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Billingsgate Fish Market, Sheffield | Tourist Information


Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom


Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

Landmark Near Billingsgate Fish Market

The Shard London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

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The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group. HOUSE RULES Welcome to The Shard, in the heart of London Bridge. We hope our Facebook page can be a place where our community can feel free to express their feelings and opinions about The Shard or share their experiences with our building, our businesses or our neighbourhood. We welcome feedback, both positive and negative, and we aim to respond to comments that necessitate an answer promptly. Our Facebook house rules are designed to serve as a guideline to ensure our online community can enjoy our Facebook page in a pleasant environment. Guidelines First of all, we ask that you please use polite language and tone at all times. Please be mindful that our page attracts a wide audience and we ask that your comments are respectful and on-topic. It’s the policy of The Shard’s Facebook team that we don’t normally moderate Facebook posts, but we won’t tolerate abusive language, disruptive behaviour or illegal or objectionable content. This includes any material which might be defamatory, offensive, infringing, obscene, lewd, pornographic, violent, abusive, insulting, threatening, harassing, discriminatory, blasphemous, indecent or otherwise unlawful or objectionable. It also includes any material which is aggressive, argumentative or likely to be construed as bullying. No spamming or repetition, please, nor off-topic material in subject-specific threads or areas. We also will not tolerate language, content, postings or links that we consider racist, sexist, homophobic or grossly off-topic. If we consider a posting to fit any of these categories, it will be removed from our Facebook page. Get in Touch There’s a chance we might miss something, so if you are concerned that a user is breaking these rules on our Facebook page, please do let us know. Or if you feel we’ve hidden your post unnecessarily, we’re happy to provide an explanation. You can message us directly via this Facebook page or you can email us via [email protected] And do please keep in mind that the comments expressed within our Facebook page, unless an official post from The Shard, come from you – our community of fans – and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Shard.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

Darwin Brasserie - Sky Garden, the Walkie Talkie Building
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6

0333 772 0020

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

Monument to the Great Fire of London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Monument Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8AH

0207 626 2717

The Monument to the Great Fire of London, more commonly known simply as the Monument, is a Doric column in the City of London, near the northern end of London Bridge, that commemorates the Great Fire of London.It stands at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill, 202 ft (62 m) tall and 202 ft (62 m) from the spot in Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started on 2 September 1666. Another monument, the Golden Boy of Pye Corner, marks the point near Smithfield where the fire was stopped. Constructed between 1671 and 1677, it was built on the site of St. Margaret's, Fish Street, the first church to be burnt down by the Great Fire.The Monument comprises a fluted Doric column built of Portland stone topped with a gilded urn of fire. It was designed by Christopher Wren and Robert Hooke. Its height marks its distance from the site of the shop of Thomas Farynor, the king's baker, where the Great Fire began.The top of the Monument is reached by a narrow winding staircase of 311 steps. A mesh cage was added in the mid-19th century at the top to prevent people jumping off, after six people had committed suicide from the structure between 1788 and 1842.

Southwark Cathedral
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DA

+44 20 7367 6700

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for more than 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since the creation of the diocese of Southwark in 1905.Between 1106 and 1538 it was the church of an Augustinian priory, Southwark Priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a parish church, with the new dedication of St Saviour's. The church was in the diocese of Winchester until 1877, when the parish of St Saviour's, along with other South London parishes, was transferred to the diocese of Rochester. The present building retains the basic form of the Gothic structure built between 1220 and 1420, although the nave is a late 19th-century reconstruction.HistoryLegendary originsThe 16th-century London historian John Stow recorded an account of the origins of the Southwark Priory of St Mary that he had heard from Bartholomew Linsted, who had been the last prior when the priory was dissolved. Linsted claimed it had been founded as a nunnery "long before the Conquest" by a maiden named Mary, on the profits of a ferry across the Thames she had inherited from her parents. Later it was converted into a college of priests by "Swithen, a noble lady". Finally in 1106 it was refounded as an Augustinian priory.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 Battlebridge Lane, Southwark
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

20 Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 6

20 Fenchurch Street is a commercial skyscraper in London that takes its name from its address on Fenchurch Street, in the historic City of London financial district. It has been nicknamed 'The Walkie-Talkie' because of its distinctive shape. Construction was completed in spring 2014, and the top-floor 'sky garden' was opened in January 2015. The 34-storey building is 160m tall, making it the sixth-tallest building in the City of London and the 12th tallest in London.Designed by architect Rafael Viñoly and costing over £200 million, 20 Fenchurch Street features a highly distinctive top-heavy form which appears to burst upward and outward. A large viewing deck, bar and restaurants are included on the top three floors; these are, with restrictions, open to the public.The tower was originally proposed at nearly 200m tall but its design was scaled down after concerns about its visual impact on the nearby St Paul's Cathedral and Tower of London. It was subsequently approved in 2006 with the revised height. Even after the height reduction there were continued concerns from heritage groups about its impact on the surrounding area. The project was consequently the subject of a public inquiry; in 2007 this ruled in the developers' favour and the building was granted full planning permission. In 2015 it was awarded the Carbuncle Cup for the worst new building in the UK in the previous 12 months.

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

The London Stone
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5AD

020 7626 8246

London Stone
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

02076268246

London Stone is a historic landmark traditionally housed at 111 Cannon Street in the City of London. It is an irregular block of oolitic limestone measuring 53 × 43 × 30 cm (21 × 17 × 12"), the remnant of a once much larger object that had stood for many centuries on the south side of the street. Currently the stone is housed at the Museum of London pending reconstruction of the 111 Cannon Street building.The name "London Stone" was first recorded around the year 1100. The date and original purpose of the Stone are unknown, although it is possibly of Roman origin, and there has been interest and speculation about it since at least the 16th century. There are modern claims that it was formerly an object of veneration, or has some occult significance. These assertions however, are completely unsubstantiated.DescriptionThe present London Stone is only the upper portion of a once much larger object, as described below under History. The surviving portion is a block of oolitic limestone approximately 53 cm wide, 43 cm high, and 30 cm front to back (21 × 17 × 12 inches). A study in the 1960s indicated that the stone is Clipsham Limestone, a good-quality stone from Rutland transported to London for building purposes in both the Roman and medieval periods. More recently Kevin Hayward has suggested that it may be Bath stone, the stone most used for monuments and sculpture in early Roman London and in Saxon times.

Lloyd's building
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 7

0845 300 0033

The Lloyd's building is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. It is located on the former site of East India House in Lime Street, in London's main financial district, the City of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior.Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by Historic England to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch".HistoryThe first Lloyd's building had been built on this site in 1928. In 1958, due to expansion of the market, a new building was constructed across the road at 51 Lime Street . Lloyd's now occupied the Heysham Building and the Cooper Building.By the 1970s Lloyd's had again outgrown these two buildings and proposed to extend the Cooper Building. In 1978, the corporation ran an architectural competition which attracted designs from practices such as Foster Associates, Arup and I.M. Pei. Lloyd's commissioned Richard Rogers to redevelop the site, and the original 1928 building on the western corner of Lime and Leadenhall Streets was demolished to make way for the present one which was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 18 November 1986. The 1928 building's entrance at 12 Leadenhall Street was preserved and forms a rather incongruous attachment to the 1986 structure. Demolition of the 1958 building commenced in 2004 to make way for the 26-storey Willis Building.

