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Regent's Park tube station, London | Tourist Information


Marylebone Rd
London, United Kingdom NW1 5HT

020 7222 1234

Regent's Park tube station is a London Underground station by Regent's Park. It is on the Bakerloo line, between Baker Street and Oxford Circus. It is located on Marylebone Road between the two arms of Park Crescent in Travelcard Zone 1.HistoryThe station was opened on 10 March 1906 by the Baker Street & Waterloo Railway (BS&WR); in the original parliamentary authority for the construction of the BS&WR no station was allowed at Regent's Park. Permission was granted to add it to the already partially constructed line in 1904.Station designUnlike most of the BS&WR's other stations, Regent's Park has no surface buildings and is accessed from a subway. The station is served by lifts, and between 10 July 2006 and 14 June 2007 it was closed to allow essential refurbishment work on these and other parts of the station. There is also a staircase which can be used which has 96 steps.Nearby points of interest are Regent's Park itself, the Royal Academy of Music, the Royal College of Physicians, Holy Trinity Church, Portland Place and Harley Street.Great Portland Street station is within walking distance to the east for interchanges to the Circle and Metropolitan lines.

Landmark Near Regent's Park tube station

Apsley House
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner, 149 Piccadilly
London, W1J 7

020 7499 5676

Apsley House, also known as Number One, London, is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner, on the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south towards the busy traffic roundabout in the centre of which stands the Wellington Arch. It is a Grade I listed building.It is sometimes referred to as the Wellington Museum. The house is now run by English Heritage and is open to the public as a museum and art gallery, exhibiting 83 paintings from the Spanish royal collection. The 9th Duke of Wellington retains the use of part of the buildings. It is perhaps the only preserved example of an English aristocratic town house from its period. The practice has been to maintain the rooms as far as possible in the original style and decor. It contains the 1st Duke's collection of paintings, porcelain, the silver centrepiece made for the Duke in Portugal, c. 1815, sculpture and furniture. Antonio Canova's heroic marble nude of Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker made 1802–10, holding a gilded Nike in the palm of his right hand, and standing to the raised left hand holding a staff. It was set up for a time in the Louvre and was bought by the Government for Wellington in 1816 (according to Nikolaus Pevsner) and stands in Adam's Stairwell.

Apsley House
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner, 149 Piccadilly
London, W1J 7

020 7499 5676

Apsley House, also known as Number One, London, is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner, on the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south towards the busy traffic roundabout in the centre of which stands the Wellington Arch. It is a Grade I listed building.It is sometimes referred to as the Wellington Museum. The house is now run by English Heritage and is open to the public as a museum and art gallery, exhibiting 83 paintings from the Spanish royal collection. The 9th Duke of Wellington retains the use of part of the buildings. It is perhaps the only preserved example of an English aristocratic town house from its period. The practice has been to maintain the rooms as far as possible in the original style and decor. It contains the 1st Duke's collection of paintings, porcelain, the silver centrepiece made for the Duke in Portugal, c. 1815, sculpture and furniture. Antonio Canova's heroic marble nude of Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker made 1802–10, holding a gilded Nike in the palm of his right hand, and standing to the raised left hand holding a staff. It was set up for a time in the Louvre and was bought by the Government for Wellington in 1816 (according to Nikolaus Pevsner) and stands in Adam's Stairwell.

The Mall, London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, SW1A 1

The Mall is a road in the City of Westminster, central London, between Buckingham Palace at its western end and Trafalgar Square via Admiralty Arch to the east. Before it terminates at Whitehall it is met by Horse Guards Road and Spring Gardens where the Metropolitan Board of Works and London County Council were once based. It is closed to traffic on Sundays, public holidays and on ceremonial occasions.HistoryThe Mall began as a field for playing pall-mall. In the 17th and 18th centuries it was a fashionable promenade, bordered by trees.The Mall was envisioned as a ceremonial route in the early 20th century, matching the creation of similar ceremonial routes in other cities such as Berlin, Mexico City, Oslo, Paris, Saint Petersburg, Vienna and Washington, D.C. These routes were intended to be used for major national ceremonies. As part of the development – designed by Aston Webb – a new façade was constructed for Buckingham Palace, and the Victoria Memorial was erected.

