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Tower Hill tube station, London | Tourist Information


24-25 Great Tower St
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7222 1234

Tower Hill is a London Underground station located on Tower Hill in Greater London, England. The station is situated in the East End of London and Central London which is on the Circle line between Monument and Aldgate stations, and on the District line between Monument and Aldgate East. Tower Hill is is a short distance from Tower Gateway station for the Docklands Light Railway and National Rail at Fenchurch Street station for regional services in neighbouring Tower ward of the City of London, and Tower Millennium Pier for River Services.The entrance to Tower Hill station is a few metres from one of the largest remaining segments of the Roman London Wall which once surrounded the historic City of London. The station was built on the site of the former Tower of London tube station that closed in 1884. The present Tower Hill station opened in 1967 and replaced a nearby station with the same name but which was originally called Mark Lane, that was slightly farther west.

Landmark Near Tower Hill tube station

Moroccan food
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
messanger street
London, sE171TE

07479308699

Heritage Tours
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
15 Alma Grove
London, EA1

01843234 345

Driscoll House
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
172 New Kent Road
London, SE1 4

020 7703 4175

Driscoll House is a building at 172 New Kent Road, London, England, which has operated as a hostel since 1913. The building is on the south side of New Kent Road, between the Bricklayers' Arms flyover and Elephant and Castle station, and is a well-detailed example of the pre-World War I institutional Baroque style.Ada Lewis HouseWhen it opened as "Ada Lewis House" in 1913, it was one of the first of a small number of accommodation places for women in London. The opening ceremony was performed by Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, and the building was named after Ada Lewis, widow of philanthropist Samuel Lewis.Driscoll HouseThe building was eventually bought by Terence Driscoll, founder of the International Language Club in Croydon. He renamed the building after himself, and two plaques were later added to the front of the building in remembrance of the 335,451 men and women of the Commonwealth (left plaque) and the 292,131 Americans (right plaque), who gave their lives in the two World Wars. The plaques were unveiled on 13 August 1995. The left plaque was unveiled by Mr Driscoll, and the right plaque was unveiled by representative of Admiral William James Crowe, US Ambassador to the UK from 1994 to 1997.

New Kent Road
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
New Kent Road
London,

New Kent Road is a 1km road in the London Borough of Southwark. The road was created in 1751 when the Turnpike Trust upgraded a local footpath. This was done as part of the general road improvements associated with the creation of Westminster Bridge; in effect it was possible to travel from the West End/ Westminster to the south-east without having to go via the Borough of Southwark but could now cross St George's Fields to the junction of Newington Causeway and Newington Butts which is where New Kent Road starts at Elephant and Castle. The route runs eastward for a few hundred yards to the junction of Great Dover Street and Tower Bridge Road, known as Bricklayers' Arms, where it joins the original route to the south-east Old Kent Road (the A2).The road forms part of the London Inner Ring Road and as such forms part of the boundary of the London congestion charge zone. New Kent Road is designated the A201 which, to the north-west past the Elephant and Castle, becomes London Road.

The Jam Factory
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
27 Green Walk
London, SE1 4

Bermondsey Square
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Bermondsey Square, Tower Bridge Rd
London, SE1 3

020 7234 0805

Bermondsey Square is located on Tower Bridge Road in Bermondsey, part of the London Borough of Southwark, in south London, England. The location was formerly the site of the 11th century Bermondsey Abbey.Archaeological excavations were undertaken in 2005–6 by Pre-Construct Archaeology. The earliest medieval remains found were a Norman church from around 1080, which was recorded in the Domesday Book. The area has subsequently undergone redevelopment and Bermondsey Square now contains apartments, offices, a boutique hotel, restaurants and an independent cinema.Bermondsey Market is an antiques market located at Bermondsey Square, which operates every Friday.Long Lane leads northwest to Borough High Street. This lane used to link the Abbey with St George the Martyr church on the High Street. To the west and heading north from the square is Bermondsey Street, leading to Tooley Street and London Bridge station about ten minutes walk away.