Lloyd's building
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 7

0845 300 0033

The Lloyd's building is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. It is located on the former site of East India House in Lime Street, in London's main financial district, the City of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior.Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by Historic England to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch".HistoryThe first Lloyd's building had been built on this site in 1928. In 1958, due to expansion of the market, a new building was constructed across the road at 51 Lime Street . Lloyd's now occupied the Heysham Building and the Cooper Building.By the 1970s Lloyd's had again outgrown these two buildings and proposed to extend the Cooper Building. In 1978, the corporation ran an architectural competition which attracted designs from practices such as Foster Associates, Arup and I.M. Pei. Lloyd's commissioned Richard Rogers to redevelop the site, and the original 1928 building on the western corner of Lime and Leadenhall Streets was demolished to make way for the present one which was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 18 November 1986. The 1928 building's entrance at 12 Leadenhall Street was preserved and forms a rather incongruous attachment to the 1986 structure. Demolition of the 1958 building commenced in 2004 to make way for the 26-storey Willis Building.

Fishmongers Hall
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9EL

0207 626 3531

Tower Hill Memorial
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2 St Mary at Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7283 9504

The Tower Hill Memorial is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission war memorial on the south side of Trinity Square Gardens, in London, England. The memorial commemorates those from the Merchant Navy and fishing fleets who died during both world wars and have "no grave but the sea". The memorial was designed by Edwin Lutyens with sculpture work by William Reid Dick, the Second World War extension was designed by Edward Maufe with sculpture work by Charles Wheeler.The First World War memorial takes the form of a vaulted corridor, long, wide and high. Inside are 12 bronze plaques engraved with 12,000 names. Those commemorated include Victoria Cross recipient, Archibald Bisset Smith.The Second World War memorial takes the form of a semi-circular sunken garden located behind the corridor, to its north. It contains the names of 24,000 British seamen and 50 Australian seamen, listed on the walls of the sunken garden. In the centre of the garden is a pool of bronze, engraved with a compass pointing north. Between the two memorials are two columns with statues representing an officer (western column) and a seaman (eastern).

Cannon Street Railway Bridge
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
103 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5AG

020 7929 0831

Cannon Street Railway Bridge is a bridge in central London, crossing the River Thames. Downstream, the next bridge is London Bridge, and upstream Southwark Bridge. It carries trains over the river to Cannon Street station on the north bank. It was originally named Alexandra Bridge after Alexandra of Denmark who was the wife of the future King Edward VII.The bridge was designed by John Hawkshaw and John Wolfe-Barry for the South Eastern Railway. It was opened in 1866 after three years of construction. In its original form, it carried the railway over the Thames on five spans standing on cast-iron Doric pillars. It was subsequently widened between 1886–93 by Francis Brady and extensively renovated by British Rail between 1979–82, which resulted in many of its ornamental features being removed and the structure taking on an even more utilitarian appearance than before.It was the scene of the Marchioness disaster in 1989.

Hays Galleria
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Battle Bridge Lane
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

St Magnus-the-Martyr
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Lower Thames Street EC3R 6DN
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6

020 7626 4481

St Magnus the Martyr, London Bridge is a Church of England church and parish within the City of London. The church, which is located in Lower Thames Street near The Monument to the Great Fire of London, is part of the Diocese of London and under the pastoral care of the Bishop of London and the Bishop of Fulham. It is a Grade I listed building. The rector uses the title "Cardinal Rector", being one of three clerics in the Church of England to use the title Cardinal.St Magnus lies on the original alignment of London Bridge between the City and Southwark. The ancient parish was united with that of St Margaret, New Fish Street, in 1670 and with that of St Michael, Crooked Lane, in 1831. The three united parishes retained separate vestries and churchwardens. Parish clerks continue to be appointed for each of the three parishes.St Magnus is the guild church of the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers and the Worshipful Company of Plumbers, and the ward church of the Ward of Bridge and Bridge Without. It is also twinned with the Church of the Resurrection in New York City.

The Shard
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group.

Elements
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
10 Pepys St
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2NR

020 7265 6000

Landmark Near Billingsgate Fish Market

The Shard London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

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The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group. HOUSE RULES Welcome to The Shard, in the heart of London Bridge. We hope our Facebook page can be a place where our community can feel free to express their feelings and opinions about The Shard or share their experiences with our building, our businesses or our neighbourhood. We welcome feedback, both positive and negative, and we aim to respond to comments that necessitate an answer promptly. Our Facebook house rules are designed to serve as a guideline to ensure our online community can enjoy our Facebook page in a pleasant environment. Guidelines First of all, we ask that you please use polite language and tone at all times. Please be mindful that our page attracts a wide audience and we ask that your comments are respectful and on-topic. It’s the policy of The Shard’s Facebook team that we don’t normally moderate Facebook posts, but we won’t tolerate abusive language, disruptive behaviour or illegal or objectionable content. This includes any material which might be defamatory, offensive, infringing, obscene, lewd, pornographic, violent, abusive, insulting, threatening, harassing, discriminatory, blasphemous, indecent or otherwise unlawful or objectionable. It also includes any material which is aggressive, argumentative or likely to be construed as bullying. No spamming or repetition, please, nor off-topic material in subject-specific threads or areas. We also will not tolerate language, content, postings or links that we consider racist, sexist, homophobic or grossly off-topic. If we consider a posting to fit any of these categories, it will be removed from our Facebook page. Get in Touch There’s a chance we might miss something, so if you are concerned that a user is breaking these rules on our Facebook page, please do let us know. Or if you feel we’ve hidden your post unnecessarily, we’re happy to provide an explanation. You can message us directly via this Facebook page or you can email us via [email protected] And do please keep in mind that the comments expressed within our Facebook page, unless an official post from The Shard, come from you – our community of fans – and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Shard.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

Darwin Brasserie - Sky Garden, the Walkie Talkie Building
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6

0333 772 0020

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

Monument to the Great Fire of London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Monument Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8AH

0207 626 2717

The Monument to the Great Fire of London, more commonly known simply as the Monument, is a Doric column in the City of London, near the northern end of London Bridge, that commemorates the Great Fire of London.It stands at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill, 202 ft (62 m) tall and 202 ft (62 m) from the spot in Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started on 2 September 1666. Another monument, the Golden Boy of Pye Corner, marks the point near Smithfield where the fire was stopped. Constructed between 1671 and 1677, it was built on the site of St. Margaret's, Fish Street, the first church to be burnt down by the Great Fire.The Monument comprises a fluted Doric column built of Portland stone topped with a gilded urn of fire. It was designed by Christopher Wren and Robert Hooke. Its height marks its distance from the site of the shop of Thomas Farynor, the king's baker, where the Great Fire began.The top of the Monument is reached by a narrow winding staircase of 311 steps. A mesh cage was added in the mid-19th century at the top to prevent people jumping off, after six people had committed suicide from the structure between 1788 and 1842.

