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Tower Hill tube station, London | Tourist Information


24-25 Great Tower St
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7222 1234

Tower Hill is a London Underground station at Tower Hill in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It is on the Circle line between Monument and Aldgate, and on the District line between Monument and Aldgate East. The station is in fare zone 1. It is a short distance from Tower Gateway DLR station and Fenchurch Street railway station.The entrance to Tower Hill station is a few metres from one of the largest remaining segments of the Roman London Wall which formerly surrounded the historic City of London. The station was built on the site of the former Tower of London tube station that closed in 1884. The present Tower Hill station opened in 1967 and replaced a nearby station with the same name but which was originally called Mark Lane, that was slightly farther west.ServicesTrain frequencies vary throughout the day, but the typical off-peak service pattern is:District line:Eastbound:12 tph to Upminster6 tph terminate at Tower Hill6 tph to Ealing Broadway6 tph to Richmond6 tph to WimbledonEastbound:6 tph to Hammersmith via Aldgate6 tph to Edgware Road via Embankment

Landmark Near Tower Hill tube station

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

+44 (0)20 7403 3761

An iconic London landmark and one of Britain's best loved historic sites, Tower Bridge is open to the public 363 days a year. Within the Bridge's iconic structure and magnificent Victorian Engine rooms, the Tower Bridge Exhibition is the best way of exploring the most famous bridge in the world! Come learn about this incredible feat of Victorian engineering, discover how the Bridge is raised and enjoy stunning panoramic views across London from our high-level walkways, 42 metres above the River Thames. Opening Times: 10:00 - 18:30 (last admission 17:30) Facebook is a public page. Please bear this in mind when posting your comments, especially regarding personal information. Further information on the City of London Corporation can be found at www.cityoflondon.gov.uk. The City of London Corporation is always happy to hear from you but please keep posts relevant. All comments will be monitored by Facebook and the City and any comments that are offensive or inappropriate will be removed. People who persistently cause conflict or offence to others will be removed and blocked from our social media pages.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (King William Street)
London, United Kingdom SE1

Darwin Brasserie - Sky Garden, the Walkie Talkie Building
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6

0333 772 0020

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

Monument to the Great Fire of London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Monument Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8AH

0207 626 2717

The Monument to the Great Fire of London, more commonly known simply as the Monument, is a Doric column in the City of London, near the northern end of London Bridge, that commemorates the Great Fire of London.It stands at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill, 202 ft (62 m) tall and 202 ft (62 m) from the spot in Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started on 2 September 1666. Another monument, the Golden Boy of Pye Corner, marks the point near Smithfield where the fire was stopped. Constructed between 1671 and 1677, it was built on the site of St. Margaret's, Fish Street, the first church to be burnt down by the Great Fire.The Monument comprises a fluted Doric column built of Portland stone topped with a gilded urn of fire. It was designed by Christopher Wren and Robert Hooke. Its height marks its distance from the site of the shop of Thomas Farynor, the king's baker, where the Great Fire began.The top of the Monument is reached by a narrow winding staircase of 311 steps. A mesh cage was added in the mid-19th century at the top to prevent people jumping off, after six people had committed suicide from the structure between 1788 and 1842.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 Battlebridge Lane, Southwark
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

20 Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 6

20 Fenchurch Street is a commercial skyscraper in London that takes its name from its address on Fenchurch Street, in the historic City of London financial district. It has been nicknamed 'The Walkie-Talkie' because of its distinctive shape. Construction was completed in spring 2014, and the top-floor 'sky garden' was opened in January 2015. The 34-storey building is 160m tall, making it the sixth-tallest building in the City of London and the 12th tallest in London.Designed by architect Rafael Viñoly and costing over £200 million, 20 Fenchurch Street features a highly distinctive top-heavy form which appears to burst upward and outward. A large viewing deck, bar and restaurants are included on the top three floors; these are, with restrictions, open to the public.The tower was originally proposed at nearly 200m tall but its design was scaled down after concerns about its visual impact on the nearby St Paul's Cathedral and Tower of London. It was subsequently approved in 2006 with the revised height. Even after the height reduction there were continued concerns from heritage groups about its impact on the surrounding area. The project was consequently the subject of a public inquiry; in 2007 this ruled in the developers' favour and the building was granted full planning permission. In 2015 it was awarded the Carbuncle Cup for the worst new building in the UK in the previous 12 months.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

City Hall
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
110 The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2AA

+44 (0) 20 7983 4000

Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Tower of London
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4AB

