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Grosvenor Chapel, London | Tourist Information


24 South Audley Street, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1K 2

020 7499 1684

Grosvenor Chapel is an Anglican church in what is now the City of Westminster, in England, built in 1730s. It inspired many churches in New England. It is situated on South Audley Street in Mayfair.HistoryThe foundation stone of the Grosvenor Chapel was laid on 7 April 1730 by Sir Richard Grosvenor, 4th Baronet, owner of the surrounding property, who had leased the site for 99 years at a peppercorn rent to a syndicate of four “undertakers” led by Benjamin Timbrell, a prosperous local builder.The new building was completed and ready to use by April 1731.Soon after the original 99-year lease ran out in 1829 the chapel was brought within the parochial system as a chapel of ease to St George's, Hanover Square.The chapel has been the spiritual home to a number of famous people including John Wilkes, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington, and his wife (parents to the Duke of Wellington), Florence Nightingale, U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Bishop Charles Gore.During the Second World War men and women of the American armed forces were welcomed to the chapel for their Sunday services, as recorded on a tablet outside the west wall, and after the war the congregation regularly included such people as the writer Rose Macaulay and Sir John Betjeman, Poet Laureate from 1972 until his death in 1984.

Anglican Church Near Grosvenor Chapel

St Luke's Church, Chelsea
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Sydney Street
London, SW3 6NH

020 7351 7365

The Parish Church of St Luke, Chelsea, is an Anglican church, on Sydney Street, Chelsea, London SW3, just off the King's Road. Ecclesiastically it is in the Deanery of Chelsea, part of the Diocese of London. It was designed by James Savage in 1819 and is of architectural significance as one of the earliest Gothic Revival churches in London, perhaps the earliest to be a complete new construction. St Luke's is one of the first group of Commissioners' churches, having received a grant of £8,333 towards its construction with money voted by Parliament as a result of the Church Building Act of 1818. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building.HistoryIn the early 19th century Chelsea was in the process of expanding from a village to an area of London. St Luke's was built as a new, more centrally located replacement for the existing parish church, now known as Chelsea Old Church, which until then was also known, though unofficially, as St Luke's. This was initially a chapel of ease to the new building following its opening. The new church was the idea of the rector of Chelsea, the Hon. and Revd Gerald Wellesley, brother of the 1st Duke of Wellington, who held his office from 1805 to 1832, seeing the consecration of the church in 1824.

St James the Less, Pimlico
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
St James the Less, Pimlico
London, SW1V 2

St James the Less is an Anglican church in Pimlico, Westminster, built in 1858–61 by George Edmund Street in the Gothic Revival style. A grade I listed building, it has been described as "one of the finest Gothic Revival churches anywhere". The church was constructed predominately in brick with embellishments from other types of stone. Its most prominent external feature is its free-standing Italian-style tower, while its interior incorporates design themes which Street observed in medieval Gothic buildings in continental Europe.HistoryThe church was Street's first commission in London, which he took on after his widely admired work in the diocese of Oxford and at All Saints, Boyne Hill, Maidenhead, where he delivered buildings in polychromatic red brick and stone. He had also published in 1855, to considerable acclaim, his book Brick and Marble Architecture in Italy. In 1858, he was commissioned by the three daughters of Bishop Monk of Gloucester to construct a church in their father's memory in what was, at the time, an area of slums and run-down tenements in a very poor part of London. The parish was inhabited by around 31,000 people at the time. The church, which stands on land formerly owned by Westminster Abbey, was consecrated in 1861. Street also built a parish school next to the church in 1861–64, in similar style, while his son Arthur Edmund Street revisited his father's designs in 1890 to add an infants' school (now a parish hall) attached to the west end of the church.