Bermondsey Market
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Bermondsey Square, London, SE1 3UN
London, SE1 3

020 7234 0805

Bermondsey Market is an antiques market located at Bermondsey Square on Tower Bridge Road in Bermondsey, part of the London Borough of Southwark, in South London, England. The location was formerly the site of Bermondsey Abbey. The site underwent redevelopment in 2006 and the market remained open during this period.HistoryThe Caledonian Market moved to its current location in 1950 after the old Caledonian Market site in Islington was designated for redevelopment in the late 1940s.Marché ouvertThe opening hours of the Bermondsey Market from 6am until noon reflect the ancient law of market ouvert, which was abolished in 1995. Under this law, in number of designated markets, including Bermondsey Market, if an item was sold between sunset and sunrise then its provenance could not be questioned, so stolen goods could be traded and good title would pass to the purchaser. To quote Minister for the Arts Estelle Morris in July 2003 during the Second Reading of the Dealing In Cultural Objects Bill: I did not have information about marché ouvert in the deep recesses of my mind, but experts reliably inform me that it no longer exists. The hon. Member for Uxbridge will be surprised to learn that it has been abolished only recently. It used to exist in designated markets, including Bermondsey. I am sure that the promoter will be interested in telling the hon. Member for Southwark, North and Bermondsey about that. In it, items could be sold before sunrise. Believe it or not, in this land of ours, people could sell stolen—my officials put "dodgy" in brackets, but we do not use that term—objects. I assure hon. Members that it has been abolished. I hope that that deals with the fears of the hon. Member for Uxbridge.

Shere House Sculpture Garden
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Great Dover Street
London, SE14YG

An art installation by Grassroot Garden, commissioned by Tabard Gardens North Tenants & Residents Association, inspired by Geoffrey Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’. Funded by a Cleaner Greener Safer grant from Borough, Bankside & Walworth Community Council. In the 1380s, half a mile from present day Shere House (located at the intersection of Trinity Street and Great Dover St), the fictional characters from Geoffrey Chaucer’s ‘Canterbury Tales’ set off on their pilgrimage towards Canterbury Cathedral. Anglo-Saxon society and culture is satirised and brought to life through the narrator’s description of the pilgrims and the tales they told on their journey. This installation imagines the twenty-nine pilgrims passing through this site, each depicted by a carved pole tilted towards Canterbury. Each pilgrim represents a section of the social hierarchy of medieval Britain, from the aristocratic nobility though to the criminal class. The carved poles are arranged in ascending height to mirror the social strata portrayed in Chaucer’s verse. The space the carvings occupy was planted with native British plants shrubs and hedging in order to create a wildlife friendly micro-habitat. Species planted include field maple, hawthorn, blackthorn, dog rose, hazel, common buckthorn, alder buckthorn, sea buckthorn, dogwood, wayfaring tree, and guelder rose. Links to hundreds of articles and essays on Chaucer and his characters: http://www.luminarium.org/medlit/chaucessays.htm Context and overview of the Canterbury Tales: http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/canterbury/context.html Social hierarchy in the Canterbury Tales: http://www.angieanderson.net/images/The_Canterbury_Tales_-_Chaucer_s_Adherence_....pdf Wife of Bath and historical context for women: http://jcc.icc.org.ro/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/JCC-vol-1-no-2-2011-pages-128-140.pdf Growth of vernacular literature: http://www.oxforddnb.com/public/themes/94/94766.html Chaucer the narrator: http://engl381-mueller.wikispaces.umb.edu/file/view/barbara.nolan.boethius.pdf http://web.archive.org/web/20000229181339/http://www.geocities.com/CollegePark/Hall/1170/chaucerhtml/pilgrim.html

St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
193 Bermondsey St
London, SE1 3