0870 756 6060

The Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom are 141 historic ceremonial objects, including the regalia and vestments worn by kings and queens of the country at their coronations, as well as processional and anointing objects, plate, and christening fonts.A symbol of 1,000 years of monarchy, the sovereign's coronation regalia is the only working collection in Europe – other present-day monarchies have abandoned coronations in favour of inauguration or enthronement ceremonies – and is the largest set of regalia in the world. Objects used to invest and crown the monarch variously denote his or her roles as Head of State, Supreme Governor of the Church of England, and Commander-in-Chief of the British Armed Forces. Wives of kings are crowned as queen consort with a plainer set of regalia. Since 1831, a new crown has been made specially for each queen consort.The use of regalia by monarchs in Britain can be traced back to its early history. Most of the present collection as a whole dates from around 350 years ago when King Charles II acceded to the throne. The medieval coronation regalia and Tudor state regalia had been either sold or melted down by Oliver Cromwell, a republican who overthrew the monarchy in 1649, during the English Civil War. Notable among the precious stones which adorn the regalia are Cullinan I (the largest clear cut diamond in the world), Cullinan II (second-largest of the Cullinan diamonds), the Koh-i-Noor diamond with a history going back to the 13th century, the Stuart Sapphire, St Edward's Sapphire, and the Black Prince's Ruby – a large spinel worn by King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt.

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
SE1 2UP
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

Butler's Wharf
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Butlers Wharf West 40 Shad Thames Flat 9
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3403

Butler's Wharf is an English historic building on the south bank of the River Thames, just east of London's Tower Bridge, now housing luxury flats and restaurants. Lying between the picturesque street Shad Thames and the Thames Path, it overlooks both the bridge and St Katharine Docks on the other side of the river. Butler's Wharf is also used as a term for the surrounding area.HistoryButler's Wharf was built between 1871-73 as a shipping wharf and warehouse complex, accommodating goods unloaded from ships using the port of London. It contained what was reputedly the largest tea warehouse in the world. During the 20th century, Butler's Wharf and other warehouses in the area fell into disuse.From 1975-78, the artists' space at 2B Butler's Wharf was a key venue for early UK video art and performance art, used among others by Derek Jarman and the artists and dancers of X6 Dance Collective who published a magazine called New Dance for a number of years. Some of these people subsequently founded Chisenhale Studios and Chisenhale Dance Space, including Philip Jeck.In 1984, Butler's Wharf and the portion of Shad Thames running behind it featured prominently in the Doctor Who serial Resurrection of the Daleks.

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

122 Leadenhall Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 4

122 Leadenhall Street, or the Leadenhall Building, is a 225 m tall building on Leadenhall Street in London. The commercial skyscraper, opened in July 2014, was designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners and is informally known as "The Cheesegrater" because of its distinctive wedge shape. It is one of a number of new tall buildings recently completed or currently under construction in the City of London financial area, including 20 Fenchurch Street, 22 Bishopsgate, and The Scalpel.The building is opposite the Lloyd's building, also designed by Rogers, which is the home of the insurance market Lloyd's of London. Until 2007 the Leadenhall site was occupied by the P&O Tower, a building owned by the developer British Land and designed by Gollins Melvin Ward Partnership that was completed in 1968 as a brother to the still existing Commercial Union tower, now called St. Helen's. That building was demolished in preparation for redevelopment of the site. The project, initially delayed due to the financial crisis, was revived in 2010 and Oxford Properties co-developed the property in partnership with British Land.

122 Leadenhall Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 4

122 Leadenhall Street, or the Leadenhall Building, is a 225 m tall building on Leadenhall Street in London. The commercial skyscraper, opened in July 2014, was designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners and is informally known as "The Cheesegrater" because of its distinctive wedge shape. It is one of a number of new tall buildings recently completed or currently under construction in the City of London financial area, including 20 Fenchurch Street, 22 Bishopsgate, and The Scalpel.The building is opposite the Lloyd's building, also designed by Rogers, which is the home of the insurance market Lloyd's of London. Until 2007 the Leadenhall site was occupied by the P&O Tower, a building owned by the developer British Land and designed by Gollins Melvin Ward Partnership that was completed in 1968 as a brother to the still existing Commercial Union tower, now called St. Helen's. That building was demolished in preparation for redevelopment of the site. The project, initially delayed due to the financial crisis, was revived in 2010 and Oxford Properties co-developed the property in partnership with British Land.

Lloyd's building
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 7

0845 300 0033

The Lloyd's building is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. It is located on the former site of East India House in Lime Street, in London's main financial district, the City of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior.Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by Historic England to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch".HistoryThe first Lloyd's building had been built on this site in 1928. In 1958, due to expansion of the market, a new building was constructed across the road at 51 Lime Street . Lloyd's now occupied the Heysham Building and the Cooper Building.By the 1970s Lloyd's had again outgrown these two buildings and proposed to extend the Cooper Building. In 1978, the corporation ran an architectural competition which attracted designs from practices such as Foster Associates, Arup and I.M. Pei. Lloyd's commissioned Richard Rogers to redevelop the site, and the original 1928 building on the western corner of Lime and Leadenhall Streets was demolished to make way for the present one which was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 18 November 1986. The 1928 building's entrance at 12 Leadenhall Street was preserved and forms a rather incongruous attachment to the 1986 structure. Demolition of the 1958 building commenced in 2004 to make way for the 26-storey Willis Building.