St James's Palace
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

Bridgewater House, Westminster
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
14 Cleveland Row
London, SW1A 1

Bridgewater House is a townhouse located at 14 Cleveland Row in the St James's area of London, England. It is a Grade I listed building.HistoryThe earliest known house on the site was Berkshire House, built in about 1626-27 for Thomas Howard, second son of the Earl of Suffolk and Master of the Horse to Charles I of England when he was Prince of Wales. Howard was later created Earl of Berkshire.After being occupied by Parliamentarian troops in the English Civil War, used for the Portuguese Embassy, and lived in by Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, the house was lived in by Charles II's mistress Barbara Villiers, who was made Duchess of Cleveland in 1670, following which the house was known as Cleveland House. She refaced the old house and added new wings. After being owned for some years by a speculator, the house was sold in 1700 to John Egerton, 3rd Earl of Bridgewater, after which it passed by inheritance until 1948.Cleveland House was re-designed in the Palazzo style by Sir Charles Barry in 1840. The rebuilding was completed and renamed in 1854 for Lord Ellesmere, heir of the 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. It is built in Bath stone with a slate roof in three storeys with a basement.

Bridgewater House, Westminster
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
14 Cleveland Row
London, SW1A 1

Bridgewater House is a townhouse located at 14 Cleveland Row in the St James's area of London, England. It is a Grade I listed building.HistoryThe earliest known house on the site was Berkshire House, built in about 1626-27 for Thomas Howard, second son of the Earl of Suffolk and Master of the Horse to Charles I of England when he was Prince of Wales. Howard was later created Earl of Berkshire.After being occupied by Parliamentarian troops in the English Civil War, used for the Portuguese Embassy, and lived in by Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, the house was lived in by Charles II's mistress Barbara Villiers, who was made Duchess of Cleveland in 1670, following which the house was known as Cleveland House. She refaced the old house and added new wings. After being owned for some years by a speculator, the house was sold in 1700 to John Egerton, 3rd Earl of Bridgewater, after which it passed by inheritance until 1948.Cleveland House was re-designed in the Palazzo style by Sir Charles Barry in 1840. The rebuilding was completed and renamed in 1854 for Lord Ellesmere, heir of the 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. It is built in Bath stone with a slate roof in three storeys with a basement.

Horse Guards
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Horse Guards Parade
London, SW1A 2

020 7930 4832

Horse Guards is a large Grade I listed building in the Palladian style between Whitehall and Horse Guards Parade in London. The first Horse Guards building was built on the site of the former tiltyard of Westminster Palace in 1664. It was demolished in 1749 and was replaced by the current building which was built between 1750 and 1753 by John Vardy after the death of original architect in 1748 William Kent. Horse Guards Road runs north-south on the western boundary of the parade ground, while Horse Guards Avenue runs east from Whitehall on other side of the building, to Victoria Embankment.The building served as the offices of the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces until 1904 when the post was abolished and replaced by the Chief of the General Staff. The Chief of the General staff moved to the Old War Office Building in 1906 and Horse Guards subsequently became the headquarters of two major Army commands: the London District and the Household Cavalry. The building is the formal entrance to St James's Palace via St. James's Park (though this is now entirely symbolic). Only the monarch is allowed to drive through its central archway, or those given a pass (formerly made of ivory).

