availability of better wells at Kentish Town, where there is less clay in the soil. The church subsequently fell into disrepair. Towards the end of the 18th century, services were only held in the church on one Sunday each month; on other weeks, the same congregation would use a chapel in Kentish Town. It lost its status as the parish church when the New Church on what was to become the Euston Road was consecrated in 1822, and became a chapel of ease.

Cleopatra's Needle
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom WC2N 6

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Cleopatra's Needles je trojica obeliskov v Londýne, Paríži a New Yorku. Sú vyrobené z čiernej žuly, sú vysoké asi 21 m a sú do nich vytesané hieroglyfy.

Saddlers Wells Theathre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Rosebery Avenue
London, United Kingdom EC1R 4TN

020 7863 8000

HMS President
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom EC4Y 0HJ

HMS Saxifrage was launched in 1918 as a Flower-class anti-submarine Q-ship. She was renamed HMS President in 1922 and moored permanently on the Thames as a Royal Navy Reserve drill ship. In 1982 she was sold to private owners, and having changed hands twice, now serves as a venue for conferences and functions, and serves as the offices for a number of media companies. Technically, she is now called HMS President (1918) to distinguish her from HMS President, the Royal Naval Reserve base in St Katharine Docks. She is one of the last three surviving Royal Navy warships of the First World War. She is also the sole representative of the first type of purpose built anti-submarine vessels, and is the ancestor of WW2 convoy escort sloops, which evolved into modern anti-submarine frigates.Design and constructionThe original Flower-class sloops (the Acacia, Azalea and Arabis classes) were all built in 1915 as fleet minesweeping vessels, with triple hulls at the bow to give extra protection against loss from mine damage. When submarine attacks on British merchant ships became a serious menace after 1916, the existing Flowers were transferred to convoy escort duty, and fitted with depth charges as well as 4.7-inch naval guns.

One Great George Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
1 Great George St
London, United Kingdom SW1P 3AA

+44 20 7665 2323

One Great George Street is a four-domed grade II listed Edwardian building used as a conference and wedding venue just off Parliament Square in Westminster, London, England. The building is also the global headquarters of the Institution of Civil Engineers ; it was originally a venue for ICE members to relax, meet and have conferences, and became available for public events in 1989. It is near the Houses of Parliament, Westminster Abbey, and St James's Park.Building and historyFrom 1839 until 1913, ICE occupied numbers 24–26 Great George Street. In the mid-1880s the government proposed re-development of the area around Great George Street to provide more office space for government departments. This meant the demolition of ICE's first location and led ICE to move its headquarters across the road to numbers 1-7.One Great George Street was built for the ICE between 1910 and 1913 and was the result of an architectural competition won by James Miller, RSA (1860–1947). His winning design was priced at £77,126, with the other architects involved in the design competition including Brigg, Wolstenholme & Thornely, John Belcher, William Emerson, Charles Edward Barry and Thomas Collcutt. The contractor who built the building was Mowlem.

Honourable Society of Inner Temple
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Arbitration Rooms, 36-37 Essex St
London, United Kingdom WC2R 3AT

020 7413 0375

Sir John Soane's Museum
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
13 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, United Kingdom WC2A 3BP

Sir John Soane's Museum was formerly the home of the neo-classical architect John Soane. It holds many drawings and models of Soane's projects and the collections of paintings, drawings and antiquities that he assembled.The museum is located in Holborn, London, adjacent to Lincoln's Inn Fields. It is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.HistoryHousesSoane demolished and rebuilt three houses in succession on the north side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. He began with No. 12 (between 1792 and 1794), externally a plain brick house. After becoming Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy in 1806, Soane purchased No. 13, the house next door, today the Museum, and rebuilt it in two phases in 1808–09 and 1812.In 1808–09 he constructed his drawing office and "museum" on the site of the former stable block at the back, using primarily top lighting. In 1812 he rebuilt the front part of the site, adding a projecting Portland Stone facade to the basement, ground and first floor levels and the centre bay of the second floor. Originally this formed three open loggias, but Soane glazed the arches during his lifetime. Once he had moved into No. 13, Soane rented out his former home at No. 12 (on his death it was left to the nation along with No. 13, the intention being that the rental income would fund the running of the Museum).

Landmark Near Coram's Fields

Hatton Garden
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
44 Hatton Garden
London, United Kingdom EC1N 8ER

020 7404 3812

Hatton Garden is a street and area in the district of Holborn in the London Borough of Camden. It is most noted for being London's jewellery quarter and centre of the UK diamond trade, but the area is also now home to a diverse range of media and creative businesses.The name 'Hatton Garden' is derived from the garden of the London residence of the Bishop of Ely called Ely Place, which was given to Sir Christopher Hatton by Elizabeth I in 1581, during a vacancy of the see.The area surrounding Hatton Garden has been the centre of London's jewellery trade since medieval times. The old City of London had certain streets, or quarters, dedicated to types of business, and the area around Hatton Garden became a centre for jewellers and jewellery.Nearly 300 of the businesses in Hatton Garden are in the jewellery industry and over 55 shops represent the largest cluster of jewellery retailers in the UK. The largest of these companies is De Beers, the international family of companies that dominate the international diamond trade. De Beers has its headquarters in a complex of offices and warehouses just behind the main Hatton Garden shopping street. The area also plays host to a large number of media, publishing and creative businesses, including Blinkbox and Grey Advertising.Hatton Garden has an extensive underground infrastructure of vaults, tunnels, offices and workshops.Hatton Garden was also the home to the invention of the machine gun. Sir Hiram Maxim had a small factory at 57 Hatton Garden and in 1881 invented and started to produce the Maxim Gun, capable of firing 666 rounds a minute.

