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Natural History Museum, Dublin | Tourist Information


museum.ie/en/intro/natural-history.aspx

Merrion Street, Dubin 2
Dublin, Ireland


Ireland's Natural History Museum (Músaem Stair an Dúlra), sometimes called the Dead Zoo a branch of the National Museum of Ireland, is housed on Merrion Street in Dublin, Ireland. The museum was built in 1856 for parts of the collection of the Royal Dublin Society and building and collection were later passed to the Irish State.The Museum's collection and building have changed little since Victorian times, and it is sometimes described as a "museum of a museum".CollectionThe building is a ‘cabinet-style’ museum designed to showcase a wide-ranging and comprehensive zoological collection, and has changed little in over a century. Often described as a ‘museum of a museum’, its 10,000 exhibits provide a glimpse of the natural world that has delighted generations of visitors since the doors opened in 1857.As the collection is unique in range and vintage, the exhibits are a product of their age, with faded and worn pelts and visible marks from bullets and rough taxidermy. Larger specimens are displayed in large, wood-framed glass cases while smaller ones are kept under glass, protected from sunlight by moveable leather panels. The main room is heated by an underfloor system similar to a Roman hypocaust.The Irish Room, the ground floor of the museum, displays Irish animals, notably several mounted skeletons of giant Irish deer. Numerous skulls of those and other deer line the walls. Stuffed and mounted mammals, birds, fish — and insects and other animals native to or found in Ireland — comprise the rest of the ground floor. Many of the specimens of currently extant animals, such as badgers, hares, and foxes, are over a century old. A basking shark hangs from this ceiling.

Community and Government Near Natural History Museum

Dublin City
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Arran Quay
Dublin, Ireland

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Merrion Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Square
Dublin, Ireland D2

Merrion Square is a Georgian garden square on the southside of Dublin city centre.HistoryThe square was laid out after 1762 and was largely complete by the beginning of the 19th century. The demand for such Georgian townhouse residences south of the River Liffey had been fueled by the decision of the then Earl of Kildare (later the Duke of Leinster) to build his Dublin home on the then undeveloped southside. He constructed the largest aristocratic residence in Dublin, Leinster House, second only to Dublin Castle. As a result of this construction, three new residential squares appeared on the Southside, Merrion Square (facing the garden front of Leinster House), St Stephen's Green and the smallest and last of Dublin's five Georgian squares to be built, Fitzwilliam Square.Aristocrats, bishops and the wealthy sold their northside townhouses and migrated to the new southside developments.LegacyMerrion Square is considered one of the city's finest surviving squares. Three sides are lined with Georgian redbrick townhouses; the West side abuts the grounds of Leinster House (seat of the Oireachtas), Government Buildings, the Natural History Museum and the National Gallery. The central railed-off garden is now a public park.

Spire of Dublin
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

The Spire of Dublin, alternatively titled the Monument of Light, is a large, stainless steel, pin-like monument 121.2m in height, located on the site of the former Nelson's Pillar on O'Connell Street in Dublin, Ireland.DescriptionThe spire was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects, who sought an "Elegant and dynamic simplicity bridging art and technology". The contract was awarded to SIAC-Radley JV and it was manufactured by Radley Engineering of Dungarvan, County Waterford, and erected by SIAC Construction Ltd & GDW Engineering Ltd. The first section was installed on 18 December 2002. Five additional 20m sections were added with the last one installed on 21 January 2003. The spire is an elongated cone of diameter 3m at the base, narrowing to 15cm at the top. Construction of the world's tallest sculpture was delayed because of difficulty in obtaining planning permission and environmental regulations. It is constructed from eight hollow tubes of stainless steel and features a tuned mass damper, designed by engineers Arup, to counteract sway. The steel underwent shot peening to alter the quality of light reflected from it.The pattern around the base of the Spire is based on a core sample of earth and rock formation taken from the ground where the spire stands. The pattern was applied by bead blasting the steel through rubber stencil masks whose patterns were created by water jet cutting based on core sample drawings supplied by the contractor.

Iveagh Gardens
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Clonmel Street, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

The Iveagh Gardens is a public park located between Clonmel Street and Upper Hatch Street, near the National Concert Hall in Dublin, Ireland. It is designated as a National Historic Property.HistoryThe site of the gardens was shown in 1756 as Leeson's Fields after Joseph Leeson, 1st Earl of Milltown.Clonmell LawnsIn the late 18th century Lord Milltown leased the land to John Hatch, the principal developer of Harcourt and Hatch Streets. Hatch sold it to The 1st Earl of Clonmell (also known as "Copper-Faced Jack") as his private gardens. The gardens then became known as "Clonmell Lawns" Located on Harcourt Street is Clonmell House that faces on to Clonmell Street which leads into the Iveagh Gardens. A subterranean passage brought the Earl from his house to the gardens without him having to walk over the street. The Wide Streets Commission had planned for Clonmell Street to run through what is now the gardens thereby linking Harcourt Street to the then newly constructed Earlsfort Terrace. However, this passage was not located during archaeological monitoring conducted during the construction of the LUAS.Coburg GardensWhen the 1st Earl died in 1798, his son the 2nd Earl inherited the estate including Clonmell Gardens. The estate was sold in 1810 and the gardens were opened for public use around 1817 and renamed "Coburg Gardens" after the royal family of Saxe-Coburg. Entrance to the park was from the South Side of St Stephen's Green, the "Royal Horse Bazaar".

O'Connell Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Town
Dublin, Ireland 1

O'Connell Bridge is a road bridge spanning the River Liffey in Dublin, and joining O'Connell Street to D'Olier Street, Westmoreland Street and the south quays.HistoryThe original bridge was designed by James Gandon, and built between 1791 and 1794.Originally humped, and narrower, Carlisle bridge was a symmetrical, three semicircular arch structure constructed in granite with a Portland stone balustrade and obelisks on each of the four corners. A keystone head at the apex of the central span symbolises the River Liffey, corresponding to the heads on the Custom House which personify the other great rivers of Ireland.Since 1860,, to improve the streetscape and relieve traffic congestion on the bridge, it was intended to widen Carlisle Bridge to bring it to the same width as 70 metres wide Sackville Street which formed the north side carriageway connection to the Bridge. In 1877-1880 the bridge was reconstructed. As can be seen on orthophotography it spans now 45 m of the Liffey and is about 50 m wide. O'Connell Bridge is said to be unique in Europe as the only traffic bridge wider than it is long.

Mansion House, Dublin
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2, Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

The Mansion House on Dawson Street, Dublin, has been the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin since 1715.FeaturesThe Mansion House's most famous features include the "Round Room", where the First Dáil assembled on 21 January 1919 to proclaim the Irish Declaration of Independence. On 21 January 1969 a special fiftieth anniversary joint session of Dáil Éireann and Seanad Éireann assembled there and was addressed by the then President of Ireland, Éamon de Valera.Externally, the distinctive metal portico over the main door was erected for the visit of Queen Victoria in 1900.Visitors and occupantsIts most famous occupants included Lord Mayors: Daniel O'Connell, nineteenth century nationalist leader Alfie Byrne (1930s), longest serving Lord Mayor in the 800-year history of the office Jim Mitchell (1976–77), the youngest Lord Mayor of Dublin, aged 29, in the history of the office Famous visitors to the mayoral residence include: Prince Rainier III and Princess Grace of Monaco Pope John Paul II Queen Victoria Mother Teresa Nelson Mandela

Jervis Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Jervis Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

The Jervis Shopping Centre is a major shopping centre in Dublin, Ireland. Opened in 1996, the centre is located in the area bordered by Jervis Street, Upper Abbey Street, Mary Street, and Liffey Street.HistoryThe centre was built on a 12,000 m2 former hospital site, which was bought in 1994 at a cost of £5.97 million. The centre was built at a cost of £76 million. Most of the facade of the former Hospital has been retained and incorporated into the Shopping Centre.Although its main entrance is on Mary Street, the centre is named for the Jervis Street Hospital, Dublin on whose site it was built following the hospital's closure in the late 1980s. The existing Marks and Spencer store on Mary Street was incorporated into the new centre, with the other anchor tenants being Quinnsworth and New Look in the unit formerly occupied by Debenhams.The centre is notable in that, as the first major shopping centre opened during the economic boom of the late 1990s, it marked the first appearance of many British 'high street' retailers in the Republic of Ireland. These included Boots, Dixons, Debenhams, Next, and Argos among others, which have gone on to become major names in the main streets of Ireland. This contrasted with existing Irish shopping centres at the time which were usually anchored by local names such as Dunnes, Roches Stores, and Penneys. Not all of the new arrivals were successes: British Home Stores opened a store in 1996 having previously sold all of its Irish interests to Primark; however, the outlet was not a success and was later sold to Heatons.

Dublin Connolly railway station
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Amiens Street 1
Dublin, Ireland

Dublin Connolly is one of the main railway stations in Dublin, Ireland, and is a focal point in the Irish route network. Opened in 1844 as Amiens Street Station, the ornate facade has a distinctive Italianate tower at its centre. On the North side of the River Liffey, it provides intercity and commuter services to the north, north-west and south-east. The North-South Dublin Area Rapid Transit service also passes through the station. The station offices are the headquarters of Irish Rail, Iarnród Éireann.

