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O'Connell Street, Dublin | Tourist Information



O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland


O'Connell Street is Dublin's main thoroughfare. It measures 49 m (54 yds) in width at its southern end, 46 m (50 yds) at the north, and is 500 m (547 yds) in length. During the 17th century it was a narrow street known as Drogheda Street (named after Henry Moore, Earl of Drogheda). It was widened, and renamed 'Sackville Street' (named after Lionel Sackville, 1st Duke of Dorset) in the late 1700s until 1924, when it was renamed in honour of Daniel O'Connell, a nationalist leader of the early 19th century, whose statue stands at the lower end of the street, facing O'Connell Bridge.IntroductionLocated in the heart of Dublin city, O'Connell Street forms part of a grand thoroughfare created in the 18th century that runs through the centre of the capital, O'Connell Bridge, Westmoreland Street, College Green and Dame Street, terminating at City Hall and Dublin Castle. Situated just north of the River Liffey, the street has a fine axial positioning, running close to a north-south orientation. Lined with many handsome buildings, O'Connell Street is the most monumental of Dublin's commercial streets, having been largely rebuilt in the early 20th century following extensive destruction in the struggle for Irish independence and subsequent civil war. It has the air of an imposing 1920s boulevard, with signature stone-faced neoclassical buildings such as Clerys department store complemented by the more subtle grain of elegant bank and retail premises. O'Connell Street Upper by contrast retains something of its original 18th century character, with the western side conforming to original plot widths and some original fabric still intact.

Bridge Near O'Connell Street

O'Connell Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Town
Dublin, Ireland 1

O'Connell Bridge is a road bridge spanning the River Liffey in Dublin, and joining O'Connell Street to D'Olier Street, Westmoreland Street and the south quays.HistoryThe original bridge was designed by James Gandon, and built between 1791 and 1794.Originally humped, and narrower, Carlisle bridge was a symmetrical, three semicircular arch structure constructed in granite with a Portland stone balustrade and obelisks on each of the four corners. A keystone head at the apex of the central span symbolises the River Liffey, corresponding to the heads on the Custom House which personify the other great rivers of Ireland.Since 1860,, to improve the streetscape and relieve traffic congestion on the bridge, it was intended to widen Carlisle Bridge to bring it to the same width as 70 metres wide Sackville Street which formed the north side carriageway connection to the Bridge. In 1877-1880 the bridge was reconstructed. As can be seen on orthophotography it spans now 45 m of the Liffey and is about 50 m wide. O'Connell Bridge is said to be unique in Europe as the only traffic bridge wider than it is long.

Samuel Beckett Bridge
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Samuel Beckett Bridge
Dublin, Ireland

Samuel Beckett Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge in Dublin that joins Sir John Rogerson's Quay on the south side of the River Liffey to Guild Street and North Wall Quay in the Docklands area.Design and constructionThe architect is Santiago Calatrava, a designer of a number of innovative bridges and buildings. This is the second bridge in the area designed by Calatrava, the first being the James Joyce Bridge, which is further upstream.Constructed by a "Graham Hollandia Joint Venture", the main span of the Samuel Beckett Bridge is supported by 31 cable stays from a doubly back-stayed single forward arc tubular tapered spar, with decking provided for four traffic and two pedestrian lanes. It is also capable of opening through an angle of 90 degrees allowing ships to pass through. This is achieved through a rotational mechanism housed in the base of the pylon.The shape of the spar and its cables is said to evoke an image of a harp lying on its edge. (The harp being the national symbol for Ireland from as early as the thirteenth century).The steel structure of the bridge was constructed in Rotterdam by Hollandia, a Dutch company also responsible for the steel fabrication of the London Eye. The steel span of the bridge was transferred from the Hollandia wharf in Krimpen aan den IJssel on 3 May 2009, with support from specialist transport company ALE Heavylift.

Ha'penny Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Wellington Quay/Bachelors Walk
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

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Ha'ppeny Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
15 Bachelors Walk, Dublin 1
Dublin, Ireland

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Never Mind :/ Nosey Hole :)
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
69 Further
Dublin, Ireland

Broom Bridge
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
Broombridge Road
Dublin, Ireland

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Broom Bridge, also called Broome Bridge, and sometimes Brougham Bridge, is a bridge along Broombridge Road which crosses the Royal Canal in Cabra, Dublin, Ireland. Broome Bridge is named after William Broome, one of the directors of the Royal Canal company who lived nearby. It is famous for being the location where Sir William Rowan Hamilton first wrote down the fundamental formula for quaternions on October 16, 1843, which is to this day commemorated by a stone plaque on the northwest corner of the underside of the bridge.The text on the plaque reads:Here as he walked byon the 16th of October 1843Sir William Rowan Hamiltonin a flash of genius discoveredthe fundamental formula forquaternion multiplicationi² = j² = k² = ijk = −1& cut it on a stone of this bridge. Given the historical importance of the bridge with respect to mathematics, mathematicians from all over the world have been known to take part in the annual commemorative walk from Dunsink Observatory to the site. Attendees have included Nobel Prize winners Murray Gell-Mann, Steven Weinberg and Frank Wilczek, and mathematicians Sir Andrew Wiles, Sir Roger Penrose and Ingrid Daubechies. The 16 October is sometimes referred to as Broomsday and as a nod to the literary commemorations on 16 June .

Liam Whelan Bridge
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Fassaugh Road, Cabra, Dublin 7
Dublin, Ireland

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Highway Near O'Connell Street

Rathgar Road
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
89 Wesley Road
Dublin, Ireland

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Terenure Road West
Distance: 2.9 mi Tourist Information
terenure
Dublin, Ireland

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Dublin Port Tunnel
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
M50 motorway
Dublin, Ireland

The Dublin Tunnel is a road traffic tunnel in Dublin, Ireland, that forms part of the M50 motorway.The twin tunnels form a two-lane dual carriageway connecting Dublin Port, which lies to the east of central Dublin, and the M1 motorway close to Dublin Airport. The tunnels are 4.5km in length and total project length of 5.6km. It had final cost of approximately €752 million.The tunnel was officially opened on 20 December 2006 by then Taoiseach Bertie Ahern; it was initially only open to HGVs. It was opened to all traffic on 28 January 2007.PurposeTraffic congestion in central Dublin became severe at the turn of the century, with thousands of heavy goods vehicles travelling to and from Dublin port via the city centre. The tunnel relieves surface road congestion in Dublin city centre by diverting heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) from Dublin Port directly onto the motorway network. This has positive knock-on effects for bus users, pedestrians and cyclists travelling along the city quays, including better air quality and safer travel.To discourage commuters from using the tunnel, vehicles other than HGVs are heavily tolled. HGVs travelling north and west benefit from the expected six-minute journey time through the tunnel. A tunnel was chosen as it was decided that a surface relief road was not feasible.Dublin Bus routes 142, 33x and 41x use the tunnel to get to the port area of the city from the northern suburbs.