St Peter's Church, Eaton Square
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
119 Eaton Square
London, SW1W 9

020 7235 4482

St. Peter's Church, Eaton Square is a large Church of England church which stands at the east end of Eaton Square, Belgravia, London. On 19 October 1991 The Times newspaper wrote "St Peter’s must now rank as one of the most beautiful churches in London". It is a Grade II* listed building.St. Peter's was designed in a classical style by the architect Henry Hakewill, and featured a six-columned Ionic portico and a clock tower. It was built between 1824 and 1827 during the first development of Eaton Square. The interior was, as was common at the time, a severe preaching box, with the organ and choir at the west end. This building burnt down and was rebuilt from Hakewill's drawings by one of his sons. The original church was a Commissioners' church, receiving a grant from the Church Building Commission towards its cost. The full cost of the church was £22,427, towards which the Commission paid £5,556.In 1875 the church was enlarged by Sir Arthur Blomfield, and reordered to provide a chancel at the east end in the Romanesque style, although externally the changes remained faithful to the original classical style. From its founding St Peter's, Eaton Square, Pimlico was usually recorded as St Peter's, Pimlico (at least prior to 1878).In 1987 an anti-Catholic arsonist set fire to the east end, in the mistaken belief that the Grade II-listed building was a Roman Catholic chapel. Within hours the entire church was engulfed, and the following day, by which time the embers had cooled, only the Georgian shell of the building remained: although the fire was out, the church was roofless, with most of its furnishings destroyed.

HTB Church
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Four Locations: HTB Brompton Road, HTB Onslow Square, HTB Queen's Gate & HTB Courtfield Gardens
London, SW7 1JA

0845 644 7533

'This is a church that loves and accepts everyone...you are so welcome here.' Rev. Nicky Gumbel We gather every Sunday and Thursday for 11 services across our 4 locations: HTB Brompton Road, SW7 1JA (9:30 am, 11:30 am, 5 pm, 7 pm services) HTB Onslow Square, SW7 2BX (10.30 am, 4:30 pm, 6:30 pm service) HTB Queen's Gate, SW7 5LP (Thursday: 12:30 pm or Sunday: 9 am, 11 am, 4:30 pm services) HTB Courtfield Gardens, SW5 0LX (10.30 am service)

St Paul's Knightsbridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
32A Wilton Place
London, SW1X 8SH

020 7201 9999

An Anglican church of Anglo-Catholic tradition, founded in 1843 as part of the development of the Grosvenor Estate in north Belgravia. St Paul's today maintains a traditonal pattern of worship and daily prayer, a lively musical tradition and a commitment to good preaching and thoughtful Christian witness. The congregation is as eclectic as it is welcoming - and seeks to be open to all who come from all over the city (and indeed all over the world!), but above all it is a parish church, rooted in the local community.

Christ Church Mayfair
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
21B Down Street
London, W1J 7

20-76295885

St James's Church, Piccadilly
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
197 Piccadilly
London, W1J 0

020 7734 4511

St James's Church, Piccadilly, also known as St James's Church, Westminster, and St James-in-the-Fields, is an Anglican church on Piccadilly in the centre of London, United Kingdom. The church was designed and built by Sir Christopher Wren.The church is built of red brick with Portland stone dressings. Its interior has galleries on three sides supported by square pillars, and the nave has a barrel vault supported by Corinthian columns. The carved marble font and limewood reredos are both notable examples of the work of Grinling Gibbons.HistoryIn 1662, Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans, was granted land for residential development on what was then the outskirts of London. He set aside land for the building of a parish church and churchyard on the south side of what is now Piccadilly. Christopher Wren was appointed the architect in 1672 and the church was consecrated on 13 July 1684 by Henry Compton, the Bishop of London. In 1685 the parish of St James was created for the church.

All Saints Margaret Street
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
7 Margaret St
London, W1W 8

20-73239222

All Saints Margaret Street (Church of England) has been serving God and people in the heart of London for 150 years. Renowned for its Anglo-Catholic liturgy and rich tradition of choral worship, All Saints draws worshippers from all over the world. The beautifully ornate Grade I listed building is regarded as one of the foremost examples of Victorian Gothic Revival architecture in Britain. Whether you are a regular worshipper or a curious visitor, we look forward to welcoming you. Visit our website for information about our services.

