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18 Stafford Terrace, London | Tourist Information


18 Stafford Terrace
London, United Kingdom W8 7BH

020 7602 3316

From 1875, 18 Stafford Terrace was the home of Punch cartoonist Edward Linley Sambourne, his wife Marion, their two children and their live-in servants. The house gives an insight into the personal lives of the Sambourne family, and also provides a rare example of what was known as an 'Aesthetic interior' or 'House Beautiful' style. The Aesthetic Movement of the late nineteenth century advocated the use of foreign or 'exotic' influences in the decoration of the home'. This can be seen by the various Japanese, Middle-Eastern and Chinese objects throughout the Sambournes' home. After the deaths of Linley and Marion Sambourne, the house was preserved by their descendants. In 1980 it was opened to the public by the Victorian Society. This organisation had been inaugurated at 18 Stafford Terrace in 1958 by the Sambourne's grand-daughter, Anne, 6th Countess of Rosse. In 1989, its ownership passed to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea who now manage this museum

Historical Place Near 18 Stafford Terrace

Madame Tussauds London
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LR
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

0871 894 3000

Kensington Palace
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Kensington Gardens
London, United Kingdom W8 4PX

020 3166 6000

The feminine influence of generations of royal women has shaped this stylish palace and elegant gardens. The birthplace and childhood home of Queen Victoria, the palace first became a royal residence for William and Mary in 1689. Mary felt ‘shut in’ at Whitehall and much preferred her new Kensington home, which was enlarged by Sir Christopher Wren. The famous Orangery, was built in 1704 by Queen Anne, and George II’s wife, Queen Caroline, another keen gardener, added further improvements. Today, the palace houses a stunning permanent display of fashionable and formal dresses, the Royal Ceremonial Dress Collection, which includes Queen Victoria’s wedding dress and dresses worn by Diana, Princess of Wales.

Kensington Gardens
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
1-8 Kensington Gardens Square
London, United Kingdom SW7 5

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Kensington Gardens, once the private gardens of Kensington Palace, are one of the Royal Parks of London, lying immediately to the west of Hyde Park. It is shared between the City of Westminster and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, lying within western central London. The park covers an area of 111ha. The open spaces of Kensington Gardens, Hyde Park, Green Park and St. James's Park together form an almost continuous "green lung" in the heart of London between Kensington and Westminster.Kensington Gardens are Grade I listed on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens.Background and locationKensington Gardens are generally regarded as being the western extent of the neighbouring Hyde Park from which they were originally taken, with West Carriage Drive and the Serpentine Bridge forming the boundary between them. The Gardens are fenced and more formal than Hyde Park. Kensington Gardens are open only during the hours of daylight, whereas Hyde Park is open from 5 am until midnight all year round, which includes many hours of darkness.Kensington Gardens were long regarded as smarter than Hyde Park because of its more private character around Kensington Palace. However, in the late 1800s, Hyde Park was considered the more "fashionable" of the two because of its location nearer to Park Lane and Knightsbridge, adjoining the entrance to central London opposite Wellington Arch and was therefore more crowded.

Kensington Gardens
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1-8 Kensington Gardens Square
London, United Kingdom W2 4BH

0907607025

Marble Arch
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1H 7

870-2427114

Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch and London landmark. The structure was designed by John Nash in 1827 to be the state entrance to the cour d'honneur of Buckingham Palace; it stood near the site of what is today the three bayed, central projection of the palace containing the well known balcony. In 1851 it was relocated and following the widening of Park Lane in the early 1960s is now sited, isolated and incongruously, on a large traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street, Park Lane, and Edgware Road.Historically, only members of the Royal Family and the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery are permitted to pass through the arch; this happens only in ceremonial processions.The arch gives its name to the vicinity of its site, particularly, the southern portion of Edgware Road and also to the nearby underground station.Design and constructionThe design of the arch is based on that of the Arch of Constantine in Rome and the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel in Paris. The arch is faced with Carrara marble with embellishments of marble extracted near Seravezza. John Flaxman was chosen to make the commemorative sculpture. After his death in 1826 the commission was divided between Sir Richard Westmacott, Edward Hodges Baily and J.C.F. Rossi. In 1829, a bronze equestrian statue of George IV was commissioned from Sir Francis Chantrey, with the intention of placing it on top of the arch.

