EuroZoid
Discover The Most Popular Places In Europe

Tower Hill tube station, London | Tourist Information


24-25 Great Tower St
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7222 1234

Tower Hill is a London Underground station located on Tower Hill in Greater London, England. The station is situated in the East End of London and Central London which is on the Circle line between Monument and Aldgate stations, and on the District line between Monument and Aldgate East. Tower Hill is is a short distance from Tower Gateway station for the Docklands Light Railway and National Rail at Fenchurch Street station for regional services in neighbouring Tower ward of the City of London, and Tower Millennium Pier for River Services.The entrance to Tower Hill station is a few metres from one of the largest remaining segments of the Roman London Wall which once surrounded the historic City of London. The station was built on the site of the former Tower of London tube station that closed in 1884. The present Tower Hill station opened in 1967 and replaced a nearby station with the same name but which was originally called Mark Lane, that was slightly farther west.

Landmark Near Tower Hill tube station

Tower of London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Tower Hill
London, E1W 1

020 7480 6358

The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, separated from the eastern edge of the square mile of the City of London by the open space known as Tower Hill. It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078, and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite. The castle was used as a prison from 1100 (Ranulf Flambard) until 1952 (Kray twins), although that was not its primary purpose. A grand palace early in its history, it served as a royal residence. As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion, mainly under Kings Richard the Lionheart, Henry III, and Edward I in the 12th and 13th centuries. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains despite later activity on the site.

Darwin Brasserie - Sky Garden, the Walkie Talkie Building
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, EC3R 6

0333 772 0020

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Morgan's Lane
London, SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Tower of London
London, EC3N 4AB

0870 756 6060

The Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom are 141 historic ceremonial objects, including the regalia and vestments worn by kings and queens of the country at their coronations, as well as processional and anointing objects, plate, and christening fonts.A symbol of 1,000 years of monarchy, the sovereign's coronation regalia is the only working collection in Europe – other present-day monarchies have abandoned coronations in favour of inauguration or enthronement ceremonies – and is the largest set of regalia in the world. Objects used to invest and crown the monarch variously denote his or her roles as Head of State, Supreme Governor of the Church of England, and Commander-in-Chief of the British Armed Forces. Wives of kings are crowned as queen consort with a plainer set of regalia. Since 1831, a new crown has been made specially for each queen consort.The use of regalia by monarchs in Britain can be traced back to its early history. Most of the present collection as a whole dates from around 350 years ago when King Charles II acceded to the throne. The medieval coronation regalia and Tudor state regalia had been either sold or melted down by Oliver Cromwell, a republican who overthrew the monarchy in 1649, during the English Civil War. Notable among the precious stones which adorn the regalia are Cullinan I (the largest clear cut diamond in the world), Cullinan II (second-largest of the Cullinan diamonds), the Koh-i-Noor diamond with a history going back to the 13th century, the Stuart Sapphire, St Edward's Sapphire, and the Black Prince's Ruby – a large spinel worn by King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt.

Lloyd's building
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Lime Street
London, EC3M 7JJ

+44 20 7327 1000

The Lloyd's building is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. It is located on the former site of East India House in Lime Street, in London's main financial district, the City of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior.Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by Historic England to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch".HistoryThe first Lloyd's building had been built on this site in 1928. In 1958, due to expansion of the market, a new building was constructed across the road at 51 Lime Street . Lloyd's now occupied the Heysham Building and the Cooper Building.By the 1970s Lloyd's had again outgrown these two buildings and proposed to extend the Cooper Building. In 1978, the corporation ran an architectural competition which attracted designs from practices such as Foster Associates, Arup and I.M. Pei. Lloyd's commissioned Richard Rogers to redevelop the site, and the original 1928 building on the western corner of Lime and Leadenhall Streets was demolished to make way for the present one which was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 18 November 1986. The 1928 building's entrance at 12 Leadenhall Street was preserved and forms a rather incongruous attachment to the 1986 structure. Demolition of the 1958 building commenced in 2004 to make way for the 26-storey Willis Building.

Lloyd's building
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Lime Street
London, EC3M 7JJ

+44 20 7327 1000

The Lloyd's building is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. It is located on the former site of East India House in Lime Street, in London's main financial district, the City of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior.Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by Historic England to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch".HistoryThe first Lloyd's building had been built on this site in 1928. In 1958, due to expansion of the market, a new building was constructed across the road at 51 Lime Street . Lloyd's now occupied the Heysham Building and the Cooper Building.By the 1970s Lloyd's had again outgrown these two buildings and proposed to extend the Cooper Building. In 1978, the corporation ran an architectural competition which attracted designs from practices such as Foster Associates, Arup and I.M. Pei. Lloyd's commissioned Richard Rogers to redevelop the site, and the original 1928 building on the western corner of Lime and Leadenhall Streets was demolished to make way for the present one which was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 18 November 1986. The 1928 building's entrance at 12 Leadenhall Street was preserved and forms a rather incongruous attachment to the 1986 structure. Demolition of the 1958 building commenced in 2004 to make way for the 26-storey Willis Building.

