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Hay's Galleria, London | Tourist Information



2 Battlebridge Lane, Southwark
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

Art Museum Near Hay's Galleria

Big Ben
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Westminster
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

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Big Ben is the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London, and often extended to refer to the clock and the clock tower. The tower is officially known as Elizabeth Tower, renamed to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II in 2012; previously it was known simply as the Clock Tower. The tower holds the second largest four-faced chiming clock in the world (after Minneapolis City Hall). The tower was completed in 1859 and had its 150th anniversary on 31 May 2009, during which celebratory events took place. The tower has become one of the most prominent symbols of the United Kingdom and is often in the establishing shot of films set in London.TowerThe Elizabeth Tower, more popularly known as Big Ben, was raised as a part of Charles Barry's design for a new palace, after the old Palace of Westminster was largely destroyed by fire on the night of 16 October 1834. The new parliament was built in a neo-gothic style. Although Barry was the chief architect of the palace, he turned to Augustus Pugin for the design of the clock tower, which resembles earlier Pugin designs, including one for Scarisbrick Hall. The design for the tower was Pugin's last design before his final descent into madness and death, and Pugin himself wrote, at the time of Barry's last visit to him to collect the drawings: "I never worked so hard in my life for Mr Barry for tomorrow I render all the designs for finishing his bell tower & it is beautiful." The tower is designed in Pugin's celebrated Gothic Revival style, and is 315ft high.

Tate
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Bankside
London, United Kingdom SE1 9TG

+44 (20) 7887 8888

Tate Modern is the UK's most popular modern art gallery, showing contemporary art from around the globe. Tate Britain is the home of British art, from 1500 to the modern day.

National Gallery
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 5DN

020 7747 2885

Exhibitions: http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/ Events: http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/whats-on Our social media code of conduct: http://bit.ly/1IN7xJt

Imperial War Museum London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Lambeth Road, London SE1 6HZ
London, United Kingdom SE1 6

020 7416 5000

IWM London tells the stories of those whose lives have been shaped by war from the First World War to the present day. Follow us on Facebook and join our growing community of fans. Discover in-depth information about IWM London, special content, and discuss and share with others.

National Portrait Gallery
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
St Martin’s Place
London, United Kingdom WC2H 0

+44(0)20 7306 0055

The Courtauld Gallery
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
150 Strand
London, United Kingdom WC2R 0RN

+44 (0)20 7848 2526

Discover our world-famous collection of paintings, drawings and decorative arts. Ranging from the Middle Ages to the 20th century the collection is displayed in the elegant surroundings of Somerset House. The Courtauld is best known for its outstanding Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, including celebrated works by Monet, Renoir, Degas and Gauguin as well as a major group of paintings by Cézanne. Visitors can enjoy iconic masteries such as Manet's 'A Bar at the Folies-Bergère' and Van Gogh's 'Self-Portrait with Badaged Ear.'

Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre
London, United Kingdom SE1 8XX

+44 (0)20 7960 4200

Opened by Her Majesty The Queen in 1968, it is an outstanding example of sixties brutalist architecture and is one of the few remaining buildings of this style. It was designed by a group of young architects, including Dennis Crompton, Warren Chalk and Ron Herron. The Hayward Gallery is named after the late Sir Isaac Hayward, the former leader of the London County Council.

Fashion and Textile Museum
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
83 Bermondsey Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 3XF

020 7407 8664

The Fashion and Textile Museum is a cutting edge centre for contemporary fashion, textiles and jewellery in London. Founded by iconic British designer Zandra Rhodes, the centre showcases a programme of changing exhibitions exploring elements of fashion, textile and jewellery as well as the Academy which runs courses for creative students and businesses. Situated in the heart of fashionable Bermondsey Village, in a fantastic building designed by Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta, the FTM aims not just to display and collect items relating to fashion, jewellery and textile design, but to offer inspiration to a new generation of creatives. Now redeveloped and operated by Newham College, the museum is a hub of learning, ideas and networking for the fashion and jewellery industry. The FTM Shop is committed to supporting design talent and has a great range of products from some of the best up and coming and established designers in the UK. Whether you are looking to treat yourself, find a unique gift for someone or perhaps you study or work in Fashion then this is a great place to shop! Showcasing the work of cutting edge fashion, textile and jewellery designers, the FTM Shop stocks a large range of Fashion and Textile books as well as gifts, jewellery and postcards. Teapod, the FTM café is open weekdays 8am to 5.30pm and weekends 10am to 5pm, adding a fresh touch of vibrant food in an inspiring place in the heart of Bermondsey Village. Entrance: £8.80 Adults / £6.60 Concessions / £5.50 Students. Children under 12 are free Remember you can follow us on Twitter, we look forward to seeing you there! @FashionTextile We look forward to seeing you at the Museum soon!