Lloyd's building
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 7

0845 300 0033

The Lloyd's building is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. It is located on the former site of East India House in Lime Street, in London's main financial district, the City of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior.Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by Historic England to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch".HistoryThe first Lloyd's building had been built on this site in 1928. In 1958, due to expansion of the market, a new building was constructed across the road at 51 Lime Street . Lloyd's now occupied the Heysham Building and the Cooper Building.By the 1970s Lloyd's had again outgrown these two buildings and proposed to extend the Cooper Building. In 1978, the corporation ran an architectural competition which attracted designs from practices such as Foster Associates, Arup and I.M. Pei. Lloyd's commissioned Richard Rogers to redevelop the site, and the original 1928 building on the western corner of Lime and Leadenhall Streets was demolished to make way for the present one which was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 18 November 1986. The 1928 building's entrance at 12 Leadenhall Street was preserved and forms a rather incongruous attachment to the 1986 structure. Demolition of the 1958 building commenced in 2004 to make way for the 26-storey Willis Building.

Minories
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
64-73 Minories
London, United Kingdom EC3N 1

Minories is the name of both a former civil parish, also known as Minories Holy Trinity, and a street in the City of London, close to the Tower of London.HistoryToponymyThe name is derived from the abbey of the Minoresses of St. Mary of the Order of St. Clare, founded in 1294, which stood on such sites; a "minoress" was a nun in the Second Order of the Order of Friars Minor (or Franciscans). (A small side-road off Minories is named St. Clare Street.) The name can also be found in other English towns including Birmingham, Colchester, Newcastle upon Tyne and Stratford-upon-Avon.RomansIn September 2013, an extremely well preserved Roman statue of an eagle, was discovered on a building site on the street. The statue is considered to be one of the best examples of Romano-British sculpture in existence.GovernanceMinories was part of the ancient parish of St Botolph without Aldgate until 1557, when it became extra-parochial.The area was a papal peculiar outside the jurisdiction of the English bishops. The abbey was dissolved in 1539, the property passing to the Crown. The chapel of the former abbey was used as the Church of Holy Trinity, Minories, and other buildings became an armoury and later workhouse. In 1686, the area became part of the Liberties of the Tower of London. The Minories area also historically hosted a large Jewish community.

The Leadenhall Building
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom

Public Transportation Near Tower Hill tube station

London Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

Embankment Pier
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom WC2N 6NU

03432221234

London River Services is responsible for managing this pier.

Liverpool Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Great Eastern Walk
London, United Kingdom EC2M 7Q

08457 484950

Liverpool Street est une station du métro de Londres en correspondance avec la gare de Liverpool Street. La station est sur la Central line, la Circle line, la Hammersmith & City line et la Metropolitan line en zone 1.Lieu remarquable à proximité Gare de Liverpool StreetVoir aussiArticles connexes Attentats du 7 juillet 2005 à Londres Liste des stations du métro de Londres Liste des stations fermées du métro de Londres Stansted Express

Platform Nine and Three Quarters
Distance: 2.5 mi Tourist Information
King's Cross Station
London, United Kingdom NW1 2

Westminster Millennium Pier
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2JH

03432221234

London River Services is responsible for managing this pier.

Holiday Inn King's Cross
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
1 King's Cross Road
London, United Kingdom WC1X 9HX

+44 (0) 20 7833 3900

Blackfriars station
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
174 Queen Victoria Street
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4

02072365474

Blackfriars, also known as London Blackfriars, is a central London railway station and connected London Underground station located in the City of London. Its platforms span the River Thames, occupying the length of Blackfriars Railway Bridge, a short distance downstream from Blackfriars Bridge. Since 2011 there have been station buildings, with passenger entrances, on both sides of the river; the north bank entrance is on the south side of Queen Victoria Street and the south bank entrance, opened in 2011, is adjacent to Blackfriars Road. It is the only London station to span the Thames, with entrances on both banks.The main line station was opened by the London, Chatham and Dover Railway company with the name St. Paul's in 1886. The Underground station opened in 1870 with the arrival of the Metropolitan District Railway. The station was renamed Blackfriars in 1937. National Rail services are now provided by Southeastern and Thameslink while the Underground station is now served by both the District line and, since 1949, the Circle line. The Underground station was closed for renovation work for nearly three years between 2009 and 2012. The station falls within fare zone 1.