Samuel Beckett Bridge
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Samuel Beckett Bridge
Dublin, Ireland

Samuel Beckett Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge in Dublin that joins Sir John Rogerson's Quay on the south side of the River Liffey to Guild Street and North Wall Quay in the Docklands area.Design and constructionThe architect is Santiago Calatrava, a designer of a number of innovative bridges and buildings. This is the second bridge in the area designed by Calatrava, the first being the James Joyce Bridge, which is further upstream.Constructed by a "Graham Hollandia Joint Venture", the main span of the Samuel Beckett Bridge is supported by 31 cable stays from a doubly back-stayed single forward arc tubular tapered spar, with decking provided for four traffic and two pedestrian lanes. It is also capable of opening through an angle of 90 degrees allowing ships to pass through. This is achieved through a rotational mechanism housed in the base of the pylon.The shape of the spar and its cables is said to evoke an image of a harp lying on its edge. (The harp being the national symbol for Ireland from as early as the thirteenth century).The steel structure of the bridge was constructed in Rotterdam by Hollandia, a Dutch company also responsible for the steel fabrication of the London Eye. The steel span of the bridge was transferred from the Hollandia wharf in Krimpen aan den IJssel on 3 May 2009, with support from specialist transport company ALE Heavylift.

City Hall, Dublin
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D

The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.OverviewLocated at the top of Parliament Street on the city's southern side, it stands next to Dublin Castle, the centre of the British government in Ireland until 1922. The street had been built in 1753, providing a continuation of Capel Street on the north bank of the Liffey, across the newly widened Essex Bridge, and so the exchange ended (and still ends) a long streetscape.The external structure is primarily made out of white Portland stone from a quarry in Dorset. The large size and fine fittings of the Royal exchange, with carved capitals by Simon Vierpyl, and plasterwork by the leading stuccodore Charles Thorpe, reflect the standing and prestige of Dublin in the 18th Century. The neo-classical building contains a central entrance hall or Rotunda, with a large dome supported by twelve columns which are surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants strolled and discussed business meetings.The function of the building was to provide a meeting place for Dublin's businessmen, where they could buy and sell goods and trade bills of exchange. It was also close to the then Customs House that stood on the site of today's Clarence Hotel, making it convenient for overseas merchants. The cost of building the exchange was met by the Parliament of Ireland, and this is reflected by the initials "SPQH", standing for "Senatus PopulusQue Hibernicus", meaning "The senate and people of Ireland" (an Irish version of SPQR).

Dáil Éireann
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Leinster House, Kildare Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 618 3000

O2 Dublin
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
N Wall Quay
Dublin, Ireland 1

+353 1 819 8888

Camden Street
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Camden Street
Dublin, Ireland

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Custom House Harbour
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Custom House Harbour
Dublin, Ireland

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Google Docks
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Barrow Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 4

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Bimm Dublin
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
62-64 Francis Street
Dublin, Ireland 8

00353 1 513 3666

Larkin Community College
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Cathal Brugha Street
Dublin, Ireland

01-874 1913

Arts block - Trinity College
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trinity College
Dublin, Ireland

Civil Registration Office
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Lr. Grand canal st, Dublin 2, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland +098

Sweny's
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Lincoln Place, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dub

Government Organization Near Natural History Museum

Dáil Éireann
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Leinster House, Kildare Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 618 3000

Dublin Docklands
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Custom House Quay
Dublin, Ireland 1

U.S. Embassy Dublin
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
42 Elgin Road
Ballsbridge, Ireland Dublin 4

+353 1 668-8777

Civil Registry Office
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Sir Patrick Duns Hospital, Lower Grand Canal Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

01 8638200

The Honorable Society Of Kings Inns
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Henrietta Street
Dublin, Ireland

+ 353 1 874 4840

Lietuvos Respublikos ambasada Airijoje / Embassy of Lithuania in Ireland
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
47 Ailesbury Rd. Ballsbridge
Dublin, Ireland D04P224

+35312035757

Lietuvos ambasada Airijoje 47 Ailesbury Road, Ballsbridge Dublin D04P224 IRELAND Tel.: +353 (0) 1 203 5737, +353 (0) 1 203 5757 Faks.: +353 (0) 1 283 9354 El. paštas: [email protected]; [email protected] http://ie.mfa.lt/

Civil Registration Office
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Lr. Grand canal st, Dublin 2, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland +098

The Digital Hub, Dublin
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Digital Exchange, Crane Street, The Digital Hub, Dublin 8, D08 HKR9
Dublin, Ireland

00 353 (0) 1 4806200

Based in the historic Liberties area of Dublin city centre, The Digital Hub is an enterprise cluster for growing technology companies. Home to established businesses and employing hundreds of people, The Digital Hub is the largest cluster of digital media, technology and Internet businesses in Ireland, providing a space for indigenous enterprises such as Athena Media, Maithú IT Solutions, Software Design and Sonru to scale and grow. The Digital Hub is also the EMEA headquarters of major international companies like Boomerang, eMaint, Eventbrite, and is home to industry organisations such as the Irish Internet Association, NDRC and Silicon Republic. Since the project’s inception, close to 200 companies have progressed through the enterprise cluster at The Digital Hub, generating thousands of skilled jobs. Some well-established alumni include Amazon, Distilled Media Group (Daft.ie), Etsy, Havok, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (Riverdeep), Kavaleer and MTT. The Digital Hub Development Agency is the Irish state agency that manages The Digital Hub. Further information is available at: www.thedigitalhub.com or on Twitter: @TheDigitalHub.

Embajada de México en Irlanda - Embassy of Mexico in Ireland
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
19 Raglan Road
Dublin, Ireland 4

+353 1 667 3105

Irish Naturalisation & Immigration Service-Visa Office
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
13-14 Burgh Quay
Dublin, Ireland D

1890 551 500

Embassy of the Netherlands in Ireland
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
160 Merrion Road
Dublin, Ireland 4

(+353) 1 2693444

DFB Phibsboro No 3 Station
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Phibsboro Road
Dublin, Ireland 07

999

No. 3 Station Phibsborough is one of 11 full time fire station in Dublin and is on busiest stations in the city. It is manned 24/7/365 by up to 90 Firefighters / Paramedics and Officers of Dublin Fire Brigade No.3 Station is also the headquarters of Charlie District which includes No.9 Blanchardstown

Polish Embassy Dublin
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
5 Ailesbury Road, Ballsbridge
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 283 08 55

This is the official Facebook page of the Embassy of the Republic of Poland, managed by our Embassy's Press Department. Please feel free to comment, but we request that your tone be civil and moderate.

Joyce House Civil Registrations Office
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Lombard Street
Dublin, Ireland

British Embassy Dublin
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
29 Merrion Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 4

+35312053700

Embassy of Russia in Ireland/Посольство России в Ирландии
Distance: 2.5 mi Tourist Information
184-186 Orwell Road, Rathgar, Dublin 14
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 14

+35314922048

Department of Justice and Equality
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
94 St. Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland

1 602 8202

The Department of Justice and Equality is a department of the Government of Ireland. It is led by the Minister for Justice and Equality who is assisted by two Ministers of State. The department's mission is to maintain and enhance community security and to promote a fairer society in Ireland.Departmental teamMinister for Justice and Equality: Frances Fitzgerald, TDMinister of State for Justice: David Stanton, TDMinister of State for Disability Issues: Finian McGrath, TDSecretary General of the Department: Noel Waters (acting)OverviewThe mission of the Department of Justice and Equality is to maintain and enhance community security and equality through the development of a range of policies and high quality services which underpin:The protection and assertion of human rights and fundamental freedoms consistent with the common goodThe security of the StateAn effective and balanced approach to tackling crime The official headquarters and Ministerial offices of the department are in 94 St Stephen's Green, Dublin 2. Over the years its name has changed several times, with some changes in its role. The department has been known as the following: Department of Home Affairs (1919–1923)Department of Justice (1923–1997)Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform (1997–2010)Department of Justice and Law Reform (2010–2011)Department of Justice and Equality (2011–present) In July 2014 the department embarked on a comprehensive program of change, including the recruitment of a new secretary-general following an independent review.