London Film Museum Events
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
45 Wellington Street
London, United Kingdom WC2E 7

020 7202 7043

Our venue located in the Covent Garden Piazza has a modern elegant feel and is the perfect space, featuring 4 cellars steeped in history, originally used as the flower cellars for the Covent Gardent market. It features the fantastic Bond in Motion exhibition creating a talking point for any event. For more information about hiring any of our spaces please call 020 7202 7043.

Guildhall Art Gallery and London's Roman Amphitheatre
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Guildhall Yard
London, United Kingdom EC2V 5

020 7332 3700

Guildhall Art Gallery was established in 1886 as 'a Collection of Art Treasures worthy of the capital city'. The original building was destroyed during a severe air raid in 1941. In 1988, when the Gallery was being rebuilt on its original site, Museum of London archaeologists discovered the remains of London’s Roman Amphitheatre. The new building was redesigned to incorporate the underground Roman ruins and opened in 1999. Facebook is a public page. Please bear this in mind when posting your comments, especially regarding personal information. Further information on the City of London Corporation can be found at www.cityoflondon.gov.uk. The City of London Corporation is always happy to hear from you but please keep posts relevant. All comments will be monitored by Facebook and the City and any comments that are offensive or inappropriate will be removed. People who persistently cause conflict or offence to others will be removed and blocked from our social media pages.

Gagosian Gallery
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
6-24 Britannia St
London, United Kingdom WC1X 9JD

020 7841 9960

Sir John Soane's Museum
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
13 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, United Kingdom WC2A 3BP

Sir John Soane's Museum was formerly the home of the neo-classical architect John Soane. It holds many drawings and models of Soane's projects and the collections of paintings, drawings and antiquities that he assembled.The museum is located in Holborn, London, adjacent to Lincoln's Inn Fields. It is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.HistoryHousesSoane demolished and rebuilt three houses in succession on the north side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. He began with No. 12 (between 1792 and 1794), externally a plain brick house. After becoming Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy in 1806, Soane purchased No. 13, the house next door, today the Museum, and rebuilt it in two phases in 1808–09 and 1812.In 1808–09 he constructed his drawing office and "museum" on the site of the former stable block at the back, using primarily top lighting. In 1812 he rebuilt the front part of the site, adding a projecting Portland Stone facade to the basement, ground and first floor levels and the centre bay of the second floor. Originally this formed three open loggias, but Soane glazed the arches during his lifetime. Once he had moved into No. 13, Soane rented out his former home at No. 12 (on his death it was left to the nation along with No. 13, the intention being that the rental income would fund the running of the Museum).

Brunei Gallery At SOAS
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
10 Thornhaugh Street
London, United Kingdom WC1H 0XG

+44 (0) 20 7898 4915

Brunei Gallery, SOAS
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
10, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square
London, United Kingdom WC1H 0XG

020 7898 4046 (Recorded info)

Running a programme of changing visiting exhibitions from Africa, Asia and the Middle East combined with the permanent rotating selection from SOAS's own collections on display in the Foyle Special Collections Gallery and with a Japanese influenced Roof Garden, The Brunei Gallery, SOAS makes a stimulating haven in the heart of London.

Chisenhale Gallery
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
64 Chisenhale Road
London, United Kingdom E3 5QZ

(+44) 020 8981 4518

Join us for up to date information about our Exhibitions and Events Programme! Chisenhale Gallery stages up to five major exhibitions a year, alongside a programme of Interim live events, '21st Century', Offsite commissions and a diverse Education programme. http://www.chisenhale.org.uk By Tube: Mile End / Bethnal Green By Bus: 8, D6, 277, 339. 425 By Car: Pay and Display on adjacent roads Admission free Wheelchair accessible

Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
14 Wharf Road
London, United Kingdom N1 7

+44 20 7490 7373

Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art is an educational charity and a not-for-profit contemporary art gallery based in London. Established in 2005, the foundation is housed in a converted warehouse over two floors in a building that was renovated to a design concept by the Italian architect, Claudio Silvestrin. The gallery comprises roughly 5,000 sq ft (460 m2) of exhibition space.Parasol unit was established by its Director/Curator, Ziba Ardalan. A graduate in the History of Art from Columbia University New York, Ardalan worked as Guest Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art. She guest curated the exhibition 'Winslow Homer and the New England Coast' at the Whitney's Stamford, Ct. Branch (1984). Ardalan became the first Director/Curator of New York City’s Swiss Institute in 1987, before moving to Zurich, Switzerland, and then relocating to UK and founding Parasol unit. She has curated numerous exhibitions and has also lectured and written about art. Prior to her career in art, Ardalan obtained a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry.AimsParasol unit is devoted to promoting contemporary art for the benefit of the public. The exhibition programme comprises work by emerging and contemporary artists in a variety of media: sculpture, painting, installation, video and photography. The institution was developed on the model of a Kunsthalle, with no permanent collection.