Park Lane Hotel
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
London, W1J 7

The Sheraton Grand London Park Lane is a 5 Star hotel on Piccadilly, London.The hotel opened in 1927 as The Park Lane Hotel to designs by architects Adie, Button and Partners, in a grand Art Deco style, and was constructed by the developer Sir Bracewell Smith. The building is a fine example with a mansard roof and Portland stone facade. The building is Grade II listed and has 303 bedrooms on eight floors with the front overlooking Green Park towards Buckingham Palace.The hotel was bought by ITT Sheraton in April 1996 for $70 million. ITT Sheraton was itself bought by Starwood Hotels in 1998. Starwood sold their leasehold on the hotel to Sir Richard Sutton’s Settled Estates in 2014, but continues to operate the property, under a long-term management contract. Though the hotel was a Sheraton property from 1996 on, it did not actually begin using the Sheraton name for twenty years, until July 19, 2016, when it was renamed Sheraton Grand London Park Lane upon the completion of a major renovation.The hotel is featured in the films The End of the Affair, The Winds of War and The Golden Compass.

Queen's Chapel
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Savoy Hill
London,

+44 20 7836 7221

The Queen's Chapel is a chapel in central London, England, that was designed by Inigo Jones and built between 1623 and 1625 as an external adjunct to St. James's Palace for Roman Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. It is one of the facilities of the British monarch's personal religious establishment, the Chapel Royal, and should not be confused with the 1540 building known as the Chapel Royal within the palace and just across Marlborough road.HistoryIt was built as a Roman Catholic chapel at a time when the construction of Catholic churches was prohibited in England, and was used by Charles I's Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. From the 1690s it was used by Continental Protestant courtiers. It was built as an integral part of St James's Palace, but when the adjacent private apartments burned down in 1809 they were not replaced and in 1856-57 Marlborough Road was built between the palace and the Queen's Chapel. The result is that physically the chapel now appears to be more part of the Marlborough House complex than of St James's Palace. It became a Chapel Royal again in 1938.Having been taken from the Royal Chapel of All Saints in Windsor Great Park, the body of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother lay at the Queen's Chapel for several days during the preparations for her lying-in-state in Westminster Hall before her ceremonial funeral.

Embassy of Japan, London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Hell on Earth for Dolphins
London,

The Embassy of Japan in London is the diplomatic mission of Japan in the United Kingdom. It occupies a large Victorian building on Piccadilly opposite Green Park, which is Grade II listed.

Hilton London Hyde Park Hotel
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
129 Bayswater Road
London, W2 4RJ

The Hilton London Hyde Park is a hotel situated on Bayswater Road, overlooking Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens in central London. It was opened in July 1999.The building was originally the Coburg Court Hotel, first opened in 1907, and it was later renamed the Coburg Hotel in the early 1960s.The Coburg Hotel was used as a filming location in Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy (1972). Richard Blaney and Babs Milligan check into the Coburg as "Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Wilde". Filming took place at the hotel during September 1971. The interiors of the Coburg Hotel were mostly recreated at Pinewood Studios, except for the policemen's point-of-view shot showing the fire escape, which was filmed by assistant director Colin M. Brewer from a fifth-floor room.The current hotel is the first Hilton Hotels & Resorts hotel in London with a state-of-the-art meeting room featuring an interactive projection and speaker system.

Bavarian Village
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Serpentine Road, Hyde Park
London, W2 2UH

LIKE US http://www.facebook.com/bavarian.village WATCH US http://www.youtube.com/thebavarianvillage

Bonhams London to Brighton Veteran Car Run supported by Hiscox
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Serpentine Road, Hyde Park
London, W2 2UH

The annual November event attracts entrants from all over the globe and for the owners of these highly valuable veteran cars it represents a rare opportunity to take their extraordinary automobiles on the historic 60-mile run from Hyde Park in central London to the seafront on the Sussex resort of Brighton.