Botanic Road
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
66 botanic road
Dublin, Ireland

Historical Place Near O'Connell Street

Croke Park
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
3 St James Avenue
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 3

+353 1 819 2300

Guinness Brewery
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
St James Gate
Dublin, Ireland

St. James's Gate Brewery is a brewery founded in 1759 in Dublin, Ireland, by Arthur Guinness. The company is now a part of Diageo, a company formed from the merger of Guinness and Grand Metropolitan in 1997. The main product of the brewery is Guinness Draught.Originally leased in 1759 to Arthur Guinness at IR£45 (Irish pounds) per year for 9,000 years, St. James's Gate has been the home of Guinness ever since. It became the largest brewery in Ireland in 1838, and the largest in the world by 1886, with an annual output of 1.2 million barrels. Although no longer the largest brewery in the world, it is still the largest brewer of stout in the world. The company has since bought out the originally leased property, and during the 19th and early 20th centuries the brewery owned most of the buildings in the surrounding area, including many streets of housing for brewery employees, and offices associated with the brewery. The brewery also made all of its own power using its own power plant.There is an attached exhibition on the 250-year-old history of Guinness, called the Guinness Storehouse.HistoryArthur Guinness started brewing ales in Leixlip, County Kildare, and then from 1759 at the St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin. On 31 December he signed a 9,000-year lease at £45 per annum for the unused brewery. However, the lease is no longer in effect because the brewery property has been bought out when it expanded beyond the original 4-acre site.

Old Jameson Distillery
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street, Smithfield Village, Dublin 7
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

The Old Jameson Distillery is an Irish whiskey tourist attraction located just off Smithfield Square in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening as an attraction in 1997, it receives between 300,000 and 350,000 guests per year. The Old Jameson Distillery is the original site where Jameson Irish Whiskey was distilled until 1971. It is now a visitors centre that provides guided tours, tutored whiskey tastings, bars, a restaurant, and a gift shop.HistoryThe original distillery on this site was called the Bow Street Distillery and was established in 1780. John Jameson took full ownership (he was previously the general manager) and expanded the distillery in 1805. By 1810, the operation was officially renamed to John Jameson & Son’s Bow Street Distillery. The distillery grew to an upwards of 5 acres by 1886.At this time, it was described by many as a "city within a city". The distillery also housed a Smithy, Cooperage, saw mills, engineers, carpenters, painters and coppersmiths’ shops. Water for the distillery came from two deep wells dug underneath the site. Cellars were also dug underneath nearby streets to store maturing whiskey, while four stills and two wash stills, each holding 24,000 gallons, were heated by both fire and steam coils above.Following a difficult period that included American Prohibition, Ireland’s trade war with Great Britain, and the introduction of Scotch blended whiskey, the Jameson distillery fell on hard times and decided to form the Irish Distillers Group with their previous rivals, the Cork Distillery Company and John Power & Son in 1966. Eventually, it became one of the last distilleries in Ireland to close in 1971. The operation was then moved out of Dublin to the New Midleton Distillery.

Dublin Castle
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

+353 1 645 8813

In continuous occupation since its establishment in 1204 AD, Dublin Castle has played a prominent role in Ireland's history.The State Apartments are among the most prestigious State Rooms in the country and are home to St. Patrick's Hall and the James Connolly Room. They can be visited both as part of a guided tour and as part of a self guided visit. The thirteenth century remains of the Gunpowder Tower and the 19th Century baroque style Chapel Royal can also be visited as part of the Guided Tour.

Guinness Storehouse
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

Guinness Storehouse is a Guinness-themed tourist attraction at St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening in 2000, it has received over four million visitors.The Storehouse covers seven floors surrounding a glass atrium shaped in the form of a pint of Guinness. The ground floor introduces the beer's four ingredients (water, barley, hops and yeast), and the brewery's founder, Arthur Guinness. Other floors feature the history of Guinness advertising and include an interactive exhibit on responsible drinking. The seventh floor houses the Gravity Bar with views of Dublin and where visitors may drink a pint of Guinness included in the price of admission, which was €18 in March 2015, described as "overpriced" by Condé Nast Traveler. In 2006, a new wing opened incorporating a live installation of the present-day brewing process.HistoryThe building in which the Storehouse is located was constructed in 1902 as a fermentation plant for the St. James's Gate Brewery (where yeast is added to the brew). The building was designed in the style of the Chicago School of Architecture and was the first multi-storey steel-framed building to be constructed in Ireland. The building was used continuously as the fermentation plant of the Brewery until its closure in 1988, when a new fermentation plant was completed near the River Liffey.In 1997, it was decided to convert the building into the Guinness Storehouse, replacing the Guinness Hop Store as the Brewery's visitor centre. The redesign of the building was undertaken by the UK-based design firm Imagination in conjunction with the Dublin-based architects firm RKD, and the Storehouse opened to the public on 2 December 2000. In 2006 a new wing was developed at a cost of €2.5 million, including a live installation demonstrating the modern brewing process.

Dublin City Center
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Dublin City Centre
Dublin, Ireland Dub

Mix Like a pro is a professional DJ course running in Dublin City Centre.

Kilmainham Gaol
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
Inchicore Road, Kilmainham
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

+353 1 453 5984

Kilmainham Gaol is a former prison in Kilmainham, Dublin, Ireland. It is now a museum run by the Office of Public Works, an agency of the Government of Ireland. Many Irish revolutionaries, including the leaders of the 1916 Easter Rising, were imprisoned and executed in the prison by the British.HistoryWhen it was first built in 1796, Kilmainham Gaol was called the "New Gaol" to distinguish it from the old prison it was intended to replace - a noisome dungeon, just a few hundred metres from the present site. It was officially called the County of Dublin Gaol, and was originally run by the Grand Jury for County Dublin.Originally, public hangings took place at the front of the prison. However, from the 1820s onward very few hangings, public or private, took place at Kilmainham. A small hanging cell was built in the prison in 1891. It is located on the first floor, between the west wing and the east wing.There was no segregation of prisoners; men, women and children were incarcerated up to 5 in each cell, with only a single candle for light and heat. Most of their time was spent in the cold and the dark, and each candle had to last for two weeks. Its cells were roughly 28 square metres in area.Children were sometimes arrested for petty theft, the youngest said to be a seven-year-old child, while many of the adult prisoners were transported to Australia.At Kilmainham the poor conditions in which women prisoners were kept provided the spur for the next stage of development. Remarkably, for an age that prided itself on a protective attitude for the "weaker sex", the conditions for women prisoners were persistently worse than for men. As early as his 1809 report the Inspector had observed that male prisoners were supplied with iron bedsteads while females 'lay on straw on the flags in the cells and common halls.' Half a century later there was little improvement. The women's section, located in the west wing, remained overcrowded.

National Botanic Gardens of Ireland
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
National Botanic Gardens, 300 Botanic Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 9

353 1 804 0300

Guided tours of the Gardens all year round- Sundays at 12.00pm & 2.30pm, admission free. Monday-Saturday 11.30am & 3.00pm, €5 pp. Pre-booked tours by arrangement. Ireland's premier garden is a green oasis situated in the leafy suburb of Glasnevin, not far from Dublin city centre. It is just under 50 acres in size and home to over 17,000 different plant species. Famous for its Victorian glasshouses: the Curvilinear Range, designed by Richard Turner, and the Great Palm House, Ireland's only tropical rainforest. Outdoor features include the rose and rock gardens, double herbaceous borders, the pond and river walks, the organic fruit and vegetable garden and wild Ireland, the native conservation area.

Spire of Dublin
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

The Spire of Dublin, alternatively titled the Monument of Light, is a large, stainless steel, pin-like monument 121.2m in height, located on the site of the former Nelson's Pillar on O'Connell Street in Dublin, Ireland.DescriptionThe spire was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects, who sought an "Elegant and dynamic simplicity bridging art and technology". The contract was awarded to SIAC-Radley JV and it was manufactured by Radley Engineering of Dungarvan, County Waterford, and erected by SIAC Construction Ltd & GDW Engineering Ltd. The first section was installed on 18 December 2002. Five additional 20m sections were added with the last one installed on 21 January 2003. The spire is an elongated cone of diameter 3m at the base, narrowing to 15cm at the top. Construction of the world's tallest sculpture was delayed because of difficulty in obtaining planning permission and environmental regulations. It is constructed from eight hollow tubes of stainless steel and features a tuned mass damper, designed by engineers Arup, to counteract sway. The steel underwent shot peening to alter the quality of light reflected from it.The pattern around the base of the Spire is based on a core sample of earth and rock formation taken from the ground where the spire stands. The pattern was applied by bead blasting the steel through rubber stencil masks whose patterns were created by water jet cutting based on core sample drawings supplied by the contractor.