Iniva - Institute of International Visual Arts
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
1 Rivington Place
London, United Kingdom EC2A 3BA

020 7729 9616

Big Ben
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Westminster,London SW1A 0AA, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom

Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
14 Wharf Road
London, United Kingdom N1 7

+44 20 7490 7373

Founded in December 2004, Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art is an educational charity and a non-profit institution that operates purely for public benefit. Admission to all exhibitions at Parasol unit is free of charge. Every year the foundation organises four challenging and thought-provoking exhibitions of works by international contemporary artists working in various media, holds artistic projects and gives awards and exhibition possibility to graduating students from London art schools. The foundation also engages with the public and the neighbouring community through a full programme of educational events. In its genuine mission to serve the public, the foundation does not bear the founder’s name and its exhibitions do not derive from any particular private collections. Admission to all exhibitions at Parasol unit is free of charge. Say hello on to us on Twitter @Parasolunit https://twitter.com/Parasolunit

Islington Museum
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
245 St John St
London, United Kingdom EC1V 0

02075272837

Islington Museum is a public museum dedicated to the history of the London Borough of IslingtonHistoryIslington Museum opened in May 2008, funded by a £1million grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund. The museum, which replaced a previous museum at Islington Town Hall, is owned and operated by Islington Council. It is located in the basement of Finsbury Library.CollectionsThe museum houses a gallery covering nine themes on local and social history: childhood, food and drink, fashion, leisure, healthcare, radicals, caring, home and wartime. Amongst the items on display are a bust of Vladimir Lenin, who lived and worked in Clerkenwell, and some of the book covers defaced by Joe Orton and Kenneth Halliwell.Exhibitions and eventsThe museum has a regular programme of temporary exhibitions, including visiting displays and displays from its own collections. The museum also hosts talks, walks and children's events. There is also an education room which is used for visits by schools and other groups.Admission and accessAdmission is free. The museum is fully accessible for wheelchair users but there is no accessible parking. An induction loop is available.

Arts and Entertainment Near Hay's Galleria

London Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

London Dungeon
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
28-34 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

The London Dungeon is a tourist attraction in London, England, which recreates various gory and macabre historical events in a gallows humour style. It uses a mixture of live actors, special effects and rides.OverviewOpening in 1974, the attraction was initially designed as a museum of macabre history, but the Dungeon has evolved to become an actor-led, interactive experience. The Dungeon is operated by Merlin Entertainments. In 2013, the London Dungeon moved from its premises on Tooley Street to a new location in County Hall next to the London Eye.FormatThe London Dungeon features 18 shows, 20 actors and 3 rides. Visitors are taken on a journey through 1000 years of London’s history where they meet actors performing as some of London’s most infamous characters, including Jack the Ripper and Sweeney Todd. The Dungeon’s shows are staged on theatrical sets with special effects. The show incorporates events such as the Black Death and the Gunpowder Plot, and includes characters such as "The Torturer", "The Plague Doctor", and "The Judge". Guests are encouraged to participate in the shows. The experience also includes a "drop ride to doom", a free-fall ride staged as a public hanging.

Proud Cabaret
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
No. 1 Mark Lane
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7AH

City 0207 283 1940 / Camden 0207 482 3867

Modeled on a 1920s speakeasy, Proud Cabaret City is an elegant destination which offers fine dining and entertainment in surroundings which exude the illicit glamour of a bygone era. Designed by Danielle Proud, the venue has a sophisticated, decadent feel. Thursday through Saturday, from 6.30pm the kitchen serves superbly executed British cuisine, with space for 275 covers. There is also an informal bar menu serving lighter dishes. The extensive wine list is the perfect accompaniment, whilst the bartenders concoct both classic and contemporary cocktails. Proud Cabaret Camden is located in the South Gallery of the 200-year-old Grade II Listed Horse Hospital in the Stables Market. After being a stronghold for live bands and the alternative scene for many years, Camden now welcomes a more glamorous crowd. Formerly Proud Kitchen, the south gallery has undergone an extensive transformation to offer not only food but a glamorous, more decadent, 360 entertainment experience that is the perfect partner to the Proud Camden gallery and live music venue. Adding to the eclectic, buzzing atmosphere of Camden, Proud Cabaret Camden is the first offering of its kind in North London. An elegant, decadent space, it oozes the glamour and sophistication of a bygone era. Thursday through to Saturday Proud Cabaret Camden venues combine the country's highest class of performers with superbly executed dishes, wine lists and cocktail menus.

Draft House Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
206-208 Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

020 7378 9995

The Draft House is a small group of Public Houses with good food and great beer. We aim to do for beer what our culture has done for food and wine over the past twenty years. Namely, we take its provenance, cellaring and serving seriously. We celebrate choice and quality with an extraordinary range of strange and wonderful brews, both bottled and on tap.