020 7234 0100

St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey is an Anglican church dedicated to St Mary Magdalen in Bermondsey in the London Borough of Southwark. The present building is late 17th century and is a Grade II* listed building.Its parish extends as far as the Thames (including the south tower of Tower Bridge, City Hall and part of London Bridge Station). The parishes of St Olave Tooley Street, St Luke Grange Road and St John Horsleydown have all been merged into it.HistoryA church of this dedication is first recorded on this site in 1290, serving lay workers at Bermondsey Abbey. The design of that building is not known, but in 1680 the church was demolished and rebuilt, retaining the late medieval tower with a gothic window and arches. This re-building was completed in about 1690, and was followed by the addition of a north gallery in 1705 and a south gallery in 1794. The south gallery retains the complete original boxed pews but those in the north gallery have had the gates removed.Further alterations were made under the supervision of the architect George Porter in 1830. He remodelled the tower and west end in an unacademic Gothic style and restored the medieval west window. The changes also involved removing the portico and school which extended into Bermondsey Street. The interior was redecorated in the Gothic Revival style in 1852 and is described in a document which can be dated to 1865 - 1879 by reference to the then rector. In 1883 the chancel was lengthened and a new stained glass window was installed, as well as other "beautification". Surviving the Blitz, the west end interior was damaged by fire in 1971. The church was first rendered externally in 1829, and was most recently re-rendered in 1994. A detailed description given in the volume of the Victoria County History covering the area, published in 1912. The church is now the oldest building in the locality, and the medieval arches are still visible inside the tower behind the organ (not normally accessible to the public).

Neal's Yard Dairy
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
106-114 Druid Street
London, SE1 2HH

+44 (0) 20 7367 0799

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, SE1 2UP

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
SE1 2UP
London, SE1 2UP

The George Inn, Southwark
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
77 Borough High Street, Southwark, London, England
London, SE1 1

The George, or George Inn, is a public house established in the medieval period on Borough High Street in Southwark, London. Currently owned and leased by the National Trust, it is located about 250 m from the south side of the River Thames near London Bridge. It is the only surviving galleried London coaching inn. The first map of Southwark (Duchy of Lancaster ca1543) clearly shows it marked as 'Gorge'. It was formerly known as the George and Dragon, named after the legend of Saint George and the Dragon. It is by far the oldest pub in London.HistoryIn 1677 the George was rebuilt after a serious fire that destroyed most of medieval Southwark. There had been many such inns in this part of London. Probably the most famous was The Tabard where, in 1388, Chaucer began The Canterbury Tales. The Tabard was also rebuilt after the same fire, but was demolished in the late nineteenth century.Later, the Great Northern Railway used the George as a depot and pulled down two of its fronts to build warehousing. Now just the south face remains.The George was one of the many famous coaching inns in the days of Charles Dickens. Dickens in fact visited the George and referred to it in Little Dorrit. It is thought that the galleried inns were the inspiration of the original theatres, that the Players were on a dais in the courtyard with the standing audience next to them and that those paying a premium would be in the galleries with a better view.

The George Inn, Southwark
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
77 Borough High Street, Southwark, London, England
London, SE1 1

The George, or George Inn, is a public house established in the medieval period on Borough High Street in Southwark, London. Currently owned and leased by the National Trust, it is located about 250 m from the south side of the River Thames near London Bridge. It is the only surviving galleried London coaching inn. The first map of Southwark (Duchy of Lancaster ca1543) clearly shows it marked as 'Gorge'. It was formerly known as the George and Dragon, named after the legend of Saint George and the Dragon. It is by far the oldest pub in London.HistoryIn 1677 the George was rebuilt after a serious fire that destroyed most of medieval Southwark. There had been many such inns in this part of London. Probably the most famous was The Tabard where, in 1388, Chaucer began The Canterbury Tales. The Tabard was also rebuilt after the same fire, but was demolished in the late nineteenth century.Later, the Great Northern Railway used the George as a depot and pulled down two of its fronts to build warehousing. Now just the south face remains.The George was one of the many famous coaching inns in the days of Charles Dickens. Dickens in fact visited the George and referred to it in Little Dorrit. It is thought that the galleried inns were the inspiration of the original theatres, that the Players were on a dais in the courtyard with the standing audience next to them and that those paying a premium would be in the galleries with a better view.