National Botanic Gardens
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
Glasnevin
Glasnevin, Ireland Dublin 9

353 1 804 0300

Mansion House, Dublin
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
2, Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

The Mansion House on Dawson Street, Dublin, has been the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin since 1715.FeaturesThe Mansion House's most famous features include the "Round Room", where the First Dáil assembled on 21 January 1919 to proclaim the Irish Declaration of Independence. On 21 January 1969 a special fiftieth anniversary joint session of Dáil Éireann and Seanad Éireann assembled there and was addressed by the then President of Ireland, Éamon de Valera.Externally, the distinctive metal portico over the main door was erected for the visit of Queen Victoria in 1900.Visitors and occupantsIts most famous occupants included Lord Mayors: Daniel O'Connell, nineteenth century nationalist leader Alfie Byrne (1930s), longest serving Lord Mayor in the 800-year history of the office Jim Mitchell (1976–77), the youngest Lord Mayor of Dublin, aged 29, in the history of the office Famous visitors to the mayoral residence include: Prince Rainier III and Princess Grace of Monaco Pope John Paul II Queen Victoria Mother Teresa Nelson Mandela

GPO,O'Connell Street, Dublin
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
O’Connell St Lower
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

01 705 7000

Grafton Street - Dublin, Ireland.
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland

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City Hall, Dublin
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D

The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.OverviewLocated at the top of Parliament Street on the city's southern side, it stands next to Dublin Castle, the centre of the British government in Ireland until 1922. The street had been built in 1753, providing a continuation of Capel Street on the north bank of the Liffey, across the newly widened Essex Bridge, and so the exchange ended (and still ends) a long streetscape.The external structure is primarily made out of white Portland stone from a quarry in Dorset. The large size and fine fittings of the Royal exchange, with carved capitals by Simon Vierpyl, and plasterwork by the leading stuccodore Charles Thorpe, reflect the standing and prestige of Dublin in the 18th Century. The neo-classical building contains a central entrance hall or Rotunda, with a large dome supported by twelve columns which are surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants strolled and discussed business meetings.The function of the building was to provide a meeting place for Dublin's businessmen, where they could buy and sell goods and trade bills of exchange. It was also close to the then Customs House that stood on the site of today's Clarence Hotel, making it convenient for overseas merchants. The cost of building the exchange was met by the Parliament of Ireland, and this is reflected by the initials "SPQH", standing for "Senatus PopulusQue Hibernicus", meaning "The senate and people of Ireland" (an Irish version of SPQR).

Ha'penny Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Wellington Quay/Bachelors Walk
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

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Grafton Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Kilmainham Jail Museum
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
Kilmainham Jail 8
Dublin, Ireland D8

+353 1 453 5984

City Hall
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

(01)2222204

Artane Castle
Distance: 3.0 mi Tourist Information
Kilmore Road
Dublin, Ireland

St. Teresa's Gardens
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
donore avenue
Dublin, Ireland

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Landmark Near O'Connell Street

Trinity College, Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
College Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+35318961812

Trinity College, Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
College Green, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

01 896 1000

Trinity College is the sole constituent college of the University of Dublin, a research university in Ireland. The college was founded in 1592 as the "mother" of a new university, modelled after the collegiate universities of Oxford and of Cambridge, but, unlike these, only one college was ever established; as such, the designations "Trinity College" and "University of Dublin" are usually synonymous for practical purposes. It is one of the seven ancient universities of Britain and Ireland, as well as Ireland's oldest university.Originally it was established outside the city walls of Dublin in the buildings of the dissolved Augustinian Priory of All Hallows. Trinity College was set up in part to consolidate the rule of the Tudor monarchy in Ireland, and it was seen as the university of the Protestant Ascendancy for much of its history. Although Catholics and Dissenters had been permitted to enter as early as the end of the XVIII century, certain restrictions on their membership of the college remained until 1873 . From 1871 to 1970, the Catholic Church in Ireland forbade its adherents from attending Trinity College without permission. Women were first admitted to the college as full members in January 1904.

Spire of Dublin
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

The Spire of Dublin, alternatively titled the Monument of Light, is a large, stainless steel, pin-like monument 121.2m in height, located on the site of the former Nelson's Pillar on O'Connell Street in Dublin, Ireland.DescriptionThe spire was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects, who sought an "Elegant and dynamic simplicity bridging art and technology". The contract was awarded to SIAC-Radley JV and it was manufactured by Radley Engineering of Dungarvan, County Waterford, and erected by SIAC Construction Ltd & GDW Engineering Ltd. The first section was installed on 18 December 2002. Five additional 20m sections were added with the last one installed on 21 January 2003. The spire is an elongated cone of diameter 3m at the base, narrowing to 15cm at the top. Construction of the world's tallest sculpture was delayed because of difficulty in obtaining planning permission and environmental regulations. It is constructed from eight hollow tubes of stainless steel and features a tuned mass damper, designed by engineers Arup, to counteract sway. The steel underwent shot peening to alter the quality of light reflected from it.The pattern around the base of the Spire is based on a core sample of earth and rock formation taken from the ground where the spire stands. The pattern was applied by bead blasting the steel through rubber stencil masks whose patterns were created by water jet cutting based on core sample drawings supplied by the contractor.

O'Connell Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Town
Dublin, Ireland 1

O'Connell Bridge is a road bridge spanning the River Liffey in Dublin, and joining O'Connell Street to D'Olier Street, Westmoreland Street and the south quays.HistoryThe original bridge was designed by James Gandon, and built between 1791 and 1794.Originally humped, and narrower, Carlisle bridge was a symmetrical, three semicircular arch structure constructed in granite with a Portland stone balustrade and obelisks on each of the four corners. A keystone head at the apex of the central span symbolises the River Liffey, corresponding to the heads on the Custom House which personify the other great rivers of Ireland.Since 1860,, to improve the streetscape and relieve traffic congestion on the bridge, it was intended to widen Carlisle Bridge to bring it to the same width as 70 metres wide Sackville Street which formed the north side carriageway connection to the Bridge. In 1877-1880 the bridge was reconstructed. As can be seen on orthophotography it spans now 45 m of the Liffey and is about 50 m wide. O'Connell Bridge is said to be unique in Europe as the only traffic bridge wider than it is long.