Wellington Arch
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Constitution Hill
London, United Kingdom W1J 7JZ

0207 9302726

Set in the heart of Royal London at Hyde Park Corner, Wellington Arch is a landmark for Londoners and visitors alike and a great addition to a memorable day out in London. The balconies also offer unique views across London and of the Household Cavalry, passing beneath on their way to and from the Changing of the Guard at Horse Guards Parade every morning. It was originally commissioned as a grand outer entrance to Buckingham Palace and moved to its present site in 1882.

Fulham Palace
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
Bishops Avenue (neighbour Bishops Park)
London, United Kingdom SW6 6EA

020 7736 3233

The site of Fulham Palace was occupied during the Neolithic, Iron Age and Roman periods, probably because of its location next to an important Thames crossing. From medieval times or earlier the site was encircled by the longest domestic moat in England. You can see part of the moat as you enter and walk across the bridge at the main entrance of the site. Since 704 AD Fulham Palace has been the property of the Bishops of London. Fulham Palace was the summer home of the bishops. Each bishop had many homes: in the 16th century there were 177 homes for 21 English bishops! This is an indication of the status of bishops in British life. The last bishop to live at the Palace moved out in 1973. Today Fulham Palace is run by Fulham Palace Trust, a registered charity, established in 2011. There is a wealth of things to see and do, from exploring the museum that charts the Palace’s eventful history to having lunch in the Drawing Room Café that looks out onto the beautiful gardens, including the recently restored 18th century Walled Garden. Admission to the Palace and its gardens is free of charge (except for special tours and events). The Palace is available to hire as a stunning venue for weddings, private and corporate events.

BBC Television Centre
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
89 Wood Lane
Shepherds Bush, United Kingdom W12 0DG

02087438000

The BBC Television Centre at White City in west London was the headquarters of BBC Television between 1960 and 2013. Officially opened on 29 June 1960, it is one of the most readily recognisable facilities of its type, having appeared as the backdrop for many BBC programmes. Parts of the building are Grade II listed, including the central ring and Studio 1. Most of the BBC's national television and radio news output came from the Television Centre (TVC) with most recorded television output from the nearby Broadcast Centre at 201 Wood Lane, care of Red Bee Media. Live television events from studios and routing of national and international sporting events took place within the Television Centre before being passed to the Broadcast Centre for transmission.It was announced on 21 September 2010 that the BBC would cease broadcasting from Television Centre in 2013. On 13 June 2011 the BBC announced that the Television Centre was on the market, and that it was "inviting bid proposals from people looking for a conventional, freehold property or those interested in a joint venture", suggesting that it may yet remain connected to the BBC.On 16 July 2012 it was announced that the complex had been sold to property developers Stanhope plc for around £200 million and that the BBC would retain a continued presence at Television Centre through its commercial subsidiaries BBC Studios and Post Production, and BBC Worldwide. BBC Studios and Post Production (relocated to Elstree Studios) was due to move back to Television Centre to operate Studio 1, 2 and 3 in 2015, but it was announced in July 2014 that it had agreed with Stanhope to move back in 2017, at the same time as other key tenants, to enable the most efficient overall site construction programme to take place. BBC Worldwide moved into office space in the Stage 6 building following extensive refurbishment in 2015.

Albert Bridge, London
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Albert Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SW11 4PL

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The Albert Bridge is a road bridge over the River Thames in West London, connecting Chelsea on the north bank to Battersea on the south bank. Designed and built by Rowland Mason Ordish in 1873 as an Ordish–Lefeuvre system modified cable-stayed bridge, it proved to be structurally unsound, so between 1884 and 1887 Sir Joseph Bazalgette incorporated some of the design elements of a suspension bridge. In 1973 the Greater London Council added two concrete piers, which transformed the central span into a simple beam bridge. As a result, today the bridge is an unusual hybrid of three different design styles. It is an English Heritage Grade II* listed building.Built as a toll bridge, it was commercially unsuccessful. Six years after its opening it was taken into public ownership and the tolls were lifted. The tollbooths remained in place and are the only surviving examples of bridge tollbooths in London. Nicknamed "The Trembling Lady" because of its tendency to vibrate when large numbers of people walked over it, the bridge has signs at its entrances that warned troops to break step whilst crossing the bridge.