Cittie of Yorke
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
22 High Holborn
London, United Kingdom WC1V 6B

020 7242 7670

The Cittie of Yorke is a grade II listed public house on London's High Holborn, and is listed in CAMRA's National Inventory of Historic Pub Interiors. The pub is owned and operated by Samuel Smith's Old Brewery.Although the current building is a rebuilding of the 1920s, the buildings on this site have been pubs since 1430. Some features include the Henekey's long bar located in the grand, hall-like back room, a late-Georgian or Regency era triangular metal stove, and Victorian-style cubicles.The Welsh poet Dylan Thomas penned an impromptu ode to the pub when it was called Henneky's Long Bar. Fred Jarvis, a former general secretary of the National Union of Teachers, found the previously unknown poem in 2014 while going through papers belonging to his late parents-in-law who knew Thomas. The top of the poem reads "This little song was written in Henneky's Long Bar High Holborn by Dylan Thomas in 1951." Orion Publishing Group plans to include the song in a new edition of collected Thomas poems in October 2014.

Senate House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Malet Street
London, United Kingdom WC1E 7

20-76368000

Senate House is the administrative centre of the University of London, situated in the heart of Bloomsbury, London between the School of Oriental and African Studies to the east, and the British Museum to the south. The Art Deco building was constructed between 1932 and 1937 as the first phase of a large uncompleted scheme designed for the University by Charles Holden. It consists of 19 floors and is 210ft high.Today the main building contains the University of London's Central Academic Bodies and activities, including the offices of the Vice-Chancellor of the University, the entire collection of the Senate House Library, and eight of the ten research institutes of the School of Advanced Study. During the Second World War, the building's use by the Ministry of Information inspired two noted English writers. Graham Greene's novel The Ministry of Fear (1943) and its film adaptation Ministry of Fear by Fritz Lang (1944) set in Bloomsbury. George Orwell's wife Eileen worked in Senate House for the Censorship Department of the Ministry of Information, and her experiences acted as the description of the Ministry of Truth in Orwell's 1949 novel Nineteen Eighty-Four.

Lincoln's Inn
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Newman's Row, London WC2A 3TL
London, United Kingdom WC2A 3TL

The Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn is one of the four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar. It is recognised to be one of the world's most prestigious professional bodies of judges and lawyers. It is the largest Inn and it covers 11acre. The other three are Middle Temple, Inner Temple and Gray's Inn. The Inn is believed to be named after Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln. The Inn is also well known for its large garden and library, which have existed since 1422.Lincoln's Inn is situated in Holborn, in the London Borough of Camden, just on the border with the City of London and the City of Westminster, and across the road from London School of Economics and Political Science, Royal Courts of Justice and King's College London's Maughan Library. The nearest tube station is Holborn tube station or Chancery Lane.

Lincoln's Inn
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Newman's Row, London WC2A 3TL
London, United Kingdom WC2A 3TL

The Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn is one of the four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar. It is recognised to be one of the world's most prestigious professional bodies of judges and lawyers. It is the largest Inn and it covers 11acre. The other three are Middle Temple, Inner Temple and Gray's Inn. The Inn is believed to be named after Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln. The Inn is also well known for its large garden and library, which have existed since 1422.Lincoln's Inn is situated in Holborn, in the London Borough of Camden, just on the border with the City of London and the City of Westminster, and across the road from London School of Economics and Political Science, Royal Courts of Justice and King's College London's Maughan Library. The nearest tube station is Holborn tube station or Chancery Lane.

St Pancras, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Euston Road
London, United Kingdom WC1H 9

St Pancras is an area of central London. For many centuries the name was used for various officially-designated areas, but it is now used mainly for the railway station and for upmarket venues in the immediate locality, having been largely superseded by other place names including Kings Cross, Somers Town, and Camden Town, or simply Camden.HistoryAncient parishThe district now encompassed by the term "St Pancras" is not easy to define, and its usage as a place name is fairly limited. The name is sometimes applied to the immediate vicinity of the eponymous railway station, but King's Cross is the usual name for the area around the two mainline stations as a whole.St Pancras was originally a medieval parish, which ran from close to what is now Oxford Street north as far as Highgate, and from what is now Regent's Park in the west to the road now known as York Way in the east, boundaries which take in much of the current London Borough of Camden, including its central part. However, as the choice of name for the borough suggests, St Pancras has lost its status as the central settlement in the area.The original focus of the area was the church, now known by the retronym of St Pancras Old Church. The building is in the southern half of the parish, and is believed by many to be one of the oldest sites of Christian worship in Great Britain. However, in the 14th century the population moved en masse to Kentish Town, probably due to flooding by the River Fleet and the availability of better wells at the new location. A chapel of ease was established there, and the old settlement was abandoned, except for a few farms, until the growth of London in the late eighteenth century.

St Pancras, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Euston Road
London, United Kingdom WC1H 9

St Pancras is an area of central London. For many centuries the name was used for various officially-designated areas, but it is now used mainly for the railway station and for upmarket venues in the immediate locality, having been largely superseded by other place names including Kings Cross, Somers Town, and Camden Town, or simply Camden.HistoryAncient parishThe district now encompassed by the term "St Pancras" is not easy to define, and its usage as a place name is fairly limited. The name is sometimes applied to the immediate vicinity of the eponymous railway station, but King's Cross is the usual name for the area around the two mainline stations as a whole.St Pancras was originally a medieval parish, which ran from close to what is now Oxford Street north as far as Highgate, and from what is now Regent's Park in the west to the road now known as York Way in the east, boundaries which take in much of the current London Borough of Camden, including its central part. However, as the choice of name for the borough suggests, St Pancras has lost its status as the central settlement in the area.The original focus of the area was the church, now known by the retronym of St Pancras Old Church. The building is in the southern half of the parish, and is believed by many to be one of the oldest sites of Christian worship in Great Britain. However, in the 14th century the population moved en masse to Kentish Town, probably due to flooding by the River Fleet and the availability of better wells at the new location. A chapel of ease was established there, and the old settlement was abandoned, except for a few farms, until the growth of London in the late eighteenth century.