Southwark Cathedral
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DA

+44 20 7367 6700

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for more than 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since the creation of the diocese of Southwark in 1905.Between 1106 and 1538 it was the church of an Augustinian priory, Southwark Priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a parish church, with the new dedication of St Saviour's. The church was in the diocese of Winchester until 1877, when the parish of St Saviour's, along with other South London parishes, was transferred to the diocese of Rochester. The present building retains the basic form of the Gothic structure built between 1220 and 1420, although the nave is a late 19th-century reconstruction.HistoryLegendary originsThe 16th-century London historian John Stow recorded an account of the origins of the Southwark Priory of St Mary that he had heard from Bartholomew Linsted, who had been the last prior when the priory was dissolved. Linsted claimed it had been founded as a nunnery "long before the Conquest" by a maiden named Mary, on the profits of a ferry across the Thames she had inherited from her parents. Later it was converted into a college of priests by "Swithen, a noble lady". Finally in 1106 it was refounded as an Augustinian priory.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 Battlebridge Lane, Southwark
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

20 Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 6

20 Fenchurch Street is a commercial skyscraper in London that takes its name from its address on Fenchurch Street, in the historic City of London financial district. It has been nicknamed 'The Walkie-Talkie' because of its distinctive shape. Construction was completed in spring 2014, and the top-floor 'sky garden' was opened in January 2015. The 34-storey building is 160m tall, making it the sixth-tallest building in the City of London and the 12th tallest in London.Designed by architect Rafael Viñoly and costing over £200 million, 20 Fenchurch Street features a highly distinctive top-heavy form which appears to burst upward and outward. A large viewing deck, bar and restaurants are included on the top three floors; these are, with restrictions, open to the public.The tower was originally proposed at nearly 200m tall but its design was scaled down after concerns about its visual impact on the nearby St Paul's Cathedral and Tower of London. It was subsequently approved in 2006 with the revised height. Even after the height reduction there were continued concerns from heritage groups about its impact on the surrounding area. The project was consequently the subject of a public inquiry; in 2007 this ruled in the developers' favour and the building was granted full planning permission. In 2015 it was awarded the Carbuncle Cup for the worst new building in the UK in the previous 12 months.

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

The London Stone
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5AD

020 7626 8246

London Stone
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

02076268246

London Stone is a historic landmark traditionally housed at 111 Cannon Street in the City of London. It is an irregular block of oolitic limestone measuring 53 × 43 × 30 cm (21 × 17 × 12"), the remnant of a once much larger object that had stood for many centuries on the south side of the street. Currently the stone is housed at the Museum of London pending reconstruction of the 111 Cannon Street building.The name "London Stone" was first recorded around the year 1100. The date and original purpose of the Stone are unknown, although it is possibly of Roman origin, and there has been interest and speculation about it since at least the 16th century. There are modern claims that it was formerly an object of veneration, or has some occult significance. These assertions however, are completely unsubstantiated.DescriptionThe present London Stone is only the upper portion of a once much larger object, as described below under History. The surviving portion is a block of oolitic limestone approximately 53 cm wide, 43 cm high, and 30 cm front to back (21 × 17 × 12 inches). A study in the 1960s indicated that the stone is Clipsham Limestone, a good-quality stone from Rutland transported to London for building purposes in both the Roman and medieval periods. More recently Kevin Hayward has suggested that it may be Bath stone, the stone most used for monuments and sculpture in early Roman London and in Saxon times.

Lloyd's building
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 7

0845 300 0033

The Lloyd's building is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. It is located on the former site of East India House in Lime Street, in London's main financial district, the City of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior.Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by Historic England to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch".HistoryThe first Lloyd's building had been built on this site in 1928. In 1958, due to expansion of the market, a new building was constructed across the road at 51 Lime Street . Lloyd's now occupied the Heysham Building and the Cooper Building.By the 1970s Lloyd's had again outgrown these two buildings and proposed to extend the Cooper Building. In 1978, the corporation ran an architectural competition which attracted designs from practices such as Foster Associates, Arup and I.M. Pei. Lloyd's commissioned Richard Rogers to redevelop the site, and the original 1928 building on the western corner of Lime and Leadenhall Streets was demolished to make way for the present one which was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 18 November 1986. The 1928 building's entrance at 12 Leadenhall Street was preserved and forms a rather incongruous attachment to the 1986 structure. Demolition of the 1958 building commenced in 2004 to make way for the 26-storey Willis Building.

Lloyd's building
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 7

0845 300 0033

The Lloyd's building is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. It is located on the former site of East India House in Lime Street, in London's main financial district, the City of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior.Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by Historic England to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch".HistoryThe first Lloyd's building had been built on this site in 1928. In 1958, due to expansion of the market, a new building was constructed across the road at 51 Lime Street . Lloyd's now occupied the Heysham Building and the Cooper Building.By the 1970s Lloyd's had again outgrown these two buildings and proposed to extend the Cooper Building. In 1978, the corporation ran an architectural competition which attracted designs from practices such as Foster Associates, Arup and I.M. Pei. Lloyd's commissioned Richard Rogers to redevelop the site, and the original 1928 building on the western corner of Lime and Leadenhall Streets was demolished to make way for the present one which was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 18 November 1986. The 1928 building's entrance at 12 Leadenhall Street was preserved and forms a rather incongruous attachment to the 1986 structure. Demolition of the 1958 building commenced in 2004 to make way for the 26-storey Willis Building.

Fishmongers Hall
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9EL

0207 626 3531

Tower Hill Memorial
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2 St Mary at Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7283 9504

The Tower Hill Memorial is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission war memorial on the south side of Trinity Square Gardens, in London, England. The memorial commemorates those from the Merchant Navy and fishing fleets who died during both world wars and have "no grave but the sea". The memorial was designed by Edwin Lutyens with sculpture work by William Reid Dick, the Second World War extension was designed by Edward Maufe with sculpture work by Charles Wheeler.The First World War memorial takes the form of a vaulted corridor, long, wide and high. Inside are 12 bronze plaques engraved with 12,000 names. Those commemorated include Victoria Cross recipient, Archibald Bisset Smith.The Second World War memorial takes the form of a semi-circular sunken garden located behind the corridor, to its north. It contains the names of 24,000 British seamen and 50 Australian seamen, listed on the walls of the sunken garden. In the centre of the garden is a pool of bronze, engraved with a compass pointing north. Between the two memorials are two columns with statues representing an officer (western column) and a seaman (eastern).