Royal Automobile Club
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
89 Pall Mall
London, SW1Y 5NQ

020 7930 2345

The Royal Automobile Club is a British private club and is not to be confused with RAC, an automotive services company, which it formerly owned.It has two club houses: one in London at 89–91 Pall Mall, and the other in the countryside at Woodcote Park, Surrey, next to the City of London Freemen's School. Like many other gentlemen's clubs in London today, the Royal Automobile Club has recently allowed women to be members.HistoryIt was founded on 10 August 1897 as the Automobile Club of Great Britain . The headquarters was originally in a block of flats at 4 Whitehall Court, moving to 119 Piccadilly in 1902.During 1902 the organisation, together with the recently formed Association of Motor Manufactures and Traders campaigned vigorously for the relaxation of speed limits claiming that the 14 mph speed limit imposed by the Locomotives on Highways Act 1896 was 'absurd' and was seldom observed. The organisations, with support from the Prime Minister Arthur Balfour, had considerable influence over the forthcoming Motor Car Act 1903 which originally proposed to remove all speed limits for cars while introducing the offence of driving recklessly. In the face of considerable opposition a speed limit of 20 mph was retained in addition to the creation of the offence of driving recklessly, dangerously or negligently.

Embassy of Kosovo, London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
8 John Street
London, WC1N 2ES

The Embassy of Kosovo in London is the diplomatic mission of Kosovo in the United Kingdom. It is located at 8 John Street, London, WC1N 2ES.

Trafalgar Studios
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
14 Whitehall
London, SW1A 2

Trafalgar Studios, formerly the Whitehall Theatre until 2004, is a West End theatre in Whitehall, near Trafalgar Square, in the City of Westminster, London.Also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation, the building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. Studio 1, the larger of the two spaces with 380 seats, opened on 3 June 2004 with the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Othello. Studio 2, with 100 seats, opened in October 2005 with the play Cyprus.History1930 to 1996The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. It had 634 seats. The theatre opened on 29 September 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre's licensee. In November 1933 Henry Daniell appeared there as Portman in Afterwards. Hackett presented several other plays of his own before leaving in 1934, and the theatre built its reputation for modern comedies throughout the rest of the decade. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the West End. In 1942, The Whitehall Follies, featuring Phyllis Dixey, the first stripper to perform in the theatre district, opened with great fanfare and became an immediate success. Dixey leased the theatre and remained in it for the next five years.

St James's Street
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Spencer House/27 St. James's Pl
London, SW1A 1LE

20-74951771

St James's Street is the principal street in the district of St James's, central London. It runs from Piccadilly downhill to St James's Palace and Pall Mall. The main gatehouse of the palace is at the southern end of the road, and in the 17th century Clarendon House faced down the street across Piccadilly on the site of most of Albemarle Street.St James's Street was built up without an over-all plan but received a boost with Lord St Albans' planned construction of St. James's Square. Today St James's Street contains several of London's best known gentlemen's clubs, such as Brooks's, the Carlton Club and White's, some exclusive shops and various offices. A series of small side streets on its western side lead to some extremely expensive properties overlooking Green Park, including Spencer House and the Royal Over-Seas League at the end of Park Place.Two 18th-century yards survive behind the noble frontages and giant orders of columns or pilasters of the street. One is Blue Ball Yard, with stables built in 1742. The other is Pickering Place, with four informal Georgian brick houses of 1731. Jermyn Street leads off St James's Street to the east. The nearest tube station is Green Park to the west on Piccadilly.

Embassy of Qatar, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
1 South Audley St
London, W1K 1

+442074932200

The Embassy of Qatar at 1 South Audley Street in Mayfair, London is the diplomatic mission of Qatar in the United Kingdom. The embassy is housed in a Grade II listed three storey house designed by the architect Frederick Pepys Cockerell and completed after his death by George Aitchison.The exterior of the house is richly decorated with a terracotta freize depicting putti.Qatar also maintains a Cultural and Military Section at 21 Hertford Street, Mayfair and a Health Section at 30 Collingham Gardens, South Kensington.In 2013 there was a protest outside the embassy against the alleged mistreatment of migrant workers in Qatar.

Embassy of Qatar, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
1 South Audley St
London, W1K 1

+442074932200

The Embassy of Qatar at 1 South Audley Street in Mayfair, London is the diplomatic mission of Qatar in the United Kingdom. The embassy is housed in a Grade II listed three storey house designed by the architect Frederick Pepys Cockerell and completed after his death by George Aitchison.The exterior of the house is richly decorated with a terracotta freize depicting putti.Qatar also maintains a Cultural and Military Section at 21 Hertford Street, Mayfair and a Health Section at 30 Collingham Gardens, South Kensington.In 2013 there was a protest outside the embassy against the alleged mistreatment of migrant workers in Qatar.