Connolly Train Station Dublin
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Amiens Street 1
Dublin, Ireland D1

1850 366 222

Mansion House, Dublin
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
2, Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

The Mansion House on Dawson Street, Dublin, has been the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin since 1715.FeaturesThe Mansion House's most famous features include the "Round Room", where the First Dáil assembled on 21 January 1919 to proclaim the Irish Declaration of Independence. On 21 January 1969 a special fiftieth anniversary joint session of Dáil Éireann and Seanad Éireann assembled there and was addressed by the then President of Ireland, Éamon de Valera.Externally, the distinctive metal portico over the main door was erected for the visit of Queen Victoria in 1900.Visitors and occupantsIts most famous occupants included Lord Mayors: Daniel O'Connell, nineteenth century nationalist leader Alfie Byrne (1930s), longest serving Lord Mayor in the 800-year history of the office Jim Mitchell (1976–77), the youngest Lord Mayor of Dublin, aged 29, in the history of the office Famous visitors to the mayoral residence include: Prince Rainier III and Princess Grace of Monaco Pope John Paul II Queen Victoria Mother Teresa Nelson Mandela

GPO,O'Connell Street, Dublin
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
O’Connell St Lower
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

01 705 7000

M.J.O'Neill's
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 Suffolk Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

(01) 679-3656

M.J.O'Neill's is a notable bar and restaurant in central Dublin. It has occupied 2 Suffolk Street and adjacent buildings, continuing round the corner into Church Lane. It is claimed there has been a tavern on the site for some three hundred years. From 1875 it was owned by the Hogan Brothers, until M.J. O’Neill bought and renamed the premises in August 1927.The part in Church Lane was the site of a printing house, where William Butler published The Volunteers Journal and the Irish Herald in 1783, and in 1789 Arthur O’Connor published The Press, supporting Wolfe Tone’s republican views.The corner structure is an impressive four-storey, vaguely of the Arts and Crafts Movement, red-brick and early twentieth century, with prominent Tudor-style projecting bay windows. There is a fine decorated iron three-dials clock on the Suffolk Street frontage. The building is protected and in a conservation area. Now, opposite the Dublin Tourist Centre, it is a fixture on the tourist trail and pub crawls.The house has a mixed clientele. It is directly opposite Andrew Street Post Office, and near the shopping centre of Grafton Street. The discreet Church Lane door is convenient for the Bank of Ireland and other financial establishments in College Green. It is also the pub nearest to the Front Gate of Trinity College, Dublin and therefore attracting Arts undergraduates and academics. The original structure was divided into definite areas: a “cocktail bar” in the corner for the gentry, a public bar off Suffolk Street, and a back bar. In recent years the next-door premises in Church Lane have been added, as a carvery, and the interior has been opened up. A small snug, immediately inside the Church Lane entrance, was the significant venue for the “Fabians” of the early 1960s and for later left-wing students from Trinity College, Dublin.

Rotunda Hospital
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Cearnóg Parnell Thiar
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

+353 (1) 817 1700

The Rotunda Hospital is one of the three main maternity hospitals in the city of Dublin, the others being the Coombe and the National Maternity Hospital. The hospital is located just off the top of O'Connell Street, on Parnell Square, on the north side of the city.FoundingThe hospital, originally known as "The Dublin Lying-In Hospital", was founded in 1745 by Bartholomew Mosse (1712-1759), a surgeon and man-midwife who was appalled at the conditions that pregnant mothers had to endure at the time. Initially located in George's Lane on the site of a recently closed theatre, the hospital was later moved to its present location in 1757 where it became known as "The New Lying-In Hospital", referred to today as "The Rotunda".Records indicate that around 1781, "when the hospital was imperfectly ventilated, every sixth child died within nine days after birth, of convulsive disease; and that after means of thorough ventilation had been adopted, the mortality of infants, within the same, in five succeeding years, was reduced to one in twenty". This issue was not limited to the Lying-In-Hospital. In that era, ventilation improvement was a general issue in patient care, along with other issues of sanitation and hygiene, and the conditions in which surgeons such as Robert Liston in Great Britain and elsewhere, had to operate.

Mountjoy Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
65 Mountjoy Square
Dublin, Ireland 1

Mountjoy Square is a Georgian garden square in Dublin, Ireland, on the north side of the city just under a kilometre from the River Liffey. One of five Georgian squares in Dublin, it was planned and developed in the late 18th century by the Luke Gardiner, 1st Viscount Mountjoy. It was surrounded on all sides by terraced, red-brick Georgian houses. Construction began in the early 1790s and the work was completed in 1818.Over the centuries, the square has been home to many of Dublin's most prominent people: lawyers, churchmen, politicians, writers and visual artists. The writer James Joyce lived around the square during some of his formative years, playwright Seán O'Casey wrote and set some of his most famous plays on the square while living there, W.B. Yeats stayed there with his friend John O'Leary, and more recently, much of the Oscar-winning film Once was made in the square. Historic meetings have taken place there, including planning for the Easter Rising and some of the earliest Dáil meetings. Prominent Irish Unionists and Republicans have shared the square.Mountjoy can boast being Dublin's only true Georgian square, each of its sides being exactly 140 metres in length. While the North, East and West sides each have 18 houses, the South has 19, reflecting some variation in plot sizes. Though each side was originally numbered individually, the houses are now numbered continuously clockwise from no. 1 in the north-west corner. While its North and South sides are continuous from corner to corner, the East and West sides are in three terraces, interrupted by two side streets, Grenville Street and Gardiner Place to the West and Fitzgibbon and North Great Charles Street to the East. Gardiner Street passes through the West side of the square, while Belvidere Place and Gardiner Lane run off the North- and South-East corners.

Dublin Connolly railway station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Amiens Street 1
Dublin, Ireland

Dublin Connolly is one of the main railway stations in Dublin, Ireland, and is a focal point in the Irish route network. Opened in 1844 as Amiens Street Station, the ornate facade has a distinctive Italianate tower at its centre. On the North side of the River Liffey, it provides intercity and commuter services to the north, north-west and south-east. The North-South Dublin Area Rapid Transit service also passes through the station. The station offices are the headquarters of Irish Rail, Iarnród Éireann.

City Hall, Dublin
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D

The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.OverviewLocated at the top of Parliament Street on the city's southern side, it stands next to Dublin Castle, the centre of the British government in Ireland until 1922. The street had been built in 1753, providing a continuation of Capel Street on the north bank of the Liffey, across the newly widened Essex Bridge, and so the exchange ended (and still ends) a long streetscape.The external structure is primarily made out of white Portland stone from a quarry in Dorset. The large size and fine fittings of the Royal exchange, with carved capitals by Simon Vierpyl, and plasterwork by the leading stuccodore Charles Thorpe, reflect the standing and prestige of Dublin in the 18th Century. The neo-classical building contains a central entrance hall or Rotunda, with a large dome supported by twelve columns which are surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants strolled and discussed business meetings.The function of the building was to provide a meeting place for Dublin's businessmen, where they could buy and sell goods and trade bills of exchange. It was also close to the then Customs House that stood on the site of today's Clarence Hotel, making it convenient for overseas merchants. The cost of building the exchange was met by the Parliament of Ireland, and this is reflected by the initials "SPQH", standing for "Senatus PopulusQue Hibernicus", meaning "The senate and people of Ireland" (an Irish version of SPQR).

Ha'penny Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Wellington Quay/Bachelors Walk
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

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Mansion House
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

Busáras
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Store Street, Dublin 1, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 836 6111

Busáras is the central bus station in Dublin, Ireland for Intercity and regional bus services operated by Bus Éireann. Busáras is also a stop on the Red Line of the Luas system, in Store Street just before the terminus at Dublin Connolly railway station. Áras Mhic Dhiarmada is the official name of the building, which also includes the headquarters of the Department of Social Protection. CIÉ, parent of Bus Éireann, rents the lower floors from the Department. Áras Mhic Dhiarmada is named after Seán Mac Diarmada, a leader of the Easter Rising in 1916.ArchitectureBusáras was designed by Michael Scott and his team of young architects and designers between 1945 and 1953. It was built against a background of public opposition which centred on the external appearance, function and excessive cost – over £1,000,000 before completion in 1953. Simultaneously loathed by some of the populace and loved by architectural purists, the building was designed in an International Modern style between 1945 and 1953. A number of the original fixtures and fittings designed by Scott still exist, including terrazzo floor tiles, and large timber wall panels.