White Tower
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
The Tower of London
London, E1W 1

+44 (0)20 3166 6000

The White Tower is a central tower, the old keep, at the Tower of London. It was built by William the Conqueror during the early 1080s, and subsequently extended. The White Tower was the castle's strongest point militarily, and provided accommodation for the king and his representatives, as well as a chapel. Henry III ordered that the tower be whitewashed in 1240.HistoryThe castle which later became known as the Tower of London was begun by William the Conqueror in 1066. It began as a timber fortification enclosed by a palisade. In the next decade work began on the White Tower, the great stone keep that still dominates the castle today. The precise date of the White Tower's foundation is unknown, and it is also uncertain how long building took. It is traditionally held that construction began in 1078. This is because the Textus Roffensis records that Gundulf, Bishop of Rochester, oversaw the building work under instruction from William the Conqueror. Dendrochronological evidence suggests construction of the White Tower began in 1075–1079. The archaeology of the standing building suggests there was a pause in construction between 1080 and 1090–1093, although it is unknown why. Gundulf did more than just oversee work and was a skilled architect. Rochester's castle and cathedral were rebuilt under his auspices. As the main castle in England's capital, the Tower of London was an important royal building. The keep built by Gundulf bears testament to this as it was one of the largest in Christendom.

122 Leadenhall Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, EC3V 4

122 Leadenhall Street, or the Leadenhall Building, is a 225 m tall building on Leadenhall Street in London. The commercial skyscraper, opened in July 2014, was designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners and is informally known as "The Cheesegrater" because of its distinctive wedge shape. It is one of a number of new tall buildings recently completed or currently under construction in the City of London financial area, including 20 Fenchurch Street, 22 Bishopsgate, and The Scalpel.The building is opposite the Lloyd's building, also designed by Rogers, which is the home of the insurance market Lloyd's of London. Until 2007 the Leadenhall site was occupied by the P&O Tower, a building owned by the developer British Land and designed by Gollins Melvin Ward Partnership that was completed in 1968 as a brother to the still existing Commercial Union tower, now called St. Helen's. That building was demolished in preparation for redevelopment of the site. The project, initially delayed due to the financial crisis, was revived in 2010 and Oxford Properties co-developed the property in partnership with British Land.

122 Leadenhall Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, EC3V 4

122 Leadenhall Street, or the Leadenhall Building, is a 225 m tall building on Leadenhall Street in London. The commercial skyscraper, opened in July 2014, was designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners and is informally known as "The Cheesegrater" because of its distinctive wedge shape. It is one of a number of new tall buildings recently completed or currently under construction in the City of London financial area, including 20 Fenchurch Street, 22 Bishopsgate, and The Scalpel.The building is opposite the Lloyd's building, also designed by Rogers, which is the home of the insurance market Lloyd's of London. Until 2007 the Leadenhall site was occupied by the P&O Tower, a building owned by the developer British Land and designed by Gollins Melvin Ward Partnership that was completed in 1968 as a brother to the still existing Commercial Union tower, now called St. Helen's. That building was demolished in preparation for redevelopment of the site. The project, initially delayed due to the financial crisis, was revived in 2010 and Oxford Properties co-developed the property in partnership with British Land.

The Leadenhall Building
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, EC3A 8

Custom House, City of London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Dock Rd, London E16 3BX
London, EC3R 5B

The Custom House, on the north bank of the Thames in the City of London was formerly in use for the collection of customs duties. It was in use for many centuries and rebuilt on a number of occasions.HistoryUntil 1814 the Custom House stood in the parish of All Hallows Barking, immediately to the east of the present site.The site was long known as "Wool Quay", and, from the medieval period, a custom house was necessary there to levy the duty payable on exported wool. Such a building is recorded as early as 1377. The quay and the buildings on it were privately owned. Around 1380, one John Churchman built a custom house there to collect dues for the City of London, and in 1382 the crown came to an agreement to use its facilities.Churchman’s custom house remained in use until 1559, the freehold passing through various hands. Its replacement was erected under the direction of William Paulet, Marquess of Winchester, the Lord High Treasurer. A print from 1663 shows it as a three-storey building, with octagonal staircase towers. This structure was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666.The post-fire replacement was on a rather larger scale, to the designs of Christopher Wren. The original estimate was for £6,000, but the eventual cost was more than £10,000. The new building was short- lived: in January 1715 a fire, which began in a nearby house, damaged the it beyond repair, and a new, larger structure was built to the designs of Thomas Ripley, “Master-Carpenter” to the board of Customs. This necessitated the acquisition of ground to the north, fronting onto Thames Street, and the east. The main body of the new building, however, had the same plan as Wren’s, and may have re-used its foundations, but was of three, rather than two storeys.

Custom House, City of London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Dock Rd, London E16 3BX
London, EC3R 5B

The Custom House, on the north bank of the Thames in the City of London was formerly in use for the collection of customs duties. It was in use for many centuries and rebuilt on a number of occasions.HistoryUntil 1814 the Custom House stood in the parish of All Hallows Barking, immediately to the east of the present site.The site was long known as "Wool Quay", and, from the medieval period, a custom house was necessary there to levy the duty payable on exported wool. Such a building is recorded as early as 1377. The quay and the buildings on it were privately owned. Around 1380, one John Churchman built a custom house there to collect dues for the City of London, and in 1382 the crown came to an agreement to use its facilities.Churchman’s custom house remained in use until 1559, the freehold passing through various hands. Its replacement was erected under the direction of William Paulet, Marquess of Winchester, the Lord High Treasurer. A print from 1663 shows it as a three-storey building, with octagonal staircase towers. This structure was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666.The post-fire replacement was on a rather larger scale, to the designs of Christopher Wren. The original estimate was for £6,000, but the eventual cost was more than £10,000. The new building was short- lived: in January 1715 a fire, which began in a nearby house, damaged the it beyond repair, and a new, larger structure was built to the designs of Thomas Ripley, “Master-Carpenter” to the board of Customs. This necessitated the acquisition of ground to the north, fronting onto Thames Street, and the east. The main body of the new building, however, had the same plan as Wren’s, and may have re-used its foundations, but was of three, rather than two storeys.