The Victoria Pub, Paddington
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
10A Strathearn Place
London, United Kingdom W2 2NH

020 7724 1191

About The Victoria was built at the same time as Paddington Station (Around 1838). It was always slightly grander than the surrounding pubs and was used by many of the butlers that served in the large houses in the area. Legend has it that Queen Victoria stopped off on her way to Paddington Station, and after that the pub was named in her honour and appointed in it's rather grand style. Charles Dickens spent time writing "Our Mutual Friend" in the pub, and it also appears in two clips from British Pathe news. After the Second World War it was taken over by some theatrical types that converted the upstairs rooms as you see today. In days gone by there have been many celebrities who have either been regulars, or who have just popped in for a drink. Most recently, we have had guests such as Liam Gallagher and his family, Claudio Ranieri, Ronnie Wood, and Damien Hirst. Keira Knightley used to be a regular, and you’d recognise plenty of other faces enjoying a discreet drink.

Freud Museum London
Distance: 3.4 mi Tourist Information
20 Maresfield Gardens
London, United Kingdom NW3 5SX

++44 (0) 20 7435 2002

The Freud family settled here after fleeing Nazi persecution in Austria in 1938. The centrepiece of the Museum is Freud’s extraordinary study, containing his iconic psychoanalytic couch, countless books and antiquities. The Museum opened in 1986, since when it has developed an international reputation for its collections, research, conferences and contemporary art exhibitions.

Royal Chelsea Hospital Home Of The Chelsea Pensioners
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Royal Hospital Road. Chelsea SW1
London, United Kingdom SW3 4SR

Warwick Castle
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
Castle Hill
Warwick, United Kingdom CV34 4QU

01926 495421

Marble Arch
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
63-79 SEYMOUR STREET
London, United Kingdom W2 2HF

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HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
Du Cane Road
London, United Kingdom W12 0

020 8588 3200

HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs is a Category B men's prison, located in the Wormwood Scrubs area of the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, in inner west London, England. The prison is operated by Her Majesty's Prison Service.History19th CenturyThe initial steps in the winter of 1874 involved the construction of a small prison made of corrugated iron and a temporary shed to serve as a barracks for the warders. Nine specially picked prisoners, all within a year of release, completed the buildings after which 50 more prisoners were brought in who in turn erected a second temporary prison wing. Building then began on the permanent prison, with bricks being manufactured on site. By the summer of 1875 enough bricks had been prepared to build the prison's first block, whose ground floor was finished as winter began. Construction was completed in 1891.WW2During World War II the prison was taken over by the War Department and the prisoners evacuated. It was used as secure office space for the duration of hostilities and housed MI5 and MI8.Modern eraIn 1979, IRA prisoners staged a rooftop protest over visiting rights. 60 inmates and several prison officers were injured. In 1982, an inquiry blamed much of the difficulties on failings in prison management. The governor, John McCarthy, had quit before the rioting. He had described Wormwood Scrubs as a "penal dustbin" in a letter to The Times.

Portsmouth Harbour
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
guwharf quays
Portsmouth, United Kingdom PO1 3

Leighton House Museum
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
12 Holland Park Road
London, United Kingdom W14 8LZ

+44 (0) 20 7602 3316

Located on the edge of Holland Park in Kensington, Leighton House Museum is the former home of the Victorian artist Frederic, Lord Leighton (1830-1896). The only purpose-built studio-house open to the public in the United Kingdom, it is one of the most remarkable buildings of the nineteenth century, containing a fascinating collection of paintings and sculpture by Leighton and his contemporaries.