Cannon Street Railway Bridge
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
103 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5AG

020 7929 0831

Cannon Street Railway Bridge is a bridge in central London, crossing the River Thames. Downstream, the next bridge is London Bridge, and upstream Southwark Bridge. It carries trains over the river to Cannon Street station on the north bank. It was originally named Alexandra Bridge after Alexandra of Denmark who was the wife of the future King Edward VII.The bridge was designed by John Hawkshaw and John Wolfe-Barry for the South Eastern Railway. It was opened in 1866 after three years of construction. In its original form, it carried the railway over the Thames on five spans standing on cast-iron Doric pillars. It was subsequently widened between 1886–93 by Francis Brady and extensively renovated by British Rail between 1979–82, which resulted in many of its ornamental features being removed and the structure taking on an even more utilitarian appearance than before.It was the scene of the Marchioness disaster in 1989.

Hays Galleria
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Battle Bridge Lane
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

St Magnus-the-Martyr
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Lower Thames Street EC3R 6DN
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6

020 7626 4481

St Magnus the Martyr, London Bridge is a Church of England church and parish within the City of London. The church, which is located in Lower Thames Street near The Monument to the Great Fire of London, is part of the Diocese of London and under the pastoral care of the Bishop of London and the Bishop of Fulham. It is a Grade I listed building. The rector uses the title "Cardinal Rector", being one of three clerics in the Church of England to use the title Cardinal.St Magnus lies on the original alignment of London Bridge between the City and Southwark. The ancient parish was united with that of St Margaret, New Fish Street, in 1670 and with that of St Michael, Crooked Lane, in 1831. The three united parishes retained separate vestries and churchwardens. Parish clerks continue to be appointed for each of the three parishes.St Magnus is the guild church of the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers and the Worshipful Company of Plumbers, and the ward church of the Ward of Bridge and Bridge Without. It is also twinned with the Church of the Resurrection in New York City.

The Shard
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group.

Elements
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
10 Pepys St
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2NR

020 7265 6000

Market Near Billingsgate Fish Market

Borough Market
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1TL

+44 (0) 20 7407 1002

Community Guidelines We love to hear from our friends and visitors and encourage you all to post your photos and experiences about Borough Market. And if you ask us a question, we'll do our very best to answer it! The Page is not the place to advertise your own page or something that's not related to Borough Market. If you do, then we're sorry, but we'll remove your post. Likewise if you post spam or abusive messages, your post will be removed and you may be banned from our Page. If you're unhappy at anytime with the service or experience you have at the Market, you can email us directly at [email protected] You can find out more about our complaints procedure on our website: http://boroughmarket.org.uk/page/complaints-procedure. Thanks for following us on Facebook - we hope you enjoy our updates!

Brick Lane Market
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Brick Lane
London, United Kingdom E1 6SB

Covent Garden
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
41 The Market
London, United Kingdom WC2B 5

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Covent Garden is a district in London on the eastern fringes of the West End, between St. Martin's Lane and Drury Lane. It is associated with the former fruit-and-vegetable market in the central square, now a popular shopping and tourist site, and with the Royal Opera House, which is also known as "Covent Garden". The district is divided by the main thoroughfare of Long Acre, north of which is given over to independent shops centred on Neal's Yard and Seven Dials, while the south contains the central square with its street performers and most of the elegant buildings, theatres and entertainment facilities, including the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane and the London Transport Museum.The area was fields, settled in the 7th century when it became the heart of the Anglo-Saxon trading town of Lundenwic, then returned to fields after Lundenwic was abandoned at the end of the 9th century. By 1201 part of it had been walled off by Westminster Abbey for use as arable land and orchards. Referred to as "the garden of the Abbey and Convent", and later "the Covent Garden", it was seized by Henry VIII and granted to the Earls of Bedford in 1552. The 4th Earl commissioned Inigo Jones to build some fine houses to attract wealthy tenants. Jones designed the Italianate arcaded square along with the church of St Paul's. The design of the square was new to London and had a significant influence on modern town planning, acting as the prototype for new estates as London grew.

Old Spitalfields Market
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
105a Commercial St
London, United Kingdom E1 6BG

0207 247 8556

One of London’s iconic Victorian market halls set in a historic location, sitting proudly where east meets west. Firmly established as a ‘must visit’ London attraction for Londoners and visitors alike, the market offers a mix of Victorian charm and contemporary architecture, bringing together an exciting collection of restaurants, shops and market stalls each day. From McQ's flagship store and the one-off vintage line at Belstaff to awarding-winning restaurants like Blixen and Nuno Mendes' casual Taberna do Mercado, Old Spitalfields Market brings together the most original concepts from the best operators. Something for everyone.

Covent Garden & Picadilly Circus
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
Covent Garden
London, United Kingdom WC2H 0

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Columbia Road Flower Market
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
3 Ezra St, Tower Hamlets
London, United Kingdom E2 7

20-77394518

Columbia Road Flower Market is a street market in East London, England. Columbia Road is a road of Victorian shops off Hackney Road in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. The market is open on Sundays only.HistoryColumbia Market was built upon an area known as Nova Scotia Gardens. This had been a brick field, north-east of St Leonard's, Shoreditch, the brick clay had been exhausted and the area begun to be filled in with waste (leystall). Cottages (probably evolving from sheds, serving the gardens), came to be built here, but were undesirable as they remained below ground level, and so were prone to flooding.London Burkers In July 1830, John Bishop and Thomas Williams rented no. 3 Nova Scotia Garden, from a Sarah Trueby. Together with Michael Shields, a Covent Garden porter, and James May, also known as Jack Stirabout and Black Eyed Jack, they formed a notorious gang of Resurrection men, stealing freshly buried bodies for sale to anatomists. On 7 November 1831 the suspiciously fresh corpse of a 14-year-old boy was delivered, by these men, to the King's College School of Anatomy, in the Strand. Joseph Sadler Thomas, a superintendent of police, searched the cottages at Nova Scotia Gardens, and found items of clothing in a well in one of the gardens, and also in one of the privies, suggesting multiple murders. The Resurrection men were arrested, and by an extraordinary arrangement, the police opened the premises for viewing, charging 5 shillings. The public carried away the dwelling, piece by piece, as souvenirs. Bishop and Williams were hanged at Newgate on 5 December 1831 for the murder. The police had tentatively identified the body as that of Carlo Ferrari, an Italian boy, from Piedmont, but at their trial Bishop and Williams admitted it to be that of a Lincolnshire cattle drover, on his way to Smithfield.

Spitalfields E1
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Spitalfields Market E1, Brushfield Street
London, United Kingdom E1 6AA

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Spitalfields markets, shops and restaurants - one-off, handmade and individual - just like you. Open 7 days a week.