Grafton Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Grafton Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Dáil Éireann
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Leinster House, Kildare Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 618 3000

The Gaeity Theatre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Sth King Street
Dublin, Ireland

Mater Private Hospital
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Eccles Street, Dublin
Dublin, Ireland

01 885 8888

The Mater Private Hospital is a private Catholic hospital in Ireland. Founded in 1986, it shares a campus on Eccles Street, Dublin 7, with its sister public hospital, the Mater Misercordiae Hospital. Its mission statement is "to continue the healing mission of Christ by providing the highest quality healthcare in an independent tertiary acute care facility, complementary to the services provided by the Mater Misericordiae Hospital".The Mater Private Hospital is built on the site of No 7 Eccles Street, the home of the main character in James Joyce's Ulysses. In Joyce's youth, No 7 Eccles Street was the actual home of his contemporary, JF Byrne.ServicesMPH provides a variety of services and procedures including: orthopaedic surgery, cardio-thoracic surgery, plastic surgery, general surgery, dermatology, dietetics, gynaecology, a sleep laboratory, oncology, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, rheumatology, cardiology, paediatric surgery, aviation medicine, ear, nose and throat surgery, ophthalmology, intensive care medicine and neurosurgery.

Landmark Near O'Connell Street

Trinity College, Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
College Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+35318961812

Trinity College, Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
College Green, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

01 896 1000

Trinity College is the sole constituent college of the University of Dublin, a research university in Ireland. The college was founded in 1592 as the "mother" of a new university, modelled after the collegiate universities of Oxford and of Cambridge, but, unlike these, only one college was ever established; as such, the designations "Trinity College" and "University of Dublin" are usually synonymous for practical purposes. It is one of the seven ancient universities of Britain and Ireland, as well as Ireland's oldest university.Originally it was established outside the city walls of Dublin in the buildings of the dissolved Augustinian Priory of All Hallows. Trinity College was set up in part to consolidate the rule of the Tudor monarchy in Ireland, and it was seen as the university of the Protestant Ascendancy for much of its history. Although Catholics and Dissenters had been permitted to enter as early as the end of the XVIII century, certain restrictions on their membership of the college remained until 1873 . From 1871 to 1970, the Catholic Church in Ireland forbade its adherents from attending Trinity College without permission. Women were first admitted to the college as full members in January 1904.

Spire of Dublin
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

The Spire of Dublin, alternatively titled the Monument of Light, is a large, stainless steel, pin-like monument 121.2m in height, located on the site of the former Nelson's Pillar on O'Connell Street in Dublin, Ireland.DescriptionThe spire was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects, who sought an "Elegant and dynamic simplicity bridging art and technology". The contract was awarded to SIAC-Radley JV and it was manufactured by Radley Engineering of Dungarvan, County Waterford, and erected by SIAC Construction Ltd & GDW Engineering Ltd. The first section was installed on 18 December 2002. Five additional 20m sections were added with the last one installed on 21 January 2003. The spire is an elongated cone of diameter 3m at the base, narrowing to 15cm at the top. Construction of the world's tallest sculpture was delayed because of difficulty in obtaining planning permission and environmental regulations. It is constructed from eight hollow tubes of stainless steel and features a tuned mass damper, designed by engineers Arup, to counteract sway. The steel underwent shot peening to alter the quality of light reflected from it.The pattern around the base of the Spire is based on a core sample of earth and rock formation taken from the ground where the spire stands. The pattern was applied by bead blasting the steel through rubber stencil masks whose patterns were created by water jet cutting based on core sample drawings supplied by the contractor.

O'Connell Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Town
Dublin, Ireland 1

O'Connell Bridge is a road bridge spanning the River Liffey in Dublin, and joining O'Connell Street to D'Olier Street, Westmoreland Street and the south quays.HistoryThe original bridge was designed by James Gandon, and built between 1791 and 1794.Originally humped, and narrower, Carlisle bridge was a symmetrical, three semicircular arch structure constructed in granite with a Portland stone balustrade and obelisks on each of the four corners. A keystone head at the apex of the central span symbolises the River Liffey, corresponding to the heads on the Custom House which personify the other great rivers of Ireland.Since 1860,, to improve the streetscape and relieve traffic congestion on the bridge, it was intended to widen Carlisle Bridge to bring it to the same width as 70 metres wide Sackville Street which formed the north side carriageway connection to the Bridge. In 1877-1880 the bridge was reconstructed. As can be seen on orthophotography it spans now 45 m of the Liffey and is about 50 m wide. O'Connell Bridge is said to be unique in Europe as the only traffic bridge wider than it is long.

Connolly Train Station Dublin
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Amiens Street 1
Dublin, Ireland D1

1850 366 222

Mansion House, Dublin
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
2, Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

The Mansion House on Dawson Street, Dublin, has been the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin since 1715.FeaturesThe Mansion House's most famous features include the "Round Room", where the First Dáil assembled on 21 January 1919 to proclaim the Irish Declaration of Independence. On 21 January 1969 a special fiftieth anniversary joint session of Dáil Éireann and Seanad Éireann assembled there and was addressed by the then President of Ireland, Éamon de Valera.Externally, the distinctive metal portico over the main door was erected for the visit of Queen Victoria in 1900.Visitors and occupantsIts most famous occupants included Lord Mayors: Daniel O'Connell, nineteenth century nationalist leader Alfie Byrne (1930s), longest serving Lord Mayor in the 800-year history of the office Jim Mitchell (1976–77), the youngest Lord Mayor of Dublin, aged 29, in the history of the office Famous visitors to the mayoral residence include: Prince Rainier III and Princess Grace of Monaco Pope John Paul II Queen Victoria Mother Teresa Nelson Mandela

GPO,O'Connell Street, Dublin
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
O’Connell St Lower
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

01 705 7000

M.J.O'Neill's
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 Suffolk Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

(01) 679-3656

M.J.O'Neill's is a notable bar and restaurant in central Dublin. It has occupied 2 Suffolk Street and adjacent buildings, continuing round the corner into Church Lane. It is claimed there has been a tavern on the site for some three hundred years. From 1875 it was owned by the Hogan Brothers, until M.J. O’Neill bought and renamed the premises in August 1927.The part in Church Lane was the site of a printing house, where William Butler published The Volunteers Journal and the Irish Herald in 1783, and in 1789 Arthur O’Connor published The Press, supporting Wolfe Tone’s republican views.The corner structure is an impressive four-storey, vaguely of the Arts and Crafts Movement, red-brick and early twentieth century, with prominent Tudor-style projecting bay windows. There is a fine decorated iron three-dials clock on the Suffolk Street frontage. The building is protected and in a conservation area. Now, opposite the Dublin Tourist Centre, it is a fixture on the tourist trail and pub crawls.The house has a mixed clientele. It is directly opposite Andrew Street Post Office, and near the shopping centre of Grafton Street. The discreet Church Lane door is convenient for the Bank of Ireland and other financial establishments in College Green. It is also the pub nearest to the Front Gate of Trinity College, Dublin and therefore attracting Arts undergraduates and academics. The original structure was divided into definite areas: a “cocktail bar” in the corner for the gentry, a public bar off Suffolk Street, and a back bar. In recent years the next-door premises in Church Lane have been added, as a carvery, and the interior has been opened up. A small snug, immediately inside the Church Lane entrance, was the significant venue for the “Fabians” of the early 1960s and for later left-wing students from Trinity College, Dublin.