Old Marylebone Town Hall
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
97-113 Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5

020 7641 6000

Marble Arch Tower
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Upper Berkley Street W1 49
London, United Kingdom W1H 7RP

Freddy Mercury House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Garden Lodge, 1 Logan Place
London, United Kingdom W8 6

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History Museum Near 18 Stafford Terrace

Natural History Museum, London
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Cromwell Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 5BD

+44 (0)20 7942 5000

The Natural History Museum in London is a treasure in every way. Join us for updates on our science, collections and all our activities. Read our blogs: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/blogs Get help from our ID experts: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/identification Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NHM_London Watch our films on YouTube: http://youtube.com/naturalhistorymuseum

Natural History Museum Ice Rink
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Cromwell Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 5BD

+44 (0)20 7942 5000

Fulham Palace
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
Bishops Avenue (neighbour Bishops Park)
London, United Kingdom SW6 6EA

020 7736 3233

The site of Fulham Palace was occupied during the Neolithic, Iron Age and Roman periods, probably because of its location next to an important Thames crossing. From medieval times or earlier the site was encircled by the longest domestic moat in England. You can see part of the moat as you enter and walk across the bridge at the main entrance of the site. Since 704 AD Fulham Palace has been the property of the Bishops of London. Fulham Palace was the summer home of the bishops. Each bishop had many homes: in the 16th century there were 177 homes for 21 English bishops! This is an indication of the status of bishops in British life. The last bishop to live at the Palace moved out in 1973. Today Fulham Palace is run by Fulham Palace Trust, a registered charity, established in 2011. There is a wealth of things to see and do, from exploring the museum that charts the Palace’s eventful history to having lunch in the Drawing Room Café that looks out onto the beautiful gardens, including the recently restored 18th century Walled Garden. Admission to the Palace and its gardens is free of charge (except for special tours and events). The Palace is available to hire as a stunning venue for weddings, private and corporate events.

National History Muesem
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Exhibition Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 2

020 7942 5000

Leighton House Museum
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
12 Holland Park Road
London, United Kingdom W14 8NA

020 7602 3316

The Leighton House Museum is a museum in the Holland Park district of Kensington and Chelsea in London. The former home of the painter Frederic, Lord Leighton, it has been open to the public since 1929.The houseBuilt for Leighton by the architect and designer George Aitchison, it is a Grade II* listed building. It is noted for its elaborate Orientalist and aesthetic interiors. It is open to the public daily except Tuesdays, and is a companion museum to 18 Stafford Terrace, another Victorian artist's home in Kensington.The first part of the house (2 Holland Park Road, later renumbered as 12) was designed in 1864 by the architect George Aitchison, although Leighton was not granted a lease on the land until April 1866. Building commenced shortly afterwards, and the house, which cost £4500, was ready for occupation by the end of the year. The building is of red Suffolk bricks with Caen Stone dressings in a restrained classical style.The architect extended the building over 30 years; the first phase was only three windows wide. The main room was the first floor studio, facing north, originally 45 by 25 feet, with a large central window to provide plenty of light for painting. There was also a gallery at the east end, and a separate staircase for use by models. The house was extended to the east in 1869–70. Additionally, a major extension was made in 1877–79: the two-storey "Arab Hall," built to house Leighton's collection of tiles collected during visits to the Middle East.

Greenwich Queen's House
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Romney Rd Greenwich, London SE10 9NF
London, United Kingdom

Freud Museum
Distance: 3.4 mi Tourist Information
20 Maresfield Gardens
London, United Kingdom NW3 5SX

+44 (0)20 7435 2002

The Freud Museum in London is a museum dedicated to Sigmund Freud, who lived there with his family during the last year of his life. In 1938, after escaping Nazi annexation of Austria he came to London via Paris and stayed for a short while at 39 Elsworthy Road before moving to 20 Maresfield Gardens, where the museum is situated. Although he died a year later in the same house, his daughter Anna Freud continued to stay there until her death in 1982. It was her wish that after her death it be converted into a museum. It was opened to the public in July 1986.Freud continued to work in London and it was here that he completed his book Moses and Monotheism. He also maintained his practice in this home and saw a number of his patients for analysis. The centrepiece of the museum is the couch brought from Berggasse 19, Vienna on which his patients were asked to say whatever came to their mind without consciously selecting information, named the free association technique by him.There are two other Freud Museums, one in Vienna, and another in Příbor, the Czech Republic, in the house where Sigmund Freud was born. The latter was opened by president Václav Klaus and four of Freud's great-grandsons.Location and descriptionThe museum is located at 20 Maresfield Gardens in Hampstead, one of London's suburbs.