Crucifix Lane
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
7-9 Crucifix Lane
London, United Kingdom SE1 3JW

Formerly known as Jacks and for a brief period in 2010 Counter Culture, 7-9 Crucifix Lane opened in its present guise at the beginning of 2011. We are located a short distance to the east of London Bridge station, housed inside of two railway arches, making for a warehouse feel throughout. Features include a 650 person capacity, two bars and a full-sized stage. Music at the venue—with sound supplied via a Nova line array system—is largely focussed on house and techno, though we also host a variety of other events. For Venue Enquiries, please email- info@crucifixlane.com If you send enquiries to us in a FB message we will not get back to you. Please note that we get a lot of enquiries and cannot respond to all. We are fully booked for weekend dates for the rest of 2014. For Lost Property, please message us on this Page Please note we do not have a telephone number at the venue, nor a website. All listings can be found on RA or FB.

London Bridge City
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
More London Riverside
London, United Kingdom SE1 2DB

020 7403 4866

From London Bridge to Tower Bridge: a bustling, central riverside destination. London Bridge City includes More London, No.1 London Bridge, Cottons Centre and Hay's Galleria. Come and experience a changing programme of arts, entertainment and events, world-class food and drink against a backdrop of great architecture and historic markets.

The Miller Pub
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
96 Snowfield Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 3

02075606640

La Pollera Colora Latin Nightclub
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
6 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

07702630257

La Pollera Colora Latinclub situated in the heart of the City of London, right next to the newly developed Shard Building in London Bridge, is widely recognised amongst UK's Latin Music & Dance enthusiasts as the best place around to experience true Latin Atmosphere, Music & Drinks. The Nightclub with a Capacity of well over 500 People recently was voted "UK's Latin Nightclub of the Year" in the Latin American UK Awards (LUKAS) & has also acquired other Prestigious Awards since opening. The Nightclub itself has 2 Separate Dance Rooms on different levels featuring Pure Wooden Dance Floors to give the place a pure Latin Flavour, Great Air-Conditioning and very attentive Service. Bottle Table Service, is always available. A wide Variety of Thirst Quenching Latin Cocktails prepared by experienced Bar Tenders are also very enticing. Wether its a Cuban Mojito that tickles you fancy, to a Peruvian Pisco Sour or Brazilian Caipirinha all the cocktails will have you feeling the heat of Latin America. A Late Entertainment & Alcohol License will have all Party goers enjoying themselves to the early hours. The Nightclub opens every Thursday, Friday & Saturday as well as Bank Holidays & special dates like NYE & Boxing Day. Be sure to visit if you want to kick back and enjoy authentic Latin Experience in the Heart of the City of London. Both floors of the Nightclub are available for Private hire. We cater for Private Functions, Birthday Parties, Wedding Receptions and any other Private Events so please do not hesitate to get in touch.

Escape Rooms
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
R/O 134 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2TU

02074037179

Based on the Japanese online game 'Takagism', Escape Rooms is a real-life room escape game which requires players to work together to solve hidden puzzles to escape a locked themed room, before the 1-hour timer runs out. This exciting new concept, brings the popular online game into real life and gives players the opportunity to use their intuition, teamwork skills and intelligence to accomplish a unique and challenging task. The game is incredibly popular in Asia, the US and several European countries. Thousands of people have played worldwide and 99% say they would visit again. We are pleased to announce that Escape Rooms London Bridge is now open. We guarantee you an unforgettable experience full of fun, adventure and intrigue.

Nicholson's Pub
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
The Queens Walk
London, United Kingdom

Old billinsgate London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Old Billinsgate Walk, 16 Lower Thames Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6 DX

Square Meal Exhibition, Old Billingsgate
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Old Billingsgate Walk
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6DX

Terminal Studios
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
4-10 Lamb Walk, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 3TT

+44 0207 403 3050

Central London's largest & best-known rehearsal and audio hire company. Opened in 1979, we've seen more than 10,000 acts through our doors over the past 30 years. Located at London Bridge, we're in easy access of both the City and the West End for the delivery of all your audio requirements. Our hire department have recently provided audio systems for clients including: Goldman Sachs, BBC TV, British Library, Cancer Research, Ernst & Young, Howard De Walden Estates, Barclays, Clear Channel, Price Waterhouse Coopers, The Telegraph, Amnesty International, ITV, Agent Provocateur, Childline, Bloomberg, The Arts Council.

The Art Academy
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Mermaid Court 165A Borough High Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1HR

+44 (0)207 407 6969

The Art Academy is an independent art school based in central London, offering a wide range of art education programmes to a diverse community of students, from beginners to postgraduates. Alongside full-time courses (3-year Diploma in Fine Art, 1-year Fine Art Foundation and 2-year Certificate courses), the Academy offers evening classes, part-time study, and weekend and short courses. The Art Academy is recognised for harnessing traditional and contemporary skills in the pursuit of students' individual creative vision, and for the unparalleled degree of individual attention offered by tutorial staff. The Art Academy offers an unrivalled selection of short courses for individuals who want to develop their skills and ideas, whether they have no previous instruction, or are returning to art school to further develop their skills

Whirl Y Gig
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Jacks 7-9, Crucifix Lane
London, United Kingdom SE1 3JW