Rotunda Hospital
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Cearnóg Parnell Thiar
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

+353 (1) 817 1700

The Rotunda Hospital is one of the three main maternity hospitals in the city of Dublin, the others being the Coombe and the National Maternity Hospital. The hospital is located just off the top of O'Connell Street, on Parnell Square, on the north side of the city.FoundingThe hospital, originally known as "The Dublin Lying-In Hospital", was founded in 1745 by Bartholomew Mosse (1712-1759), a surgeon and man-midwife who was appalled at the conditions that pregnant mothers had to endure at the time. Initially located in George's Lane on the site of a recently closed theatre, the hospital was later moved to its present location in 1757 where it became known as "The New Lying-In Hospital", referred to today as "The Rotunda".Records indicate that around 1781, "when the hospital was imperfectly ventilated, every sixth child died within nine days after birth, of convulsive disease; and that after means of thorough ventilation had been adopted, the mortality of infants, within the same, in five succeeding years, was reduced to one in twenty". This issue was not limited to the Lying-In-Hospital. In that era, ventilation improvement was a general issue in patient care, along with other issues of sanitation and hygiene, and the conditions in which surgeons such as Robert Liston in Great Britain and elsewhere, had to operate.

Mountjoy Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
65 Mountjoy Square
Dublin, Ireland 1

Mountjoy Square is a Georgian garden square in Dublin, Ireland, on the north side of the city just under a kilometre from the River Liffey. One of five Georgian squares in Dublin, it was planned and developed in the late 18th century by the Luke Gardiner, 1st Viscount Mountjoy. It was surrounded on all sides by terraced, red-brick Georgian houses. Construction began in the early 1790s and the work was completed in 1818.Over the centuries, the square has been home to many of Dublin's most prominent people: lawyers, churchmen, politicians, writers and visual artists. The writer James Joyce lived around the square during some of his formative years, playwright Seán O'Casey wrote and set some of his most famous plays on the square while living there, W.B. Yeats stayed there with his friend John O'Leary, and more recently, much of the Oscar-winning film Once was made in the square. Historic meetings have taken place there, including planning for the Easter Rising and some of the earliest Dáil meetings. Prominent Irish Unionists and Republicans have shared the square.Mountjoy can boast being Dublin's only true Georgian square, each of its sides being exactly 140 metres in length. While the North, East and West sides each have 18 houses, the South has 19, reflecting some variation in plot sizes. Though each side was originally numbered individually, the houses are now numbered continuously clockwise from no. 1 in the north-west corner. While its North and South sides are continuous from corner to corner, the East and West sides are in three terraces, interrupted by two side streets, Grenville Street and Gardiner Place to the West and Fitzgibbon and North Great Charles Street to the East. Gardiner Street passes through the West side of the square, while Belvidere Place and Gardiner Lane run off the North- and South-East corners.

Dublin Connolly railway station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Amiens Street 1
Dublin, Ireland

Dublin Connolly is one of the main railway stations in Dublin, Ireland, and is a focal point in the Irish route network. Opened in 1844 as Amiens Street Station, the ornate facade has a distinctive Italianate tower at its centre. On the North side of the River Liffey, it provides intercity and commuter services to the north, north-west and south-east. The North-South Dublin Area Rapid Transit service also passes through the station. The station offices are the headquarters of Irish Rail, Iarnród Éireann.

City Hall, Dublin
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D

The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.OverviewLocated at the top of Parliament Street on the city's southern side, it stands next to Dublin Castle, the centre of the British government in Ireland until 1922. The street had been built in 1753, providing a continuation of Capel Street on the north bank of the Liffey, across the newly widened Essex Bridge, and so the exchange ended (and still ends) a long streetscape.The external structure is primarily made out of white Portland stone from a quarry in Dorset. The large size and fine fittings of the Royal exchange, with carved capitals by Simon Vierpyl, and plasterwork by the leading stuccodore Charles Thorpe, reflect the standing and prestige of Dublin in the 18th Century. The neo-classical building contains a central entrance hall or Rotunda, with a large dome supported by twelve columns which are surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants strolled and discussed business meetings.The function of the building was to provide a meeting place for Dublin's businessmen, where they could buy and sell goods and trade bills of exchange. It was also close to the then Customs House that stood on the site of today's Clarence Hotel, making it convenient for overseas merchants. The cost of building the exchange was met by the Parliament of Ireland, and this is reflected by the initials "SPQH", standing for "Senatus PopulusQue Hibernicus", meaning "The senate and people of Ireland" (an Irish version of SPQR).

Ha'penny Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Wellington Quay/Bachelors Walk
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

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Mansion House
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

Busáras
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Store Street, Dublin 1, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 836 6111

Busáras is the central bus station in Dublin, Ireland for Intercity and regional bus services operated by Bus Éireann. Busáras is also a stop on the Red Line of the Luas system, in Store Street just before the terminus at Dublin Connolly railway station. Áras Mhic Dhiarmada is the official name of the building, which also includes the headquarters of the Department of Social Protection. CIÉ, parent of Bus Éireann, rents the lower floors from the Department. Áras Mhic Dhiarmada is named after Seán Mac Diarmada, a leader of the Easter Rising in 1916.ArchitectureBusáras was designed by Michael Scott and his team of young architects and designers between 1945 and 1953. It was built against a background of public opposition which centred on the external appearance, function and excessive cost – over £1,000,000 before completion in 1953. Simultaneously loathed by some of the populace and loved by architectural purists, the building was designed in an International Modern style between 1945 and 1953. A number of the original fixtures and fittings designed by Scott still exist, including terrazzo floor tiles, and large timber wall panels.

Grafton Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Grafton Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Dáil Éireann
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Leinster House, Kildare Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 618 3000

The Gaeity Theatre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Sth King Street
Dublin, Ireland

Mater Private Hospital
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Eccles Street, Dublin
Dublin, Ireland

01 885 8888

The Mater Private Hospital is a private Catholic hospital in Ireland. Founded in 1986, it shares a campus on Eccles Street, Dublin 7, with its sister public hospital, the Mater Misercordiae Hospital. Its mission statement is "to continue the healing mission of Christ by providing the highest quality healthcare in an independent tertiary acute care facility, complementary to the services provided by the Mater Misericordiae Hospital".The Mater Private Hospital is built on the site of No 7 Eccles Street, the home of the main character in James Joyce's Ulysses. In Joyce's youth, No 7 Eccles Street was the actual home of his contemporary, JF Byrne.ServicesMPH provides a variety of services and procedures including: orthopaedic surgery, cardio-thoracic surgery, plastic surgery, general surgery, dermatology, dietetics, gynaecology, a sleep laboratory, oncology, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, rheumatology, cardiology, paediatric surgery, aviation medicine, ear, nose and throat surgery, ophthalmology, intensive care medicine and neurosurgery.