Elements
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
10 Pepys Street
London, EC3N 2NU

020 7265 6000

London Metal Exchange
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
56 Leadenhall Street
London,

020 7264 5555

The London Metal Exchange is the futures exchange with the world's largest market in options and futures contracts on base and other metals. As the LME offers contracts with daily expiry dates of up to three months from trade date, weekly contracts to six months, and monthly contracts up to 123 months, it also allows for cash trading. It offers hedging, worldwide reference pricing, and the option of physical delivery to settle contracts. In July 2012, LME's shareholders voted to sell the exchange to Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing for £1.4 billion.It is located at 10 Finsbury Square in the London Borough of Islington, just to the north of the City of London.HistoryThe London Metal Market and Exchange Company was founded in 1877, but the market traces its origins back to 1571 and the opening of the Royal Exchange, London. Before the exchange was created, business was conducted by traders in London coffee houses using a makeshift ring drawn in chalk on the floor.At first only copper was traded. Lead and zinc were soon added but only gained official trading status in 1920. The exchange was closed during World War II and did not re-open until 1954. The range of metals traded was extended to include aluminium (1978), nickel (1979), tin (1989), aluminium alloy (1992), steel (2008), and minor metals cobalt and molybdenum (2010). The exchange ceased trading plastics in 2011. The total value of the trade is around $US 11.6 trillion annually.

The Elizabeth Tower
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Bridge Street
London,

Pudding Lane
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Pudding lane
London,

Pudding Lane es una calle de la City de Londres, donde exactamente se originó el Gran incendio de Londres del domingo 2 de septiembre hasta el martes 4 de septiembre de 1666. La calle está ubicada a la salida Eastcheap, cerca de Puente de Londres y el Monumento al Gran Incendio de Londres.Según el cronista John Stow, esta calle es llamada así por los "puddings" (una palabra medieval de vísceras y órganos ) que caían de los carros que bajaban por la calle de los carniceros en Eastcheap mientras se dirigían a las barcazas de residuos en el río Támesis. Una placa en la pared de un edificio llamado Faryners House, en Pudding Lane, registra el sitio del inicio del incendio. Esta placa fue presentada por el Gremio de Panaderos de Londres en 1986.El incendio fue producido por el panadero Thomas Farynor,que ya no era muy listo todo ocurrió porque por un pequeño descuido dejó la chimenea encendida durante la noche, y al poco tiempo se encontraron, él y su familia, entre las llamas. Todos ellos pudieron sobrevivir, a excepción de la criada, que no llegó a salir del edificio. Resultó que aquella noche hacia un fuerte viento y reforzó la fuerza y la rapidez del fuego, el otro factor fue que las casas eran de madera. Todo el desastre producido fue redactado y después publicado por Samuel Pepys.

Pudding Lane
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Pudding lane
London,

Pudding Lane es una calle de la City de Londres, donde exactamente se originó el Gran incendio de Londres del domingo 2 de septiembre hasta el martes 4 de septiembre de 1666. La calle está ubicada a la salida Eastcheap, cerca de Puente de Londres y el Monumento al Gran Incendio de Londres.Según el cronista John Stow, esta calle es llamada así por los "puddings" (una palabra medieval de vísceras y órganos ) que caían de los carros que bajaban por la calle de los carniceros en Eastcheap mientras se dirigían a las barcazas de residuos en el río Támesis. Una placa en la pared de un edificio llamado Faryners House, en Pudding Lane, registra el sitio del inicio del incendio. Esta placa fue presentada por el Gremio de Panaderos de Londres en 1986.El incendio fue producido por el panadero Thomas Farynor,que ya no era muy listo todo ocurrió porque por un pequeño descuido dejó la chimenea encendida durante la noche, y al poco tiempo se encontraron, él y su familia, entre las llamas. Todos ellos pudieron sobrevivir, a excepción de la criada, que no llegó a salir del edificio. Resultó que aquella noche hacia un fuerte viento y reforzó la fuerza y la rapidez del fuego, el otro factor fue que las casas eran de madera. Todo el desastre producido fue redactado y después publicado por Samuel Pepys.

St Olave Hart Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
8 Hart St
London, EC3R 7

20-74884318

St Olave Hart Street is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on the corner of Hart Street and Seething Lane near Fenchurch Street railway station.John Betjeman described St Olave's as "a country church in the world of Seething Lane." The church is one of the smallest in the City and is one of only a handful of medieval City churches that escaped the Great Fire of London in 1666. In addition to being a local parish church, St Olave's is the Ward Church of the Tower Ward of the City of London.HistoryThe church is first recorded in the 13th century as St Olave-towards-the-Tower, a stone building replacing the earlier construction. It is dedicated to the patron saint of Norway, King Olaf II of Norway, who fought alongside the Anglo-Saxon King Ethelred the Unready against the Danes in the Battle of London Bridge in 1014. He was canonised after his death and the church of St Olave's was built apparently on the site of the battle. The Norwegian connection was reinforced during the Second World War when King Haakon VII of Norway worshipped there while in exile.Saint Olave's was rebuilt in the 13th century and then again in the 15th century. The present building dates from around 1450. According to John Stow's Survey of London, a major benefactor of the church in the late 15th century was wool merchant Richard Cely Sr., who held the advowson on the church . On his death, Cely bequeathed money for making the steeple and an altar in the church. The merchant mark of the Cely family was carved in two of the corbels in the nave . No memorial to the Celys now remains in the church.