The Breakfast Club, Spitalfields
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
12-16 Artillery Lane
London, United Kingdom E1 7LS

02070789633

For friends to get together in the morning for a nice breakfast and start a brand new and beautiful day together. MEMBERS ONLY CLUB

Columbia Road Flower Market
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
Columbia Road
London, United Kingdom E2 7RG

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Smithfield, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
31-32 Watling St
London, United Kingdom EC1A 2

020 7248 3151

Smithfield is a locality in the ward of Farringdon Without situated at the City of London's northwest in central London, England. The principal street of the area is West Smithfield.A number of valued City institutions are located in the area, such as St Bartholomew's Hospital, the Charterhouse, and Livery Halls notably those of the Butchers' and Haberdashers' Companies, but Smithfield is best known for its ancient meat market, dating from the 10th century, which is now London's only remaining wholesale market in continuous operation since medieval times. The area also contains London's oldest surviving church, St Bartholomew-the-Great, founded in 1123 AD.Smithfield has borne witness to many bloody executions of heretics and political rebels over the centuries, including major historical figures such as Scottish patriot Sir William Wallace and Wat Tyler, leader of the Peasants' Revolt, among many other religious reformers and dissenters.

The Southwark Tavern
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
22 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1TU

0207 403 0257

With Borough Market as a neighbour, catering for every taste at The Southwark Tavern comes part and parcel with the local territory. From the extensive range of hop-based beverages on our pumps to the multitude of nooks and crannies to discover, it's easy to get lost in the inimitable charm of this 150-year-old pub. While away the hours over something tempting from our seasonal pub food menu in a cosy candle-lit corner, claim your own 'prison cell' downstairs or perch by the bar and savour the unique atmosphere of this true South London institution. Six real ales, 22 speciality draught beers & lagers Weekly Wine Club & quiz night Saturday brunch - perfect for before or after the market Best Bloody Marys in Borough always available Traditional Sunday roasts

Whitecross Street Market
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Whitecross Street
London, United Kingdom EC1Y 8NS

020 7527 3830

Christmas Market at Tate Modern
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Tate Modern
London, United Kingdom SE1 9TG

0044 208 310 2542

Authentic German Christmas Market - Offering a large variety of gifts, treats, food, wine and cider. Perfect for everyone, young and old. Come and celebrate the festive period with us at our new site, The Tate Modern. How to get to our Christmas Market - By Tube The nearest London Underground stations to Tate Modern are: Southwark (Jubilee Line, 600 metres approx.) Blackfriars (District and Circle Line, 800 metres approx.) has now been reopened St Pauls (Central Line, 1,100 metres approx.) By bus The following buses stop near Tate Modern: Routes 45, 63 and 100 stop on Blackfriars Bridge Road Routes RV1 and 381 stop on Southwark Street Route 344 stops on Southwark Bridge Road By train The nearest mainline train stations to Tate Modern are: Blackfriars (800 metres approx.) London Bridge (1,100 metres approx.) There are no parking facilities so we do recommend to use public transport for your visit. http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern/access-and-facilities/disabled-visitors

Giraffe Restaurant, Spitalfields Market, Liverpool Street, London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Spitalfields Market
London, United Kingdom E1 6DW

0203 116 2000

East Street Market
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
East Street
London, United Kingdom SE17 1DP

020 7525 6000

Sunday UpMarket
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Ely's Yard, The Old Truman Brewery
London, United Kingdom E1 6QL

0207-770-6028

First opened in September 2004, The Sunday UpMarket has over 140 stalls with products ranging from vintage fashion, to hand-crafted gifts, to foods from around the world. As a platform for emerging designers and organic cuisine, this established market offers every visitor the chance to experience the real charm of Brick Lane. Those interested in acquiring a stall please email [email protected] and one of our dedicated market staff will email you all relevant details.

Leon - Spitalfields Market
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
3 Crispin Place
London, United Kingdom E1 6DW

020 7247 4369

Truman Markets
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
The Old Truman Brewery
London, United Kingdom E1 6QL

0207 770 6028

Opened in 2006, the Backyard market is London’s freshest and brightest new market. With over 100 stalls focused upon specialised arts & crafts; the Backyard is packed full of treasures, young edgy designers and wholesome homemade food.

One Aldwich Hotel - Covent Garden
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
1 Aldwych Buildings
London, United Kingdom

+44 (20) 73001000

Borough Market London England
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
8 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom

Wholesale and Supply Store Near Billingsgate Fish Market

The life goddess, store street
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
29 Store Street
London, United Kingdom WC1E 7

02076374077

Divine taste, honest food, local sustainable products, traditional recipes, healthy eating. the life goddess brings the best ingredients of Greek nature in the heart of London.

The Bottle Shop
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
128 Druid Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2HH

020 3490 9252

The Bottle Shop offers one of London's greatest beer selections at the best London prices. We import beer from all over the world and wholesale it to Pubs and Bottle Shops in the UK. Our retail location is based in Bermondsey, 128 Druid Street SE1 2HH, and we are open to the public on Saturdays from 10:00am-7:00pm. Our space is now available to hire for private parties and events. We have 10 taps available, 4 downstairs and 6 up in our mezzanine. For more information about our retail location please email [email protected] and for information about wholesale please email [email protected]

Allpress Espresso UK
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
55 Dalston Lane
London, United Kingdom E8 2NG

0207 749 1780

Bangla Town Cash & Carry
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
67/77 Hanbury Street
London, United Kingdom E1 5

+44 (0) 20 7377 1770

Booker Wholesale
Distance: 2.9 mi Tourist Information
106 Camley Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 0

+44 (0) 20 7387 2585

Flirt Designer Hosiery
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
WHITECHURCH LANE
London, United Kingdom E1

02072475744

Booker Cash & Carry
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
39 Queen St
London, United Kingdom N17 8JA

20-88084240

Best Food Cash & Carry
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
133 Chapman Street
London, United Kingdom E1 2PH

+44 (0) 20 7709 8380

Best food is a retail and wholesale cash and carry selling and delivering everything related to restaurant and catering. We also deliver to houses.

Gisela Graham
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
12 Colworth Grove
London, United Kingdom SE17 1

20-77084956

Mary Katrantzou Show Room
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
48 Hoxton Square
London, United Kingdom N1 7

Tca Showroom
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
137 Essex Road
London, United Kingdom N1 2SN

0203 432 6385

Travis perkins , dalston lane ,hackney
Distance: 2.8 mi Tourist Information
Dalston Lane 113
London, United Kingdom E8 1

020 7254 0153

Walter Reginald Group Ltd.
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
100 The Highway Unit 6
London, United Kingdom E1W 2AZ

0044 207 481 2233

International leather merchant stocking a wide range of finished hides and skins for use on garments, accessories, small leathergoods, upholstery, interiors, costumes and footwear.