Lates at the Natural History Museum
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Cromwell Road, SW7 5BD London, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom SW7 5

18 Stafford Terrace
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
18 Stafford Terrace
London, United Kingdom W8 7

020 7602 3316

18 Stafford Terrace, formerly known as Linley Sambourne House, was the home of the Punch illustrator Edward Linley Sambourne (1844–1910) in Kensington, London. The house is currently open to the public as a museum.18 Stafford Terrace was an almost new townhouse when the Sambournes moved in, in 1875. It was Linley Sambourne who set about re-decorating the house in the Aesthetic style. Today the house is a fine example of middle-class Aestheticism; its influences can still be seen permeating throughout the house, from decorative Sunflower motifs in the stained glass windows to the fine selection of William Morris wallpapers that hang within the rooms through to the displayed collection of blue-and-white Chinese import porcelain.LegacyLinley Sambourne died in 1910 but it wasn't until his wife Marion's death four years later that the house passed to their bachelor son Roy. Roy kept the house's interior largely unchanged until his own death in 1946. The house then passed to Roy's sister Maud Messel. Maud already had a large London residence therefore 18 Stafford remained mostly unoccupied and unchanged. In the years leading up to Maud's death in 1960, the house had become increasingly fascinating to her daughter Anne, Countess of Rosse. This fascination led to Anne proposing the foundation of The Victorian Society in 1957, and in turn the continued preservation of the house largely as it had been lived in by Linley.Lady Rosse negotiated the sale of the house to the Greater London Council and the lease to the Victorian Society in 1980; the house was then opened to the public as a museum which included the furniture, art, and decorative schemes retained from its original inhabitants, Linley Sambourne and his household. Following the demise of the Greater London Council the ownership of the house transferred to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1989. The Royal Borough continued to work with the Victorian Society until 2000, when the lease to the Victorian Society wasn't renewed.

Natural History Museum London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
12 Billing Road
London, United Kingdom

Polish Institute & Sikorsi Museum
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
20 Prince's Gate
London, United Kingdom SW7 1PT

+44 (0) 20 7589 9249

Brent Museum and Archives
Distance: 3.5 mi Tourist Information
The Library at Willesden Green
London, United Kingdom NW10 2SF

020 8937 3600, 020 8937 3541

Formerly Grange Museum of Community History, Brent Museum is now based in The Library at Willesden Green. The museum collection consists of thousands of objects relating to the Brent in the past and in the present. Brent Archives hold collections related to the London Borough of Brent and its residents and can help with many local history enquires. The Archives are available Tuesday and Wednesday 9-5, Thursday 1-8 and Saturday 10-5. We hold the records of Brent Council and its predecessors, historical maps and street directories, electoral registers, school records, and an extensive collection of old photographs and postcards. Our local history collections include a large reference collection, and local newspapers dating back to 1870. We also collect the records of local groups and organisations; if you have records you would be interested in donating, please contact us. For our house rules regarding posts and comments please visit - https://www.brent.gov.uk/houserules

V&A Shop
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Cromwell Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 2

020 7942 2696

The Polish Institute and Sikorski Museum
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
20 Prince's Gate
London, United Kingdom SW7 1

020 7589 9249

The Sikorski Museum is located in Princes Gate in London and is a museum that was created by Polish exiles living in London who didn’t want to go back to Poland after World War Two, as it was now under Russian control. The Sikorski Museum contain thousands and thousands of artefacts from the war, and has recently undergone a renovation which has seen all the labels and signage printed in English as well as Polish for the first time ever. The museum is only open for two hours a day during the week (except for Mondays), between two and four in the afternoon, but is well worth a visit, especially for those interested in the Polish contribution to World War Two. Those who are unable to visit in the week can visit on the first Saturday of each month when the museum is open between ten and four. For information in museum opening hours you can call the museum on 0207 589 9249, or visit this webpage for a map of where the museum is based: Polish Institute and Sikorski Museum in London

Kurdish Museum
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
241 King Street
London, United Kingdom W6 9