One Great George Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
1 Great George St
London, United Kingdom SW1P 3AA

+44 20 7665 2323

One Great George Street is a four-domed grade II listed Edwardian building used as a conference and wedding venue just off Parliament Square in Westminster, London, England. The building is also the global headquarters of the Institution of Civil Engineers ; it was originally a venue for ICE members to relax, meet and have conferences, and became available for public events in 1989. It is near the Houses of Parliament, Westminster Abbey, and St James's Park.Building and historyFrom 1839 until 1913, ICE occupied numbers 24–26 Great George Street. In the mid-1880s the government proposed re-development of the area around Great George Street to provide more office space for government departments. This meant the demolition of ICE's first location and led ICE to move its headquarters across the road to numbers 1-7.One Great George Street was built for the ICE between 1910 and 1913 and was the result of an architectural competition won by James Miller, RSA (1860–1947). His winning design was priced at £77,126, with the other architects involved in the design competition including Brigg, Wolstenholme & Thornely, John Belcher, William Emerson, Charles Edward Barry and Thomas Collcutt. The contractor who built the building was Mowlem.

Eastman Dental Hospital
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
123 Gray's Inn Road
London, United Kingdom WC1X 8LD

020 3456 7899

The Eastman Dental Hospital is a specialist hospital for dental treatment located in London, United Kingdom, and a part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. It is based on Gray's Inn Road in the Bloomsbury area of Central London.The Eastman Dental Hospital is closely associated with University College London (UCL), and in partnership with the UCL Eastman Dental Institute, which occupies the same site, is a major centre for dental research and the largest provider of postgraduate teaching and training in dentistry in Europe. In 2009 there were more than 22,000 orthodontic appointments at the hospital, making its orthodontic department one of the largest in the UK. The hospital is part of both the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre.HistoryIn 1926, George Eastman donated £200,000 (plus another £100,000 from two other principal benefactors) for the establishment of a specialist dental and oral health clinic for the benefit of poor children of Central London. The Eastman Dental Clinic was constructed between 1928 and 1930 to the design of Sir John Burnet and Partners and was opened on 20 November 1931 by the American Ambassador. Until 1947/48, the clinic was integrated into the Royal Free Hospital. Afterwards, as an independent institution, it was established as the postgraduate dental institute of the Postgraduate Medical Federation.

St Peter's Italian Church
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
136 Clerkenwell Road
London, United Kingdom EC1R 5

020 7837 1528

St. Peter's Italian Church is a Basilica-style church located in Holborn, London.HistoryIt was built by request of Saint Vincent Pallotti, and it is still under the control of the Pallotine order which he founded. He had assistance from Giuseppe Mazzini, who was in London at the time, for the growing number of Italian immigrants in the mid 19th century and modelled by Irish architect Sir John Miller-Bryson on the Basilica San Crisogono in Rome.It was consecrated on 16 April 1863 as The Church of St. Peter of all Nations. At the time of consecration, it was the only Basilica-style church in the UK. Its organ was built in 1886 by Belgian Anneesen.The frontal section of the church consists of a loggia and portico with twin arches, above which are three alcoves. The central alcove contains a statue of Christ, whilst the sides contain statues of St. Bede and St. George. Between the alcoves are two large mosaics depicting the miracle of the fishes and Jesus giving the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven to St. Peter.Above the façade is a 33-metre-high bell tower, built in 1891 which houses a bell known as "The Steel Monster".In the loggia are two remembrance plaques, one to veterans (mostly Italian Britons) of World War I and the other to 446 Italians who lost their lives on the Arandora Star.

Holborn tube station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
88-94 Kingsway
London, United Kingdom WC2B 6

020 7222 1234

Holborn is a London Underground station in Holborn, central London. It is served by the Central and Piccadilly lines. On the Central line the station is between Tottenham Court Road and Chancery Lane stations; on the Piccadilly line it is between Covent Garden and Russell Square. The station is located at the junction of High Holborn and Kingsway and is in Travelcard Zone 1. Close by are the British Museum, Lincoln's Inn Fields, Red Lion Square, Bloomsbury Square and Sir John Soane's Museum.Located at the junction of two earlier tube railway schemes, the station was opened in 1906 by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR). The station entrances and below ground circulation were largely reconstructed for the introduction of escalators and the opening of Central line platforms in 1933, making the station the only interchange between the lines. Before 1994, Holborn was the northern terminus of the short and little-frequented Piccadilly line branch to Aldwych and two platforms originally used for this service are disused. One of the disused platforms has been used for location filming when a London Underground station platform is needed.

Bloomsbury Square
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
London WC1
London, United Kingdom WC1A 2

2031-785062

Bloomsbury Square is a garden square in Holborn, Camden, London, built by James Burton.GeographyTo the north of the square is Great Russell Street and Bedford Place, leading to Russell Square. To the south is Bloomsbury Way. To the west is the British Museum and Holborn tube station is the nearest underground station to the southeast. There are gardens in the centre of the square.HistoryThe square was developed by 4th Earl of Southampton in the late 17th century and was initially known as Southampton Square. It was one of the earliest London squares. The Earl's own house, then known as Southampton House and later as Bedford House after the square and the rest of the Bloomsbury Estate passed by marriage from the Earls of Southampton to the Dukes of Bedford, occupied the whole of the north side of the square, where Bedford Place is now located. The other sides were lined with typical terraced houses of the time, which were initially occupied by members of the aristocracy and gentry.

Bloomsbury Square
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
London WC1
London, United Kingdom WC1A 2

2031-785062

Bloomsbury Square is a garden square in Holborn, Camden, London, built by James Burton.GeographyTo the north of the square is Great Russell Street and Bedford Place, leading to Russell Square. To the south is Bloomsbury Way. To the west is the British Museum and Holborn tube station is the nearest underground station to the southeast. There are gardens in the centre of the square.HistoryThe square was developed by 4th Earl of Southampton in the late 17th century and was initially known as Southampton Square. It was one of the earliest London squares. The Earl's own house, then known as Southampton House and later as Bedford House after the square and the rest of the Bloomsbury Estate passed by marriage from the Earls of Southampton to the Dukes of Bedford, occupied the whole of the north side of the square, where Bedford Place is now located. The other sides were lined with typical terraced houses of the time, which were initially occupied by members of the aristocracy and gentry.