High Commission of The Bahamas, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
10 Chesterfield Street
London, W1J 5JL

02074084488

The High Commission of The Bahamas in London is the diplomatic mission of The Bahamas in the United Kingdom.

Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
30 Charles Street
London, W1J 5

+44 (0) 20 7917 3000

The Embassy of Saudi Arabia in London (officially the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia) (السفارة السعودية الملكية في لندن) is the diplomatic mission of Saudi Arabia in the United Kingdom. Saudi Arabia also maintains a Defence Attaché’s Office at 26 Queen's Gate, South Kensington, a Diplomatic Office of the Cultural Bureau at 630 Chiswick High Road, Gunnersbury, a Medical Section at 60 Queen Anne Street, Marylebone, a Commercial Section at 15/16 Queen Street, Mayfair, an Islamic Affairs Section at 2nd Floor, Park Lorne, 111 Park Road, Lisson Grove and an Information Section at 18 Seymour Street, Marylebone.The embassy is situated in Crewe House, a detached mansion designed and constructed by Edward Sheppard in 1730, set in its own grounds. Built in the Georgian style, it is a Grade II* listed building. The house was considerably altered in the late 18th and early 19th-century. Much of its neo-classical interior dates from the early 19th-century, and some of Shepard's original plasterwork ceilings may survive.

Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
30 Charles Street
London, W1J 5

+44 (0) 20 7917 3000

The Embassy of Saudi Arabia in London (officially the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia) (السفارة السعودية الملكية في لندن) is the diplomatic mission of Saudi Arabia in the United Kingdom. Saudi Arabia also maintains a Defence Attaché’s Office at 26 Queen's Gate, South Kensington, a Diplomatic Office of the Cultural Bureau at 630 Chiswick High Road, Gunnersbury, a Medical Section at 60 Queen Anne Street, Marylebone, a Commercial Section at 15/16 Queen Street, Mayfair, an Islamic Affairs Section at 2nd Floor, Park Lorne, 111 Park Road, Lisson Grove and an Information Section at 18 Seymour Street, Marylebone.The embassy is situated in Crewe House, a detached mansion designed and constructed by Edward Sheppard in 1730, set in its own grounds. Built in the Georgian style, it is a Grade II* listed building. The house was considerably altered in the late 18th and early 19th-century. Much of its neo-classical interior dates from the early 19th-century, and some of Shepard's original plasterwork ceilings may survive.

St James's Square
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
St. James's, London, SW1
London, SW1Y 4RB

020 7234 5800

St James's Square is the only square in the exclusive St James's district of the City of Westminster. It has predominantly Georgian and Neo-Georgian architecture and a garden in the centre. For its first two hundred or so years it was one of the three or four most fashionable residential address in London. It is now home to the headquarters of a number of well-known businesses, including BP and Rio Tinto Group; to three private members' clubs, the East India Club, the Canning Club and the Naval and Military Club; to the High Commission of Cyprus; and to the London Library. Also based in the square is the premises of the think tank Chatham House. The square's main feature is an equestrian statue of William III erected in 1808.HistoryIn 1662 Charles II extended a lease over the 45 acres of Pall Mall (St James's) Field held by Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans to 1720 and soon afterwards the earl began to lay out the property for development. The earl petitioned the king that the class of occupants they both hoped to attract to the new district would not take houses without the prospect of eventually acquiring them outright, and in 1665 the king granted the freehold of the site of St. James's Square and some closely adjacent parts of the field to the earl's trustees. The location was convenient for the royal palaces of Whitehall and St James. The houses on the east, north and west sides of the square were soon developed, each of them being constructed separately as was usual at that time.