St Marylebone Parish Church
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, NW1 5LT

St Marylebone Parish Church is an Anglican church on the Marylebone Road in London. It was built to the designs of Thomas Hardwick in 1813–17. The present site is the third used by the parish for its church. The first was further south, near Oxford Street. The church there was demolished in 1400 and a new one erected further north. This was completely rebuilt in 1740–42, and converted into a chapel-of-ease when Hardwick's church was constructed. The Marylebone area takes its name from the church. Located behind the church is St Marylebone School, a Church of England school for girls.Previous churchesFirst churchThe first church for the parish was built in the vicinity of the present Marble Arch c.1200, and dedicated to St John the Evangelist.Second churchIn 1400 the Bishop of London gave the parishioners permission to demolish the church of St John and build a new one in a more convenient position, near a recently completed chapel, which could be used until the new church was completed. The bishop stipulated that the old churchyard should be preserved, but also gave permission to enclose a new burial ground at the new site, The church was dedicated to the Virgin Mary. It was closer to the village, at the north end of Marylebone High Street. Having fallen into a state of decay, it was demolished in 1740.

St. Marylebone Parish Church
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
17 Marylebone Rd
London, NW1 5LT

+44 (0) 20 7935 7315

St Marylebone Parish Church is a place of active and engaged Christian witness, set at the very heart of central London. With a history stretching back nearly 900 years, we seek to offer God worship that has long been renowned for musical and liturgical excellence and to serve the diverse community in which we are set. For more than 30 years, St Marylebone, just a few metres from Harley Street, has pioneered the work of Christian healing and, as well as being home to the internationally respected St Marylebone Healing and Counselling Centre, which offers low-cost analytical psychotherapy and spiritual direction, the Crypt at St Marylebone also houses an innovative NHS doctor’s surgery - the Marylebone Health Centre. Our work is enhanced by maintaining close and active links with some of medicine’s Royal Colleges and through our provision of chaplaincy to The London Clinic and King Edward VII’s Hospital. St Marylebone has a flourishing Young Church which complements our two schools: The St Marylebone Church of England School, an Outstanding Academy, National Teaching School and Maths Hub, and The St Marylebone Church of England Bridge School, a Free Special School working with secondary school age students who have speech, language and communication difficulties. Alongside our two schools St Marylebone works closely with the Royal Academy of Music and the University of Westminster, providing chaplaincy services to both, and also with Regent’s University. As a parish church in the Diocese of London, we share a vision of a Church for this great world city that is Christ-centred and outward looking. By God’s grace we seek to be more confident in speaking and living the Gospel of Jesus Christ, more compassionate in serving others with the love of God the Father and more creative in reaching new people and places in the power of the Spirit.

St Mary Magdalene Parish Church, London, NW1
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Munster Square
London, NW1 3PL

07572 822237

Sunday Mass is at 11am. Weekday Masses on Tuesdays at 7pm

Landmark Near Grosvenor Chapel

Embassy of Albania, London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
33 St George's Drive
London, United Kingdom SW1V 4DG

020 7828 8897

The Embassy of Albania in London is the diplomatic mission of Albania in the United Kingdom.A protest was held outside the embassy in 2013 following the proposal to destroy the chemical weapons of Syria in Albania.

English Channel
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Channel View
Newhaven, United Kingdom BN9 9DS

+44 (0) 2945222444

A fun packed open all hours adventure for all ages, unlimited dampness and salt with more seagulls than you can shake a shitty stick at, bring a shotgun and take one home.

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Westminster
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Ambrosden Avenue, Westminster, London SW1P 1QJ, England, Great Britain
London, United Kingdom SW1P 1

020 7798 9033

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Westminster is an archdiocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church in England, historically however it has always been styled the Diocese of Westminster. The archdiocese consists of all of London north of the River Thames and west of the River Lea, together with the borough of Spelthorne and the county of Hertfordshire, which lies immediately to London's north.The diocese is led by the Archbishop of Westminster, who serves as pastor of the mother church, Westminster Cathedral, as well as the metropolitan bishop of the Metropolitan Province of Westminster. Since the re-establishment of the English Catholic dioceses in 1850 each Archbishop of Westminster, including the incumbent, Archbishop Vincent Gerard Nichols, has been created a cardinal by the Pope in consistory, often as the only cardinal in England. It is also customary for the Archbishop of Westminster to be elected President of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of England and Wales providing a degree of a formal direction for the other English bishops and archbishops. However he is not formally a primate, though has special privileges conferred by the Papal Bull Si qua es. The diocese is one of the smallest dioceses in England and Wales in geographical area, but the largest in terms of Catholic population and priests. It is legally established as a diocese, though canonically an archdiocese.