Neighborhood Near O'Connell Street

Trinity College
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
College Green
Dublin, Ireland

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Smithfield, Dublin
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Smithfield
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 7

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Crumlin Dublin 12
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
crumlin
Crumlin, Ireland dublin 12

North Great Georges Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
North Great Georges Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

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A BRIEF ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY Composed of grandly scaled brick terraces and overlooked by the imposing elevation of Belvedere House, North Great George’s Street remains one of the handsomest streets in north Dublin’s ever-diminishing Georgian streetscape. While its eighteenth-century reputation as an enclave of ‘polite’ living is confirmed by property leases which record the names of distinguished former residents – including Emilia, Dowager Viscountess Powerscourt and Valentine Browne, 1st Earl of Kenmare – the history of its development also provides an instructive précis of late eighteenth-century building and decorative practices. Conor Lucey University College Dublin April 200

Dublin Ballymun
Distance: 3.0 mi Tourist Information
Ballymun Road
Dublin, Ireland

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Pembroke
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
31/32 Lower Pembroke Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

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Beggars Bush D4
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Beggars Bush
Dublin, Ireland 4

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The five road intersection at Beggars Bush Dublin 4 is unique. It is the only such intersection in Ireland. It is also now one of the best areas in Dublin to live, work and play. Well managed pubs, restaurants, cafés, local shops and businesses add significant value. It's a safe, clean and progressive area. Beggars Bush is within walking distance of The Aviva Stadium, RDS, Point Depot (3), Sandymount Strand, City Centre and Bord Gais Theatre on Grand Canal Square.

Public Places and Attractions Near O'Connell Street

Temple Bar
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland 2

Guinness Brewery
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
St James Gate
Dublin, Ireland

St. James's Gate Brewery is a brewery founded in 1759 in Dublin, Ireland, by Arthur Guinness. The company is now a part of Diageo, a company formed from the merger of Guinness and Grand Metropolitan in 1997. The main product of the brewery is Guinness Draught.Originally leased in 1759 to Arthur Guinness at IR£45 (Irish pounds) per year for 9,000 years, St. James's Gate has been the home of Guinness ever since. It became the largest brewery in Ireland in 1838, and the largest in the world by 1886, with an annual output of 1.2 million barrels. Although no longer the largest brewery in the world, it is still the largest brewer of stout in the world. The company has since bought out the originally leased property, and during the 19th and early 20th centuries the brewery owned most of the buildings in the surrounding area, including many streets of housing for brewery employees, and offices associated with the brewery. The brewery also made all of its own power using its own power plant.There is an attached exhibition on the 250-year-old history of Guinness, called the Guinness Storehouse.HistoryArthur Guinness started brewing ales in Leixlip, County Kildare, and then from 1759 at the St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin. On 31 December he signed a 9,000-year lease at £45 per annum for the unused brewery. However, the lease is no longer in effect because the brewery property has been bought out when it expanded beyond the original 4-acre site.

Old Jameson Whiskey Distillery
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 (1) 8072348

Heuston railway station
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
St Johns Road West
Dublin, Ireland Dubli

1850 366 222 / 01 703 3299

Heuston Station is one of Ireland's main railway stations, serving the south, southwest and west. It is operated by Iarnród Éireann, the national railway operator. It also houses the head office of its parent company - Córas Iompair Éireann.HistoryThe station opened on 4 August 1846 as the terminus and headquarters of the Great Southern and Western Railway (GS&WR). It was originally called Kingsbridge Station after the nearby Kings Bridge over the River Liffey. In 1966, on the 50th anniversary of the Easter Rising it was renamed "Heuston Station", in honour of Sean Heuston, an executed leader of the Rising, who had worked in the station's offices.Designed by Sancton Wood, the handsome original buildings remain. The five panels along the front represent, in order: VIII.VIC - being the Act of Parliament that incorporated the GS&WR Coat of Arms of Cork City Coat of Arms of Dublin City Coat of Arms of Limerick City AD. 1844 - being the year of incorporation of the GS&WR Since its renewal (by Quinn Savage Smyth architects and engineers Buro Happold) it includes two branches of Eason's, as well as some dining facilities, including a Supermacs and a pub.

Jervis Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
24-29 Mary Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

+353 1 878 1323

Cliff Of Moher
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Co. Clare
Galway, Ireland

Phoenix Park, Dublin
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Dublin 8, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland

Trinity College
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
College Green
Dublin, Ireland

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Clontarf Seafront
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Clontarf Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

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Science Gallery Dublin
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Trinity College, Pearse Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

+353-18964091

In 2008, a car park in a forgotten corner of Dublin was transformed into an experimental space that would bridge art and science, unleashing their combined creative potential. Over 1.9 million visitors to Science Gallery Dublin have experienced exhibitions ranging from living art experiments to materials science, to the future of the human race to the future of play. We develop an ever-changing programme of exhibitions and events fuelled by the expertise of scientists, researchers, students, artists, designers, inventors, creative thinkers and entrepreneurs.

Natural History Museum
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Street, Dubin 2
Dublin, Ireland

Ireland's Natural History Museum (Músaem Stair an Dúlra), sometimes called the Dead Zoo a branch of the National Museum of Ireland, is housed on Merrion Street in Dublin, Ireland. The museum was built in 1856 for parts of the collection of the Royal Dublin Society and building and collection were later passed to the Irish State.The Museum's collection and building have changed little since Victorian times, and it is sometimes described as a "museum of a museum".CollectionThe building is a ‘cabinet-style’ museum designed to showcase a wide-ranging and comprehensive zoological collection, and has changed little in over a century. Often described as a ‘museum of a museum’, its 10,000 exhibits provide a glimpse of the natural world that has delighted generations of visitors since the doors opened in 1857.As the collection is unique in range and vintage, the exhibits are a product of their age, with faded and worn pelts and visible marks from bullets and rough taxidermy. Larger specimens are displayed in large, wood-framed glass cases while smaller ones are kept under glass, protected from sunlight by moveable leather panels. The main room is heated by an underfloor system similar to a Roman hypocaust.The Irish Room, the ground floor of the museum, displays Irish animals, notably several mounted skeletons of giant Irish deer. Numerous skulls of those and other deer line the walls. Stuffed and mounted mammals, birds, fish — and insects and other animals native to or found in Ireland — comprise the rest of the ground floor. Many of the specimens of currently extant animals, such as badgers, hares, and foxes, are over a century old. A basking shark hangs from this ceiling.

The Quays, Dublin
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
12 Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland Dublin2

01 6713922

Mansion House
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

Temple Bar District, Dublin
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland 2

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Botanic Garden Dublin
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
Glasnevin
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

01 804 0300

Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Charlemont House, Parnell Square North
Dublin, Ireland D01 F2X9

+353 (0)1 222 5550

North Circular Road
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
North Circular Road
Dublin, Ireland D1

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Four Courts
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Inns Quay
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 7

The Four Courts is Ireland's main courts building, located on Inns Quay in Dublin. The Four Courts are the location of the Supreme Court, the High Court and the Dublin Circuit Court. Until 2010 the building also housed the Central Criminal Court.Gandon's BuildingWork based on the design of Thomas Cooley for the Public Records Office of Ireland, began in 1776. After his death in 1784 renowned architect James Gandon was appointed to finish the building, which we recognise today as the Four Courts. It was built between 1786 and 1796, while the finishing touches to the arcades and wings were completed in 1802. The lands were previously used by the King's Inns. The building originally housed the four courts of Chancery, King's Bench, Exchequer and Common Pleas, hence the name of the building. A major revision in the court system in the late nineteenth century saw these courts merged into a new High Court of Ireland, but the building has retained its historic name. This courts system remained until 1924, when the new Irish Free State introduced a new courts structure, replacing the High Court of Ireland, the Lord Chief Justice of Ireland and the Lord Chancellor of Ireland with a Supreme Court of Justice presided over by the Chief Justice and a High Court of Justice, presided over by the President of the High Court. In 1961 the words "of justice" were dropped from the names of both courts when they were belatedly re-established consequent upon the enactment of the 1937 Constitution.