National Archives of Ireland
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Bishop Street
Dublin, Ireland

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The National Archives of Ireland is the official repository for the state records of Ireland. Established by the National Archives Act 1986, it came into existence in 1988, taking over the functions of the State Paper Office and the Public Record Office of Ireland. The National Archives moved to its current premises in Bishop Street, Dublin, in 1991. The Archives stand on the site of the Jacob's Factory, one of the garrisons held by rebels during the 1916 Easter Rising.The State Paper Office was originally based in Dublin Castle. The Public Record Office of Ireland was established under the Public Records Act, 1867 to acquire administrative, court and probate records over twenty years old.1922 destructionDuring the Civil War, the Four Courts, where it was based, was seized and the repository building destroyed by detonating explosives, resulting in a fire in June 1922 during the Battle of Dublin, along with most of the records held here, some dating back to the thirteenth century.When four-fifths of Ireland became independent as the Irish Free State in 1922, the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland was set up to take over the records of that part of Ireland which remained in the United Kingdom.HoldingsThe holdings of the National Archives include:

National Archives of Ireland
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Bishop Street
Dublin, Ireland

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The National Archives of Ireland is the official repository for the state records of Ireland. Established by the National Archives Act 1986, it came into existence in 1988, taking over the functions of the State Paper Office and the Public Record Office of Ireland. The National Archives moved to its current premises in Bishop Street, Dublin, in 1991. The Archives stand on the site of the Jacob's Factory, one of the garrisons held by rebels during the 1916 Easter Rising.The State Paper Office was originally based in Dublin Castle. The Public Record Office of Ireland was established under the Public Records Act, 1867 to acquire administrative, court and probate records over twenty years old.1922 destructionDuring the Civil War, the Four Courts, where it was based, was seized and the repository building destroyed by detonating explosives, resulting in a fire in June 1922 during the Battle of Dublin, along with most of the records held here, some dating back to the thirteenth century.When four-fifths of Ireland became independent as the Irish Free State in 1922, the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland was set up to take over the records of that part of Ireland which remained in the United Kingdom.HoldingsThe holdings of the National Archives include:

Embassy of Belgium in Dublin
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
1 Elgin Road
Ballsbridge, Ireland Dublin 4

+353 1 631 52 83 during office hours

Belgium is represented in Ireland by the Embassy situated in Dublin, as well as 2 honorary consulats in Cork and Limerick. In addition to its diplomatic tasks, the embassy also acts as a public service, in certain areas, for Belgians in Ireland as well as foreigners willing to come to Belgium. All relevant information can be obtained on our website.

History Museum Near Natural History Museum

Dublin Castle
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

+353 1 645 8813

In continuous occupation since its establishment in 1204 AD, Dublin Castle has played a prominent role in Ireland's history.The State Apartments are among the most prestigious State Rooms in the country and are home to St. Patrick's Hall and the James Connolly Room. They can be visited both as part of a guided tour and as part of a self guided visit. The thirteenth century remains of the Gunpowder Tower and the 19th Century baroque style Chapel Royal can also be visited as part of the Guided Tour.

The National Wax Museum plus
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
4 Foster Place, Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D2

(01) 671 8373

About The National Wax Museum Plus The National Wax Museum Plus is an exciting interactive visitor attraction located in the heart of Dublin's city centre Temple Bar district and just off Dame Street. The museum is housed over four floors and 13,000 square feet in a historic Foster Place landmark building, previously the home for Ireland's gold store and arms at the turn of the last century! The museum is an outstandingly original visitor attraction and has been designed to deliver an interactive experience taking you on a journey through Irish cultural heritage, an enchanting children's zone of discovery, Ireland's only dedicated tribute to our top scientific inventors, a green screen video room, a fully functioning recording studio and all the exceptional life like wax work characters you can expect at the national wax museum. The National Wax Museum Plus offers a museum experience unlike any other, whether you are young or old, a culture vulture or fun seeker, male or female, star struck or star studded, The National Wax Museum Plus is the ultimate entertainment experience for all.

Glasnevin Cemetery
Distance: 2.5 mi Tourist Information
Finglas Road
Dublin, Ireland D

Glasnevin Cemetery is a large cemetery in Glasnevin, Dublin, Ireland which opened in 1832.History and descriptionPrior to the establishment of Glasnevin Cemetery, Irish Catholics had no cemeteries of their own in which to bury their dead and, as the repressive Penal Laws of the eighteenth century placed heavy restrictions on the public performance of Catholic services, it had become normal practice for Catholics to conduct a limited version of their own funeral services in Protestant churchyards or graveyards. This situation continued until an incident at a funeral held at St. Kevin's Churchyard in 1823 provoked public outcry when a Protestant sexton reprimanded a Catholic priest for proceeding to perform a limited version of a funeral mass. The outcry prompted Daniel O'Connell, champion of Catholic rights, to launch a campaign and prepare a legal opinion proving that there was actually no law passed forbidding praying for a dead Catholic in a graveyard. O'Connell pushed for the opening of a burial ground in which both Irish Catholics and Protestants could give their dead dignified burial.Glasnevin Cemetery was consecrated and opened to the public for the first time on 21 February 1832. The first burial, that of eleven-year-old Michael Carey from Francis Street in Dublin, took place on the following day in a section of the cemetery known as Curran's Square. The cemetery was initially known as Prospect Cemetery, a name chosen from the townland of Prospect, which surrounded the cemetery lands. Originally covering nine acres of ground, the area of the cemetery has now grown to approximately 124 acres. This includes its expansion on the southern side of the Finglas Road with the section called St. Paul's. The option of cremation has been provided since March 1982.

City Hall, Dublin
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D

The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.OverviewLocated at the top of Parliament Street on the city's southern side, it stands next to Dublin Castle, the centre of the British government in Ireland until 1922. The street had been built in 1753, providing a continuation of Capel Street on the north bank of the Liffey, across the newly widened Essex Bridge, and so the exchange ended (and still ends) a long streetscape.The external structure is primarily made out of white Portland stone from a quarry in Dorset. The large size and fine fittings of the Royal exchange, with carved capitals by Simon Vierpyl, and plasterwork by the leading stuccodore Charles Thorpe, reflect the standing and prestige of Dublin in the 18th Century. The neo-classical building contains a central entrance hall or Rotunda, with a large dome supported by twelve columns which are surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants strolled and discussed business meetings.The function of the building was to provide a meeting place for Dublin's businessmen, where they could buy and sell goods and trade bills of exchange. It was also close to the then Customs House that stood on the site of today's Clarence Hotel, making it convenient for overseas merchants. The cost of building the exchange was met by the Parliament of Ireland, and this is reflected by the initials "SPQH", standing for "Senatus PopulusQue Hibernicus", meaning "The senate and people of Ireland" (an Irish version of SPQR).

Dublinia
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Winetavern Street
Dublin, Ireland 8

+353 (0) 1 6794611

Dublinia is one of Dublin’s top visitor attractions with three exciting exhibitions, Viking Dublin, Medieval Dublin and History Hunters! All located at the historic crossroads of old Dublin. The Viking and Medieval Dublin exhibitions bring the city to life in an exciting and contemporary way for all ages. Unearth the city’s past at the History Hunters exhibition and see Dublin from a new perspective. Come away knowing more about the citizens of Dublin throughout the ages!

The Little Museum of Dublin
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
15 St Stephens Green
Dublin, Ireland

01 661 1000

The Little Museum of Dublin tells the story of Ireland’s capital city in the 20th Century. This new non-profit museum was formally opened by the Lord Mayor of Dublin, Councillor Andrew Montague, in October 2011. The collection boasts over 400 artefacts, reflecting the generosity of ordinary Dubliners, as well as many cultural institutions and local luminaries. The social, cultural and political history of Dublin is chronicled in the Little Museum. There are simple artefacts that encourage contemplation of the past, alongside items related to famous visitors such as President John F Kennedy, Marlene Dietrich and Muhammad Ali. The museum occupies the first floor of a fine Georgian townhouse, 15 St Stephen's Green, near the corner of Dawson Street. We are open at the following times: Friday to Monday: 9am - 5pm Late opening Thursdays until 8om The most popular way to see the museum is on a guided tour with our exceptional tour guides, each one a gem in and of themselves! Our goal is not to sell an ideology but simply to remember the past. We look forward to welcoming you to the museum.

National Museum of Ireland – Decorative Arts and History
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Collins Barracks, Benburb Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 6777444

The National Museum of Ireland - Decorative Arts & History is a branch of the National Museum of Ireland located at the former Collins Barracks in the Arbour Hill area of Dublin, Ireland. The main focus of the galleries is on arts, craft and wares, including exhibits on: Irish coins and currency, silverware, furniture, folklife and costumes, ceramics, and glassware. Included are artifacts such as Etruscan vases, gauntlets worn by King William at the Battle of the Boyne, a life belt and oar salvaged from the wreck of the RMS Lusitania and a pocket book carried by Wolfe Tone whilst imprisoned in the Barracks.

National Museum of Ireland – Archaeology
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Kildare Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 6777444

The National Museum of Ireland – Archaeology is a branch of the National Museum of Ireland located on Kildare Street in Dublin, Ireland. It features displays on prehistoric Ireland, including early work in gold, church treasures and the Viking and medieval periods. There are special displays of items from Ancient Egypt, Cyprus and the Roman world, and special exhibitions are regularly mounted.Permanent exhibitionsThe Museum has a number of large permanent exhibits, mainly of Irish historical objects and also a few smaller exhibits on the ancient Mediterranean. In general, the museum covers the history of Ireland from the Stone Age to the Late Middle Ages. Many important artefacts from the museum were featured in the The Irish Times feature and book A History of Ireland in 100 Objects.Prehistoric IrelandThis section contains artefacts from the earliest period of human habitation in Ireland up to the Celtic Iron Age. There are numerous stone implements created by the first hunter-gatherer colonists beginning around 7000 BC, then moving on to the tools, pottery and burial objects of the Neolithic farmers. Some notable artefacts include four rare Jadeite axeheads imported from the Alps of Neolithic Italy, and the unique ceremonial macehead discovered at the tomb of Knowth. The exhibit then covers the introduction of metallurgy into Ireland around 2500 BC, with early copper implements. From the later Bronze Age period there is an impressive array of bronze axes, daggers, swords, shields, cauldrons and cast bronze horns . There are a few very early Iron weapons. Wooden objects include a large dugout logboat, wooden wheels and cauldrons and ancient reed fishing equipment.