Lime Street, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Bootlegger, 25-26 Lime Street
London,

Lime Street is a minor road in the City of London between Fenchurch Street to the south and Leadenhall Street to the north. Its name comes from the lime burners who once sold lime from there for use in construction.It is perhaps best known as the current home of the world's largest insurance market, Lloyd's of London, since its newest building was opened on the street in 1986. Opposite Lloyd's, the Willis Building is the global headquarters of insurance broker Willis. A 35-storey building has been proposed at 52-54 Lime Street, and upon approval and completion by 2017 will become the European headquarters of global insurer W. R. Berkley.The northern portion of the street is pedestrianised. Vehicular through-access to Leadenhall Street is prevented by a firegate, forcing drivers to bear right onto Fenchurch Avenue, from which a left turn onto Billiter Street returns vehicles to Leadenhall Street.Nearby is the Norman Foster-designed and gherkin-shaped skyscraper 30 St Mary Axe, and the Leadenhall Building. Leadenhall Market is on Lime Street's western side, adjacent to Lloyd's.

Lime Street, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Bootlegger, 25-26 Lime Street
London,

Lime Street is a minor road in the City of London between Fenchurch Street to the south and Leadenhall Street to the north. Its name comes from the lime burners who once sold lime from there for use in construction.It is perhaps best known as the current home of the world's largest insurance market, Lloyd's of London, since its newest building was opened on the street in 1986. Opposite Lloyd's, the Willis Building is the global headquarters of insurance broker Willis. A 35-storey building has been proposed at 52-54 Lime Street, and upon approval and completion by 2017 will become the European headquarters of global insurer W. R. Berkley.The northern portion of the street is pedestrianised. Vehicular through-access to Leadenhall Street is prevented by a firegate, forcing drivers to bear right onto Fenchurch Avenue, from which a left turn onto Billiter Street returns vehicles to Leadenhall Street.Nearby is the Norman Foster-designed and gherkin-shaped skyscraper 30 St Mary Axe, and the Leadenhall Building. Leadenhall Market is on Lime Street's western side, adjacent to Lloyd's.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Morgan's Lane
London, SE1 2

HMS „Belfast” – krążownik lekki brytyjskiej marynarki Royal Navy z okresu II wojny światowej.BudowaWraz z siostrzanym HMS „Edinburgh”, krążownik należał do typu Edinburgh, określanego też jako trzecia seria typu Town. Oba krążowniki zamówione przez Admiralicję w roku 1936 miały być brytyjską odpowiedzią na zwodowanie dwóch włoskich krążowników typu Giuseppe Garibaldi o wyporności 9591 ton. Do służby w Royal Navy HMS „Belfast” wcielony w sierpniu 1939 roku.Okres II wojny światowej„Belfast” rozpoczął wojnę w składzie 18 Eskadry Krążowników Home Fleet pod dowództwem kapitana J. Scotta. 9 października 1939 HMS „Belfast” przechwycił na północ od Orkadów niemiecki liniowiec „Cap Norte” o pojemności 13 615 BRT. Wkrótce potem przeniesiony został do bazy w Rosyth, gdzie 21 listopada 1939 podczas wychodzenia z portu krążownik wszedł na niemiecką minę magnetyczną postawioną przez U-21. Eksplodująca pod dnem mina spowodowała na tyle poważne uszkodzenia kadłuba, że HMS „Belfast” został wyłączony z działań na okres 3 lat.Po remoncie okręt ponownie został wcielony do służby 8 grudnia 1942, zostając w styczniu następnego roku okrętem flagowym 10 Eskadry Krążowników Home Fleet pod komendą kontradmirała Burnetta. Pierwszą operacją HMS „Belfast” na Morzu Arktycznym była osłona konwoju JW-53 w lutym 1943 roku. Również kolejny konwój JW-54 płynący w dwóch częściach w listopadzie 1943 roku był osłaniany przez 10 Eskadrę Krążowników.

70 Mark Lane
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
70 Mark Lane
London, EC3R 7NQ

0207 264 8740

Oliver Bonas
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
29 Lime Street
London, EC3M 7HR

+44 (0) 20 7621 0411

St George's German Lutheran Church
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
55 Alie St
London, E1 8EB

020 7481 0533

St George's German Lutheran Church is a church in Alie Street, Aldgate just to the East of the City of London. From its foundation in 1762 until 1995 it was used by German Lutherans. Today the small vestry serves as an office for the Historic Chapels Trust and the church is available for hire for secular events.St George's was the fifth Lutheran church to be built in London. It is now the oldest surviving German Lutheran church in the United Kingdom.Foundation and HistoryThe founder was Dietrich Beckman, a successful sugar boiler who put up half the money required to buy the stie and erect the church. Beckman's cousin, Gustav Anton Wachsel from Halberstadt, became the first pastor. At the time, the street was called "Little Ayliffe Street" and the area was called "Goodman's Fields". The name of the street changed to "Alie Street" about 1800. This area of Whitechapel had many sugar refiners of German descent in the nineteenth century and they constituted most of the congregation. From 1853 the churchyard and crypt were closed, and no longer accepted burials.At its height, there were an estimated 16,000 German Lutherans in Whitechapel and the area was sometimes referred to as Little Germany. St Georges Church is the last remaining physical evidence of this major wave of immigration into East London.The last major influx of Germans to the area was in the 1930s, when, during the Nazi period, the pastor, Julius Rieger, set up a relief centre for Jewish refugees at St Georges. The theologian and anti-Nazi activist Dietrich Bonhoeffer preached here for a brief period in 1935, following the destruction of his own St Paul's church nearby.