St Lukes Hospital
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
highfield rd
Dublin, Ireland 6w

01 4065000

Custom House Harbour
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Custom House Harbour
Dublin, Ireland

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Street Near O'Connell Street

Grafton Street - Dublin, Ireland.
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland

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Grafton Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

North Circular Road
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
North Circular Road
Dublin, Ireland D1

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Portobello Harbour
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Portobello Harbour
Dublin, Ireland

Camden Street
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Camden Street
Dublin, Ireland

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Rutland Avenue
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Rutland Avenue
Crumlin, Ireland

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North King Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
north king st
Dublin, Ireland

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Clogher Road
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Clogher Road
Dublin, Ireland D.12

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Cow's Lane
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Essex Street West, Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland

0872455565

Temple Bar Square
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
12 Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland

Summerhill Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
80,Summerhill Street
Dublin, Ireland

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Temple Bar TradFest
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2-5 Wellington Quay
Dublin, Ireland Temple Bar

017030700

TradFest Temple Bar has gained a reputation as the one of the biggest and best traditional Irish music and culture festivals in Ireland. It is now a firm fixture on the National and International festival calendar attracting national and international visitors. The festival takes place over 5 days and 5 nights with over 200 events. The festival has been recognised for its contribution to Irish traditional music and culture with several awards including Best Traditional Music Festival in the Festival Awards. Numerous iconic venues are used to host concerts featuring talented and beloved musicians from Ireland (and further afield) such as The Dubliners, Martin Hayes, Donovan, Paul Brady, Paddy Casey, John Sheahan, Mick Flanney, Matt Molloy, Arty McGlynn, John Carty, Mundy, Clannad, Moya Brennan, Sharon Shannon, Maura O’Connell, Altan and many more. The venues include St. Patrick’s Cathedral, St Werburgh’s Church, St Michan’s Church, Dublin’s City Hall, House of Lords, Dublin Castle, The New Theatre and the Button Factory. For more information visit us on: www.templebartrad.com

Blackhall Place, Dublin
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Blackhall Place
Dublin, Ireland

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Poplar Row
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Poplar Row, Dublin 3
Dublin, Ireland

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Dominick Street Lower
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Lower Dominick St, Dublin 1
Dublin, Ireland

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O'conells Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Mountjoy Square North
Dublin, Ireland

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Poddle Park, Kimmage, Dublin
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
4 poddle parc
Dublin, Ireland

NorthWall Quay Dublin 1
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
NorthWall Quay Dublin 1
Dublin, Ireland

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Crazy Street Art
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Dublin
Dublin, Ireland

08555555361

The Van Side Of Food
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Dublin
Dublin, Ireland dublin

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Local Business Near O'Connell Street

GPO,O'Connell Street, Dublin
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
O’Connell St Lower
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

01 705 7000

Concorde Travel
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
69 Upper O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland D1

01 775 9300

Concorde Travel offer package holidays to Croatia, Montenegro, Malta and Portugal (Madeira and Lisbon Coast). Also a specialist in Weddings Abroad, Pilgrimages to Medjugorje & Schooner Holidays in Croatia. Part of the Joe Walsh Tour Group, Concorde Travel is located close to the spire on O'Connell Street. For offers see www.concordetravel.ie, contact 01 775 9300 or [email protected] or call in today!

Clerys, Dublin
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
18-27 Lower O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

+353 (0)1 8786000

Oatfield Sweetshop
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Unit 151 Blanchardstown Shopping Centre
Dublin, Ireland 15

01-8278224

Step back in time when you enter the Oatfield Sweetshop in Blanchardstown Shopping Centre. Visit our old-style sweetshop and choose from the vast selection of favourite sweets from your childhood. We have Emeralds, Sherbet Lemons, Rosy Apples, Bull's Eyes, Rhubarb & Custard, Chocolate Limes, Mint Humbugs, Barley Sugar, Cough Candy, Clove Drops, Dip Dabs, Fizz Bombs, Sherbet Fountains, Fruit Salads, Black Jacks and many, many more! Fill a bag or fill one of our beautiful glass jars and take some sweets home today!

Muse Cafe, Easons
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland

Hairspray Ireland
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
27, Henry Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

01-6339004 01-8735846 01-2988115 01-4295688 021-2029840

Hairspray is ireland's number 1 hair company. We have 5 stores in Dublin and Cork. Dundrum Town Centre, Wicklow Street Dublin 2, Fashion City Ballymount Dublin 12 and Henry Street Dublin 1. We also have a hair extensions training academy and supply over 1200 salons with our famous Russian Hair extensions brand.

Mac Donals
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Kylemore
Dublin, Ireland

Paddy Power
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
3 Moore st
Dublin, Ireland

(180)0238888

Grand Central
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
10-11 O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland D1

(01)8728658

Rté Road to the Rising
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street, Dublin 1.
Dublin, Ireland

Club Travel
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
30 Lower Abbey Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

Club Travel Ireland
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
30 Lower Abbey Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

+353 (01) 435 0089

GO4LESS.IE
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
30 Lower Abbey Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

+353 (01) 435 0000

RocTel International
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
The Capel Building
Dublin, Ireland

1850 222 444

RocTel International was established in 2000 with a mission to provide the best in class telecommunication and broadband services to businesses’. As a Cisco partner, RocTel specialise in providing the best telecommunications infrastructure to suit all your business requirements. We are a privately owned company, focused on building our business in Ireland and the UK, servicing the local and international markets. Our telecommunication suite includes Voice, Broadband, IP Networks, Managed Services and Unified Communications Systems, all coupled with first class telecommunication and internet back-up services ensuring that your business can operate efficiently. We have commercial offices in Dublin City, City of London and satellite offices in the UK and Ireland, where we can offer remote managed services to customers. We provide high quality routers giving you bespoke broadband speeds tailored to your requirements. In addition we provide low-cost telecommunications services across all industries, together with Cisco infrastructure it will allow you to keep your business unified wherever your offices may be located while supporting all your business conferencing needs . Our premium product RocSolid is a dual internet broadband service. Effective and strong connectivity is mission critical to your business; unforeseen events can and do happen, which can impact your primary service therefore affecting your business. RocSolid is diversely routed and remotely managed to offer high availability underpinned by best in class Cisco infrastructure.

Kelamer Bloodstock
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Charel Park Stud, Southlodge, Carrick on Suir
Dublin, Ireland

0035351647898

Kelamer Bloodstock is now in its fifth year in business and 2011 is already shaping up to be the busiest to date. Starting off on a small scale, we have since built up a clientele which is second to none. Our main clients are French, but we transport to all European countries and beyond. No job is too small, or too big! Be it thoroughbred broodmares, half-bred show jumpers or donkeys, the care and attention is equal. We have two horse-boxes to suit our needs and our transport team members are some of the most experienced in the industry.

Love2sparkle
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
[email protected]
Dublin, Ireland

Ambassador Windows & Repairs
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Boot Road, Clondalkin
Dublin, Ireland

014582031

This Page is designed to bring you information and news about Ambassador Windows & Repairs Ltd. We aim to keep you informed about new safety products, additions to our window repair service and general tips on getting the most from your windows and doors.

Colaiste choilm bookmarkers
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Rathbeale road
Dublin, Ireland

0874196936

JEArchitecture
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
The Quay
Dublin, Ireland

(01) 8079641

Sheridan's Late Night Pharmacy
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Unit O Roselawn Shopping Centre Blanchardstown Dublin 15
Dublin, Ireland

01-6405740

Here in Sheridan's Pharmacy, Roselawn we provide a fast service on prescriptions with the best value for money. We value our customers very much and pride ourselves in the personalised customer service which we provide. Sheridan's Pharmacy is located in Roselawn Shopping Centre, Dublin 15 and we are open 9am-9pm Monday to Saturday and 11-9pm on Sunday.