National Leprauchan Museam Dublin
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
jervis street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 873 3899

EPIC Ireland CHQ
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
The chq Building, Custom House Quay
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

+353 (0)1 531 3688

Housed in the iconic chq Building, a historic stone and iron warehouse, built in 1820, this state-of-the-art visitor attraction tells the epic story of the Irish people’s dispersal throughout the world over the ages. Visitors will be taken on a journey that starts on the island of Ireland and ends with the global presence of the Irish today. The exhibition is spread across 20 immersive and interactive galleries, and the aim is to bring to life the story of Ireland’s communities overseas - past, present and future – in a way that is highly entertaining, engaging and educational. The story is told using innovative techniques and cutting-edge interactive technologies in combination with more traditional photographic, film, sound recordings and historic objects. EPIC Ireland also offers a state-of-the-art genealogy centre. The Irish Family History Centre is operated by Eneclann, Ireland’s leading genealogical services provider, in conjunction with international partners. In addition to extensive, easy-to-use research facilities, the genealogy centre offers the latest DNA testing that will enable visitors to learn about their Irish roots.

Waldorf Barbershop
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
13 Westmoreland Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

01 6778608

:::Striving for sartorial and tonsorial excellence since 1946::: We operate a mobile service - traditional men's barbershop | shaving | hot-towel head massage HAIRCUTS | SHAVES | HEAD MASSAGES | 1929 - 2012 Celebrating 83 years of mens' grooming in Dublin!

Dublin Writers Museum
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
18 Parnell Square
Dublin, Ireland 1

1 872 2077

The Dublin Writers Museum was opened in November 1991 at No 18, Parnell Square, Dublin, Ireland. The museum occupies an original 18th-century house, which accommodates the museum rooms, library, gallery and administration area. The annexe behind it has a coffee shop and bookshop on the ground floor and exhibition and lecture rooms on the floors above. The Irish Writers' Centre, next door in No 19, contains the meeting rooms and offices of the Irish Writers’ Union, the Society of Irish Playwrights, the Irish Children's Book Trust and the Irish Translators' & Interpreters' Association. The basement beneath both houses is occupied by the Chapter One restaurant.The Museum was established to promote interest, through its collection, displays and activities, in Irish literature as a whole and in the lives and works of individual Irish writers. Through its association with the Irish Writers' Centre it provides a link with living writers and the international literary scene. On a national level it acts as a centre, simultaneously pulling together the strands of Irish literature and complementing the smaller, more detailed museums devoted to individuals like James Joyce, George Bernard Shaw, William Butler Yeats and Patrick Pearse. It functions as a place where people can come from Dublin, Ireland and abroad to experience the phenomenon of Irish writing both as history and as actuality.The writers featured in the Museum are those who have made an important contribution to Irish or international literature or, on a local level, to the literature of Dublin. It is a view of Irish literature from a Dublin perspective.

Guiness Brewery, St James Gate, Dublin, Ireland
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

01 408 4800

Glasnevin Museum
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
Finglas Road
Dublin, Ireland

National Print Museum
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Beggars Bush Haddington Road
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 660 3770

The National Print Museum in Dublin collects, documents, preserves, exhibits, interprets and makes accessible the material evidence of printing craft and fosters associated skills of the craft in Ireland. Opened in 1996, the National Print Museum is a place for printers, historians, students and the general public to see and hear how printing developed and brought information, in all its forms, to the world.The Museum is fully accredited under The Heritage Council’s Museum Standards Programme for Ireland. On exhibit is a representative display of the equipment and artefacts of the rich centuries-old printing heritage. Items include a replica Gutenberg press (on loan from The Tudors TV series) and an original 1916 Proclamation (on loan until 2016) along with a machine (Wharfedale) similar to the one it was printed on. The National Print Museum's activities include guided tours, exhibitions, workshops, outreach, lectures, demonstrations days, and many other special events.

National Museum Of Decorative Arts & History
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Collins Barracks, Benburb Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 6777444

Glasnevin Cemetery Museum
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
Glasnevin Cemetery Museum, Finglas Rd.
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 11

+353 (0)1 882 6550

Open Monday to Friday 10am - 5pm, Saturday, Sunday and Bank Holiday Mondays 10am -5pm. Museum & Cemetery Tour: Adult €12, Concession €8 & Family Ticket €25 Museum Only Adult €6, Concession €4 & Family Ticket €15

Jameson Distillery Smithfield
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Bow St, Smithfield Village
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 7

01 807 2355

National Archives of Ireland
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Bishop Street
Dublin, Ireland

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The National Archives of Ireland is the official repository for the state records of Ireland. Established by the National Archives Act 1986, it came into existence in 1988, taking over the functions of the State Paper Office and the Public Record Office of Ireland. The National Archives moved to its current premises in Bishop Street, Dublin, in 1991. The Archives stand on the site of the Jacob's Factory, one of the garrisons held by rebels during the 1916 Easter Rising.The State Paper Office was originally based in Dublin Castle. The Public Record Office of Ireland was established under the Public Records Act, 1867 to acquire administrative, court and probate records over twenty years old.1922 destructionDuring the Civil War, the Four Courts, where it was based, was seized and the repository building destroyed by detonating explosives, resulting in a fire in June 1922 during the Battle of Dublin, along with most of the records held here, some dating back to the thirteenth century.When four-fifths of Ireland became independent as the Irish Free State in 1922, the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland was set up to take over the records of that part of Ireland which remained in the United Kingdom.HoldingsThe holdings of the National Archives include:

James Joyce Tower
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Sandycove
Dublin, Ireland

Landmark Near Natural History Museum

Trinity College, Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
College Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+35318961812

St Stephen's Green
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Saint Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

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St Stephen's Green is a city centre public park in Dublin, Ireland. The current landscape of the park was designed by William Sheppard, which officially opened to the public on Tuesday, 27 July 1880. The park is adjacent to one of Dublin's main shopping streets, Grafton Street, and to a shopping centre named for it, while on its surrounding streets are the offices of a number of public bodies and the city terminus of one of Dublin's Luas tram lines. It is often informally called Stephen's Green. At 22acre, it is the largest of the parks in Dublin's main Georgian garden squares. Others include nearby Merrion Square and Fitzwilliam Square.The park is rectangular, surrounded by streets that once formed major traffic arteries through Dublin city centre, although traffic management changes implemented in 2004 during the course of the Luas works have greatly reduced the volume of traffic. These four bordering streets are called, respectively, St Stephen's Green North, St Stephen's Green South, St Stephen's Green East and St Stephen's Green West.HistoryUntil 1663 St Stephen's Green was a marshy common on the edge of Dublin, used for grazing. In that year Dublin Corporation, seeing an opportunity to raise much needed revenue, decided to enclose the centre of the common and to sell land around the perimeter for building. The park was enclosed with a wall in 1664. The houses built around the Green were rapidly replaced by new buildings in the Georgian style and by the end of the eighteenth century the Green was a place of resort for the better-off of the city. Much of the present-day landscape of the square comprises modern buildings, some in a replica Georgian style, and relatively little survives from the 18th and 19th centuries.

St Stephen's Green
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Saint Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

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St Stephen's Green is a city centre public park in Dublin, Ireland. The current landscape of the park was designed by William Sheppard, which officially opened to the public on Tuesday, 27 July 1880. The park is adjacent to one of Dublin's main shopping streets, Grafton Street, and to a shopping centre named for it, while on its surrounding streets are the offices of a number of public bodies and the city terminus of one of Dublin's Luas tram lines. It is often informally called Stephen's Green. At 22acre, it is the largest of the parks in Dublin's main Georgian garden squares. Others include nearby Merrion Square and Fitzwilliam Square.The park is rectangular, surrounded by streets that once formed major traffic arteries through Dublin city centre, although traffic management changes implemented in 2004 during the course of the Luas works have greatly reduced the volume of traffic. These four bordering streets are called, respectively, St Stephen's Green North, St Stephen's Green South, St Stephen's Green East and St Stephen's Green West.HistoryUntil 1663 St Stephen's Green was a marshy common on the edge of Dublin, used for grazing. In that year Dublin Corporation, seeing an opportunity to raise much needed revenue, decided to enclose the centre of the common and to sell land around the perimeter for building. The park was enclosed with a wall in 1664. The houses built around the Green were rapidly replaced by new buildings in the Georgian style and by the end of the eighteenth century the Green was a place of resort for the better-off of the city. Much of the present-day landscape of the square comprises modern buildings, some in a replica Georgian style, and relatively little survives from the 18th and 19th centuries.