02088646760

The northern and shell Building
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Number 10 Lower Thames St
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6EN

Agenda Bar / Club (3 Mincing Lane. Central London) Ec3r 7aa
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
3 MINCING LANE. CENTRAL LONDON
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7AA

07956557199

Hop Exchange
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
24 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1

The Hop Exchange is a Grade II listed building at No. 24 Southwark Street, London, in the Bankside area of the London Borough of Southwark. Opened in 1867 and designed by R.H. Moore it served as the centre for hop trading for the brewing industry.OverviewHops, introduced to England from the Netherlands, are still used in the brewing industry. They are harvested from farms (known as "hop gardens") in Kent, and in the 19th century they were brought by railway to London Bridge Station, or by boat up the River Thames. They were then stored in the many warehouses in the Borough area.The purpose of the Hop Exchange was to provide a single market centre for dealers in hops. A glass roof allowed business on the trading floor of the Great Hall to be conducted under natural light. There were many similar outcry floor exchanges across London, such as the Coal, Metal and Stock exchanges, but wartime bombing, fires, redevelopment and modernisation have left the Hop Exchange the only one still standing. However, a fire in 1920 led to the top two storeys being removed, and the Hop Exchange was then converted into offices.

Bermondsey St Park
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
bermondsay road 111
London, United Kingdom SE1 3

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The Tango Club, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
8 The Leather Market, WESTON STREET, off Long Lane London Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 3ER

+44 20 7403 5060

Nearest Tube: London Bridge or Borough Lots of Buses nearby

Historical Place Near Hay's Galleria

Blackfriars Bridge
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Blackfriars Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9UD

020 7928 8998

Blackfriars Bridge is a road and foot traffic bridge over the River Thames in London, between Waterloo Bridge and Blackfriars Railway Bridge, carrying the A201 road. The north end is near the Inns of Court and Temple Church, along with Blackfriars station. The south end is near the Tate Modern art gallery and the Oxo Tower.HistoryThe first fixed crossing at Blackfriars was a 995ft long toll bridge designed in an Italianate style by Robert Mylne and constructed with nine semi-elliptical arches of Portland stone. Beating designs by John Gwynn and George Dance, it took nine years to build, opening to the public in 1769. It was the third bridge across the Thames in the then built-up area of London, supplementing the ancient London Bridge, which dated from several centuries earlier, and Westminster Bridge. It was originally named "William Pitt Bridge" (after the Prime Minister William Pitt the Elder) as a dedication, but its informal name relating to the precinct within the City named after the Blackfriars Monastery, a Dominican priory which once stood nearby, was generally adopted. It was later made toll free.

The George Inn
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
77 Borough High Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1

02074072056

Spitalfields E1
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Spitalfields Market E1, Brushfield Street
London, United Kingdom E1 6AA

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Spitalfields markets, shops and restaurants - one-off, handmade and individual - just like you. Open 7 days a week.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7940 6300

Follow us on Facebook and join our growing community of fans. Discover in-depth information about HMS Belfast, special content, and discuss and share with others.

Royal Exchange, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
st. Threadneedle
London, United Kingdom EC3V 3

020 7623 3857

The Royal Exchange in London was founded in the 16th century by the merchant Thomas Gresham on the suggestion of his factor Richard Clough to act as a centre of commerce for the City of London. The site was provided by the City of London Corporation and the Worshipful Company of Mercers, who still jointly own the freehold. It is trapezoidal in shape and is flanked by Cornhill and Threadneedle Street, which converge at Bank junction in the heart of the City. The design was inspired by a bourse Gresham had seen in Antwerp, and was Britain's first specialist commercial building.It has twice been destroyed by fire and subsequently rebuilt. The present building was designed by William Tite in the 1840s. The site was notably occupied by the Lloyd's insurance market for nearly 150 years. Today the Royal Exchange contains offices, luxury shops and restaurants.Traditionally, the steps of the Royal Exchange is the place where Royal Proclamations (such as the dissolution of Parliament) are read out by either a herald or a crier.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

Monument to the Great Fire of London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Monument Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8AH

0207 626 2717

The Monument to the Great Fire of London, more commonly known simply as the Monument, is a Doric column in the City of London, near the northern end of London Bridge, that commemorates the Great Fire of London.It stands at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill, 202 ft (62 m) tall and 202 ft (62 m) from the spot in Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started on 2 September 1666. Another monument, the Golden Boy of Pye Corner, marks the point near Smithfield where the fire was stopped. Constructed between 1671 and 1677, it was built on the site of St. Margaret's, Fish Street, the first church to be burnt down by the Great Fire.The Monument comprises a fluted Doric column built of Portland stone topped with a gilded urn of fire. It was designed by Christopher Wren and Robert Hooke. Its height marks its distance from the site of the shop of Thomas Farynor, the king's baker, where the Great Fire began.The top of the Monument is reached by a narrow winding staircase of 311 steps. A mesh cage was added in the mid-19th century at the top to prevent people jumping off, after six people had committed suicide from the structure between 1788 and 1842.