Anjoman Foods
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
14 premier park road
London, United Kingdom NW10 7NZ

+44 20 8961 9999

Anjoman Foods Corporation is a multinational manufacturer and marketer of high-quality, brand-name food for consumers throughout the world. We offer a wide variety of products including rice, saffron, cans and dried fruit. Anjoman Foods is built on a set of internal principles that we call Our Way. We believe in doing business in concert with Our Way, our values platform that helps guide our everyday efforts and helps keep integrity at the core of our operations. Our products are sold to retail, foodservice and wholesale operations under many well-established trademarks.

Unipack Worldwide
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Hastingwood Trading Estate
London, United Kingdom N18 3HU

0208 884 1010

Welcome to our online packaging store. We are proud to be one of the largest online packaging shops to stock hundreds of different packaging products. We are confident that we offer one of the largest product ranges across Europe. With our large warehousing facility and nationwide distribution links, we are able to process and deliver hundreds of orders on a daily basis. We also have a fantastic international delivery service in place, allowing us to deliver to over 40 countries worldwide. With our competitive pricing, high quality products, great delivery prices and friendly customer service, we are sure that you will be happy with your shopping experience with Unipack Ltd.

Kushiara Cash & Carry
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
319 Commercial Rd
London, United Kingdom E1 2

+44 (0) 20 7790 1234

BTB Islington Ltd
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
185 Caledonian Road
Islington, United Kingdom N1 0SL

020 7833 5749

Virgin & Wonderful Hair
Distance: 3.0 mi Tourist Information
4, 12 Godman road
London, United Kingdom SE15 3SR

0033 (0)7 51 05 89 44

Our hair comes straight from the Temples in India to our warehouse. The hair is cut directly from the donors head and then goes through a process of cleaning, wefting, and then packaged to be sent to our company. Currently, we have in stock 100% Pure Virgin Indian, Virgin Malaysian and Brazilian Hair for sew-in weaves. Our hair is in its pure and natural state, no chemical processing or coloring. Textures: Straight, Wavy, Natural Curl, Curly or Deep Curl Our quality control process is very detailed and thorough. We exercise a very strict quality control process to ensure that our clients receive only the very best of our products. We wash, sterilize, treat, condition and air dry our hair. We carefully re-examine our hair prior to shipping. · Our virgin hair has not been processed by any chemicals whatsoever, we only wash, sterilized and soften the hair. · Texture – Natural Straight or Wave · Color - Natural color, a little lighter then 1b · Weft – Machine weft · Weight - bet 3.6 to 4oz · Lengths Available – 10”, 12”, 14”, 16”, 18”, 20”, 22”, 24”, 26" and 28'' · Cuticles Intact - Cuticles in each strand of hair is aligned in the same direction. · Minimal Tangling - Because the hair cuticles are aligned in the same direction, excessive tangling and matting is eliminated. · Minimal Shedding – We recommend that you seal the wefts to prevent shedding. · Shine & Luster - Natural shine and luster is retained because of the cuticle direction. · Longevity – This hair is very durable, with proper maintenance it will be long lasting and reusable.

Pedlars Home Delivery
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
105 Abbey Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 3NP

07760100901

Solstice
Distance: 2.8 mi Tourist Information
Unit 16. Merton Industrial Park, Lee Road
London, United Kingdom SW19 3HX

020 7498 7700

Solstice has been supplying London’s finest restaurants for over five years with vegetables and fruits of the highest quality.Led by Philip Britten whom after having earned a Michelin star he took his experience at the top combined with his pure passion for quality produce, which provided him with the inspiration and philosophy for Solstice.

Landmark Near Billingsgate Fish Market

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

Pudding Lane
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Pudding lane
London, United Kingdom

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Pudding Sokağı İngiltere'nin başkenti Londra'da bulunan dar bir geçittir. 1666 yılında çıkan Büyük Londra Yangını'nın başlangıç noktası olan Thomas Farryner'ın ekmek fırını bu sokakta yer almıştır. Londra Köprüsü'ne yakın bir alandadır. Tarihçi John Stow'un söylediklerine göre sokak adını, eski İngilizcede iç organ demek olan Pudding sözcüğünden almıştır. Bu da söylenceye göre Thames Nehri'ndeki çöp kayıklarına kasapların atmış olduğu sakatatı taşıyan at arabalarından düşen hayvan iç organlarıdır.

Fishmongers Hall
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9EL

0207 626 3531

St Margaret Pattens
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
18 Rood Lane
London, United Kingdom EC3M 1HS

20-76236630

St Margaret Pattens is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on Eastcheap near the Monument. The dedication is to St. Margaret of Antioch.HistoryThe church was first recorded in 1067, at which time the church was probably built from wood. It was rebuilt in stone at some unknown subsequent date but fell into disrepair and had to be demolished in 1530. It was rebuilt in 1538 but was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. The present church was built by Sir Christopher Wren in 1687. It is one of only a few City churches to have escaped significant damage in the Second World War.In 1954 St Margaret Pattens ceased to be a parish church and became one of the City’s guild churches, within the living of the Lord Chancellor and under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of London. They have a regular weekday, rather than Sunday congregation, drawn mostly from people who work in offices nearby.The church was designated a Grade I listed building on 4 January 1950.BuildingThe church's exterior is notable for its 200-ft high spire, Wren's third highest and the only one that he designed in a medieval style. This is sometimes referred to as Wren's only "true spire". Its interior is a simple rectangle with some unusual fittings – the only canopied pews in London, dating from the 17th century. These were intended for the churchwardens. The initials "CW" which appear in one of the pews have been thought to refer to Christopher Wren, but they may also signify "church warden." Other features in the interior include a punishment box carved with the Devil's head where wrongdoers had to sit during the church service.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

20 Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 6

20 Fenchurch Street is a commercial skyscraper in London that takes its name from its address on Fenchurch Street, in the historic City of London financial district. It has been nicknamed 'The Walkie-Talkie' because of its distinctive shape. Construction was completed in spring 2014, and the top-floor 'sky garden' was opened in January 2015. The 34-storey building is 160m tall, making it the sixth-tallest building in the City of London and the 12th tallest in London.Designed by architect Rafael Viñoly and costing over £200 million, 20 Fenchurch Street features a highly distinctive top-heavy form which appears to burst upward and outward. A large viewing deck, bar and restaurants are included on the top three floors; these are, with restrictions, open to the public.The tower was originally proposed at nearly 200m tall but its design was scaled down after concerns about its visual impact on the nearby St Paul's Cathedral and Tower of London. It was subsequently approved in 2006 with the revised height. Even after the height reduction there were continued concerns from heritage groups about its impact on the surrounding area. The project was consequently the subject of a public inquiry; in 2007 this ruled in the developers' favour and the building was granted full planning permission. In 2015 it was awarded the Carbuncle Cup for the worst new building in the UK in the previous 12 months.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 Battlebridge Lane, Southwark
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

Lime Street, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Bootlegger, 25-26 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom

Lime Street is a minor road in the City of London between Fenchurch Street to the south and Leadenhall Street to the north. Its name comes from the lime burners who once sold lime from there for use in construction.It is perhaps best known as the current home of the world's largest insurance market, Lloyd's of London, since its newest building was opened on the street in 1986. Opposite Lloyd's, the Willis Building is the global headquarters of insurance broker Willis. A 35-storey building has been proposed at 52-54 Lime Street, and upon approval and completion by 2017 will become the European headquarters of global insurer W. R. Berkley.The northern portion of the street is pedestrianised. Vehicular through-access to Leadenhall Street is prevented by a firegate, forcing drivers to bear right onto Fenchurch Avenue, from which a left turn onto Billiter Street returns vehicles to Leadenhall Street.Nearby is the Norman Foster-designed and gherkin-shaped skyscraper 30 St Mary Axe, and the Leadenhall Building. Leadenhall Market is on Lime Street's western side, adjacent to Lloyd's.