122 Leadenhall Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, EC3V 4

122 Leadenhall Street – wieżowiec w Londynie (Wielka Brytania), w finansowej dzielnicy City of London, zaprojektowany przez brytyjskiego architekta Richarda Rogersa. Budynek nazywany "tarką do sera" (ang. Cheese Grater) ma wysokość 225 metrów i 48 kondygnacji. Obok znajduje się budynek korporacji ubezpieczeniowej Lloyd's of London, również zaprojektowany przez Rogersa.W miejscu, gdzie zbudowany jest wieżowiec, znajdował się budynek o wysokości 54 metrów. Ukończony został w 1969 roku według projektu Gollins Melvin Ward Partnership, do pary z wieżowcem St Helen's, będącym siedzibą spółki ubezpieczeniowej Commercial Union. W 1992 roku budynek został mocno uszkodzony w wyniku ataku bombowego, dokonanego przez IRA (Provisional Irish Republican Army).W latach 2007-2008 budynek został rozebrany. Kontrakt o wartości 16 milionów funtów podpisano z firmą McGee Group Ltd. Prace ukończono planowo po 105 tygodniach.Projekt budowlany został przedstawiony władzom miasta w 10 lutego 2004 roku, a zatwierdzony w maju 2005 roku. Budynek ma stożkową szklaną fasadę i przypominającą drabinę stalową ramę sięgającą wierzchołka wieży. Ruch pionowy zapewnią zewnętrzne oszklone windy, podobne do tych w sąsiadującym budynku banku Lloyd's, zaprojektowanym przez tego samego architekta. Wadą niezwykłego projektu budynku jest stosunkowo mała powierzchnia biurowa (84 424 m2), zważając na wysokość konstrukcji.

122 Leadenhall Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, EC3V 4

122 Leadenhall Street – wieżowiec w Londynie (Wielka Brytania), w finansowej dzielnicy City of London, zaprojektowany przez brytyjskiego architekta Richarda Rogersa. Budynek nazywany "tarką do sera" (ang. Cheese Grater) ma wysokość 225 metrów i 48 kondygnacji. Obok znajduje się budynek korporacji ubezpieczeniowej Lloyd's of London, również zaprojektowany przez Rogersa.W miejscu, gdzie zbudowany jest wieżowiec, znajdował się budynek o wysokości 54 metrów. Ukończony został w 1969 roku według projektu Gollins Melvin Ward Partnership, do pary z wieżowcem St Helen's, będącym siedzibą spółki ubezpieczeniowej Commercial Union. W 1992 roku budynek został mocno uszkodzony w wyniku ataku bombowego, dokonanego przez IRA (Provisional Irish Republican Army).W latach 2007-2008 budynek został rozebrany. Kontrakt o wartości 16 milionów funtów podpisano z firmą McGee Group Ltd. Prace ukończono planowo po 105 tygodniach.Projekt budowlany został przedstawiony władzom miasta w 10 lutego 2004 roku, a zatwierdzony w maju 2005 roku. Budynek ma stożkową szklaną fasadę i przypominającą drabinę stalową ramę sięgającą wierzchołka wieży. Ruch pionowy zapewnią zewnętrzne oszklone windy, podobne do tych w sąsiadującym budynku banku Lloyd's, zaprojektowanym przez tego samego architekta. Wadą niezwykłego projektu budynku jest stosunkowo mała powierzchnia biurowa (84 424 m2), zważając na wysokość konstrukcji.

Pudding Lane
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Pudding lane
London,

Pudding Sokağı İngiltere'nin başkenti Londra'da bulunan dar bir geçittir. 1666 yılında çıkan Büyük Londra Yangını'nın başlangıç noktası olan Thomas Farryner'ın ekmek fırını bu sokakta yer almıştır. Londra Köprüsü'ne yakın bir alandadır. Tarihçi John Stow'un söylediklerine göre sokak adını, eski İngilizcede iç organ demek olan Pudding sözcüğünden almıştır. Bu da söylenceye göre Thames Nehri'ndeki çöp kayıklarına kasapların atmış olduğu sakatatı taşıyan at arabalarından düşen hayvan iç organlarıdır.

Pudding Lane
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Pudding lane
London,

Pudding Sokağı İngiltere'nin başkenti Londra'da bulunan dar bir geçittir. 1666 yılında çıkan Büyük Londra Yangını'nın başlangıç noktası olan Thomas Farryner'ın ekmek fırını bu sokakta yer almıştır. Londra Köprüsü'ne yakın bir alandadır. Tarihçi John Stow'un söylediklerine göre sokak adını, eski İngilizcede iç organ demek olan Pudding sözcüğünden almıştır. Bu da söylenceye göre Thames Nehri'ndeki çöp kayıklarına kasapların atmış olduğu sakatatı taşıyan at arabalarından düşen hayvan iç organlarıdır.

Public Transportation Near Tower Hill tube station

London Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (A3)
London, EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

Liverpool Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Liverpool St
London, EC2M 7Q

08457 484950

Liverpool Street est une station du métro de Londres en correspondance avec la gare de Liverpool Street. La station est sur la Central line, la Circle line, la Hammersmith & City line et la Metropolitan line en zone 1.Lieu remarquable à proximité Gare de Liverpool StreetVoir aussiArticles connexes Attentats du 7 juillet 2005 à Londres Liste des stations du métro de Londres Liste des stations fermées du métro de Londres Stansted Express

Tower Millennium Pier
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Lower Thames Street
London, EC3N 4DT

03432221234

London River Services is responsible for managing this pier.