RADA Studios
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
16 Chenies St
London, United Kingdom WC1E 7EX

+44 (0)20 7307 5060

RADA Studios is a theatrical venue in Chenies Street in the London Borough of Camden, just to the east of Tottenham Court Road, owned by the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art .The venue contains rehearsal rooms and meeting rooms, and two small theatres - the 200-seat Studio Theatre, and the 50-seat Club Theatre.History and Drill HallThe venue was built in 1882 as a drill hall for the Bloomsbury Rifles - the architect was Samuel Knight. It has a notable artistic history: in the 1900s, Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes rehearsed there. During World War II it was used for Ralph Reader's Gang Shows. In the 1960s it was used as an art gallery for the Tate Gallery’s exhibition of the McAlpine Collection.The venue started to be used as an arts centre for Bloomsbury and Fitzrovia in 1977, and became a theatre, the Drill Hall, in the 1980s after many years of being used as a rehearsal hall. From 1984, the Drill Hall particularly supported production of theatrical and artistic works with gay and lesbian themes. In 2007, the Drill Hall, with an annual turnover of £1.25 million, was supported with £250,000 of Arts Council funding, but late in 2007, the Arts Council announced it was withdrawing this funding to concentrate its funding on other ventures. (Similar fates befell 194 other arts organisations.)

The Lamb, Bloomsbury
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
94 Lamb’s Conduit Street
London, United Kingdom WC1N 3LZ

020 8699 9535

The Lamb on Lamb's Conduit Street is a Grade II listed pub at 94 Lamb's Conduit Street, Bloomsbury, London.The Lamb was built in the 1720s and the pub and the street were named after William Lamb, who had erected a water conduit along the street in 1577. The Lamb was refurbished in the Victorian era and is one of the few remaining pubs with 'snob screens' which allowed the well-to-do drinker not to see the bar staff, and vice versa.Charles Dickens lived locally and is reputed to have frequented The Lamb. Other writers associated with the pub include Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath. Hughes, who was a regular at the pub, arranged to meet Plath there in the early days of their relationship.

Brunei Gallery At SOAS
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
10 Thornhaugh Street
London, United Kingdom WC1H 0XG

+44 (0) 20 7898 4915

Brunei Gallery, SOAS
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
10, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square
London, United Kingdom WC1H 0XG

020 7898 4046 (Recorded info)

Running a programme of changing visiting exhibitions from Africa, Asia and the Middle East combined with the permanent rotating selection from SOAS's own collections on display in the Foyle Special Collections Gallery and with a Japanese influenced Roof Garden, The Brunei Gallery, SOAS makes a stimulating haven in the heart of London.

Freemasons Hall, Great Queen Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
60 Great Queen Street
London, United Kingdom WC2B 5AZ

020 7831 9811

Shaw Theatre
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
100-110 Euston Rd
London, United Kingdom NW1 2AJ

020 7666 9037

The Shaw Theatre is a theatre in Somers Town, in the London Borough of Camden. It is located near the Euston Road, beside the British Library, equidistant from King's Cross-St Pancras station and Euston station.St Pancras libraryBefore being refurbished in 1998, the Shaw Theatre originally opened its doors in 1971 as a purpose built theatre within the St Pancras library. The opening production was the show Zigger Zagger with a cast that included Barrie Rutter and Paula Wilcox. In 1972, Simon Ward and Sinéad Cusack appeared in Romeo and Juliet. Later in the same year Vanessa Redgrave, Nyree Dawn Porter and Windsor Davies starred in Twelfth Night. Other stars who appeared in the early days include Sir Ian McKellen, Mia Farrow, Julia McKenzie and Raymond Francis. The theatre hosted a series of Sunday nights at the Shaw, with many notable actors including Dame Judi Dench, Dame Flora Robson, Patricia Routledge and Michael Williams. It also hosted numerous productions by the National Youth Theatre.

UCL Institute of Archaeology
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
31-34 Gordon Square
London, United Kingdom WC1H 0PY

020 7969 5204

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is an academic department of the Social & Historical Sciences Faculty of University College London (UCL), England which it joined in 1986. It is currently one of the largest centres for the study of archaeology, cultural heritage and museum studies in the world, with over 100 members of staff and 600 students housed in a 1950s building on the north side of Gordon Square in the Bloomsbury area of Central London.

Park Near Coram's Fields

Regents Park, London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Regent's Park
London, United Kingdom NW1

0207 0788 359

Jubilee Gardens
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Belvedere Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

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Meliá White House Hotel
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Albany Street, Regents Park
London, United Kingdom NW1 3UP

+44 20 7391 3000

Coram's Fields
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
93 Guilford Street
London, United Kingdom WC1N 1DN

020 7837 6138

Coram's Fields is a unique seven acre playground and park for children and young people living in or visiting London. It includes a Youth Centre, Children's Centre, Community Nursery, Sports Programme, play areas and animals. Coram's Fields is a registered charity (#302963) established in 1936.