The Clink Prison Museum
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
1 Clink Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DG

02074030900

The Clink Prison Museum is built upon the original site of the Clink Prison. The Prison dates back to 1144 making it one of England’s oldest, if not the oldest prison. Visitors will experience a hands on educational experience allowing them to handle original artefacts, including torture devices, as well as the opportunity to view and hear the amazing stories of the inmates and the notorious Southbank. Owned by the Bishop of Winchester, The Clink Prison was used to control the Southbank of London known as “The Liberty of The Clink”. This area housed much of London’s entertainment establishments including four theatres, bull-baiting, bear-baiting, inns and many other darker entertainments. The Clink Prison was only a small part of a vast complex on the Bankside that the Bishop owned called Winchester House. At one point in history Henry VIII planned toake control of the palace and use it as his own. Parts of the Great Hall still stand even today including the world famous Rose Arch Window preserved by English Heritage. Visitors to the area included individuals such as William Shakespeare, King Henry VIII, Sir Francis Drake, Geoffrey Chaucer and many more. Why not explore the prison that gave its name to all others? The clink Prison.

City Hall
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
110 The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2AA

+44 (0) 20 7983 4000

Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Tower of London
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4AB

0870 756 6060

The Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom are 141 historic ceremonial objects, including the regalia and vestments worn by kings and queens of the country at their coronations, as well as processional and anointing objects, plate, and christening fonts.A symbol of 1,000 years of monarchy, the sovereign's coronation regalia is the only working collection in Europe – other present-day monarchies have abandoned coronations in favour of inauguration or enthronement ceremonies – and is the largest set of regalia in the world. Objects used to invest and crown the monarch variously denote his or her roles as Head of State, Supreme Governor of the Church of England, and Commander-in-Chief of the British Armed Forces. Wives of kings are crowned as queen consort with a plainer set of regalia. Since 1831, a new crown has been made specially for each queen consort.The use of regalia by monarchs in Britain can be traced back to its early history. Most of the present collection as a whole dates from around 350 years ago when King Charles II acceded to the throne. The medieval coronation regalia and Tudor state regalia had been either sold or melted down by Oliver Cromwell, a republican who overthrew the monarchy in 1649, during the English Civil War. Notable among the precious stones which adorn the regalia are Cullinan I (the largest clear cut diamond in the world), Cullinan II (second-largest of the Cullinan diamonds), the Koh-i-Noor diamond with a history going back to the 13th century, the Stuart Sapphire, St Edward's Sapphire, and the Black Prince's Ruby – a large spinel worn by King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt.

Butler's Wharf
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Butlers Wharf West 40 Shad Thames Flat 9
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3403

Butler's Wharf is an English historic building on the south bank of the River Thames, just east of London's Tower Bridge, now housing luxury flats and restaurants. Lying between the picturesque street Shad Thames and the Thames Path, it overlooks both the bridge and St Katharine Docks on the other side of the river. Butler's Wharf is also used as a term for the surrounding area.HistoryButler's Wharf was built between 1871-73 as a shipping wharf and warehouse complex, accommodating goods unloaded from ships using the port of London. It contained what was reputedly the largest tea warehouse in the world. During the 20th century, Butler's Wharf and other warehouses in the area fell into disuse.From 1975-78, the artists' space at 2B Butler's Wharf was a key venue for early UK video art and performance art, used among others by Derek Jarman and the artists and dancers of X6 Dance Collective who published a magazine called New Dance for a number of years. Some of these people subsequently founded Chisenhale Studios and Chisenhale Dance Space, including Philip Jeck.In 1984, Butler's Wharf and the portion of Shad Thames running behind it featured prominently in the Doctor Who serial Resurrection of the Daleks.

Bishopsgate Institute
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
230 Bishopsgate
London, United Kingdom EC2M 4QH

020 7392 9200

We are a home for ideas and debate, learning and enquiry; a place where culture, heritage and learning meet, and where independent thought is cherished. We do this through our cultural events, courses and historic library and archive collections.

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

All Hallows by the Tower
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Byward Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 5BJ

020 74812928

Unilever House
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
100 Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom EC4Y 0DY

020 7822 5252

Unilever House is a Grade II listed office building in the Neoclassical Art Deco style, located on New Bridge Street, Victoria Embankment in Blackfriars, London. The building has a tall, curving frontage which overlooks Blackfriars Bridge on the north bank of the River Thames.The site of Unilever House was previously occupied by Bridewell Palace, a residence of Henry VIII, which later became a poorhouse and prison. These buildings were destroyed in 1864 making way for De Keyser's Royal Hotel. In 1920, Lord Leverhulme leased the site to build the London headquarters of his soap manufacturing company Lever Brothers, which became Unilever in 1930. Construction did not commence until 1929.ConstructionThe building design and construction is thought to be a collaboration between James Lomax-Simpson, a member of the Unilever Board, and John James Burnet and Thomas S. Tait, partners in the firm of Sir John Burnet and Partners. However, there is some uncertainty over the credit for the design; a note by Simpson claims exclusive credit, suggesting that Burnet and Tait only approved the final design. Burnet and Tait exhibited the design as a joint work with Simpson at the Royal Academy, and the drawings held at the City of London Record Office are signed by Burnet and Tait alone.