Leviathan
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, SE1 9SG

Floatworks London Bridge
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
1 Thrale St
London, SE1 9HW

020 7357 0111

Hop Exchange
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
24 Southwark Street
London, SE1 1

The Hop Exchange is a Grade II listed building at No. 24 Southwark Street, London, in the Bankside area of the London Borough of Southwark. Opened in 1867 and designed by R.H. Moore it served as the centre for hop trading for the brewing industry.OverviewHops, introduced to England from the Netherlands, are still used in the brewing industry. They are harvested from farms (known as "hop gardens") in Kent, and in the 19th century they were brought by railway to London Bridge Station, or by boat up the River Thames. They were then stored in the many warehouses in the Borough area.The purpose of the Hop Exchange was to provide a single market centre for dealers in hops. A glass roof allowed business on the trading floor of the Great Hall to be conducted under natural light. There were many similar outcry floor exchanges across London, such as the Coal, Metal and Stock exchanges, but wartime bombing, fires, redevelopment and modernisation have left the Hop Exchange the only one still standing. However, a fire in 1920 led to the top two storeys being removed, and the Hop Exchange was then converted into offices.

Cora Brazier
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Borough High Street London, SE1 1JX UK
London, SE1 1JX

02073780411

Hays Galleria
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
1 Battle Bridge Lane
London, SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Borough Market
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
8 Southwark Streethh
London, SE1 1TL

+44 (0) 20 7407 1002

Community Guidelines We love to hear from our friends and visitors and encourage you all to post your photos and experiences about Borough Market. And if you ask us a question, we'll do our very best to answer it! The Page is not the place to advertise your own page or something that's not related to Borough Market. If you do, then we're sorry, but we'll remove your post. Likewise if you post spam or abusive messages, your post will be removed and you may be banned from our Page. If you're unhappy at anytime with the service or experience you have at the Market, you can email us directly at [email protected] You can find out more about our complaints procedure on our website: http://boroughmarket.org.uk/page/complaints-procedure. Thanks for following us on Facebook - we hope you enjoy our updates!

London Bridge bus station
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge Station Unit 10
London, SE1 9SP

020 7357 0069

London Bridge bus station serves the London Bridge area of the city of London and is situated at the London Bridge tube and rail station.There are three stands at the station which are situated on the station forecourt.London Buses routes 17, 43, 48, 141, 149 and 521 and night routes N21 and N343 serve the station.New bus stationA new bus station was built as part of the new Shard London Bridge "Gem" development which was open in 2012.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Unit 22, Hays Galleria, Tooley Street,
London, SE1 2HD

020 7407 4301

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property – then a brewhouse – in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

Southwark Cathedral
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, SE1 9DA

+44 20 7367 6700

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for more than 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since the creation of the diocese of Southwark in 1905.Between 1106 and 1538 it was the church of an Augustinian priory, Southwark Priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a parish church, with the new dedication of St Saviour's. The church was in the diocese of Winchester until 1877, when the parish of St Saviour's, along with other South London parishes, was transferred to the diocese of Rochester. The present building retains the basic form of the Gothic structure built between 1220 and 1420, although the nave is a late 19th-century reconstruction.HistoryLegendary originsThe 16th-century London historian John Stow recorded an account of the origins of the Southwark Priory of St Mary that he had heard from Bartholomew Linsted, who had been the last prior when the priory was dissolved. Linsted claimed it had been founded as a nunnery "long before the Conquest" by a maiden named Mary, on the profits of a ferry across the Thames she had inherited from her parents. Later it was converted into a college of priests by "Swithen, a noble lady". Finally in 1106 it was refounded as an Augustinian priory.