Trinity College, Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
College Green, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

01 896 1000

Trinity College is the sole constituent college of the University of Dublin, a research university in Ireland. The college was founded in 1592 as the "mother" of a new university, modelled after the collegiate universities of Oxford and of Cambridge, but, unlike these, only one college was ever established; as such, the designations "Trinity College" and "University of Dublin" are usually synonymous for practical purposes. It is one of the seven ancient universities of Britain and Ireland, as well as Ireland's oldest university.Originally it was established outside the city walls of Dublin in the buildings of the dissolved Augustinian Priory of All Hallows. Trinity College was set up in part to consolidate the rule of the Tudor monarchy in Ireland, and it was seen as the university of the Protestant Ascendancy for much of its history. Although Catholics and Dissenters had been permitted to enter as early as the end of the XVIII century, certain restrictions on their membership of the college remained until 1873 . From 1871 to 1970, the Catholic Church in Ireland forbade its adherents from attending Trinity College without permission. Women were first admitted to the college as full members in January 1904.

Merrion Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Square
Dublin, Ireland D2

Merrion Square is a Georgian garden square on the southside of Dublin city centre.HistoryThe square was laid out after 1762 and was largely complete by the beginning of the 19th century. The demand for such Georgian townhouse residences south of the River Liffey had been fueled by the decision of the then Earl of Kildare (later the Duke of Leinster) to build his Dublin home on the then undeveloped southside. He constructed the largest aristocratic residence in Dublin, Leinster House, second only to Dublin Castle. As a result of this construction, three new residential squares appeared on the Southside, Merrion Square (facing the garden front of Leinster House), St Stephen's Green and the smallest and last of Dublin's five Georgian squares to be built, Fitzwilliam Square.Aristocrats, bishops and the wealthy sold their northside townhouses and migrated to the new southside developments.LegacyMerrion Square is considered one of the city's finest surviving squares. Three sides are lined with Georgian redbrick townhouses; the West side abuts the grounds of Leinster House (seat of the Oireachtas), Government Buildings, the Natural History Museum and the National Gallery. The central railed-off garden is now a public park.

Iveagh Gardens
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Clonmel Street, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

The Iveagh Gardens is a public park located between Clonmel Street and Upper Hatch Street, near the National Concert Hall in Dublin, Ireland. It is designated as a National Historic Property.HistoryThe site of the gardens was shown in 1756 as Leeson's Fields after Joseph Leeson, 1st Earl of Milltown.Clonmell LawnsIn the late 18th century Lord Milltown leased the land to John Hatch, the principal developer of Harcourt and Hatch Streets. Hatch sold it to The 1st Earl of Clonmell (also known as "Copper-Faced Jack") as his private gardens. The gardens then became known as "Clonmell Lawns" Located on Harcourt Street is Clonmell House that faces on to Clonmell Street which leads into the Iveagh Gardens. A subterranean passage brought the Earl from his house to the gardens without him having to walk over the street. The Wide Streets Commission had planned for Clonmell Street to run through what is now the gardens thereby linking Harcourt Street to the then newly constructed Earlsfort Terrace. However, this passage was not located during archaeological monitoring conducted during the construction of the LUAS.Coburg GardensWhen the 1st Earl died in 1798, his son the 2nd Earl inherited the estate including Clonmell Gardens. The estate was sold in 1810 and the gardens were opened for public use around 1817 and renamed "Coburg Gardens" after the royal family of Saxe-Coburg. Entrance to the park was from the South Side of St Stephen's Green, the "Royal Horse Bazaar".

Iveagh Gardens
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Clonmel Street, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

The Iveagh Gardens is a public park located between Clonmel Street and Upper Hatch Street, near the National Concert Hall in Dublin, Ireland. It is designated as a National Historic Property.HistoryThe site of the gardens was shown in 1756 as Leeson's Fields after Joseph Leeson, 1st Earl of Milltown.Clonmell LawnsIn the late 18th century Lord Milltown leased the land to John Hatch, the principal developer of Harcourt and Hatch Streets. Hatch sold it to The 1st Earl of Clonmell (also known as "Copper-Faced Jack") as his private gardens. The gardens then became known as "Clonmell Lawns" Located on Harcourt Street is Clonmell House that faces on to Clonmell Street which leads into the Iveagh Gardens. A subterranean passage brought the Earl from his house to the gardens without him having to walk over the street. The Wide Streets Commission had planned for Clonmell Street to run through what is now the gardens thereby linking Harcourt Street to the then newly constructed Earlsfort Terrace. However, this passage was not located during archaeological monitoring conducted during the construction of the LUAS.Coburg GardensWhen the 1st Earl died in 1798, his son the 2nd Earl inherited the estate including Clonmell Gardens. The estate was sold in 1810 and the gardens were opened for public use around 1817 and renamed "Coburg Gardens" after the royal family of Saxe-Coburg. Entrance to the park was from the South Side of St Stephen's Green, the "Royal Horse Bazaar".

O'Connell Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Town
Dublin, Ireland 1

O'Connell Bridge is a road bridge spanning the River Liffey in Dublin, and joining O'Connell Street to D'Olier Street, Westmoreland Street and the south quays.HistoryThe original bridge was designed by James Gandon, and built between 1791 and 1794.Originally humped, and narrower, Carlisle bridge was a symmetrical, three semicircular arch structure constructed in granite with a Portland stone balustrade and obelisks on each of the four corners. A keystone head at the apex of the central span symbolises the River Liffey, corresponding to the heads on the Custom House which personify the other great rivers of Ireland.Since 1860,, to improve the streetscape and relieve traffic congestion on the bridge, it was intended to widen Carlisle Bridge to bring it to the same width as 70 metres wide Sackville Street which formed the north side carriageway connection to the Bridge. In 1877-1880 the bridge was reconstructed. As can be seen on orthophotography it spans now 45 m of the Liffey and is about 50 m wide. O'Connell Bridge is said to be unique in Europe as the only traffic bridge wider than it is long.

Mansion House, Dublin
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2, Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

The Mansion House on Dawson Street, Dublin, has been the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin since 1715.FeaturesThe Mansion House's most famous features include the "Round Room", where the First Dáil assembled on 21 January 1919 to proclaim the Irish Declaration of Independence. On 21 January 1969 a special fiftieth anniversary joint session of Dáil Éireann and Seanad Éireann assembled there and was addressed by the then President of Ireland, Éamon de Valera.Externally, the distinctive metal portico over the main door was erected for the visit of Queen Victoria in 1900.Visitors and occupantsIts most famous occupants included Lord Mayors: Daniel O'Connell, nineteenth century nationalist leader Alfie Byrne (1930s), longest serving Lord Mayor in the 800-year history of the office Jim Mitchell (1976–77), the youngest Lord Mayor of Dublin, aged 29, in the history of the office Famous visitors to the mayoral residence include: Prince Rainier III and Princess Grace of Monaco Pope John Paul II Queen Victoria Mother Teresa Nelson Mandela

M.J.O'Neill's
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 Suffolk Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

(01) 679-3656

M.J.O'Neill's is a notable bar and restaurant in central Dublin. It has occupied 2 Suffolk Street and adjacent buildings, continuing round the corner into Church Lane. It is claimed there has been a tavern on the site for some three hundred years. From 1875 it was owned by the Hogan Brothers, until M.J. O’Neill bought and renamed the premises in August 1927.The part in Church Lane was the site of a printing house, where William Butler published The Volunteers Journal and the Irish Herald in 1783, and in 1789 Arthur O’Connor published The Press, supporting Wolfe Tone’s republican views.The corner structure is an impressive four-storey, vaguely of the Arts and Crafts Movement, red-brick and early twentieth century, with prominent Tudor-style projecting bay windows. There is a fine decorated iron three-dials clock on the Suffolk Street frontage. The building is protected and in a conservation area. Now, opposite the Dublin Tourist Centre, it is a fixture on the tourist trail and pub crawls.The house has a mixed clientele. It is directly opposite Andrew Street Post Office, and near the shopping centre of Grafton Street. The discreet Church Lane door is convenient for the Bank of Ireland and other financial establishments in College Green. It is also the pub nearest to the Front Gate of Trinity College, Dublin and therefore attracting Arts undergraduates and academics. The original structure was divided into definite areas: a “cocktail bar” in the corner for the gentry, a public bar off Suffolk Street, and a back bar. In recent years the next-door premises in Church Lane have been added, as a carvery, and the interior has been opened up. A small snug, immediately inside the Church Lane entrance, was the significant venue for the “Fabians” of the early 1960s and for later left-wing students from Trinity College, Dublin.

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (01) 4780888

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre is a large indoor shopping centre located at the top of Grafton Street in the Southside of Dublin City. It is named after St. Stephen's Green, a nearby park (its street address is Stephens Green West).HistoryThe Dandelion Market, well known as the site of U2's earliest gigs and its array of stalls selling punk badges, clothes and posters was situated in the area the shopping centre now resides in. The site had been assembled over the years by the Slazanger family.The market, which closed in 1981, is commemorated with a plaque, while Sinnotts Bar on South King Street is the only part of the original site that remains. Work began on the St. Stephen's Green Shopping Centre in 1985, with the whole project taking three years to complete. The centre officially opened its doors on 8 November 1988.ShopsThe centre has over 100 outlets. Major franchises include Dunnes Stores, Boots, Gamestop and TK Maxx. Examples of other, more independent shops include the gothic and alternative clothes shop Asha, leading Irish men's branded fashion clothing store 'Counterpropaganda' and the wrestling devoted shop Wrestling Mania. It also houses a 'Big & Tall' mans shop called Kingsize Menswear and has a large food court.