Wimbledon Village
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
60 High Street
London, SW19

Stephanie Anne Louise Bailey
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Strand, Charing Cross, London E1W3ST
London, E1W3ST

+44 20 7839 7282

The Cockney Sparrow
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Westminster Pier
London,

0800 007 5196

Stepping Stones
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Creighton Avenue, East Finchley
London, SW1A 2

07836 284538

Fun interactive play session accompanied by guitar and violin. Songs, rhymes parachute games, puppets, storytime, bubbles. Suitable for 0-4 years. Tuesdays 10am at East Finchley Baptist Church. Drop-in. Cost £5 (£2.50 siblings).

Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
The Dorchester Hotel, Park Lane,
London, W1K 1QA

020 7629 8888

Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester is a restaurant located in The Dorchester, a hotel in Park Lane, London. It is one of 27 restaurants operated by French chef Alain Ducasse: the head chef is Jean-Philippe Blondet, who replaced Jocelyn Herland in January 2016. Since 2010, it has been one of four UK-sited restaurants to hold three Michelin stars. It opened in 2007 to mixed opinions, but the reviews have since improved.DescriptionAt the time of opening, Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester was one of 27 restaurants around the world operated by Ducasse. He intended the restaurant to have "the modernity of Beige in Tokyo, the seriousness of La Plaza Athénée in Paris and the flavours of Le Louis XV in Monaco meeting the energy of London."The Head Chef was originally intended to be Nicola Canuti, but Canuti was replaced before opening by Jocelyn Herland, who moved from Ducasse's La Plaza Athénée in Paris. Patrick Jouin designed the interior of the restaurant, in light coffee and cream colours. The tables feature ceramic vegetables as centrepieces, handmade butter dishes in pink marble, and Porthault linen tablecloths.The restaurant features a special table for up to six diners called the "Table Lumière", which is surrounded by a thin white curtain which allows diners at the table to view out into the restaurant but prevents other diners from viewing in, and is lit by 4,500 fibre optic lights. Diners who book this table are allowed to select from a choice of tableware and menus, described by the restaurant as being a bespoke dining experience.

Local Business Near Regent's Park tube station

Apsley House
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner, 149 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

020 7499 5676

Apsley House, also known as Number One, London, is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner, on the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south towards the busy traffic roundabout in the centre of which stands the Wellington Arch. It is a Grade I listed building.It is sometimes referred to as the Wellington Museum. The house is now run by English Heritage and is open to the public as a museum and art gallery, exhibiting 83 paintings from the Spanish royal collection. The 9th Duke of Wellington retains the use of part of the buildings. It is perhaps the only preserved example of an English aristocratic town house from its period. The practice has been to maintain the rooms as far as possible in the original style and decor. It contains the 1st Duke's collection of paintings, porcelain, the silver centrepiece made for the Duke in Portugal, c. 1815, sculpture and furniture. Antonio Canova's heroic marble nude of Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker made 1802–10, holding a gilded Nike in the palm of his right hand, and standing to the raised left hand holding a staff. It was set up for a time in the Louvre and was bought by the Government for Wellington in 1816 (according to Nikolaus Pevsner) and stands in Adam's Stairwell.

Scumbag monkey training
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
7 Downing st
London, United Kingdom wc1 1aa

01305 888123

InterContinental London Park Lane
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
1 Hamilton Place
London, United Kingdom W1J 7QY

+442074093131

Wellington Lounge
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
1 Hamilton Pl
London, United Kingdom W1J 7NS

020 7409 3131

The Wellington Lounge The Intercontinental Hotel
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
One Hamilton Place, Park Lane
London, United Kingdom W1J 7QY

02074093131

RAF Club, 128 Piccadilly
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
128 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

Hard Rock Cafe London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
150 Old Park Lane
London, United Kingdom W1K 1

20-76290382

The Mall Royale
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom Sw1

Hyde Park Rose Garden
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park {Hyde Park Corner - - Tube / Bus Stop}.
London, United Kingdom W1K 1