Cavendish Square Gardens
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Cavendish Square, London
London, United Kingdom W1G 0

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Cartwright Gardens
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
49-50 Cartwright Gardens
London, United Kingdom WC1H 9EH

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London Southbank Skatepark
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
9 Belvedere Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 8YL

020 7202 8470

St. James's Square
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
St. James's, London, SW1
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4JU

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St. James's Square is the only square in the exclusive St James's district of the City of Westminster. It has predominantly Georgian and Neo-Georgian architecture and a garden in the centre. For its first two hundred or so years it was one of the three or four most fashionable residential address in London. It is now home to the headquarters of a number of well-known businesses, including BP and Rio Tinto Group; to three private members' clubs, the East India Club, the Canning Club and the Naval and Military Club; to the High Commission of Cyprus; and to the London Library. Also based in the square is the premises of the think tank Chatham House. The square's main feature is an equestrian statue of William III erected in 1808.HistoryIn 1662 Charles II extended a lease over the 45 acres of Pall Mall (St James's) Field held by Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans to 1720 and soon afterwards the earl began to lay out the property for development. The earl petitioned the king that the class of occupants they both hoped to attract to the new district would not take houses without the prospect of eventually acquiring them outright, and in 1665 the king granted the freehold of the site of St. James's Square and some closely adjacent parts of the field to the earl's trustees. The location was convenient for the royal palaces of Whitehall and St James. The houses on the east, north and west sides of the square were soon developed, each of them being constructed separately as was usual at that time.

Regent's Place
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
10 Brock Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 3

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Regent's Place is a mixed use business and retail and residential quarter on the north side of Euston Road in the London Borough of Camden. The site is also bounded by Osnaburgh Street to the west, Longford and Drummond Streets to the north, and Hampstead Road to the east.Regent's Place was developed by British Land from an earlier speculative property development 'Euston Centre' that included Euston Tower one of the first high-rise office developments in the West End. The tower is at the south western corner of the Regent's Place estate. The 'Euston Centre' scheme was developed between 1962 and 1972 designed by Sidney Kaye. Originally the scheme was for a series of medium rise blocks but to create space for underpass and road junction the LCC gave approval for the high-rise Euston Tower.Work by British Land commenced in 1996. The first stage involved the demolition of the head office and studios of the former ITV company Thames Television and the subsequent development of the central part of the site and much of the Euston Road frontage, with four new office buildings and a pedestrian plaza called Triton Square. One of these buildings called 2-3 Triton Square was a new headquarters for what was then the UK's fifth largest bank by gross assets, Abbey National. The lower levels of Euston Tower were modernised at the same time. The development includes a shopping mall and an open space Triton Square that includes art features by Langlands and Bell. The developers also commissioned a large mural by Michael Craig-Martin a lighting scheme by Liam Gillick and a smaller sculptural installation by Antony Gormley.

Bloomsbury Square
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
London WC1
London, United Kingdom WC1A 2

2031-785062

Bloomsbury Square is a garden square in Holborn, Camden, London, built by James Burton.GeographyTo the north of the square is Great Russell Street and Bedford Place, leading to Russell Square. To the south is Bloomsbury Way. To the west is the British Museum and Holborn tube station is the nearest underground station to the southeast. There are gardens in the centre of the square.HistoryThe square was developed by 4th Earl of Southampton in the late 17th century and was initially known as Southampton Square. It was one of the earliest London squares. The Earl's own house, then known as Southampton House and later as Bedford House after the square and the rest of the Bloomsbury Estate passed by marriage from the Earls of Southampton to the Dukes of Bedford, occupied the whole of the north side of the square, where Bedford Place is now located. The other sides were lined with typical terraced houses of the time, which were initially occupied by members of the aristocracy and gentry.

Argyle Square
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Argyle Street
London, United Kingdom WC1H 8

012345678

A pleasant green garden square for residents, workers and tourists alike to relax, picknic, walk or play basketball in the courts, watched over by an experienced on-site park warden and gardener. Only a few minutes walk away from the King's Cross St. Pancras international train station complex. Sound Trail http://www.camden.gov.uk/ccm/content/leisure/local-history/kings-cross-voices.en?page=13 [email protected] Friends of Argyle Square (Camden record 2011) [email protected] Activities: Aims to ensure the square is maintained appropriately, to promote its heritage and bio-diversity, involve local communities and businesses, conserve plant and wildlife and promote the enjoyment of the Gardens by all. Borough: Camden Ward: Kings Cross Ward

Russell Square Gardens Cafe In The Gardens
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Russell Square
London, United Kingdom

020 7637 5093

Camley Street Natural Park
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
12 Camley Street
London, United Kingdom N1C 4PW

020 7833 2311

Leicester Square Gardens
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
50 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7LU

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Gray's Inn Gardens
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Theobald's Road
London, United Kingdom WC1R 5

020 7458 7822

Walker's of St James
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
32 Duke Street St James
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6NP

02079300620

Bernie Spain Gardens
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Upper Ground
London, United Kingdom SE1 9

020 7021 1686

Cafe In The Gardens
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Russell Square
London, United Kingdom WC1B 5EH

020 7637 5093

Queen Mary's Rose Garden, Regents Park
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Inner Circle, Regent's Park, London, Greater London, England, NW1
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

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RBS, Regents House, Angel
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
40 Islington High St
London, United Kingdom N1 8

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Landmark Near Coram's Fields

St Pancras, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Euston Road
London, United Kingdom WC1H 9

St Pancras is an area of central London. For many centuries the name was used for various officially-designated areas, but it is now used mainly for the railway station and for upmarket venues in the immediate locality, having been largely superseded by other place names including Kings Cross, Somers Town, and Camden Town, or simply Camden.HistoryAncient parishThe district now encompassed by the term "St Pancras" is not easy to define, and its usage as a place name is fairly limited. The name is sometimes applied to the immediate vicinity of the eponymous railway station, but King's Cross is the usual name for the area around the two mainline stations as a whole.St Pancras was originally a medieval parish, which ran from close to what is now Oxford Street north as far as Highgate, and from what is now Regent's Park in the west to the road now known as York Way in the east, boundaries which take in much of the current London Borough of Camden, including its central part. However, as the choice of name for the borough suggests, St Pancras has lost its status as the central settlement in the area.The original focus of the area was the church, now known by the retronym of St Pancras Old Church. The building is in the southern half of the parish, and is believed by many to be one of the oldest sites of Christian worship in Great Britain. However, in the 14th century the population moved en masse to Kentish Town, probably due to flooding by the River Fleet and the availability of better wells at the new location. A chapel of ease was established there, and the old settlement was abandoned, except for a few farms, until the growth of London in the late eighteenth century.

Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
60 Great Ormond St
London, United Kingdom WC1N 3

+44 (0) 845 155 5000

The Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine is a specialist alternative medicine hospital located in London, England and a part of University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. It is the largest public sector provider of complementary medicine in Europe.The Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine offers clinical services including complementary cancer treatments, allergy services, acupuncture, homeopathy, rheumatology, weight loss management, sleep management, musculoskeletal medicine and stress management, and has access to conventional medicine. It has an education department which offers full and part-time courses in complementary medicine for registered health professionals. It is also home to a specialist library for complementary and alternative medicine.The hospital is based in the Bloomsbury area of Central London, adjacent to Great Ormond Street Hospital.

High Commission of Malawi, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
36 John Street
London, United Kingdom

The High Commission of Malawi in London is the diplomatic mission of Malawi in the United Kingdom.

UCL Institute of Education
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
20 Bedford Way
London, United Kingdom WC1H 0AL

+44 (0)20 7612 6000

The UCL Institute of Education is the education school of University College London . It specialises in postgraduate study and research in the field of education and is one of UCL's 11 constituent faculties. Prior to merging with UCL in 2014, it was a constituent college of the University of London. The IoE is currently ranked first in the world for education in the QS World University Rankings.The IoE is the largest education research body in the United Kingdom, with over 700 research students in the doctoral school. It also has the largest portfolio of postgraduate programmes in education in the UK, with approximately 4,000 students taking Master's programmes, and a further 1,200 students on PGCE teacher-training courses. At any one time the IoE hosts over 100 research projects funded by Research Councils, government departments and other agencies. It publishes Educate~|Educate~ The Journal of Doctoral Research in Education.HistoryIn 1900, a report on the training of teachers, produced by the Higher Education Sub-Committee of the Technical Education Board of the London County Council, called for further provision for the training of teachers in London in universities. The TEB submitted a scheme to the Senate of the University of London for a new day training college which would train teachers of both sexes when most existing courses were taught in single sex colleges or departments. The principal of the proposed college was also to act as the Professor of the Theory, History and Practice of Education at the University. The new college was opened on 6 October 1902 as the London Day Training College under the administration of the LCC.

High Commission of Sierra Leone, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
41 Eagle St
London, United Kingdom WC1R 4

+44 (0) 20 7404 0140

The High Commission of Sierra Leone in London is the diplomatic mission of Sierra Leone in the United Kingdom.

St Peter's Italian Church
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
136 Clerkenwell Road
London, United Kingdom EC1R 5

020 7837 1528

St. Peter's Italian Church is a Basilica-style church located in Holborn, London.HistoryIt was built by request of Saint Vincent Pallotti, and it is still under the control of the Pallotine order which he founded. He had assistance from Giuseppe Mazzini, who was in London at the time, for the growing number of Italian immigrants in the mid 19th century and modelled by Irish architect Sir John Miller-Bryson on the Basilica San Crisogono in Rome.It was consecrated on 16 April 1863 as The Church of St. Peter of all Nations. At the time of consecration, it was the only Basilica-style church in the UK. Its organ was built in 1886 by Belgian Anneesen.The frontal section of the church consists of a loggia and portico with twin arches, above which are three alcoves. The central alcove contains a statue of Christ, whilst the sides contain statues of St. Bede and St. George. Between the alcoves are two large mosaics depicting the miracle of the fishes and Jesus giving the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven to St. Peter.Above the façade is a 33-metre-high bell tower, built in 1891 which houses a bell known as "The Steel Monster".In the loggia are two remembrance plaques, one to veterans (mostly Italian Britons) of World War I and the other to 446 Italians who lost their lives on the Arandora Star.

UCL Institute of Archaeology
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
31-34 Gordon Square
London, United Kingdom WC1H 0PY

020 7969 5204

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is an academic department of the Social & Historical Sciences Faculty of University College London (UCL), England which it joined in 1986. It is currently one of the largest centres for the study of archaeology, cultural heritage and museum studies in the world, with over 100 members of staff and 600 students housed in a 1950s building on the north side of Gordon Square in the Bloomsbury area of Central London.

UCL Mechanical Engineering Dungeon
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
University College London
London, United Kingdom WC1E 7JE

no natural light, windows that open into another basement

Urdang Academy
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
90 Rosebery Avenue
London, United Kingdom EC1R 4RP

020 7713 7710

The Urdang Academy, commonly known as Urdang, is an independent performing arts academy based in Islington, London. Originally founded as a ballet school by Leonie Urdang in 1970, the academy now provides specialist vocational training in dance and musical theatre at further and higher education level, preparing students for a professional career in the performing arts.The academy is accredited by the Council for Dance Education and Training and offers Qualifications and Curriculum Authority-recognised qualifications validated by Anglia Ruskin University, University of East London, and Trinity College, London. It was rated "Outstanding" by Ofsted in 2011 and again in 2015 as well as being named one of the best places to study degree level musical theatre by The Stage in 2015.Urdang has a history of feeding graduates into West End musicals, dance shows, UK tours and regional theatre productions as well as more recent commercial dance success with graduates choreographing and dancing for top pop artists.LocationsUrdang Academy was originally based in a church hall in Golders Green until 1978, when it moved to studios in Covent Garden. The Old Finsbury Town Hall in Clerkenwell, Islington, has been the home of the Urdang Academy since January 2007, when the school relocated from its Covent Garden premises.