Premier Inn London Kings Cross
Distance: 2.5 mi Tourist Information
26-30 York Way
London, United Kingdom N1 9AA

0871 527 8672

Right at the hub of London's rail network, Premier Inn King's Cross puts the capital and Europe on your doorstep. With easy connections across the UK, France and Belgium, the world's your oyster.

Tower Millennium Pier
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Lower Thames Street
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4DT

03432221234

London River Services is responsible for managing this pier.

London King's Cross Theatre
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
Good's Way, King's Cross, London, N1C 4UR
London, United Kingdom N1C 4UR

0844 871 7604

Festival Pier
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Riverside Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 8XZ

03432221234

London River Services is responsible for managing this pier.

Holborn tube station
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
88-94 Kingsway
London, United Kingdom WC2B 6

020 7222 1234

Holborn is a London Underground station in Holborn, central London. It is served by the Central and Piccadilly lines. On the Central line the station is between Tottenham Court Road and Chancery Lane stations; on the Piccadilly line it is between Covent Garden and Russell Square. The station is located at the junction of High Holborn and Kingsway and is in Travelcard Zone 1. Close by are the British Museum, Lincoln's Inn Fields, Red Lion Square, Bloomsbury Square and Sir John Soane's Museum.Located at the junction of two earlier tube railway schemes, the station was opened in 1906 by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR). The station entrances and below ground circulation were largely reconstructed for the introduction of escalators and the opening of Central line platforms in 1933, making the station the only interchange between the lines. Before 1994, Holborn was the northern terminus of the short and little-frequented Piccadilly line branch to Aldwych and two platforms originally used for this service are disused. One of the disused platforms has been used for location filming when a London Underground station platform is needed.

Vauxhall bus station
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
Vauxhall Cross
London, United Kingdom SW8 2LE

+44 343 222 1234

Vauxhall Bus Station serves the area of Vauxhall in the London Borough of Lambeth, England. The station is owned and maintained by Transport for London and is the second busiest in London.The bus station, which is adjacent to the Vauxhall railway and tube stations, is situated on Bondway between Wandsworth Road, Kennington Road and Parry Street.Only one route terminates there, route 156.LayoutIn 2004, bus stops were moved from outlying roads to a central point at the Vauxhall Cross road junction to create an improved transport interchange.The bus station was designed by Arup Associates. It incorporates two cantilevered arms that contain 167 solar panels, which provide a third of the bus station's electricity.The nine stands are served by Transport for London contracted operators Abellio London, Arriva London, London Central and London General.ConnectionsDirectly south next to the bus station is Vauxhall station for London Underground Victoria line and National Rail South West Trains.

Loughborough Junction
Distance: 3.2 mi Tourist Information
Loughborough Junction
London, United Kingdom SW9 7

3457-484950

Loughborough Junction is an area of South London, in the London Borough of Lambeth, which is located between Brixton, Camberwell and Herne Hill. It is centred on a junction consisting of nine railway bridges, six of which can be seen at once from the centre of the junction.HistoryToponymyThe name "Loughborough Junction" relates to the railway junction immediately to the north of the station of the same name, where spurs diverge from the north–south line that forms the Wimbledon Loop part of the Thameslink network, to connect with the east–west South London Line. The section of the South London Line which passes through Loughborough Junction is one of the major cross-London rail freight routes, carrying traffic from the Channel Tunnel and the ports of the Thames Estuary to destinations west and north of London.GovernanceLoughborough Junction Action Group (LJAG) was formed by volunteer residents in 2008 with a view to regenerate the area. LJAG worked with the council to form a masterplan for the area, with consultation events held with local residents to ascertain how they would like the area to be improved. These plans were developed during 2013.GeographyLoughborough Junction can be found within the postal codes of SE5 and SW9, which shows its southern central position. It forms a zone between Herne Hill, Brixton and Camberwell. The main road passing through it is Coldharbour Lane, which runs from central Brixton all the way to Camberwell. The name 'Loughborough Junction' came about because the area was once the location of Loughborough House, the residence of Henry Hastings, 1st Baron Loughborough, which was previously the Manor House of Lambeth Wick; there is no other significant connection with the Midlands town of Loughborough or with the railways that serve it.

Camberwell Bus Garage
Distance: 2.6 mi Tourist Information
1 Warner Road
London, United Kingdom SE5 9NE

020 7064 5700

New Cross Bus Garage
Distance: 2.8 mi Tourist Information
208 New Cross Road
London, United Kingdom SE14 5UH

02070645600

Bankside Pier
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Bankside, Southwark
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DT

03432221234

London River Services is responsible for managing this pier.