South Bermondsey, Southwark
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Roseberry Street
London, SE16 3

Fenchurch Street C2C
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Place
London, EC3N 2

0345 744 4422

Crossrail Durward Street
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Durward Street
London, E1 5

London General bus depot Mandela way
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Unit 2, 5 Mandela Way
London, SE1 5

(020) 7819 5850

Nextstop cars
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
75 Whitechapel Road
London, E11du

02072479533

Train Station Near Tower Hill tube station

London Bridge Station
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Station Approach
London, SE1 9SP

03457 11 41 41

London Bridge is the oldest railway station in London, and one of the busiest. Owned and operated by Network Rail. All the history of the station at networkrail.co.uk/virtualarchive/london-bridge/

London Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (A3)
London, EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

London Fenchurch Street Station
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Street
London, EC3M 4AJ

Station enquiries 08457 11 41 41

Fenchurch Street was the first railway station to be located within the City of London. Owned and operated by Network Rail.

Tower Hill Station
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Trinity Square
London, EC3N 4DJ

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

The Middle Of London Bridge!
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
City of London
London, EC4R 9

London Bridge London Underground Station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
21 Duke Street Hill
London, SE1 2SW

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Tower Hill London Underground Station
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Trinity Square
London, EC3N 4DJ

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Aldgate
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Aldgate High Street
London,

020 7636 8309

Aldgate was the eastern-most gateway through the London Wall leading from the City of London to Whitechapel and the East End of London. It gives its name to a City ward bounded by White Kennet Street in the north and Crutched Friars in the south, taking in Leadenhall and Fenchurch Streets, which remain principal thoroughfares through the City, each splitting from the short street named Aldgate that connects to Aldgate High Street. The road is situated 2.3mi east north-east of Charing Cross.John Cass's school, where a plaque records the former placement of London Wall, is sited on the north side of Aldgate (the street).EtymologyThe etymology of the name "Aldgate" is disputed. It is first recorded in 1052 as Æst geat ("east gate") but had become Alegate by 1108. Writing in the 16th century, John Stow derived the name from "Old Gate" (Aeld Gate). However, Henry Harben, writing in 1918, contended that this was wrong and that documents show that the "d" is missing in documents written before 1486–7. Alternative meanings include "Ale Gate" in connection with a putative ale-house or "All Gate" meaning the gate was free to all. Other possibilities canvassed by Harben include reference to a Saxon named "Ealh," or reference to foreigners ("el") or oil ("ele") or "awl". Gillian Bebbington, writing in 1972, suggests Alegate, Aelgate ("public gate") or Aeldgate" (Old Gate") as equally viable alternatives whilst Weinreb and Hibbert, writing in 1983, revert to Stow's theory that the name means "Old Gate".

Aldgate East London Underground Station
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Whitechapel High Street
London, E1 7PT

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Aldgate London Underground Station
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Aldgate High Street
London, EC3N 1AH

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Fenchurch Street C2C
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Place
London, EC3N 2

0345 744 4422

Fenchurch Seafood Bar & Grill, 20 Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Sky Garden, 20 Fenchurch Street
London, EC3M 6

0333 772 0020

The Lane Bar, Osborn Street, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
12-20 Osborn Street
London, E1 6TE

02073771797

Tower Gateway DLR Station
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
The Minories
London, EC3N 1JL

08432221234

This transport service is managed by Transport for London.

Starbucks SSP Rail - Liverpool Street Station
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Lower Concourse
London, EC2M 7QH

Nando's Leadenhall Lime Street.
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
27 Lime Street
London, SE10 9HT

020 7626 0074

Fenchurch Street railway station
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Pl
London, EC3M 4AJ

020 7488 3725

Fenchurch Street, also known as London Fenchurch Street, is a central London railway terminus in the southeastern corner of the City of London. From it, trains managed by c2c run on lines built by the London and Blackwall Railway (L&BR) and the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway (LTSR) towards east London and south Essex.The station opened in 1841 to serve trains on the L&BR and was rebuilt in 1854 when the LTSR, a joint venture between the L&BR and the Eastern Counties Railway (ECR), began operating. The ECR also operated services at Fenchurch Street to relieve congestion at its Bishopsgate terminus. In 1862 the Great Eastern Railway was created by amalgamating various East Anglian railway companies (including the ECR) and it shared the station with the LTSR until 1912, when the LTSR was bought by the Midland Railway. The station came under ownership of the London & North Eastern Railway (LNER) following the Railways Act 1921, and was shared by LNER and London Midland & Scottish Railway (LMS) services until nationalisation in 1948. The line from the station was electrified in 1961, and controversially closed for seven weeks in 1994.

House Of Fraser
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
68 King William St 3Rd Floor
London, EC4N 7

0844 800 3718

King William Street London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
King William Street
London, EC4

Balls Brothers
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
52 Lime Street
London, EC3M 7

(020) 7283 0841

KFC Liverpool Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Bishopsgate Arcade
London, EC2M 3

Lime Street, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Bootlegger, 25-26 Lime Street
London,

Lime Street is a minor road in the City of London between Fenchurch Street to the south and Leadenhall Street to the north. Its name comes from the lime burners who once sold lime from there for use in construction.It is perhaps best known as the current home of the world's largest insurance market, Lloyd's of London, since its newest building was opened on the street in 1986. Opposite Lloyd's, the Willis Building is the global headquarters of insurance broker Willis. A 35-storey building has been proposed at 52-54 Lime Street, and upon approval and completion by 2017 will become the European headquarters of global insurer W. R. Berkley.The northern portion of the street is pedestrianised. Vehicular through-access to Leadenhall Street is prevented by a firegate, forcing drivers to bear right onto Fenchurch Avenue, from which a left turn onto Billiter Street returns vehicles to Leadenhall Street.Nearby is the Norman Foster-designed and gherkin-shaped skyscraper 30 St Mary Axe, and the Leadenhall Building. Leadenhall Market is on Lime Street's western side, adjacent to Lloyd's.