St Clement's, Eastcheap
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Clement's Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4N 7AE

020 7623 5454

St Clement Eastcheap is a Church of England parish church in Candlewick Ward of the City of London. It is located on Clement's Lane, off King William Street and close to London Bridge and the River Thames.Clement was a disciple of St Peter the Apostle and was ordained as Bishop of Rome in the year 93 AD. By legend, Clement was martyred by being tied to an anchor and thrown into the Black Sea, which led to his adoption as a patron saint of sailors. The dedication to St Clement is unusual in London, with only one other ancient church there dedicated to this saint, namely St Clement Danes, Westminster. It is also located a little north of the Thames, but further west from Eastcheap and outside the old City boundary, just beyond the Temple Bar on the Strand.HistoryMedieval periodEastcheap was one of the main streets of medieval London. The name 'Eastcheap' derives from the Saxon word 'cheap', meaning a market, and Eastcheap was so called to distinguish it from Westcheap, later to become Cheapside. The southern end of Clement's Lane opened onto Eastcheap until the 1880s when the construction of King William Street separated Clement's Lane from Eastcheap, which still remains nearby as a street.

St Olave Hart Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
8 Hart St
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7

20-74884318

St Olave Hart Street is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on the corner of Hart Street and Seething Lane near Fenchurch Street railway station.John Betjeman described St Olave's as "a country church in the world of Seething Lane." The church is one of the smallest in the City and is one of only a handful of medieval City churches that escaped the Great Fire of London in 1666. In addition to being a local parish church, St Olave's is the Ward Church of the Tower Ward of the City of London.HistoryThe church is first recorded in the 13th century as St Olave-towards-the-Tower, a stone building replacing the earlier construction. It is dedicated to the patron saint of Norway, King Olaf II of Norway, who fought alongside the Anglo-Saxon King Ethelred the Unready against the Danes in the Battle of London Bridge in 1014. He was canonised after his death and the church of St Olave's was built apparently on the site of the battle. The Norwegian connection was reinforced during the Second World War when King Haakon VII of Norway worshipped there while in exile.Saint Olave's was rebuilt in the 13th century and then again in the 15th century. The present building dates from around 1450. According to John Stow's Survey of London, a major benefactor of the church in the late 15th century was wool merchant Richard Cely Sr., who held the advowson on the church . On his death, Cely bequeathed money for making the steeple and an altar in the church. The merchant mark of the Cely family was carved in two of the corbels in the nave . No memorial to the Celys now remains in the church.

London Bridge bus station
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge Unit 10
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SP

020 7357 0069

London Bridge bus station serves the London Bridge area of the city of London and is situated at the London Bridge tube and rail station.There are three stands at the station which are situated on the station forecourt.London Buses routes 17, 43, 48, 141, 149 and 521 and night routes N21 and N343 serve the station.New bus stationA new bus station was built as part of the new Shard London Bridge "Gem" development which was open in 2012.

St Mary Abchurch
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Abchurch Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

20-76260306

St Mary Abchurch is a Church of England church off Cannon Street in the City of London. Dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, it is first mentioned in 1198–1199. The medieval church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666, and replaced by the present building.HistoryMedieval churchThe church dates back to the twelfth century and is dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The additional name "Abchurch" may be a variant of "Upchurch", referring to its position on comparatively high ground.The patronage of the church belonged to the convent of St Mary Overy, Southwark, until around 1455, when it passed to the master and chaplains of the college of Corpus Christi at the church of St Laurence Pountney. After the Reformation, Archbishop Parker persuaded Elizabeth I to grant the church to his college, Corpus Christi, Cambridge, which has appointed the incumbent ever since."Restored and beautified" in 1611 at the cost of the parishioners, St Mary's was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666.RebuildingThe church was rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren in 1681–1686. The parish was united with that of the nearby church of St Laurence Poutney, also destroyed in the Great Fire but not rebuilt.Wartime damage and repairA bomb hit the church in September 1940 during the London Blitz. The greatest damage was to the dome. Godfrey Allen repaired the church between 1948–1953.

Tower Hill Memorial
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2 St Mary at Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7283 9504

The Tower Hill Memorial is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission war memorial on the south side of Trinity Square Gardens, in London, England. The memorial commemorates those from the Merchant Navy and fishing fleets who died during both world wars and have "no grave but the sea". The memorial was designed by Edwin Lutyens with sculpture work by William Reid Dick, the Second World War extension was designed by Edward Maufe with sculpture work by Charles Wheeler.The First World War memorial takes the form of a vaulted corridor, long, wide and high. Inside are 12 bronze plaques engraved with 12,000 names. Those commemorated include Victoria Cross recipient, Archibald Bisset Smith.The Second World War memorial takes the form of a semi-circular sunken garden located behind the corridor, to its north. It contains the names of 24,000 British seamen and 50 Australian seamen, listed on the walls of the sunken garden. In the centre of the garden is a pool of bronze, engraved with a compass pointing north. Between the two memorials are two columns with statues representing an officer (western column) and a seaman (eastern).

Lloyd's Coffee House
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Gracechurch Street 55
London, United Kingdom EC3V 9

020 7621 0911

Lloyd's Coffee House was a coffee shop in London opened by Edward Lloyd (c. 1648–15 February 1713) originally on Tower Street in around 1688. The establishment was a popular place for sailors, merchants and shipowners, and Lloyd catered to them with reliable shipping news. The shipping industry community frequented the place to discuss insurance deals among themselves. The dealing that took place led to the establishment of the insurance market Lloyd's of London, Lloyd's Register and several related shipping and insurance businesses.Just after Christmas 1691, the coffee shop relocated to Lombard Street. Merchants continued to discuss insurance matters here until 1774 when the participating members of the insurance arrangement formed a committee and moved to the Royal Exchange on Cornhill as the Society of Lloyd's.Traces of the coffee houseThe 17th century original shop frontage of Lloyd's Coffee House is owned by Lloyd's of London and has been re-erected on display at the National Maritime Museum. A blue plaque in Lombard Street commemorates the coffee house's second location (now occupied at ground level by Sainsbury's supermarket). It was fictionalized in the 1936 film Lloyd's of London.