Blackfriars Millennium Pier
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
The Old Pumphouse, Paul's Walk
London, United Kingdom EC4V 3QR

03432221234

London River Services is responsible for managing this pier.

The Hill Station Cafe
Distance: 3.2 mi Tourist Information
Kitto Road
London, United Kingdom SE14 5

020 7635 2955

Stockwell Bus Garage
Distance: 3.3 mi Tourist Information
Binfield Road
London, United Kingdom SW4 6

02078195800

Stockwell Garage is a large bus garage in Stockwell, London, coded \"SW\" by London Transport. It was designed by Adie, Button and Partners, with the engineer A E Beer, and was opened in 1952. On a cursory view of the exterior, it is typical of much of the architecture built in the post war reconstruction period in London around the Festival of Britain. There was a steel shortage at the time, so concrete was used for the roof structure instead of the steel girder structure that had previously been the norm. At Stockwell the opportunity was taken to create a bravura piece of reinforced concrete design. The 393 ft long roof structure is supported by ten very shallow \"two-hinged\" arched ribs. Each is 7 ft deep at the centre of the arch, 10 ft 6 in at the end, and spans 194 ft Cantilevered barrel vaults between, topped by large skylights, span the 42 ft between each pair of ribs. The vaults are crossed by smaller ribs to prevent torsion. Seen from the outside, the main arches are visible as outward-leaning buttresses, with a segmental curve to each bay forming a flowing roof line. The garage provides 73,350 sq ft of unobstructed parking space and could originally house 200 buses.

Train Station Near Tower Hill tube station

London Liverpool Street Station
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Liverpool Street
London, United Kingdom EC2M 7QH

03457 11 41 41

London Liverpool Street station has 123 million visitors each year and is a stunning example of the fusion of modern facilities within a traditional environment. Owned and operated by Network Rail. All the history of the station at http://www.networkrail.co.uk/virtualarchive/liverpool-street/

London Bridge Station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
21 Railway Approach
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

03457 11 41 41

London Bridge is the oldest railway station in London, and one of the busiest. Owned and operated by Network Rail. All the history of the station at networkrail.co.uk/virtualarchive/london-bridge/

London Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (King William Street)
London, United Kingdom SE1

London Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

London Fenchurch Street Station
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 4AJ

Station enquiries 08457 11 41 41

Fenchurch Street was the first railway station to be located within the City of London. Owned and operated by Network Rail.

Liverpool Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Great Eastern Walk
London, United Kingdom EC2M 7Q

08457 484950

Liverpool Street est une station du métro de Londres en correspondance avec la gare de Liverpool Street. La station est sur la Central line, la Circle line, la Hammersmith & City line et la Metropolitan line en zone 1.Lieu remarquable à proximité Gare de Liverpool StreetVoir aussiArticles connexes Attentats du 7 juillet 2005 à Londres Liste des stations du métro de Londres Liste des stations fermées du métro de Londres Stansted Express

London Cannon Street Station
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Cannon Street
London, United Kingdom EC4N 6AP

03457 11 41 41

Cannon Street station is at the heart of London's financial district and it is closed on Sundays. Owned and operated by Network Rail.

Bank London Underground and DLR Station
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Bank/Monument Complex, Princes Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 3LA

08432221234

These transport services are managed by Transport for London.

Liverpool Street London Underground Station
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Liverpool Street
London, United Kingdom EC2M 7PP

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

wagamama
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1 Clink Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DG

020 7403 3659

London Bridge London Underground Station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
21 Duke Street Hill
London, United Kingdom SE1 2SW

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Tower Hill London Underground Station
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Trinity Square
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4DJ

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Giraffe Restaurant, Spitalfields Market, Liverpool Street, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Spitalfields Market
London, United Kingdom E1 6DW

0203 116 2000

Aldgate East London Underground Station
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Whitechapel High Street
London, United Kingdom E1 7PT

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Aldgate London Underground Station
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Aldgate High Street
London, United Kingdom EC3N 1AH

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Monument London Underground Station
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
King William Street
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9AA

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

The Green Man Pub - Bank Tube Station
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
No. 1 Poultry Bank Station exit 9 City of London
London, United Kingdom EC2R 8EJ

020 7248 3529

BPP London Liverpool Street
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
3 London Wall Buildings, Fl 4th
London, United Kingdom EC2M 5PD

Fenchurch Seafood Bar & Grill, 20 Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch St
London, United Kingdom EC3M 3BY

0333 772 0020

The Lane Bar, Osborn Street, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
12-20 Osborn Street
London, United Kingdom E1 6TE

02073771797

Transit Stop Near Tower Hill tube station

Blackfriars station
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
174 Queen Victoria Street
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4