London St Katherine Dock
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
50 St Katharine's Way
London,

Frenchurch Train Sation
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Streer
London,

Burger King Fenchurch St Station
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch St Station
London, EC3M 4AJ

020 7680 9083

Burger King Liverpool St Station
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Liverpool Street Station
London, EC2M 7PD

020 7375 3702

Barcelona Tapas 24 Lime St Ec3
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
24 Lime Street
London,

02079292389

Burger King London Bridge Stn
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Mainline Railway Station, London Bridge
London, SE1 9SP

020 7357 8722

Mainline Railway Station, London Bridge, Southwark

Transit Stop Near Tower Hill tube station

Shoreditch High Street railway station
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Shoreditch High Street
London, E1 6

08432221234

Shoreditch High Street is a station on the East London Line in Shoreditch and Bethnal Green in between London Borough of Tower Hamlets and Hackney within Greater London. The station is served by London Overground services under the control of the London Rail division of Transport for London and is in Travelcard Zone 1.The station officially opened to the public on 27 April 2010 with services running between and or. On 23 May 2010 services were extended from New Cross Gate to West Croydon or. The station replaced nearby, which closed on 9 June 2006. The next station to the south is and to the north is.HistoryOn the 1994 planning version of the underground map, the station was called 'Bishopsgate'.ConstructionIt was built on the former site of the Eastern Counties Railway's Shoreditch station, built in 1840, The original station was later renamed Bishopsgate and converted for use as a goods yard. It was destroyed by fire in 1964 and remained derelict until being demolished in 2005. The present station is fully enclosed in a concrete box structure so that future building works on the rest of the Bishopsgate site can be carried out without requiring the line to close in the future. The station is situated on a section of track constructed to link the original East London Line and the formerly disused North London Railway's Kingsland Viaduct. Construction of the link included a new bridge over Shoreditch High Street and links to Whitechapel via a bridge over Brick Lane and a ramp on the site of the former Shoreditch tube station.

Whitechapel station
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
277 Whitechapel Road
London, E1 1

020 7247 9290

Whitechapel is a London Underground and London Overground station on Whitechapel Road in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets in east London. It lies between Aldgate East and Stepney Green stations on the District and Hammersmith & City lines, and between Shoreditch High Street and Shadwell stations on the London Overground. It is in Travelcard Zone 2.The London Overground section of the station was closed between 2007 and 27 April 2010 for rebuilding while the former East London Line was readied for service; it initially reopened for a preview service on 27 April 2010 with the full service starting on 23 May 2010. In the near future, Whitechapel will become a station on the Crossrail route.Nearby places of interest include the Royal London Hospital, the Blind Beggar public house, and the former Wickhams department store. There are also many tours in this area focusing on the Jack the Ripper murders.

Fenchurch Street railway station
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Pl
London, EC3M 4AJ

020 7488 3725

Fenchurch Street, also known as London Fenchurch Street, is a central London railway terminus in the southeastern corner of the City of London. From it, trains managed by c2c run on lines built by the London and Blackwall Railway (L&BR) and the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway (LTSR) towards east London and south Essex.The station opened in 1841 to serve trains on the L&BR and was rebuilt in 1854 when the LTSR, a joint venture between the L&BR and the Eastern Counties Railway (ECR), began operating. The ECR also operated services at Fenchurch Street to relieve congestion at its Bishopsgate terminus. In 1862 the Great Eastern Railway was created by amalgamating various East Anglian railway companies (including the ECR) and it shared the station with the LTSR until 1912, when the LTSR was bought by the Midland Railway. The station came under ownership of the London & North Eastern Railway (LNER) following the Railways Act 1921, and was shared by LNER and London Midland & Scottish Railway (LMS) services until nationalisation in 1948. The line from the station was electrified in 1961, and controversially closed for seven weeks in 1994.

Bermondsey tube station
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
142-145 Jamaica Rd
London, SE16 4

020 7222 1234

Bermondsey is a London Underground station. It is situated in the eastern part of Bermondsey in the London Borough of Southwark, and so also serves the western part of Rotherhithe.The station itself was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects and was originally intended to have a multi-storey office building sitting on top. London Underground have yet to realise this second phase of the scheme.It is on the Jubilee line, having been built as part of the Jubilee Line Extension between and stations. It is notable for its extensive use of natural light. The main station entrance is situated on the south side of Jamaica Road. The station is in Travelcard Zone 2.The station was opened on 17 September 1999.Station designLike its extension counterparts, Bermondsey station was designed with a futuristic style in mind by Ian Ritchie Architects. Extensively using natural light, it is built in both a cut-and-cover and tube design. The cut-and-cover section is supported by latticed concrete beams allowing light to penetrate to the platform level. The escalators down to this area are lined by flat concrete with a high ceiling to give a feeling of spaciousness. The bored section is encased with metal to keep in line the futuristic and metallic theme of the extension. As with all other deep level stations on the Jubilee Line Extension, Bermondsey station has platform screen doors for passenger safety and comfort.