Embassy of Hungary, London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
46 Eaton Pl
London, United Kingdom

020 7325 5218

The Embassy of Hungary in London is the diplomatic mission of Hungary in the United Kingdom. Opposite the embassy itself can be found the Hungarian Economic, Investment & Trade Commission and the Hungarian National Tourist Office at 46 Eaton Place. A Hungarian Cultural Centre is also maintained at 10 Maiden Lane in Covent Garden.

Portland House
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Bressenden Pl
London, United Kingdom SW1E 5DS

Portland House is a skyscraper in Westminster, London. It is 101m tall with 29 floors and was completed in 1963.The building has two banks of lifts — the first serving the first up to the fifteenth floor, and the second the fifteenth floor upwards.Firms that currently use Portland House for office space include American Express, Crossrail, Caxton FX, HomeAway UK, Owners Direct, Increase the Wedge, NetBooster, Somo Global, TradeDoubler, uSwitch, Upmystreet.com, Reef Television, Rentokil Initial, AkzoNobel and Regus. Regus provides serviced offices to a number of companies. The building once contained the head offices of British United Airways.The building is a five-minute walk from London Victoria station (mainline and tube) and a ten-minute walk from Victoria Coach Station. Difficult to find entrance but off Victoria Street, Cathedral Walk goes to main entrance. The surrounding area has been redeveloped between 2003 and 2005 with a new shopping and refreshments area called Cardinal Place. The building also has a gym in the basement.

High Commission of Lesotho, London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
7 Chesham Pl
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8

020 7235 5686

The High Commission of Lesotho in London is the diplomatic mission of Lesotho in the United Kingdom.

Embassy of Austria, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
18 Belgrave Mews West
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8HU

The Embassy of Austria in London is the diplomatic mission of Austria in the United Kingdom. Austria also maintain a Commercial Section at 45 Prince’s Gate, South Kensington and a Cultural Section at 28 Rutland Gate, South Kensington.HistoryThe Austrian Habsburg Monarchy had a permanent delegation in London from 1677 onwards, it was upgraded to the embassy of the Austrian Empire in 1860. The residence was in Chandos House in Marylebone, before it moved to Belgravia in 1866, thus making this the only building used by the Austro-Hungarian Foreign Service that is still used today the Austrian government.Following the rupture of diplomatic relations between Austria-Hungary and Britain after the outbreak of the First World War the embassy was looked after first by the government of America and then that of Sweden. Following the end of that conflict the embassy was given to the government of the new state of Austria, though a dispute over ownership of the embassy with Hungary was not resolved until 1934. Following the unification of Austria with Nazi Germany in 1938 the building was used as a German consulate, and was then looked after by the Swiss government following the outbreak of the Second World War. After a brief period of use by the Ministry of Works Austria resumed occupation of the embassy in 1949 where it remains to this day.

St Ermin's Hotel
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
2 Caxton Street,
London, United Kingdom SW1H 0

(20) 7222 6914

St. Ermin's Hotel is a four-star central London hotel adjacent to St James's Park underground station, close to Westminster Abbey, Buckingham Palace and the Houses of Parliament. The Grade II-listed late Victorian building, built as one of the early mansion blocks in the city is thought to be named after an ancient monastery reputed to have occupied the site pre-10th century. Converted to a hotel in 1896–99, it became during the 1930s, through the Second World War and beyond, a meeting place of the British intelligence services, notably the birthplace of the Special Operations Executive (SOE), and where notorious Cambridge Five double agents Philby and MacLean met their Russian handlers.BackgroundThe St Ermin's Hotel in St James's Park, London was originally a horse-shoe shaped mansion block built in 1887–89 to the designs of E. T. Hall (1851–1923). Mansion blocks (high-status, serviced apartments) were first seen in Victoria Street, London in the 1850s and remain a feature of the area today. St Ermin's Mansions was typical in both plan and elevation; Hall employed the fashionable red-brick Queen Anne style for the exterior and grouped the apartments around a courtyard which functioned both as a carriageway and garden for the residents. Four entrances led off the courtyard into the apartments (the two entrances in the side wings still exist in their original form to this day). By 1894 the building appears to have been extended along Broadway as far as St Ermin's Hill.