Cookbook Cafe At The Intercontinental Hotel, Park Lane
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
PARK LANE
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

The Mall, London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

The Mall is a road in the City of Westminster, central London, between Buckingham Palace at its western end and Trafalgar Square via Admiralty Arch to the east. Before it terminates at Whitehall it is met by Horse Guards Road and Spring Gardens where the Metropolitan Board of Works and London County Council were once based. It is closed to traffic on Sundays, public holidays and on ceremonial occasions.HistoryThe Mall began as a field for playing pall-mall. In the 17th and 18th centuries it was a fashionable promenade, bordered by trees.The Mall was envisioned as a ceremonial route in the early 20th century, matching the creation of similar ceremonial routes in other cities such as Berlin, Mexico City, Oslo, Paris, Saint Petersburg, Vienna and Washington, D.C. These routes were intended to be used for major national ceremonies. As part of the development – designed by Aston Webb – a new façade was constructed for Buckingham Palace, and the Victoria Memorial was erected.

No.4 Hamilton Place
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
4 Hamilton Place
London, United Kingdom W1J 7BQ

+44 (0)20 7670 4314

No.4 Hamilton Place is as much about exceptional details as it is about an exceptional location. Not only is the building itself listed the bow windows and the baroque staircase are too, though those features are stunning, there is arguably even more delight in the very fine Edwardian details – from the door handles, Louis XVI gilt cornicing and chandeliers, right down to the magnificent window latches. No.4 Hamilton Place may have an air of old luxury, but as far as service, comfort and technology are concerned, our guests demand the highest standards and services.

Royal Aeronautical Society
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
4 Hamilton Place
London, United Kingdom W1J 7BQ

+44 (0) 20 7670 4300

Playboy Club London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
14 Old Park Lane
London, United Kingdom W1K 1

020 7491 8586

The eagerly awaited new gaming and entertainment venue spread over two floors, brings the Iconic Playboy Bunny back to Mayfair, 30 years after she left town. Traditional table games with Bunny dealers coupled with the latest in electronic roulette and slots will be the place to place your bets. The Ground floor has been designed to provide sexy yet sophisticated entertainment. The highly acclaimed Salvatore Calabrese brings a mix of high class cocktails in his self titled bar, a great way to start your evening or end your day. Want something with a little more energy, Baroque has the best of London's table service, naturally served by a Playboy Bunny. Playboy Club London will be exclusive to members and offer the ultimate fora London entertainment venue, 24 hours a day. To register your interest in membership visit www.playboyclublondon.com

Playboy Club Mayfair
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
14 Old Park Lane, London, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom

St James's Palace
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Marlborough Rd, St James's SW1A 1DD
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1BS

Gold Duke Of Edingbrugh Presentations-St James Palace
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Marlborough Road St James's
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1BS

020 7930 4832

The Athenaeum Hotel & Apartments | Luxury 5 Star Hotel In Mayfair
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
116 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7BJ

Horse Guards
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Horse Guards Parade
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

020 7930 4832

Horse Guards is a large Grade I listed building in the Palladian style between Whitehall and Horse Guards Parade in London. The first Horse Guards building was built on the site of the former tiltyard of Westminster Palace in 1664. It was demolished in 1749 and was replaced by the current building which was built between 1750 and 1753 by John Vardy after the death of original architect in 1748 William Kent. Horse Guards Road runs north-south on the western boundary of the parade ground, while Horse Guards Avenue runs east from Whitehall on other side of the building, to Victoria Embankment.The building served as the offices of the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces until 1904 when the post was abolished and replaced by the Chief of the General Staff. The Chief of the General staff moved to the Old War Office Building in 1906 and Horse Guards subsequently became the headquarters of two major Army commands: the London District and the Household Cavalry. The building is the formal entrance to St James's Palace via St. James's Park (though this is now entirely symbolic). Only the monarch is allowed to drive through its central archway, or those given a pass (formerly made of ivory).

Christ Church Mayfair
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
21B Down Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

20-76295885