Top Office Machines
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
133-135 Bethnal Green Road
London, E2 7DG

07796955572

Bethnal Green railway station
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Three Colts Lane
London, E2 6JL

Bethnal Green is a London Overground station in Bethnal Green, London, England, on the Lea Valley Lines 1mi down-line from London Liverpool Street; the next station down-line is either or. Its three-letter station code is BET and it is in Travelcard zone 2.The station was opened in 1872 and was formerly called Bethnal Green Junction until 1946: it was also formerly served by trains on the Great Eastern Main Line (GEML) via. The station is situated on Three Colts Lane and is within walking distance to Bethnal Green Road via Wilmot Street. It is some distance from Bethnal Green tube station on the London Underground.HistoryIn 1872 the Great Eastern Railway opened a new branch from to ; to serve this line a new junction was built to the west of Cambridge Heath Road. Bethnal Green Junction station was constructed immediately to the west. It replaced a nearby station called Mile End (not to be confused with the current Underground station of the same name) which was located on the eastern side of Cambridge Heath Road. The new station served both of the Great Eastern Railway's routes and had four platforms.In 1946 trains on the Great Eastern Main Line (GEML) between Liverpool Street and Stratford ceased calling at Bethnal Green and two platforms were closed, though the remains of the eastbound platform are still in situ and visible from the GEML. The London-bound platform was demolished and the tracks rearranged, coinciding with the swapping of services from the former "fast" tracks onto the former "slow" tracks, resulting in the arrangement utilised today.

Shoreditch tube station
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Shoreditch Railway Station
London,

07584 297208

Shoreditch was a London Underground station in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets in east London. It was originally opened by the East London Railway in 1876. It was permanently closed in 2006 and replaced by Shoreditch High Street station four years later. It should not be confused with the Shoreditch main line station, some distance further north on the North London Railway, that opened in 1865 and closed in 1940.This Shoreditch was the northern terminus of the East London Line, with latterly a single platform alongside a single track that ran next to the disused Bishopsgate goods yard. Until the late 1960s the East London Line connected with the main line railway to Liverpool Street just north of Shoreditch station. The site of the link is still visible from the end of the platform and from main line trains travelling between Stratford and Liverpool Street. The station was one of only a handful on the network with a single platform and a single-track layout, though it originally had two tracks and two platforms. The preceding station was Whitechapel, which after Shoreditch's closure was the northern terminus of the East London Line until that line closed for extension in 2007.HistoryShoreditch station opened in April 1876 as a stop on the East London Railway from Liverpool Street to points south. The passenger service between Shoreditch and Liverpool Street was withdrawn in 1885. Shoreditch joined the Underground network on 31 March 1913 as part of the Metropolitan Railway in conjunction with an electrification of the line.

Shadwell railway station
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Cable Street, Shadwell
London, E1 2

Shadwell is a station on the East London Line in Shadwell within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, Greater London and is served by National Rail London Overground services under the control of the London Rail division of Transport for London, however there is no standard red National Rail "double arrow" logo signage located at the station, instead only the Overground roundel. The station is between to the north and to the south. It is located near to Shadwell DLR station. The station is in Travelcard Zone 2.The Overground station is underground (the DLR station is on a viaduct).The Overground platforms are decorated with enamel panels designed by Sarah McMenemy in 1995.HistoryLondon UndergroundThe original station was one of the oldest on the network, and was built over a spring. First opened by the East London Railway on 10 April 1876, it was first served by the District Railway and Metropolitan Railway on 1 October 1884. It was renamed Shadwell & St. George-in-the-East on 1 July 1900 but reverted to its original name in 1918. In 1983, a new ticket hall was built on Cable Street, replacing the original building in Watney Street, which was demolished in May 2010. Access to the station platforms was through lifts or stairs. The station was closed between 1995 and 1998 due to repair work on the East London Line's Thames Tunnel. The typical off-peak East London Line service from the station was:

Local Business Near Tower Hill tube station

Tower Hill Station
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Trinity Square
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4DJ

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

Traders's Gate
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Tower Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

20-74883329

Tower Hill London Underground Station
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Trinity Square
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4DJ

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red WW1 Memorial at the Tower of London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Tower of London, EC3N 4NB
London, United Kingdom

Jack The Ripper Tour By Ripping Yarns
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Just Outside Tower Hill Tube Station Exit
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4AA

+44-(0)-7813-559301

The Grange City Hotel
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Cooper's Row
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2BQ

020 7863 3700

Commanding sweeping views over the River Thames and the Tower of London, the 5-Star Grange City Hotel offers accommodation, hospitality and events services. The hotel is located in the heart of the City’s famous business district and has easy access to Canary Wharf, the Square Mile and London’s most vibrant tourist attractions.

Novotel London Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
10 Pepys Street
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2NR

Isis Bar And Lounge
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Cooper's Row
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2BQ

020 7863 3700

Fitness First
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1 America Square
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2LS

+44 (0) 20 7488 9311

ISIS London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
14a Rosebery Avenue and 3 Warner Yard
London, United Kingdom EC1R 4TD

0207 833 8335

Karaveddy,Jaffna
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
karaveddy center kara\veddy
London, United Kingdom SE15 2

India Raj
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
105A Minories
London, United Kingdom EC3N 1

+44 (0) 20 7481 1022

Hidden Club, Vauxhall
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
100 Tinworth Street
London, United Kingdom SE11 5EQ

The Forum
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Cooper's Row
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2BQ

+44 (0) 20 7233 7373

10 Trinity Square
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
10 Trinity Square
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

Elements
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
10 Pepys Street
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2NU

020 7265 6000

Moslem Halal
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
14 Hessel St
London, United Kingdom E1 1PZ

(020) 76809175

Tower Bridge London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

Sceptre Court Campus
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
40 Tower Hill
London, United Kingdom

Frenchurch Train Sation
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Streer
London, United Kingdom