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (01) 4780888

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre is a large indoor shopping centre located at the top of Grafton Street in the Southside of Dublin City. It is named after St. Stephen's Green, a nearby park (its street address is Stephens Green West).HistoryThe Dandelion Market, well known as the site of U2's earliest gigs and its array of stalls selling punk badges, clothes and posters was situated in the area the shopping centre now resides in. The site had been assembled over the years by the Slazanger family.The market, which closed in 1981, is commemorated with a plaque, while Sinnotts Bar on South King Street is the only part of the original site that remains. Work began on the St. Stephen's Green Shopping Centre in 1985, with the whole project taking three years to complete. The centre officially opened its doors on 8 November 1988.ShopsThe centre has over 100 outlets. Major franchises include Dunnes Stores, Boots, Gamestop and TK Maxx. Examples of other, more independent shops include the gothic and alternative clothes shop Asha, leading Irish men's branded fashion clothing store 'Counterpropaganda' and the wrestling devoted shop Wrestling Mania. It also houses a 'Big & Tall' mans shop called Kingsize Menswear and has a large food court.

City Hall, Dublin
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D

The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.OverviewLocated at the top of Parliament Street on the city's southern side, it stands next to Dublin Castle, the centre of the British government in Ireland until 1922. The street had been built in 1753, providing a continuation of Capel Street on the north bank of the Liffey, across the newly widened Essex Bridge, and so the exchange ended (and still ends) a long streetscape.The external structure is primarily made out of white Portland stone from a quarry in Dorset. The large size and fine fittings of the Royal exchange, with carved capitals by Simon Vierpyl, and plasterwork by the leading stuccodore Charles Thorpe, reflect the standing and prestige of Dublin in the 18th Century. The neo-classical building contains a central entrance hall or Rotunda, with a large dome supported by twelve columns which are surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants strolled and discussed business meetings.The function of the building was to provide a meeting place for Dublin's businessmen, where they could buy and sell goods and trade bills of exchange. It was also close to the then Customs House that stood on the site of today's Clarence Hotel, making it convenient for overseas merchants. The cost of building the exchange was met by the Parliament of Ireland, and this is reflected by the initials "SPQH", standing for "Senatus PopulusQue Hibernicus", meaning "The senate and people of Ireland" (an Irish version of SPQR).

Ha'penny Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Wellington Quay/Bachelors Walk
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

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Mansion House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

Grafton Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Grafton Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Dáil Éireann
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Leinster House, Kildare Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 618 3000

Fitzwilliam Square
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Fitzwilliam Street Upper
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Fitzwilliam Square is a Georgian garden square in the south of central Dublin, Ireland. It was the last of the five Georgian squares in Dublin to be built, and is the smallest.The square was developed by Richard FitzWilliam, 7th Viscount FitzWilliam, hence the name. It was designed from 1789 and laid out in 1792. The center of the square was enclosed in 1813 through an Act of the Parliament of Ireland. To the north is the much larger Merrion Square, with which Richard FitzWilliam was also involved. The square was a popular place for the Irish Social Season of aristocrats entertaining in Dublin between January and Saint Patrick's Day each year.Shootings took place in the square during Bloody Sunday of 1920. Sir Thomas O'Shaughnessy (1850–1933), the last Recorder of Dublin, lived in Fitzwilliam Square and died there on 7 March 1933.The N11 road passes through the northwest side of the square on its way into central Dublin.In March 2011, the entire space at 14 Fitzwilliam Square was let on a flexible seven-year lease to gold bullion brokers GoldCore.

The Gaeity Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Sth King Street
Dublin, Ireland

Public Places and Attractions Near Natural History Museum

Temple Bar
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland 2

Guinness Brewery
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
St James Gate
Dublin, Ireland

St. James's Gate Brewery is a brewery founded in 1759 in Dublin, Ireland, by Arthur Guinness. The company is now a part of Diageo, a company formed from the merger of Guinness and Grand Metropolitan in 1997. The main product of the brewery is Guinness Draught.Originally leased in 1759 to Arthur Guinness at IR£45 (Irish pounds) per year for 9,000 years, St. James's Gate has been the home of Guinness ever since. It became the largest brewery in Ireland in 1838, and the largest in the world by 1886, with an annual output of 1.2 million barrels. Although no longer the largest brewery in the world, it is still the largest brewer of stout in the world. The company has since bought out the originally leased property, and during the 19th and early 20th centuries the brewery owned most of the buildings in the surrounding area, including many streets of housing for brewery employees, and offices associated with the brewery. The brewery also made all of its own power using its own power plant.There is an attached exhibition on the 250-year-old history of Guinness, called the Guinness Storehouse.HistoryArthur Guinness started brewing ales in Leixlip, County Kildare, and then from 1759 at the St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin. On 31 December he signed a 9,000-year lease at £45 per annum for the unused brewery. However, the lease is no longer in effect because the brewery property has been bought out when it expanded beyond the original 4-acre site.

O'Connell Street
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland

O'Connell Street is Dublin's main thoroughfare. It measures 49 m (54 yds) in width at its southern end, 46 m (50 yds) at the north, and is 500 m (547 yds) in length. During the 17th century it was a narrow street known as Drogheda Street (named after Henry Moore, Earl of Drogheda). It was widened, and renamed 'Sackville Street' (named after Lionel Sackville, 1st Duke of Dorset) in the late 1700s until 1924, when it was renamed in honour of Daniel O'Connell, a nationalist leader of the early 19th century, whose statue stands at the lower end of the street, facing O'Connell Bridge.IntroductionLocated in the heart of Dublin city, O'Connell Street forms part of a grand thoroughfare created in the 18th century that runs through the centre of the capital, O'Connell Bridge, Westmoreland Street, College Green and Dame Street, terminating at City Hall and Dublin Castle. Situated just north of the River Liffey, the street has a fine axial positioning, running close to a north-south orientation. Lined with many handsome buildings, O'Connell Street is the most monumental of Dublin's commercial streets, having been largely rebuilt in the early 20th century following extensive destruction in the struggle for Irish independence and subsequent civil war. It has the air of an imposing 1920s boulevard, with signature stone-faced neoclassical buildings such as Clerys department store complemented by the more subtle grain of elegant bank and retail premises. O'Connell Street Upper by contrast retains something of its original 18th century character, with the western side conforming to original plot widths and some original fabric still intact.

Old Jameson Whiskey Distillery
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 (1) 8072348

Heuston railway station
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
St Johns Road West
Dublin, Ireland Dubli

1850 366 222 / 01 703 3299

Heuston Station is one of Ireland's main railway stations, serving the south, southwest and west. It is operated by Iarnród Éireann, the national railway operator. It also houses the head office of its parent company - Córas Iompair Éireann.HistoryThe station opened on 4 August 1846 as the terminus and headquarters of the Great Southern and Western Railway (GS&WR). It was originally called Kingsbridge Station after the nearby Kings Bridge over the River Liffey. In 1966, on the 50th anniversary of the Easter Rising it was renamed "Heuston Station", in honour of Sean Heuston, an executed leader of the Rising, who had worked in the station's offices.Designed by Sancton Wood, the handsome original buildings remain. The five panels along the front represent, in order: VIII.VIC - being the Act of Parliament that incorporated the GS&WR Coat of Arms of Cork City Coat of Arms of Dublin City Coat of Arms of Limerick City AD. 1844 - being the year of incorporation of the GS&WR Since its renewal (by Quinn Savage Smyth architects and engineers Buro Happold) it includes two branches of Eason's, as well as some dining facilities, including a Supermacs and a pub.

Jervis Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
24-29 Mary Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

+353 1 878 1323

Cliff Of Moher
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Co. Clare
Galway, Ireland

Parnells GAA Club An Cumann Parnell C.L.G
Distance: 3.9 mi Tourist Information
Coolock Village, CoolockTerri
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 5

018481283

Phoenix Park, Dublin
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Dublin 8, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland

Trinity College
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
College Green
Dublin, Ireland

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Clontarf Seafront
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
Clontarf Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

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Science Gallery Dublin
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trinity College, Pearse Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

+353-18964091

In 2008, a car park in a forgotten corner of Dublin was transformed into an experimental space that would bridge art and science, unleashing their combined creative potential. Over 1.9 million visitors to Science Gallery Dublin have experienced exhibitions ranging from living art experiments to materials science, to the future of the human race to the future of play. We develop an ever-changing programme of exhibitions and events fuelled by the expertise of scientists, researchers, students, artists, designers, inventors, creative thinkers and entrepreneurs.