55 Broadway
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
55 Broadway
London, United Kingdom SW1H 0BD

0843 222 1234

55 Broadway is a Grade I listed building overlooking St. James's Park in London. It was designed by Charles Holden and built between 1927 and 1929; in 1931 the building earned him the RIBA London Architecture Medal.It was constructed as a new headquarters for the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL), the main forerunner of London Underground. Upon completion, it was the tallest office block in the city.London Underground was due to vacate the building in 2015 for new headquarters, and 55 Broadway will be converted for residential use.DescriptionFaced with Portland stone and covering a site with an irregular footprint, the upper office floors of the building are on a cruciform plan, stepping back towards the central clock tower at the top. The cruciform design afforded the optimum level of natural light to the offices. The ground floor now contains a shopping arcade and many art deco details. Previously the ground floor was also given over to London Transport offices, including a travel information centre, cash office and a library. The whole building straddles St. James's Park tube station, the east and west wings being immediately above the railway tunnel. When finished it was the tallest steel-framed office building in London, until another Holden building, the University of London's Senate House (based on similar designs and materials), took the accolade.

High Commission of Pakistan, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
34-36 Lowndes Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 9JN

+44 (0)20 7664 9200

The High Commission of Pakistan in London is the diplomatic mission of Pakistan in the United Kingdom.In September 2015, DAWN (newspaper) reported Prime Minister of Pakistan Nawaz Sharif constituted a four-member committee to explore the possibility of selling the High Commission building.

Demi Kenny Huggett
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
17 Sloane St, Knightsbridge, London SW1X 9NU
London, United Kingdom SW1X 9NU

+44 20 7422 8400

Buckingham Palace
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1AA

Buckingham Palace est la résidence officielle de la monarchie britannique à Londres. Le palais est à la fois le lieu où se produisent les événements en relation avec la famille royale, le point de chute de beaucoup de chefs d’État en visite, et une attraction touristique importante. C’est le point de convergence du peuple britannique lors des moments de joie, de crise et de peine. « Buckingham Palace », ou tout simplement « le Palais », désigne la source des déclarations de presse émanant des bureaux royaux. Buckingham Palace a été construit par John Sheffield à l'origine du duc de Buckingham en 1703, c'est le lieu de résidence de la monarchie britannique. Buckingham Palace a été reconstruit au cours des siècles par John Nash pour George IV.Au Moyen Âge, le site du palais de Buckingham formait une partie du manoir d’Ebury. Il y eut plusieurs occupants royaux depuis Édouard le Confesseur, et a été l’objet de nombreuses spéculations à propos de son propriétaire : une faille dans le bail de Charles d’Angleterre permit au terrain de revenir dans le giron royal au. Les précurseurs de Buckingham Palace sont Blake House, Goring House et Arlington House.D’abord connu sous le nom de Buckingham House, le bâtiment formant le cœur du palais d’aujourd’hui était auparavant un grand hôtel particulier construit en 1703 par le duc de Buckingham John Sheffield et acquis par le roi George III en 1762 pour en faire sa résidence privée. Il a été agrandi au cours des 75 années suivantes, principalement par les architectes John Nash et Edward Blore, qui ajoutèrent trois ailes autour d’une cour carrée. Buckingham Palace devint finalement la résidence officielle de la monarchie britannique lors de l’accession au trône de la reine Victoria en 1837. Les derniers ajouts structurels d’importance datent de la fin du et du début du : l’imposante aile est qui fait face au Mall a été ajoutée, et l’ancienne entrée officielle, Marble Arch, a été déplacée près du Speaker’s Corner à Hyde Park, où elle se trouve toujours. La façade côté est a été refaite en 1913 avec des blocs de calcaire de Portland, en arrière plan du Victoria Memorial, créant la « façade publique » de Buckingham, avec le fameux balcon en son centre.

Embassy of France, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
58 Knightsbridge
London, United Kingdom SW1X 7JT

07751591500

The Embassy of France in London is the diplomatic mission of France to the United Kingdom. Located just off Knightsbridge at Albert Gate, one of the entrances to Hyde Park, it is situated immediately opposite the Embassy of Kuwait.This building, along with the rest of Albert Gate and neighbouring buildings, were designed by the British architect Thomas Cubitt; his son, George Cubitt, who was created Baron Ashcombe in 1892, is Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall's great-great-grandfather.At the time of these buildings' construction in the 1840s, they were by far the tallest structures in the neighbourhood.The Republic of France also owns various premises along the Cromwell Road, South Kensington which house its Consular, Cultural, Science & Technology and Visa sections. It is also has a Trade Mission at 28-29 Haymarket and a Paymaster & Financial Comptroller Section at 30 Queen’s Gate Terrace, South Kensington.