20-87487874

Museum/Art Gallery Near 18 Stafford Terrace

Leighton House Museum
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
12 Holland Park Road
London, United Kingdom W14 8NA

020 7602 3316

The Leighton House Museum is a museum in the Holland Park district of Kensington and Chelsea in London. The former home of the painter Frederic, Lord Leighton, it has been open to the public since 1929.The houseBuilt for Leighton by the architect and designer George Aitchison, it is a Grade II* listed building. It is noted for its elaborate Orientalist and aesthetic interiors. It is open to the public daily except Tuesdays, and is a companion museum to 18 Stafford Terrace, another Victorian artist's home in Kensington.The first part of the house (2 Holland Park Road, later renumbered as 12) was designed in 1864 by the architect George Aitchison, although Leighton was not granted a lease on the land until April 1866. Building commenced shortly afterwards, and the house, which cost £4500, was ready for occupation by the end of the year. The building is of red Suffolk bricks with Caen Stone dressings in a restrained classical style.The architect extended the building over 30 years; the first phase was only three windows wide. The main room was the first floor studio, facing north, originally 45 by 25 feet, with a large central window to provide plenty of light for painting. There was also a gallery at the east end, and a separate staircase for use by models. The house was extended to the east in 1869–70. Additionally, a major extension was made in 1877–79: the two-storey "Arab Hall," built to house Leighton's collection of tiles collected during visits to the Middle East.

Leighton House Museum
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
12 Holland Park Road
London, United Kingdom W14 8LZ

+44 (0) 20 7602 3316

Located on the edge of Holland Park in Kensington, Leighton House Museum is the former home of the Victorian artist Frederic, Lord Leighton (1830-1896). The only purpose-built studio-house open to the public in the United Kingdom, it is one of the most remarkable buildings of the nineteenth century, containing a fascinating collection of paintings and sculpture by Leighton and his contemporaries.

Richard Young Gallery
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
4 Holland Street
London, United Kingdom W8 4LT

020 7937 8911

Gallery 19
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
19 Kensington Court Place
London, United Kingdom W8 5BJ

02079377222

French art studio
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
58 Gloucester Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 4QT

020 7584 1821

>french art studio is a London-based art gallery specialised in French contemporary art. The gallery creates a fruitful link between France and the UK by helping talented French artists to gain the international recognition they deserve and by proposing unseen artworks to UK art amateurs - without the hassle of finding them abroad. Our exhibition space is located at the heart of Kensington near Hyde Park, 58 Gloucester Road, London SW7. See you soon!

Cate Gallery
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
35 Gloucester Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 4PL

07532160212

Graduation exhibitions: MA Curating Contemporary Art
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Royal College of Art, Kensington Gore
London, United Kingdom SW7 2EU

Curating Contemporary Art: Graduate Exhibitions Royal College of Art galleries, Kensington Gore, London SW7 2EU Preview: 5 March, 6pm–8pm Open: 6 – 22 March, 11am–5pm daily Free admission Black Box Formula: Black Box Formula is an exhibition of new work by contemporary artists reflecting on the nature of the Black Box, a concept used in technology and social sciences. Artists employ prosthetics, networks and post-human thinking in works displayed in an installation evocative of the Black Box process. Artists include: Zach Blas (US), Harry Sanderson (UK), Lawrence Lek (UK) Hyungkoo Lee (KR) and Young-hae Chang Heavy Industries (US/KR). Echo Chamber: Echo Chamber is a new commission by acclaimed theatre designer Chloe Lamford, currently Royal Court Theatre Associate Artist. The project is a unique collaboration with Lamford, reframing relationships between contemporary art and theatre. The audience is invited into a dystopic future world, a theatrical set where a programme of artists’ interventions, performances and screenings unfold over the course of the exhibition. Artists include: Chloe Lamford (UK), The ARKA Group (UK), Bedwyr Williams (UK), Graeme Thomson & Silvia Maglioni (FR), Louise Hervé & Chloé Maillet (FR), Mark Aerial Waller (UK) and the editors of Living in the Future (UK). statement house (temporary title): An ambitious commission, statement house (temporary title) by French artist Jean-Pascal Flavien continues his international series of houses for living, resting and working. Located outside the RCA’s main entrance, the site-specific structure will host writers engaged in ‘writing the house’. statement house (temporary title) is the artist’s first commission in the UK and will run until 4 May 2015. Artist: Jean-Pascal Flavien (FR). Whose Game Is It?: Whose Game is it? is an exhibition that considers contemporary socio-political questions in a globalised world of disparities and hegemonies. The exhibition asks audiences to reflect on these issues through playful and interactive works including a doughnut-shaped table-tennis table. Artists include: Han Ishu (CN/JP), Lee Wen (SG), Dan Perjovschi (RO), Lia Perjovschi (RO), Raqs Media Collective (IN) and Tintin Wulia (ID/AU).