The Quays, Dublin
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
12 Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland Dublin2

01 6713922

Mansion House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

Temple Bar District, Dublin
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland 2

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Botanic Garden Dublin
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
Glasnevin
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

01 804 0300

Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Charlemont House, Parnell Square North
Dublin, Ireland D01 F2X9

+353 (0)1 222 5550

North Circular Road
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
North Circular Road
Dublin, Ireland D1

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Four Courts
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Inns Quay
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 7

The Four Courts is Ireland's main courts building, located on Inns Quay in Dublin. The Four Courts are the location of the Supreme Court, the High Court and the Dublin Circuit Court. Until 2010 the building also housed the Central Criminal Court.Gandon's BuildingWork based on the design of Thomas Cooley for the Public Records Office of Ireland, began in 1776. After his death in 1784 renowned architect James Gandon was appointed to finish the building, which we recognise today as the Four Courts. It was built between 1786 and 1796, while the finishing touches to the arcades and wings were completed in 1802. The lands were previously used by the King's Inns. The building originally housed the four courts of Chancery, King's Bench, Exchequer and Common Pleas, hence the name of the building. A major revision in the court system in the late nineteenth century saw these courts merged into a new High Court of Ireland, but the building has retained its historic name. This courts system remained until 1924, when the new Irish Free State introduced a new courts structure, replacing the High Court of Ireland, the Lord Chief Justice of Ireland and the Lord Chancellor of Ireland with a Supreme Court of Justice presided over by the Chief Justice and a High Court of Justice, presided over by the President of the High Court. In 1961 the words "of justice" were dropped from the names of both courts when they were belatedly re-established consequent upon the enactment of the 1937 Constitution.

St Lukes Hospital
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
highfield rd
Dublin, Ireland 6w

01 4065000

Landmark Near Natural History Museum

Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
21 Upper Merrion Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud is a restaurant in Dublin, Ireland. It is a fine dining restaurant that was awarded one Michelin star in the period 1989–1995 and two stars from 1996–present. Egon Ronay Guide awarded the restaurant one star in the period 1983–1985 and 1987. It was mentioned in the Guide in 1988 and 1989.The restaurant's proprietor is the acclaimed French professional chef, Patrick Guilbaud, who lives in Ireland. Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud claims to be Ireland's most award-winning restaurant. It was established by Guilbaud in 1981 in James's Place East, Dublin 2, before moving to the Merrion Hotel in Upper Merrion Street, Dublin 2. The restaurant was the first in Dublin to receive two Michelin stars and has been praised by The New York Times. It has been named the most expensive restaurant in Dublin.ReviewsIn February 2004, Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud was mentioned in The New York Times, where it was reported that lunch cost $36 and dinner was available for $124. Guilbaud's food was described as "seriously good" and was served in "seriously elegant surroundings", with "reservations advised" by the newspaper. Food on offer included roast quail coated with hazelnuts.

St Andrew's Church, Westland Row, Dublin
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Westland Row
Dublin, Ireland

St. Andrew's Church is a Roman Catholic church located in Westland Row, Dublin, Republic of Ireland. Construction started in 1832, it opened for public worship in 1834 but was not completed until 1837.HistoryThe architect appointed to design the church was John Bolger. However, he used the plans for a previous church, in Townsend Street, which had been designed by James Leeson. Assistance was received from Francis Johnston and James Lever. The roof was by Richard Turner. The exterior of the church has a Doric portico with a statue of St. Andrew, sculpted by John Smyth 1776 - 1840, son of Edward Smyth, d.1812, sculptor of the Riverine heads at the Custom House.On 7 January 1940 ornamentation fell from the ceiling, which prompted an investigation and refurbishment. This started in 1942 when the interior was renovated and painted. All sculptures were restored at the same time.Notable peopleDominic Corrigan (1802-1880), a noted physician, is buried in the crypt of the church.OrganThe organ of St. Andrew's was built by John White of Dublin in 1872. It is a large three manual instrument which originally contained many ranks of orchestral Cavaille-Coll pipework. This is no surprise as John White learned his trade in France. However, during the 1976 rebuild a large number of these were lost in favor of more neo-classical stops. If it were to be restored, the organ would be one of the finest in Dublin.OrganistThe organist of St. Andrew's since October 2011 is Aleksandre Nisse.References and sourcesNotesSourcesGeorge Newenham Wright An Historical Guide to the City of Dublin

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (01) 4780888

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre is a large indoor shopping centre located at the top of Grafton Street in the Southside of Dublin City. It is named after St. Stephen's Green, a nearby park (its street address is Stephens Green West).HistoryThe Dandelion Market, well known as the site of U2's earliest gigs and its array of stalls selling punk badges, clothes and posters was situated in the area the shopping centre now resides in. The site had been assembled over the years by the Slazanger family.The market, which closed in 1981, is commemorated with a plaque, while Sinnotts Bar on South King Street is the only part of the original site that remains. Work began on the St. Stephen's Green Shopping Centre in 1985, with the whole project taking three years to complete. The centre officially opened its doors on 8 November 1988.ShopsThe centre has over 100 outlets. Major franchises include Dunnes Stores, Boots, Gamestop and TK Maxx. Examples of other, more independent shops include the gothic and alternative clothes shop Asha, leading Irish men's branded fashion clothing store 'Counterpropaganda' and the wrestling devoted shop Wrestling Mania. It also houses a 'Big & Tall' mans shop called Kingsize Menswear and has a large food court.

Department of Justice and Equality
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
94 St. Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland

1 602 8202

The Department of Justice and Equality is a department of the Government of Ireland. It is led by the Minister for Justice and Equality who is assisted by two Ministers of State. The department's mission is to maintain and enhance community security and to promote a fairer society in Ireland.Departmental teamMinister for Justice and Equality: Frances Fitzgerald, TDMinister of State for Justice: David Stanton, TDMinister of State for Disability Issues: Finian McGrath, TDSecretary General of the Department: Noel Waters (acting)OverviewThe mission of the Department of Justice and Equality is to maintain and enhance community security and equality through the development of a range of policies and high quality services which underpin:The protection and assertion of human rights and fundamental freedoms consistent with the common goodThe security of the StateAn effective and balanced approach to tackling crime The official headquarters and Ministerial offices of the department are in 94 St Stephen's Green, Dublin 2. Over the years its name has changed several times, with some changes in its role. The department has been known as the following: Department of Home Affairs (1919–1923)Department of Justice (1923–1997)Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform (1997–2010)Department of Justice and Law Reform (2010–2011)Department of Justice and Equality (2011–present) In July 2014 the department embarked on a comprehensive program of change, including the recruitment of a new secretary-general following an independent review.

M.J.O'Neill's
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 Suffolk Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

(01) 679-3656

M.J.O'Neill's is a notable bar and restaurant in central Dublin. It has occupied 2 Suffolk Street and adjacent buildings, continuing round the corner into Church Lane. It is claimed there has been a tavern on the site for some three hundred years. From 1875 it was owned by the Hogan Brothers, until M.J. O’Neill bought and renamed the premises in August 1927.The part in Church Lane was the site of a printing house, where William Butler published The Volunteers Journal and the Irish Herald in 1783, and in 1789 Arthur O’Connor published The Press, supporting Wolfe Tone’s republican views.The corner structure is an impressive four-storey, vaguely of the Arts and Crafts Movement, red-brick and early twentieth century, with prominent Tudor-style projecting bay windows. There is a fine decorated iron three-dials clock on the Suffolk Street frontage. The building is protected and in a conservation area. Now, opposite the Dublin Tourist Centre, it is a fixture on the tourist trail and pub crawls.The house has a mixed clientele. It is directly opposite Andrew Street Post Office, and near the shopping centre of Grafton Street. The discreet Church Lane door is convenient for the Bank of Ireland and other financial establishments in College Green. It is also the pub nearest to the Front Gate of Trinity College, Dublin and therefore attracting Arts undergraduates and academics. The original structure was divided into definite areas: a “cocktail bar” in the corner for the gentry, a public bar off Suffolk Street, and a back bar. In recent years the next-door premises in Church Lane have been added, as a carvery, and the interior has been opened up. A small snug, immediately inside the Church Lane entrance, was the significant venue for the “Fabians” of the early 1960s and for later left-wing students from Trinity College, Dublin.

Iveagh Gardens
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Clonmel Street, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

The Iveagh Gardens is a public park located between Clonmel Street and Upper Hatch Street, near the National Concert Hall in Dublin, Ireland. It is designated as a National Historic Property.HistoryThe site of the gardens was shown in 1756 as Leeson's Fields after Joseph Leeson, 1st Earl of Milltown.Clonmell LawnsIn the late 18th century Lord Milltown leased the land to John Hatch, the principal developer of Harcourt and Hatch Streets. Hatch sold it to The 1st Earl of Clonmell (also known as "Copper-Faced Jack") as his private gardens. The gardens then became known as "Clonmell Lawns" Located on Harcourt Street is Clonmell House that faces on to Clonmell Street which leads into the Iveagh Gardens. A subterranean passage brought the Earl from his house to the gardens without him having to walk over the street. The Wide Streets Commission had planned for Clonmell Street to run through what is now the gardens thereby linking Harcourt Street to the then newly constructed Earlsfort Terrace. However, this passage was not located during archaeological monitoring conducted during the construction of the LUAS.Coburg GardensWhen the 1st Earl died in 1798, his son the 2nd Earl inherited the estate including Clonmell Gardens. The estate was sold in 1810 and the gardens were opened for public use around 1817 and renamed "Coburg Gardens" after the royal family of Saxe-Coburg. Entrance to the park was from the South Side of St Stephen's Green, the "Royal Horse Bazaar".

hydraulix tattoos studio
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
20 DRURY STREET (1st floor)
Dublin, Ireland DUBLIN 2