Wellington Arch
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Constitution Hill
London, United Kingdom W1J 7JZ

0207 9302726

Set in the heart of Royal London at Hyde Park Corner, Wellington Arch is a landmark for Londoners and visitors alike and a great addition to a memorable day out in London. The balconies also offer unique views across London and of the Household Cavalry, passing beneath on their way to and from the Changing of the Guard at Horse Guards Parade every morning. It was originally commissioned as a grand outer entrance to Buckingham Palace and moved to its present site in 1882.

St James's Palace
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

Bridgewater House, Westminster
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
14 Cleveland Row
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

Bridgewater House is a townhouse located at 14 Cleveland Row in the St James's area of London, England. It is a Grade I listed building.HistoryThe earliest known house on the site was Berkshire House, built in about 1626-27 for Thomas Howard, second son of the Earl of Suffolk and Master of the Horse to Charles I of England when he was Prince of Wales. Howard was later created Earl of Berkshire.After being occupied by Parliamentarian troops in the English Civil War, used for the Portuguese Embassy, and lived in by Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, the house was lived in by Charles II's mistress Barbara Villiers, who was made Duchess of Cleveland in 1670, following which the house was known as Cleveland House. She refaced the old house and added new wings. After being owned for some years by a speculator, the house was sold in 1700 to John Egerton, 3rd Earl of Bridgewater, after which it passed by inheritance until 1948.Cleveland House was re-designed in the Palazzo style by Sir Charles Barry in 1840. The rebuilding was completed and renamed in 1854 for Lord Ellesmere, heir of the 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. It is built in Bath stone with a slate roof in three storeys with a basement.

Queen's Chapel
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Savoy Hill
London, United Kingdom

+44 20 7836 7221

The Queen's Chapel is a chapel in central London, England, that was designed by Inigo Jones and built between 1623 and 1625 as an external adjunct to St. James's Palace for Roman Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. It is one of the facilities of the British monarch's personal religious establishment, the Chapel Royal, and should not be confused with the 1540 building known as the Chapel Royal within the palace and just across Marlborough road.HistoryIt was built as a Roman Catholic chapel at a time when the construction of Catholic churches was prohibited in England, and was used by Charles I's Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. From the 1690s it was used by Continental Protestant courtiers. It was built as an integral part of St James's Palace, but when the adjacent private apartments burned down in 1809 they were not replaced and in 1856-57 Marlborough Road was built between the palace and the Queen's Chapel. The result is that physically the chapel now appears to be more part of the Marlborough House complex than of St James's Palace. It became a Chapel Royal again in 1938.Having been taken from the Royal Chapel of All Saints in Windsor Great Park, the body of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother lay at the Queen's Chapel for several days during the preparations for her lying-in-state in Westminster Hall before her ceremonial funeral.

Embassy of Japan, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Hell on Earth for Dolphins
London, United Kingdom

The Embassy of Japan in London is the diplomatic mission of Japan in the United Kingdom. It occupies a large Victorian building on Piccadilly opposite Green Park, which is Grade II listed.

Hilton London Hyde Park Hotel
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
129 Bayswater Road
London, United Kingdom W2 4RJ

The Hilton London Hyde Park is a hotel situated on Bayswater Road, overlooking Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens in central London. It was opened in July 1999.The building was originally the Coburg Court Hotel, first opened in 1907, and it was later renamed the Coburg Hotel in the early 1960s.The Coburg Hotel was used as a filming location in Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy (1972). Richard Blaney and Babs Milligan check into the Coburg as "Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Wilde". Filming took place at the hotel during September 1971. The interiors of the Coburg Hotel were mostly recreated at Pinewood Studios, except for the policemen's point-of-view shot showing the fire escape, which was filmed by assistant director Colin M. Brewer from a fifth-floor room.The current hotel is the first Hilton Hotels & Resorts hotel in London with a state-of-the-art meeting room featuring an interactive projection and speaker system.

Bavarian Village
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Serpentine Road, Hyde Park
London, United Kingdom W2 2UH

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