Oaktree & Tiger Gallery
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
South Kensington
London, United Kingdom

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The Portobello Arts Club. Notting Hill.
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
117 Portobello Road
London, United Kingdom W11 2DY

02072299240

Natural History Museum, London
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Cromwell Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 5BD

+44 (0)20 7942 5000

The Natural History Museum in London is a treasure in every way. Join us for updates on our science, collections and all our activities. Read our blogs: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/blogs Get help from our ID experts: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/identification Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NHM_London Watch our films on YouTube: http://youtube.com/naturalhistorymuseum

Hua Gallery
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Online Art Gallery
London, United Kingdom SW10

Hua Gallery is an online gallery exclusively specialising in contemporary Chinese art. The gallery prides itself on exhibiting fresh and innovative art by established Chinese artists, as well as emerging artists who have not yet gained international recognition. Our mission is to provide a platform from which to engage Western collectors in the vibrant and dynamic art generating from China today. As a bridge to the East, we aim to create a more thorough appreciation for these artists and their ever-evolving talents. Founder and Director: Shanyan Koder

Science Museum
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Exhibition Road, South Kensington
London, United Kingdom SW7 2DD

020 7942 4000

Serpentine Galleries
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Kensington Gardens
London, United Kingdom W2 3XA

+44 (0)20 7402 6075

The Serpentine Galleries are one of London’s best-loved galleries for modern and contemporary art. They attract up to 800,000 visitors in any one year and admission is free. In the grounds of the Galleries is a permanent work by artist and poet Ian Hamilton Finlay, dedicated to the Serpentine’s former Patron Diana, Princess of Wales. The work comprises eight benches, a tree-plaque, and a carved stone circle at the Gallery’s entrance. In September 2013, Serpentine Galleries opened its new space, the Serpentine Sackler Gallery. This innovative arts venue for the 21st century is housed in the Grade II-listed building formerly known as The Magazine, situated in Kensington Gardens. In 2016 the Serpentine Pavilion programme expanded to include four Summer Houses in a group show of architecture in the built form. For the second year running the Serpentine, in association with Bloomberg Philanthropies, has opened the Build Your Own Pavilion Challenge, a competition for 8-14 year olds to design and enter their Pavilion models. For more information http://buildyourownpavilion.serpentinegalleries.org/ Getting here Serpentine Gallery Nearest tube stations: Lancaster Gate, Knightsbridge or South Kensington Main bus routes: 9, 10, 52, 94, 148 Serpentine Sackler Gallery Nearest tube stations: Lancaster Gate or Marble Arch Main bus routes: 148, 274, 390 94 Group visits The Serpentine welcomes school, university and community groups to the Galleries on Tuesday through Sunday for self-led visits. All groups must book in advance with the visitor services team. For further information regarding planning a group visit, please visit our group visits page. Parking for vehicles and bicycles There is metered car parking in Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park. There is dedicated cycle parking within the grounds of the Serpentine Sackler Gallery. There are Santander Cycles hire stations on West Carriage Drive near the Serpentine Sackler Gallery and on The Ring near the Serpentine Gallery. Dogs Dogs are not permitted inside the Serpentine Galleries or The Magazine restaurant. There are several dog rings outside the Serpentine Galleries for short visits. Guide dogs are permitted. Accessibility We have full disability access and facilities. Facilities – toilets/baby changing room The Serpentine Galleries have full disability access and facilities. There is a baby changing room located at each Gallery. Refreshments Kofler & Kompanie run a cafe at the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion has a selection of teas, coffees, sandwiches and cakes available daily 10am-6pm until 9 October 2016. The Magazine bar at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery offers visitors a selection of snack items, teas, coffees, cocktails and wine. Opening times vary on a daily basis. Call the bar on 020 7298 7552 for more information.