UCL Main Building
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Chandler House, 2 Wakefield St
London, United Kingdom WC1N 1PF

The Main Building at University College London, includes the Octagon, Quad, Cloisters, Main Library, Flaxman Gallery and the Wilkins Building. The North Wing, South Wing, Chadwick Building and Pearson Building are also considered part of the main UCL building.HistoryIn 1827, a year after the founding of UCL, construction of the Main Building began on the site of the old Carmarthen Square. The Octagon Building is a term used for the whole of the Main Building, but more appropriately for a central part of it. At the centrepiece of the building is an ornate dome, which is visible throughout the immediate area. The Octagon was designed by the Architect William Wilkins, who also designed the National Gallery. The original plans by Wilkins called for a U-shaped enclosure around the Quad (square). Funds, however, ran out in 1829 with only the Portico and Dome finished. Wilkins original plans were not to be completed until the 20th century: The Main Building was finally finished in 1985, 158 years since the foundations were laid, with a formal opening ceremony by Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom.OctagonThe Wilkins Building is a term used for the whole of the Main Building, but more appropriately for a central part of it. The Octagon dome houses the central hall of the University Main Library, which contains casts from the John Flaxman casts-collection and a mural depicting the construction of UCL in a mythical scene with Jeremy Bentham overlooking the plans.

RADA Studios
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
16 Chenies St
London, United Kingdom WC1E 7EX

+44 (0)20 7307 5060

RADA Studios is a theatrical venue in Chenies Street in the London Borough of Camden, just to the east of Tottenham Court Road, owned by the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art .The venue contains rehearsal rooms and meeting rooms, and two small theatres - the 200-seat Studio Theatre, and the 50-seat Club Theatre.History and Drill HallThe venue was built in 1882 as a drill hall for the Bloomsbury Rifles - the architect was Samuel Knight. It has a notable artistic history: in the 1900s, Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes rehearsed there. During World War II it was used for Ralph Reader's Gang Shows. In the 1960s it was used as an art gallery for the Tate Gallery’s exhibition of the McAlpine Collection.The venue started to be used as an arts centre for Bloomsbury and Fitzrovia in 1977, and became a theatre, the Drill Hall, in the 1980s after many years of being used as a rehearsal hall. From 1984, the Drill Hall particularly supported production of theatrical and artistic works with gay and lesbian themes. In 2007, the Drill Hall, with an annual turnover of £1.25 million, was supported with £250,000 of Arts Council funding, but late in 2007, the Arts Council announced it was withdrawing this funding to concentrate its funding on other ventures. (Similar fates befell 194 other arts organisations.)

Kingsway, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
36-38 Kingsway
London, United Kingdom

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Kingsway is a major road in central London, designated as part of the A4200. It runs from High Holborn, at its north end in the London Borough of Camden, and meets Aldwych in the south in the City of Westminster at Bush House. It was built in the 1900s. Together Kingsway and Aldwych form one of the major north-south routes through central London linking the ancient east-west routes of High Holborn and Strand.HistoryThe road was purpose-built as part of a major redevelopment of the area in the 1900s. Its route cleared away the maze of small streets in Holborn such as Little Queen Street and the surrounding slum dwellings. However Holy Trinity Church, which was built in Little Queen Street was spared, whereas the Sardinian Embassy Chapel, an important Roman Catholic church attached to the Embassy of the Kingdom of Sardinia, was demolished to make way for the new street.Plans were published by London County Council in 1898 and the road was formally opened in 1905. It is one of the broadest streets in central London at wide. There were several proposed names for the new street, including King Edward VII Street, Empire Avenue, Imperial Avenue and Connecticut Avenue. The name "Kingsway" was in honour of King Edward VII, who opened the street.

Shaftesbury Theatre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom WC2H 8DP

The Shaftesbury Theatre is a West End Theatre, located on Shaftesbury Avenue, in the London Borough of Camden.HistoryThe theatre was designed for the brothers Walter and Frederick Melville by Bertie Crewe and opened on 26 December 1911 with a production of The Three Musketeers, as the New Prince's Theatre, becoming the Prince's Theatre in 1914. It had a capacity of 2,392 and a stage 31' 10" wide by 31' deep.The Prince's was the last theatre to be built in Shaftesbury Avenue, and is located near New Oxford Street, perhaps explaining the many gaps between performances in its early years. It had considerable success with an 18-week season of Gilbert and Sullivan operas, presented by the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, in 1919. These became a regular attraction at the theatre in the 1920s, interspersed with runs of theatre productions transferred from other venues. Basil Rathbone appeared at the Prince's Theatre in May 1933 when he played Julian Beauclerc in a revival of Diplomacy. The Rose of Persia was revived at the theatre in 1935. The D'Oyly Carte returned in 1942.The theatre was sold to EMI in 1962, and became the Shaftesbury Theatre the following year. Broadway productions that transferred to the theatre for long runs in the 1960s included Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1962)and How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1963).

Barnard's Inn
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
91 Holborn
London, United Kingdom EC1N 2JT

Barnard's Inn is the current home of Gresham College in Holborn, London.HistoryBarnard's Inn dates back at least to the mid-13th century — it was recorded as part of the estate of Sir Adam de Basing (Adam de Baysing), one time Lord Mayor of London. It passed on to John Mackworth, the Dean of Lincoln, who in turn passed it on to the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln on his death in 1451. Three years later, it was established as an Inn of Chancery — these were schools for law students before they passed on to an Inn of Court. Barnard's Inn was one of two Inns of Chancery linked to Gray's Inn, the other being Staple Inn. Members of the Gray's Inn were appointed readers to the Barnard or Staple Inn. For example, in the meeting of the Pension of Gray's Inn, 19 November 1617, it was stated: "Mr. William Denny chosen Reader of Barnard's Inn." Members of Barnard or Staple's Inn had to pay four pounds for being admitted to Gray's Inn. Hence, at the meeting of the Pension 15 May 1626 it was said that gentlemen coming from Barnard or Staple's Inn "and crave the benefit of the fine of 43 pounds and 4 shillings upon their admittance shall be admitted of the third table and paye but 43 pounds and 4 shillings in that respect, otherwise to paye foure poundes as others do notwithstanding they be of Barnards Inne or Staple Inne."