Southwark Cathedral
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DA

+44 20 7367 6700

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for more than 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since the creation of the diocese of Southwark in 1905.Between 1106 and 1538 it was the church of an Augustinian priory, Southwark Priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a parish church, with the new dedication of St Saviour's. The church was in the diocese of Winchester until 1877, when the parish of St Saviour's, along with other South London parishes, was transferred to the diocese of Rochester. The present building retains the basic form of the Gothic structure built between 1220 and 1420, although the nave is a late 19th-century reconstruction.HistoryLegendary originsThe 16th-century London historian John Stow recorded an account of the origins of the Southwark Priory of St Mary that he had heard from Bartholomew Linsted, who had been the last prior when the priory was dissolved. Linsted claimed it had been founded as a nunnery "long before the Conquest" by a maiden named Mary, on the profits of a ferry across the Thames she had inherited from her parents. Later it was converted into a college of priests by "Swithen, a noble lady". Finally in 1106 it was refounded as an Augustinian priory.

Anglican Diocese of Southwark
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trinity House, 4 Chapel Court, Borough High Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1HW

020 7939 9400

The Diocese of Southwark is one of the 42 dioceses of the Church of England, part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The diocese forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. It was created on 1 May 1905 from part of the ancient Diocese of Rochester that was served by a Suffragan Bishop of Southwark (1891–1905). Before 1877 the area was part of the Diocese of Winchester.The diocese covers Greater London south of the River Thames (except for the London Borough of Bexley and London Borough of Bromley) and east Surrey. Since the creation of the episcopal area scheme in 1991, the diocese is divided into three episcopal areas each of which contains two archdeaconries: Croydon Episcopal Area (overseen by the area Bishop of Croydon)Archdeaconry of Croydonincludes Deaneries of Croydon Addington, Croydon Central, Croydon North, Croydon South, and Suttonincludes Deaneries of Caterham, Godstone, and ReigateArchdeaconry of Lambethincludes Deaneries of Brixton, Clapham, Lambeth North, Lambeth South, Streatham, and Mertonincludes Deaneries of Battersea, Kingston, Richmond and Barnes, Tooting, and WandsworthArchdeaconry of Lewisham & Greenwichincludes Deaneries of Charlton, Deptford, East Lewisham, Eltham and Mottingham, Plumstead, and West Lewishamincludes Deaneries of Bermondsey, Camberwell, Dulwich, and Southwark and Newington In other ecclesiastical use, although having lost religious orders in the English Reformation, the diocese has the London home of the Archbishop of Canterbury and records centre of the Church of England in the diocese, Lambeth Palace.

London Stone
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

02076268246

London Stone is a historic landmark traditionally housed at 111 Cannon Street in the City of London. It is an irregular block of oolitic limestone measuring 53 × 43 × 30 cm (21 × 17 × 12"), the remnant of a once much larger object that had stood for many centuries on the south side of the street. Currently the stone is housed at the Museum of London pending reconstruction of the 111 Cannon Street building.The name "London Stone" was first recorded around the year 1100. The date and original purpose of the Stone are unknown, although it is possibly of Roman origin, and there has been interest and speculation about it since at least the 16th century. There are modern claims that it was formerly an object of veneration, or has some occult significance. These assertions however, are completely unsubstantiated.DescriptionThe present London Stone is only the upper portion of a once much larger object, as described below under History. The surviving portion is a block of oolitic limestone approximately 53 cm wide, 43 cm high, and 30 cm front to back (21 × 17 × 12 inches). A study in the 1960s indicated that the stone is Clipsham Limestone, a good-quality stone from Rutland transported to London for building purposes in both the Roman and medieval periods. More recently Kevin Hayward has suggested that it may be Bath stone, the stone most used for monuments and sculpture in early Roman London and in Saxon times.

The Shard London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

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The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group. HOUSE RULES Welcome to The Shard, in the heart of London Bridge. We hope our Facebook page can be a place where our community can feel free to express their feelings and opinions about The Shard or share their experiences with our building, our businesses or our neighbourhood. We welcome feedback, both positive and negative, and we aim to respond to comments that necessitate an answer promptly. Our Facebook house rules are designed to serve as a guideline to ensure our online community can enjoy our Facebook page in a pleasant environment. Guidelines First of all, we ask that you please use polite language and tone at all times. Please be mindful that our page attracts a wide audience and we ask that your comments are respectful and on-topic. It’s the policy of The Shard’s Facebook team that we don’t normally moderate Facebook posts, but we won’t tolerate abusive language, disruptive behaviour or illegal or objectionable content. This includes any material which might be defamatory, offensive, infringing, obscene, lewd, pornographic, violent, abusive, insulting, threatening, harassing, discriminatory, blasphemous, indecent or otherwise unlawful or objectionable. It also includes any material which is aggressive, argumentative or likely to be construed as bullying. No spamming or repetition, please, nor off-topic material in subject-specific threads or areas. We also will not tolerate language, content, postings or links that we consider racist, sexist, homophobic or grossly off-topic. If we consider a posting to fit any of these categories, it will be removed from our Facebook page. Get in Touch There’s a chance we might miss something, so if you are concerned that a user is breaking these rules on our Facebook page, please do let us know. Or if you feel we’ve hidden your post unnecessarily, we’re happy to provide an explanation. You can message us directly via this Facebook page or you can email us via [email protected] And do please keep in mind that the comments expressed within our Facebook page, unless an official post from The Shard, come from you – our community of fans – and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Shard.

Unicorn Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
147 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2HZ

The Unicorn Theatre is the UK's leading theatre for audiences aged 2–21. The theatre has its home in a custom-built, RIBA Award–winning building on Tooley Street, in the London Borough of Southwark, which opened in 2005. The theatre was designed by Keith Williams, built by Arup and comprises two theatre spaces (the Weston and Clore Theatres), an education studio, rehearsal space, café and the John Lyon meeting room.The theatre was founded in 1947, by Caryl Jenner, originally as a Mobile Theatre; In 1961, Jenner began presenting children's productions at the Arts Theatre in the West End, and in 1967 the company took over the lease of the theatre which then became Unicorn's permanent performing base until 1999; during this period the normal run of adult performances continued during the evenings.The Unicorn is a registered charity and is an Arts Council England National Portfolio organisation.OriginsFrom 1944 Caryl Jenner wrote Christmas pantomimes for small-time playhouses. During performances she would make note of the behaviour of the children, recording what scenes and sequences held their attention, and which did not. She began to formulate the principles that would guide her theatre and writing. In 1947 the ‘Mobile Theatre’ was born. Caryl's mission was to drive around the austere post-war towns of Britain, as well as isolated villages to bring theatre to new audiences. They supplemented their income by performing to adults in the evenings but their goal was always to captivate the minds and imagination of children.