02072365474

Blackfriars, also known as London Blackfriars, is a central London railway station and connected London Underground station located in the City of London. Its platforms span the River Thames, occupying the length of Blackfriars Railway Bridge, a short distance downstream from Blackfriars Bridge. Since 2011 there have been station buildings, with passenger entrances, on both sides of the river; the north bank entrance is on the south side of Queen Victoria Street and the south bank entrance, opened in 2011, is adjacent to Blackfriars Road. It is the only London station to span the Thames, with entrances on both banks.The main line station was opened by the London, Chatham and Dover Railway company with the name St. Paul's in 1886. The Underground station opened in 1870 with the arrival of the Metropolitan District Railway. The station was renamed Blackfriars in 1937. National Rail services are now provided by Southeastern and Thameslink while the Underground station is now served by both the District line and, since 1949, the Circle line. The Underground station was closed for renovation work for nearly three years between 2009 and 2012. The station falls within fare zone 1.

Whitechapel station
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
277 Whitechapel Road
London, United Kingdom E1 1

020 7247 9290

Whitechapel is a London Underground and London Overground station on Whitechapel Road in the Whitechapel neighbourhood of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets in the East End of London, England. The station is located on the east–west tracks shared by the District line and Hammersmith & City line and is on the north–south route of the East London Line. The station was opened in 1876 by the East London Railway on a line connecting Liverpool Street station in the City of London with destinations south of the River Thames. The station site was expanded in 1884, and again in 1902, to accommodate the services of the District Railway, a predecessor of the London Underground.The London Overground section of the station was closed between 2007 and 27 April 2010 for rebuilding, initially reopening for a preview service on 27 April 2010 with the full service starting on 23 May 2010. In the near future, Whitechapel will become a station on the Crossrail route. The station is in Zone 2.Nearby places of interest include the Royal London Hospital, the Blind Beggar public house, and the former Wickhams department store. There are also many tours in this area focusing on the Jack the Ripper murders.

Stockwell tube station
Distance: 3.3 mi Tourist Information
256 Clapham Rd
London, United Kingdom SW9 9

020 7222 1234

Stockwell is a London Underground station in Stockwell in the London Borough of Lambeth. It is located on the Northern line between Oval and Clapham North stations, and on the Victoria line between Brixton and Vauxhall stations. It is in Travelcard Zone 2.HistoryOriginal stationStockwell station was ceremonially opened on 4 November 1890 by the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII), as the most southerly station on the City & South London Railway (C&SLR) – London's first deep-level tube railway. Passenger services began just over one month later on 18 December 1890.The station was built with a single island platform with tracks on either side, an arrangement rarely used underground on the network, but which exists today at Clapham North and Clapham Common. Stockwell's original platform was further north than the new ones, and trains pass them today. The other terminus of the C&SLR line was King William Street in the City of London. In 1900, when an extension to Clapham Common was opened, Stockwell ceased to be a terminus. A flight of stairs at the south end of the platform was also added to take passengers to a subway that passed over the new northbound tunnel and joined the lift shaft at a higher level.

Fenchurch Street railway station
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Pl
London, United Kingdom EC3M 4AJ

020 7488 3725

Fenchurch Street, also known as London Fenchurch Street, is a central London railway terminus in the southeastern corner of the City of London. From it, trains managed by c2c run on lines built by the London and Blackwall Railway (L&BR) and the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway (LTSR) towards east London and south Essex.The station opened in 1841 to serve trains on the L&BR and was rebuilt in 1854 when the LTSR, a joint venture between the L&BR and the Eastern Counties Railway (ECR), began operating. The ECR also operated services at Fenchurch Street to relieve congestion at its Bishopsgate terminus. In 1862 the Great Eastern Railway was created by amalgamating various East Anglian railway companies (including the ECR) and it shared the station with the LTSR until 1912, when the LTSR was bought by the Midland Railway. The station came under ownership of the London & North Eastern Railway (LNER) following the Railways Act 1921, and was shared by LNER and London Midland & Scottish Railway (LMS) services until nationalisation in 1948. The line from the station was electrified in 1961, and controversially closed for seven weeks in 1994.

Kennington tube station
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Kennington Tube Station
London, United Kingdom SE11 4

Kennington is a London Underground station on Kennington Park Road in Kennington on both the Charing Cross and Bank branches of the Northern line. It is within the London Borough of Southwark. Its neighbouring stations to the north are Waterloo on the Charing Cross branch and Elephant & Castle on the Bank branch; the next station to the south is Oval. The station is in Travelcard Zone 2.HistoryThe station was opened on 18 December 1890 as part of London's first deep-level tube, the City & South London Railway (C&SLR) (now the Bank branch of the Northern line). The name 'Kennington' was adopted instead of 'Kennington Park Road' although in fact it was in the civil parish of Newington and thence became part of Southwark rather than in the Kennington part of Lambeth. The layout was originally similar to the current arrangement at Borough, with one platform (the northbound) having level access to the lift, and the other (the southbound) being one floor below it.