30 Euston Square
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
30 Euston Square, 1-9 Melton Street, 194 Euston Road.
London, United Kingdom NW1 2

020 8453 4600

30 Euston Square is a building located at the corner of Euston Road and Melton Street, London NW1. Originally built as the headquarters of an assurance company, it has since been converted to form the headquarters of the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP). Its architectural style is Greek Revival. The first phase, built in 1906–08, was designed by Arthur Beresford Pite, and the 1932 extension is W. H. Gunton.HistoryThe original part of the building, with the address 1–9 Melton Street, was constructed in 1906–08 as the headquarters of the London, Edinburgh and Glasgow Assurance Company to a design by Arthur Beresford Pite. In 1910 the insurance company became part of the Pearl Life Assurance Company, which was one of the initial members of the National Amalgamated Approved Society (NASA). in 1913 Pite extended the roof of the building, and in 1923 he made a further extension to the north end of the building. The final phase of the building, with the address 194–198 Euston Road, was built in 1932 on the south side of the original building; this was designed by W. H. Gunton. The building continued to be the headquarters of the NASA until approved societies were abolished under the terms of the National Insurance Act 1946. From 1948 it was owned by the government, and subsequently served a number of purposes, including being a local office of the Department of Health and Social Security*. It was transferred to private ownership in the 1990s, but was virtually unused from that time. It was later acquired by the RCGP, and refurbished to act as their headquarters. It opened for this purpose in late October 2012.

Central Saint Giles
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
1–13 St Giles High Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 8AG

020 7240 6480

Central Saint Giles is a mixed-use development in central London. Built at a cost of £450 million and completed in May 2010, it was designed by the Italian architect Renzo Piano and is his first work in the UK. The development consists of two buildings of up to 15 storeys in height, arranged around a public courtyard lined with shops and restaurants. It is chiefly notable for its façades, covered with 134,000 glazed tiles in vivid shades of green, orange, lime and yellow. It has attracted a number of high-profile tenants including NBCUniversal, MindShare and Google.Location and backgroundThe development is located in the district of St Giles, a short distance to the east of the east end of Oxford Street. The area was once notorious for being one of the worst slums in London, known as the Rookery – a maze of ramshackle houses, alleys and courtyards inhabited by thousands of destitute people. It was famously depicted by William Hogarth in his 1751 print Gin Lane. Central Saint Giles stands on the site of St Giles Court, an office development originally erected in the 1950s for the Ministry of Supply and latterly used by the Ministry of Defence (MOD). It consisted of a series of linked brick blocks of six to eight storeys high, arranged in an S-shape around two inner courtyards to which there was no public access. The grim appearance of St Giles Court contributed to the area becoming a magnet for prostitutes and the homeless. The building was owned by Legal & General but was occupied by the MOD on a lease that was not due to expire until 2011. However, at the start of the 21st century the MOD began undertaking a process of reducing its London estate and discontinued the use of several buildings in the capital, including St Giles Court. It vacated the building in April 2005.

St Etheldreda's Church
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
14 Ely Place
London, United Kingdom EC1N 6

0207 405 1061

St Etheldreda's Church is in Ely Place, off Charterhouse Street in Holborn, London. The Roman Catholic church is dedicated to Æthelthryth, or Etheldreda, the Anglo-Saxon saint who founded the monastery at Ely in 673. It was the chapel of the London residence of the Bishops of Ely.It is one of the oldest Roman Catholic churches in England, and one of two surviving buildings in London dating from Edward I's reign. The chapel was purchased by the Roman Catholic church in 1874 and opened in 1878.DescriptionSt Etheldreda's consists of a chapel, or upper church, and a crypt or undercroft and is active and used for Masses, baptisms, weddings, and funerals. Because Etheldreda was often invoked for help with infections of the throat, the Blessing of the Throats is held annually at the chapel.The Catholic chapel at the United States Military Academy, West Point, is modelled on St Etheldreda's.

Peacock Theatre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Kingsway 22
London, United Kingdom WC2A 2

020 7863 8222

The Peacock Theatre is a theatre in the City of Westminster, located in Portugal Street, near Aldwych. The 999-seat house is owned by, and comprises part of the London School of Economics and Political Science campus, who utilise the theatre for lectures, public talks, conferences, political speeches and open days.The university has a long lease with London's principal centre for contemporary dance, Sadler's Wells, with whom it has negotiated a deal to bring in dance companies under the banner 'Sadler's Wells in the West End'. The venue often plays host to dance performances, conferences, ballet, pop concerts and award ceremonies. The stage is approximately 36ft by 33ft.Gibbon's Tennis Court became used as a theatre on this site in the 17th century. In 1911, the London Opera House opened on this site, becoming the National Theatre of England, three years later. Neither theatre was successful and the venture was sold, becoming the Stoll Theatre, in 1916.HistoryFormer theatresA theatre has stood on the site since the 17th century. Known as Gibbon's Tennis Court, or the Vere Street Theatre. Mrs Hughes became the first (identified) woman to tread the boards of a London theatre, on 8 December 1660, in a performance of Othello. The company left the theatre in 1663 and there is no record of further plays at the theatre. The building was finally destroyed by fire in 1809.

Mine And My Sisters place
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Endell Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 9AD

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Pollock's Toy Museum
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1 Scala Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 2

0207-636 3452

Pollock's Toy Museum is a small museum in London, England.It was started in 1956 in a single attic room at 44 Monmouth Street, near Covent Garden, above Benjamin Pollock's Toy Shop, where Pollock's Toy Theatres were also sold. As the enterprise flourished, other rooms were taken over for the museum and the ground floor became a toyshop. By 1969 the collection had outgrown the Monmouth Street premises and Pollock's Toy Museum moved to 1 Scala Street, with a museum shop on the ground floor to contribute to its support. The museum continues today to be run by the grandson of the founder Marguerite Fawdry.