1 Old Billingsgate Walk London EC3R 6DX
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Old Billingsgate Walk
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6DX

The Woolhouse
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
74 Back Church Lane
London, United Kingdom E1 1LU

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Wool House is a grade II listed Victorian wool warehouse at 74 Backchurch Lane, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It was originally five storeys tall, and spanned a total of 137,455 square feet. An additional floor was constructed on the roof in the early 2000s, creating an additional 12,000 square feet of floorspace. The warehouse is one of two that were constructed on Backchurch lane in the late 1880s for Browne & Eagle, a wool storage firm. Wool House underwent a series of redevelopments in the early 21st century. The first of these took place between 1998 and 2003, when the building was refurbished and converted into office space. An extra floor constructed from lightweight materials was also added. In 2005 the offices closed down and the building was redesigned for residential usage. The residential conversion was completed in October 2006. The Wool House is now owned by Octagon Investments which is part of the Yianis Group owned by property magnate John Christodoulou who according to the Times Rich List 2007 is the 82nd wealthiest person in Britain with an estimated personal fortune of £835m.

Toynbee Hall
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
28 Commercial Street
London, United Kingdom E1 6LS

+44 (0) 20 7247 6943

-We have been a catalyst for social reform in the UK for over 130 years, and continue to bring together communities, organisations and policy makers to create new ways to help those who find themselves in poverty today. Supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund: www.hlf.org.uk

St Mary-le-Bow
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Cheapside
London, United Kingdom EC4M 9

020 7248 5139

St Mary-le-Bow is a historic church rebuilt after the Great Fire of 1666 by Sir Christopher Wren in the City of London on the main east–west thoroughfare, Cheapside. According to tradition a true Cockney must be born within earshot of the sound of Bow Bells (which refers to this church's bells rather than St Mary and Holy Trinity, Bow Road, in Bow, an outlying village until the 19th century).BellsThe sound of the bells of St Mary's is credited with having persuaded Dick Whittington to turn back from Highgate and remain in London to become Lord Mayor.Details of the bells:Weights in hundredweights, quarters and pounds.The previous "great bell at Bow", the tenor bell of the peal installed in 1762 and destroyed in an air raid of 1941, weighed 58 hundredweight, with six tons of ironwork braces cut into the inside walls of the tower as reinforcement. Earlier still, the first great bell was a byword for having a sonorous tone as, in 1588, pamphleteer Robert Greene sarcastically likens the verse of Christopher Marlowe to the bell's "mouth-filling" resonance.

Fishmongers Hall
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9EL

0207 626 3531

Landmark Near Hay's Galleria

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

+44 (0)20 7403 3761

An iconic London landmark and one of Britain's best loved historic sites, Tower Bridge is open to the public 363 days a year. Within the Bridge's iconic structure and magnificent Victorian Engine rooms, the Tower Bridge Exhibition is the best way of exploring the most famous bridge in the world! Come learn about this incredible feat of Victorian engineering, discover how the Bridge is raised and enjoy stunning panoramic views across London from our high-level walkways, 42 metres above the River Thames. Opening Times: 10:00 - 18:30 (last admission 17:30) Facebook is a public page. Please bear this in mind when posting your comments, especially regarding personal information. Further information on the City of London Corporation can be found at www.cityoflondon.gov.uk. The City of London Corporation is always happy to hear from you but please keep posts relevant. All comments will be monitored by Facebook and the City and any comments that are offensive or inappropriate will be removed. People who persistently cause conflict or offence to others will be removed and blocked from our social media pages.

The Shard London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

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The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group. HOUSE RULES Welcome to The Shard, in the heart of London Bridge. We hope our Facebook page can be a place where our community can feel free to express their feelings and opinions about The Shard or share their experiences with our building, our businesses or our neighbourhood. We welcome feedback, both positive and negative, and we aim to respond to comments that necessitate an answer promptly. Our Facebook house rules are designed to serve as a guideline to ensure our online community can enjoy our Facebook page in a pleasant environment. Guidelines First of all, we ask that you please use polite language and tone at all times. Please be mindful that our page attracts a wide audience and we ask that your comments are respectful and on-topic. It’s the policy of The Shard’s Facebook team that we don’t normally moderate Facebook posts, but we won’t tolerate abusive language, disruptive behaviour or illegal or objectionable content. This includes any material which might be defamatory, offensive, infringing, obscene, lewd, pornographic, violent, abusive, insulting, threatening, harassing, discriminatory, blasphemous, indecent or otherwise unlawful or objectionable. It also includes any material which is aggressive, argumentative or likely to be construed as bullying. No spamming or repetition, please, nor off-topic material in subject-specific threads or areas. We also will not tolerate language, content, postings or links that we consider racist, sexist, homophobic or grossly off-topic. If we consider a posting to fit any of these categories, it will be removed from our Facebook page. Get in Touch There’s a chance we might miss something, so if you are concerned that a user is breaking these rules on our Facebook page, please do let us know. Or if you feel we’ve hidden your post unnecessarily, we’re happy to provide an explanation. You can message us directly via this Facebook page or you can email us via press@londonbridgequarter.com. And do please keep in mind that the comments expressed within our Facebook page, unless an official post from The Shard, come from you – our community of fans – and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Shard.