Anglican Diocese of Southwark
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Trinity House, 4 Chapel Court, Borough High Street
London, SE1 1HW

020 7939 9400

The Diocese of Southwark is one of the 42 dioceses of the Church of England, part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The diocese forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. It was created on 1 May 1905 from part of the ancient Diocese of Rochester that was served by a Suffragan Bishop of Southwark (1891–1905). Before 1877 the area was part of the Diocese of Winchester.The diocese covers Greater London south of the River Thames (except for the London Borough of Bexley and London Borough of Bromley) and east Surrey. Since the creation of the episcopal area scheme in 1991, the diocese is divided into three episcopal areas each of which contains two archdeaconries: Croydon Episcopal Area (overseen by the area Bishop of Croydon)Archdeaconry of Croydonincludes Deaneries of Croydon Addington, Croydon Central, Croydon North, Croydon South, and Suttonincludes Deaneries of Caterham, Godstone, and ReigateArchdeaconry of Lambethincludes Deaneries of Brixton, Clapham, Lambeth North, Lambeth South, Streatham, and Mertonincludes Deaneries of Battersea, Kingston, Richmond and Barnes, Tooting, and WandsworthArchdeaconry of Lewisham & Greenwichincludes Deaneries of Charlton, Deptford, East Lewisham, Eltham and Mottingham, Plumstead, and West Lewishamincludes Deaneries of Bermondsey, Camberwell, Dulwich, and Southwark and Newington In other ecclesiastical use, although having lost religious orders in the English Reformation, the diocese has the London home of the Archbishop of Canterbury and records centre of the Church of England in the diocese, Lambeth Palace.

Anglican Diocese of Southwark
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Trinity House, 4 Chapel Court, Borough High Street
London, SE1 1HW

020 7939 9400

The Diocese of Southwark is one of the 42 dioceses of the Church of England, part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The diocese forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. It was created on 1 May 1905 from part of the ancient Diocese of Rochester that was served by a Suffragan Bishop of Southwark (1891–1905). Before 1877 the area was part of the Diocese of Winchester.The diocese covers Greater London south of the River Thames (except for the London Borough of Bexley and London Borough of Bromley) and east Surrey. Since the creation of the episcopal area scheme in 1991, the diocese is divided into three episcopal areas each of which contains two archdeaconries: Croydon Episcopal Area (overseen by the area Bishop of Croydon)Archdeaconry of Croydonincludes Deaneries of Croydon Addington, Croydon Central, Croydon North, Croydon South, and Suttonincludes Deaneries of Caterham, Godstone, and ReigateArchdeaconry of Lambethincludes Deaneries of Brixton, Clapham, Lambeth North, Lambeth South, Streatham, and Mertonincludes Deaneries of Battersea, Kingston, Richmond and Barnes, Tooting, and WandsworthArchdeaconry of Lewisham & Greenwichincludes Deaneries of Charlton, Deptford, East Lewisham, Eltham and Mottingham, Plumstead, and West Lewishamincludes Deaneries of Bermondsey, Camberwell, Dulwich, and Southwark and Newington In other ecclesiastical use, although having lost religious orders in the English Reformation, the diocese has the London home of the Archbishop of Canterbury and records centre of the Church of England in the diocese, Lambeth Palace.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Morgan's Lane
London, SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Morgan's Lane
London, SE1 2

HMS „Belfast” – krążownik lekki brytyjskiej marynarki Royal Navy z okresu II wojny światowej.BudowaWraz z siostrzanym HMS „Edinburgh”, krążownik należał do typu Edinburgh, określanego też jako trzecia seria typu Town. Oba krążowniki zamówione przez Admiralicję w roku 1936 miały być brytyjską odpowiedzią na zwodowanie dwóch włoskich krążowników typu Giuseppe Garibaldi o wyporności 9591 ton. Do służby w Royal Navy HMS „Belfast” wcielony w sierpniu 1939 roku.Okres II wojny światowej„Belfast” rozpoczął wojnę w składzie 18 Eskadry Krążowników Home Fleet pod dowództwem kapitana J. Scotta. 9 października 1939 HMS „Belfast” przechwycił na północ od Orkadów niemiecki liniowiec „Cap Norte” o pojemności 13 615 BRT. Wkrótce potem przeniesiony został do bazy w Rosyth, gdzie 21 listopada 1939 podczas wychodzenia z portu krążownik wszedł na niemiecką minę magnetyczną postawioną przez U-21. Eksplodująca pod dnem mina spowodowała na tyle poważne uszkodzenia kadłuba, że HMS „Belfast” został wyłączony z działań na okres 3 lat.Po remoncie okręt ponownie został wcielony do służby 8 grudnia 1942, zostając w styczniu następnego roku okrętem flagowym 10 Eskadry Krążowników Home Fleet pod komendą kontradmirała Burnetta. Pierwszą operacją HMS „Belfast” na Morzu Arktycznym była osłona konwoju JW-53 w lutym 1943 roku. Również kolejny konwój JW-54 płynący w dwóch częściach w listopadzie 1943 roku był osłaniany przez 10 Eskadrę Krążowników.