C A McMillan Fine Arts
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
26 Bute Street
London, United Kingdom SW7 3EX

+44 (0) 20 7581 1111

The McMillan Gallery is a strategically placed, charming fine art gallery which houses 19th and 20th century oil paintings and antique furniture. Subjects vary between landscapes, animals, seascapes, and equestrian paintings. There is always a broad and varied selection of high quality paintings, with new pictures constantly being acquired. , and portrait pictures. One can find our shop in the cultural area of South Kensington, just next to the underground station.

Studio 141
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Talgarth Rd
London, United Kingdom W14 9DA

07738782384

Cadogan Contemporary
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
87 Old Brompton Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 3LD

02075815451

Cadogan Contemporary is a truly independent art gallery. English in sensibility, we have an international appeal.Trading successfully for over 30 years in Chelsea, our client list is as diverse and distinguished as our stock. From quirky realism to pure abstraction, our selection is eclectic but retains an enduring identity. We exhibit many established and critically acclaimed artists but choose each painting for what we think will connect to people. We have evolved with some of our artists who have been with us since the very beginning as well as always being on the lookout for new talent that will bring our gallery forward.

Multiplied
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Christie's South Kensington, 85 Old Brompton Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 3LD

+44 (0)20 7930 6074

The fourth edition of the contemporary art in editions fair, Multiplied, returns to Christie's South Kensington this October. Christie's is pleased to announce forty-one international contemporary galleries will be participating, in what continues to be the UK's only contemporary print fair. Once again the salerooms in South Kensington will be transformed during Frieze week. The fair will be open to the public with free admission from 18-21 October 2013. http://www.multipliedartfair.com

Debut Contemporary
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
82 Westbourne Grove, Notting Hill
London, United Kingdom W2 5RT

+44 020 7221 1651

Be a part of the evolution. Artists can apply through the DEBUT Contemporary website to showcase their work and launch their careers. Collectors, art professionals and businesses can support DEBUT Artists by getting involved. www.debutcontemporary.com Artists have historically found it difficult to access gallery space and professional industry help to assist in pushing their careers in the right direction. lack of professional development in the industry has had a devastating affect in the respect of the loss of creative talent for decades now. DEBUT contemporary's key role is to change that as well as give the rising talent a chance to shine and get a necessary exposure within the right networks. using this flexible platform designed to pass on the industry knowledge with the aim to increase a success rate of artists staying in business. it will also teach all participating artists how to look at their practice as business. enabling then not only to live off their work and make some serious financial gains in the process. We believe it is more important than ever that these creatives are promoted and nurtured and debut contemporary offers a sustainable solution to this problem. we will enable emerging, talented artists to showcase their art in a prime location and with a full service offering that removes all the difficulties of setting-up and running an art business. our simple and affordable "all-inclusive licence fee" allows talented artists to take their first step into the professional art environment without long-term commitments; artists maintain complete control over their creative licences, pricing (with our professional assistance) and profits. DEBUT contemporary not only offers emerging artists an affordable opportunity to succeed in their creative careers, but also looks set to deliver a dynamic and stimulating gallery experience that has not previously been seen, in this particular format. a series of art performances in the gallery window will entice a wider audience to be part of the art world. The DEBUT Contemporary licence fee will entail exhibition space, a 70% net profit from all sales facilitated by the gallery, be it for a piece of art or a commercial deal and most importantly guidance and mentoring by a team of industry professionals. Artists will be prepared with a business savvy mind whilst they maintain their artistic freedom and creative licence.

Jacques Dupres Collection
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
28 Old Brompton Road, Ofc 660
London, United Kingdom SW7 3SS

+44 759 051 5819

Purdy Hicks Gallery
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
25 Thurloe Street, South Kensington
London, United Kingdom SW7 2LQ

+44 (0)20 7401 9229