Southwark tube station
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
68-70 Blackfriars Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 8NW

0845 300 7000

Southwark is a London Underground station in the London Borough of Southwark at the corner of Blackfriars Road and The Cut. It is between and stations on the Jubilee line and is in Travelcard Zone 1. It was opened on 20 November 1999 as part of the Jubilee Line Extension. The station is somewhat west of historic Southwark, which is served by Borough tube station and London Bridge station. Its entrance is across the street from the disused Blackfriars Road railway station.The original plan for the Extension did not include a station between those at Waterloo and London Bridge; Southwark station was added after lobbying by the local council, it is in fact sited right next to the borough's boundary with Lambeth at Joane Street. Although it is close to Waterloo, not near the Bankside attractions it was intended to serve, and its only National Rail interchange is to main line station; the passenger usage matches those of other minor central stations. It does however get over double the traffic of nearby Borough station and around triple Lambeth North.HistorySouthwark station was designed by Sir Richard MacCormac of MJP Architects. It is on a cramped site with the platforms underneath the Victorian main line viaduct between Waterloo East and London Bridge stations. The site presented significant technical and architectural difficulties which were resolved by constructing two concourses at different levels.

Bermondsey tube station
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
142-145 Jamaica Rd
London, United Kingdom SE16 4

020 7222 1234

Bermondsey is a London Underground station. It is situated in the eastern part of Bermondsey in the London Borough of Southwark, and so also serves the western part of Rotherhithe.The station itself was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects and was originally intended to have a multi-storey office building sitting on top. London Underground have yet to realise this second phase of the scheme.It is on the Jubilee line, having been built as part of the Jubilee Line Extension between and stations. It is notable for its extensive use of natural light. The main station entrance is situated on the south side of Jamaica Road. The station is in Travelcard Zone 2.The station was opened on 17 September 1999.Station designLike its extension counterparts, Bermondsey station was designed with a futuristic style in mind by Ian Ritchie Architects. Extensively using natural light, it is built in both a cut-and-cover and tube design. The cut-and-cover section is supported by latticed concrete beams allowing light to penetrate to the platform level. The escalators down to this area are lined by flat concrete with a high ceiling to give a feeling of spaciousness. The bored section is encased with metal to keep in line the futuristic and metallic theme of the extension. As with all other deep level stations on the Jubilee Line Extension, Bermondsey station has platform screen doors for passenger safety and comfort.

Barbican tube station
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
135 Aldersgate St
London, United Kingdom EC1M 7

20-72532190

Barbican is a London Underground station situated near the Barbican Estate, on the edge of the ward of Farringdon Within, in the City of London. It has been known by various names since its opening in 1865, mostly in reference to the neighbouring ward of Aldersgate.The station is served by the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, and is situated between and Moorgate stations, in Travelcard Zone 1. Until 2009, Barbican was additionally served by Thameslink services to and from Moorgate.LocationBarbican station lies in an east-west-aligned trench with cut-and-cover tunnels at either end. The modern entrance gives access from Aldersgate Street, through a 1990s building, to a much older footbridge leading to the eastern end of the platforms. To the north of the station are the rears of buildings that face onto Charterhouse Street, Charterhouse Square and Carthusian Street. To the south are the rears of buildings that face onto Long Lane, and to the west is Hayne Street. The station is close to the Barbican Estate, Barbican Centre, City of London School for Girls, St Bartholomew-the-Great, and Smithfield.

St. Paul's tube station
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
1 Cheapside
London, United Kingdom EC2V 6

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

St. Paul's is a London Underground station located in the City of London financial district. The station, which takes its name from the nearby St Paul's Cathedral, is on the Central line, between Bank and Chancery Lane stations, and is in fare zone 1.It should not be confused with City Thameslink railway station which opened in 1990 with the name St. Paul's Thameslink, but is some distance from the Underground station. That station was subsequently renamed City Thameslink to avoid confusion for the emergency services, but for some years afterwards many maps and guidebooks in circulation continued to carry the earlier name.HistoryThe station was opened by the Central London Railway (CLR) on 30 July 1900 with the name Post Office, after the headquarters of the General Post Office on nearby St Martin's Le Grand. The name Post Office was possibly chosen instead of the more obvious St. Paul's to differentiate it from a South Eastern Railway (SER) station which already held that name (but which today is called Blackfriars).