Globe Theatre
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
21 New Globe Walk, Bankside, London
London, SE1 9

020 7407 0043

The Globe Theatre was a theatre in London associated with William Shakespeare. It was built in 1599 by Shakespeare's playing company, the Lord Chamberlain's Men, on land owned by Thomas Brend and inherited by his son, Nicholas Brend and grandson Sir Matthew Brend, and was destroyed by fire on 29 June 1613. A second Globe Theatre was built on the same site by June 1614 and closed by an Ordinance issued on 6 September 1642.A modern reconstruction of the Globe, named "Shakespeare's Globe", opened in 1997 approximately 230m from the site of the original theatre. From 1909, the current Gielgud Theatre was called "Globe Theatre", until it was renamed (in honour of John Gielgud) in 1994.LocationsExamination of old property records has identified the plot of land occupied by the Globe as extending from the west side of modern-day Southwark Bridge Road eastwards as far as Porter Street and from Park Street southwards as far as the back of Gatehouse Square. However, the precise location of the building remained unknown until a small part of the foundations, including one original pier base, was discovered in 1989 beneath the car park at the rear of Anchor Terrace on Park Street. The shape of the foundations is now replicated on the surface. As the majority of the foundations lies beneath 67—70 Anchor Terrace, a listed building, no further excavations have been permitted.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (A3)
London, EC4R 3

ロンドン橋はロンドンを流れるテムズ川にかかる橋。タワーブリッジとキャノン・ストリート鉄道橋の間に位置する。市内のシティとサザークを結び、プール・オブ・ロンドンの西端に位置する。この橋の架かる位置には古くから、何度も橋が架けられては倒壊しており、その回数の多さから『ロンドン橋落ちた』という民謡が生まれた。1750年にウェストミンスター・ブリッジが架けられるまでロンドン市内でテムズ川に架かる橋としては唯一のものであった。 橋の南側にはとロンドン・ブリッジ駅が、北側にはロンドン大火記念碑とバンク・アンド・モニュメント駅がある。 現在の橋はロンドンとポーツマスとを結ぶ道路A3の一部であり、大ロンドン庁により維持管理されている。ロンドン橋はプレストレストコンクリート橋であって極めて地味であるのに対して、直下流にあるタワーブリッジは2つの塔を持つ跳開橋であり見栄えがよい。このため、タワーブリッジの方がロンドン橋であると、世界中で極めてしばしば勘違いされている。歴史現在のロンドン橋が架かる位置にはその近辺も含め、2000年近くにもわたって橋が存在してきた。ロンドン地域でテムズ川に架かった最古の橋はローマ人によるもので、西暦46年に架けられた木製のものであった。1013年、侵略してきたスヴェン1世率いるデーン人たちを分裂させるためにエゼルレッド2世によって焼き落とされた。架け直された橋は1091年に嵐で破壊され、1136年には火災に遭っている。

London Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (A3)
London, EC4R 3

ロンドン橋はロンドンを流れるテムズ川にかかる橋。タワーブリッジとキャノン・ストリート鉄道橋の間に位置する。市内のシティとサザークを結び、プール・オブ・ロンドンの西端に位置する。この橋の架かる位置には古くから、何度も橋が架けられては倒壊しており、その回数の多さから『ロンドン橋落ちた』という民謡が生まれた。1750年にウェストミンスター・ブリッジが架けられるまでロンドン市内でテムズ川に架かる橋としては唯一のものであった。 橋の南側にはとロンドン・ブリッジ駅が、北側にはロンドン大火記念碑とバンク・アンド・モニュメント駅がある。 現在の橋はロンドンとポーツマスとを結ぶ道路A3の一部であり、大ロンドン庁により維持管理されている。ロンドン橋はプレストレストコンクリート橋であって極めて地味であるのに対して、直下流にあるタワーブリッジは2つの塔を持つ跳開橋であり見栄えがよい。このため、タワーブリッジの方がロンドン橋であると、世界中で極めてしばしば勘違いされている。歴史現在のロンドン橋が架かる位置にはその近辺も含め、2000年近くにもわたって橋が存在してきた。ロンドン地域でテムズ川に架かった最古の橋はローマ人によるもので、西暦46年に架けられた木製のものであった。1013年、侵略してきたスヴェン1世率いるデーン人たちを分裂させるためにエゼルレッド2世によって焼き落とされた。架け直された橋は1091年に嵐で破壊され、1136年には火災に遭っている。

Local Business Near Tower Hill tube station

Amazonas Shopping Centre
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
206 Old Kent Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 5TY

ABC Global Asset
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
346 East Street
London, United Kingdom SE17 2SX

+44 (0) 20 7703 8362

Gisela Graham
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
12 Colworth Grove
London, United Kingdom SE17 1

20-77084956

Eurotraveller Premier Hotel
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
194-202 Old Kent Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 5

(020) 7740 5999

Wing Fu
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
227 Old Kent Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 5LU

+44 (0) 20 7237 3044

ICandy Studios
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
214 Rotherhithe New Road
London, United Kingdom SE16 3EH

020 3417 6155

ICandy Studio is a trendy multifunctional photographic and video studio with over 1250 square feet of private space with 2 levels, a green room, 3 phase power and drive-in capacity. Located within the City of London, just a few minutes by train or tube from London Bridge. Our spacious studio provides an ideal working environment for advertising, fashion; car shoots to music promos, TV castings and rehearsals. The studio is fully equipped with top of the range lighting gear, a seated client area, hair and make-up station, changing area, wireless Internet connection, music sound system plus a range of props. Clients have unlimited access to toilet facilities with hot drinks always available. Whatever your priorities, our mission is to ensure that your shoot works out perfectly. To take a tour or to make a reservations call 020 3417 6155 or email [email protected]

Dragon Inn
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
194-202 Old Kent Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 5

020 7703 9797

Eazy2Move
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Donkin House, Rennie Estate Flat 17
London, United Kingdom se163pq

02034752985 07894 811738

Eazy2Move Man And Van London 5 Donkin House, Rennie Estate, London SE16 3PQ 07894 811738 http://www.eazy2move.com

Tips & Toes
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
221 Old Kent Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 5

+44 (0) 20 7237 0460

East Street Surgery
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
301 East St
London, United Kingdom SE17 1

20-77034550

Costa Azul
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
190-192 Old Kent Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 5T

020 7740 6174

The Rocketvan Box Shop
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
92 Brandon Street
London, United Kingdom SE17 0AL

02074013928

Massage
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
woodrow woolwich
London, United Kingdom se18 5dh

07455087565

Kam's Barbers Shop
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
356 East St
London, United Kingdom SE17 2SX

+44 (0) 20 7252 7125

Ozzies Cafe
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Old Kent Road
London, United Kingdom

Hair UK
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
166 Old Kent Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 5TU

+44 (0) 20 7703 2323

St Anne's Church, Bermondsey
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Thorburn Square
London, United Kingdom SE1 5

South Bermondsey, Southwark
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Roseberry Street
London, United Kingdom SE16 3

Presidential Suya
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
162-164 Old Kent Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 5TY

+44 (0) 20 7708 4491

Tristar Travel & Cargo Services
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
158-160 Old Kent Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 5TY

+44 (0) 20 7708 5718