0862642309

Capital Dock
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Sir John Rogersons Quay
Dublin, Ireland D2

Cut & Sew
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
All City Records, Crow Street, Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland Dubl

085 165 7769

St Mary's Graveyard
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Crumlin
Dublin, Ireland

014562142

The old church of St. Mary's Crumlin stands on a prominent site at the junction of St. Mary's Rd. and St. Agnes Rd, a short distance to the north of the main shopping street of Crumlin village. Archaeological finds have confirmed the existence of pre-historic sites in the area, and in the early medieval period Crumlin was one of four royal manors near Dublin. The St. Mary's site is one of great antiquity, having been occupied by a succession of churches since the twelfth century. Most of the present body of the church dates from the early nineteenth century, but the tower is medieval with a fine early eighteenth century door case.  Surrounding the church is an old graveyard which contains numerous early headstones. The graveyard is enclosed by a high stone wall, probably dating from the eighteenth century, and in the southwest corner is a large shallow vaulted structure which may be a mort-safe, or corpse house employed to deter grave robbers.  In the early twentieth century, Crumlin was a small village well outside the urban spread of Dublin, which provided St. Mary's with only a small congregation. On the completion of the new church, the old church was used as a parish hall for various church societies such as the bowling and badminton clubs and remained in this use until 1994 when the nave and vestry were damaged by fire. Fortunately, the old church has survived as the major landmark of the area and more importantly as a record of the village's long and interesting history.

Radha Shyam Sundar Mondir
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Shyam sundar temple bati road,goswami para,24 parganas(North)
Dublin, Ireland 70011

City Hall, Dublin
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D

The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.OverviewLocated at the top of Parliament Street on the city's southern side, it stands next to Dublin Castle, the centre of the British government in Ireland until 1922. The street had been built in 1753, providing a continuation of Capel Street on the north bank of the Liffey, across the newly widened Essex Bridge, and so the exchange ended (and still ends) a long streetscape.The external structure is primarily made out of white Portland stone from a quarry in Dorset. The large size and fine fittings of the Royal exchange, with carved capitals by Simon Vierpyl, and plasterwork by the leading stuccodore Charles Thorpe, reflect the standing and prestige of Dublin in the 18th Century. The neo-classical building contains a central entrance hall or Rotunda, with a large dome supported by twelve columns which are surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants strolled and discussed business meetings.The function of the building was to provide a meeting place for Dublin's businessmen, where they could buy and sell goods and trade bills of exchange. It was also close to the then Customs House that stood on the site of today's Clarence Hotel, making it convenient for overseas merchants. The cost of building the exchange was met by the Parliament of Ireland, and this is reflected by the initials "SPQH", standing for "Senatus PopulusQue Hibernicus", meaning "The senate and people of Ireland" (an Irish version of SPQR).

Boland's Mill
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
ringsend road
Dublin, Ireland

Boland's Mill is located on the Grand Canal Dock in Dublin, Ireland on Ringsend Road between the inner basin of Grand Canal Dock and Barrow Street. It is currently undergoing a €150 million reconstruction to become Bolands Quay, accommodating new residences, commercial, retail, and civic spaces.The mill site includes a number of buildings. There are two six-storey stone warehouse buildings dating from the 1830s (photo on right), and others on Barrow Street dating from the 1870s. The majority of the complex consists of concrete silos built between the 1940s and 1960s. The mill stopped production in 2001 and the site has been derelict since then. Within the complex of buildings, the older 19th century stone block buildings facing onto Ringsend Road and onto Grand Canal Dock together with two terraced houses on Barrow street are listed as protected buildings by Dublin City Council. The taller concrete silos on the site are not protected structures.The site is in an area dubbed "Silicon Docks" (a reference to Silicon Valley) as it has become an extremely popular location for high-tech multinationals such as Google and Facebook.

Grand Canal Dock
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Grand Canal Quay
Dublin, Ireland

Grand Canal Dock is an area near the city centre of Dublin, in the easternmost part of Dublin 2 and the westernmost part of Ringsend in Dublin 4, surrounding the Grand Canal Docks, an enclosed harbour or docking area between the River Liffey and the Grand Canal. Since 2000 the area has undergone significant redevelopment as part of the Dublin Docklands area redevelopment project.The Grand Canal Dock area is somewhat disputed. It is generally understood to be bounded by the Liffey to the north, South Lotts Road to the east, Grand Canal Street to the south and Macken Street to the west . Grand Canal Dock contains Grand Canal Dock railway station, the national Waterways Ireland Visitor Centre, the U2 Tower site, and a number of notable buildings.The area has been dubbed "Silicon Docks" as it has become an extremely popular location for high-tech multinationals such as Google, Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, Airbnb, and more.

The Italian Quarter
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Bloom's Lane
Dublin, Ireland dublin 1

00353873674027

Spire of Dublin
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

The Spire of Dublin, alternatively titled the Monument of Light, is a large, stainless steel, pin-like monument 121.2m in height, located on the site of the former Nelson's Pillar on O'Connell Street in Dublin, Ireland.DescriptionThe spire was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects, who sought an "Elegant and dynamic simplicity bridging art and technology". The contract was awarded to SIAC-Radley JV and it was manufactured by Radley Engineering of Dungarvan, County Waterford, and erected by SIAC Construction Ltd & GDW Engineering Ltd. The first section was installed on 18 December 2002. Five additional 20m sections were added with the last one installed on 21 January 2003. The spire is an elongated cone of diameter 3m at the base, narrowing to 15cm at the top. Construction of the world's tallest sculpture was delayed because of difficulty in obtaining planning permission and environmental regulations. It is constructed from eight hollow tubes of stainless steel and features a tuned mass damper, designed by engineers Arup, to counteract sway. The steel underwent shot peening to alter the quality of light reflected from it.The pattern around the base of the Spire is based on a core sample of earth and rock formation taken from the ground where the spire stands. The pattern was applied by bead blasting the steel through rubber stencil masks whose patterns were created by water jet cutting based on core sample drawings supplied by the contractor.

Hanover Quay Studios
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Hanover Quay
Dublin, Ireland

to keep updated all fans u2, about all movements of U2 or crew at Hanover Quay Studios!

Jervis Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Jervis Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

The Jervis Shopping Centre is a major shopping centre in Dublin, Ireland. Opened in 1996, the centre is located in the area bordered by Jervis Street, Upper Abbey Street, Mary Street, and Liffey Street.HistoryThe centre was built on a 12,000 m2 former hospital site, which was bought in 1994 at a cost of £5.97 million. The centre was built at a cost of £76 million. Most of the facade of the former Hospital has been retained and incorporated into the Shopping Centre.Although its main entrance is on Mary Street, the centre is named for the Jervis Street Hospital, Dublin on whose site it was built following the hospital's closure in the late 1980s. The existing Marks and Spencer store on Mary Street was incorporated into the new centre, with the other anchor tenants being Quinnsworth and New Look in the unit formerly occupied by Debenhams.The centre is notable in that, as the first major shopping centre opened during the economic boom of the late 1990s, it marked the first appearance of many British 'high street' retailers in the Republic of Ireland. These included Boots, Dixons, Debenhams, Next, and Argos among others, which have gone on to become major names in the main streets of Ireland. This contrasted with existing Irish shopping centres at the time which were usually anchored by local names such as Dunnes, Roches Stores, and Penneys. Not all of the new arrivals were successes: British Home Stores opened a store in 1996 having previously sold all of its Irish interests to Primark; however, the outlet was not a success and was later sold to Heatons.

Ha'penny Bridge, Dublin, Ireland
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Quays
Dublin, Ireland Dublin, Ireland

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Savoy Cinema
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
16-17 Upper O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland

The Savoy Cinema is the oldest operational cinema in Dublin, and it is the preferred cinema in Ireland for film premières.HistoryThe cinema was built in 1929 on the site of the old Granville Hotel. The luxurious auditorium, housing 2,789 seats, opened to the public with the American colour talkie On with the Show. It was altered in 1954 to incorporate a large CinemaScope screen, and showed Ireland's first widescreen feature, The Robe, at the time owned by Odeon Ireland Ltd.It was reported in February 2012 that the cinema was in danger of closing. In the previous decade, audience numbers fell from 740,000 to 250,000 per annum.ScreensThe Savoy is the most altered cinema in Dublin's history, and in 1969 the cinema was converted into a twin cinema. In 1975, the Savoy's restaurant was converted into a third screen, holding 200 seats, followed in 1979 by further sub-divisions, creating five screens in all. In 1988, the cinema was given its sixth screen. In the process, the Savoy had lost a third of its capacity.In 2004, renovation work was carried out, moving the box office from the two booths located on either side of the entrance to what used to be an adjoining shop. The confectionery counter has also been moved many times, but is now at its original location, between the doors of Screen 1.The Advance Screening Room became a seventh screen in 2014.PremièresThe cinema has hosted the Irish premières of many films, most of them having an Irish connection. Films shown here have included Alexander, Once and The Man in the Iron Mask. The cinema is also used during the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival, primarily for big-event screenings such as opening and closing night shows. It also hosts the surprise film, which in 2006 was the first Irish screening of the film, 300.