Top Office Machines
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
133-135 Bethnal Green Road
London, United Kingdom E2 7DG

07796955572

Haggerston railway station
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Lee Street
London, United Kingdom E8 4

Haggerston railway station is in the London Borough of Hackney, in London. The station is located on the Kingsland Viaduct in the Haggerston district at the junction of Arbutus Street and Frederick Terrace, near Kingsland Road. The main entrance is in Lee Street. The station was built as part of the extended East London Line under the control of the London Rail division of Transport for London. The next station north is and the next station south is. It is in Travelcard Zone 2.ConstructionThe station was opened to the general public on 27 April 2010 with a limited service running between Dalston Junction and or. On 23 May 2010 services were extended from New Cross Gate to West Croydon or, whilst through trains to began operating at the December 2012 timetable change.The station was designed by Acanthus LW Architects. The design features towers that serve to strengthen the station's urban presence and recall the language of London's stations of the 1930s designed by Charles Holden. The building is clad externally in precast concrete with screens of cast glass planks. Internally, the building features orange mosaic tiling and a large mural to Edmond Halley, who was born in the area.Original stationA station of the same name on the North London Line previously occupied a site immediately to the south of the modern station from 1865 to 1940. It was served by local services from Broad Street to Poplar on the City Extension of the North London Railway.

Weasley Büyücü Şakaları
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Diagon Yolu
London, United Kingdom 44

5791224

Kural aşığı değiliz... Sizide kısıtlamayacağız. Ama dükkanda izinsiz link ve küfür istemiyoruz. Olursa engelleme büyüsü yersiniz, bizden söylemesi... Çok ciddiyiz . :)

Local Business Near Tower Hill tube station

Tower Hill London Underground Station
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Trinity Square
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4DJ

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Maxela
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
84 Old Brompton Rd
London, United Kingdom SW7 3LQ

020 7589 5834

Societe Generale
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Tower Hill
London, United Kingdom

The Grange City Hotel
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Cooper's Row
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2BQ

020 7863 3700

Commanding sweeping views over the River Thames and the Tower of London, the 5-Star Grange City Hotel offers accommodation, hospitality and events services. The hotel is located in the heart of the City’s famous business district and has easy access to Canary Wharf, the Square Mile and London’s most vibrant tourist attractions.

Minories
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
64-73 Minories
London, United Kingdom EC3N 1

Minories is the name of both a former civil parish, also known as Minories Holy Trinity, and a street in the City of London, close to the Tower of London.HistoryToponymyThe name is derived from the abbey of the Minoresses of St. Mary of the Order of St. Clare, founded in 1294, which stood on such sites; a "minoress" was a nun in the Second Order of the Order of Friars Minor (or Franciscans). (A small side-road off Minories is named St. Clare Street.) The name can also be found in other English towns including Birmingham, Colchester, Newcastle upon Tyne and Stratford-upon-Avon.RomansIn September 2013, an extremely well preserved Roman statue of an eagle, was discovered on a building site on the street. The statue is considered to be one of the best examples of Romano-British sculpture in existence.GovernanceMinories was part of the ancient parish of St Botolph without Aldgate until 1557, when it became extra-parochial.The area was a papal peculiar outside the jurisdiction of the English bishops. The abbey was dissolved in 1539, the property passing to the Crown. The chapel of the former abbey was used as the Church of Holy Trinity, Minories, and other buildings became an armoury and later workhouse. In 1686, the area became part of the Liberties of the Tower of London. The Minories area also historically hosted a large Jewish community.

Elements
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
10 Pepys St
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2NR

020 7265 6000

Novotel London Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
10 Pepys Street
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2NR

Pret A Manger America Square
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
3 America Square
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2LR

020 7932 5342

Fitness First
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1 America Square
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2LS

+44 (0) 20 7488 9311

ISIS London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
14a Rosebery Avenue and 3 Warner Yard
London, United Kingdom EC1R 4TD

0207 833 8335

Sceptre Court Campus
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
40 Tower Hill
London, United Kingdom

India Raj
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
105A Minories
London, United Kingdom EC3N 1

+44 (0) 20 7481 1022

The Forum
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Cooper's Row
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2

+44 (0) 20 7233 7373

10 Trinity Square
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
10 Trinity Square
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

Moslem Halal
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
14 Hessel St
London, United Kingdom E1 1PZ

(020) 76809175

City of London Medical Centre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
11-13 Crosswall
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2

020 7488 5060

Weatherspoons Tower Hill London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
15 Trinity Square
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4AA

020 7481 0513

One America Square
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
17 Crosswall
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2SG

Jamies
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
119-121 Minories
London, United Kingdom EC3N 1DR

+44 (0) 20 7709 9900

Witherspoons London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
87-91 Mansell Street
London, United Kingdom E1 4