Borough Market
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1TL

+44 (0) 20 7407 1002

Community Guidelines We love to hear from our friends and visitors and encourage you all to post your photos and experiences about Borough Market. And if you ask us a question, we'll do our very best to answer it! The Page is not the place to advertise your own page or something that's not related to Borough Market. If you do, then we're sorry, but we'll remove your post. Likewise if you post spam or abusive messages, your post will be removed and you may be banned from our Page. If you're unhappy at anytime with the service or experience you have at the Market, you can email us directly at info@boroughmarket.org.uk. You can find out more about our complaints procedure on our website: http://boroughmarket.org.uk/page/complaints-procedure. Thanks for following us on Facebook - we hope you enjoy our updates!

London Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (King William Street)
London, United Kingdom SE1

London Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

Darwin Brasserie - Sky Garden, the Walkie Talkie Building
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6

0333 772 0020

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

Monument to the Great Fire of London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Monument Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8AH

0207 626 2717

The Monument to the Great Fire of London, more commonly known simply as the Monument, is a Doric column in the City of London, near the northern end of London Bridge, that commemorates the Great Fire of London.It stands at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill, 202 ft (62 m) tall and 202 ft (62 m) from the spot in Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started on 2 September 1666. Another monument, the Golden Boy of Pye Corner, marks the point near Smithfield where the fire was stopped. Constructed between 1671 and 1677, it was built on the site of St. Margaret's, Fish Street, the first church to be burnt down by the Great Fire.The Monument comprises a fluted Doric column built of Portland stone topped with a gilded urn of fire. It was designed by Christopher Wren and Robert Hooke. Its height marks its distance from the site of the shop of Thomas Farynor, the king's baker, where the Great Fire began.The top of the Monument is reached by a narrow winding staircase of 311 steps. A mesh cage was added in the mid-19th century at the top to prevent people jumping off, after six people had committed suicide from the structure between 1788 and 1842.

Southwark Cathedral
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DA

+44 20 7367 6700

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for more than 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since the creation of the diocese of Southwark in 1905.Between 1106 and 1538 it was the church of an Augustinian priory, Southwark Priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a parish church, with the new dedication of St Saviour's. The church was in the diocese of Winchester until 1877, when the parish of St Saviour's, along with other South London parishes, was transferred to the diocese of Rochester. The present building retains the basic form of the Gothic structure built between 1220 and 1420, although the nave is a late 19th-century reconstruction.HistoryLegendary originsThe 16th-century London historian John Stow recorded an account of the origins of the Southwark Priory of St Mary that he had heard from Bartholomew Linsted, who had been the last prior when the priory was dissolved. Linsted claimed it had been founded as a nunnery "long before the Conquest" by a maiden named Mary, on the profits of a ferry across the Thames she had inherited from her parents. Later it was converted into a college of priests by "Swithen, a noble lady". Finally in 1106 it was refounded as an Augustinian priory.

20 Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 6

20 Fenchurch Street is a commercial skyscraper in London that takes its name from its address on Fenchurch Street, in the historic City of London financial district. It has been nicknamed 'The Walkie-Talkie' because of its distinctive shape. Construction was completed in spring 2014, and the top-floor 'sky garden' was opened in January 2015. The 34-storey building is 160m tall, making it the sixth-tallest building in the City of London and the 12th tallest in London.Designed by architect Rafael Viñoly and costing over £200 million, 20 Fenchurch Street features a highly distinctive top-heavy form which appears to burst upward and outward. A large viewing deck, bar and restaurants are included on the top three floors; these are, with restrictions, open to the public.The tower was originally proposed at nearly 200m tall but its design was scaled down after concerns about its visual impact on the nearby St Paul's Cathedral and Tower of London. It was subsequently approved in 2006 with the revised height. Even after the height reduction there were continued concerns from heritage groups about its impact on the surrounding area. The project was consequently the subject of a public inquiry; in 2007 this ruled in the developers' favour and the building was granted full planning permission. In 2015 it was awarded the Carbuncle Cup for the worst new building in the UK in the previous 12 months.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

City Hall
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
110 The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2AA

+44 (0) 20 7983 4000

Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Tower of London
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4AB

0870 756 6060

The Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom are 141 historic ceremonial objects, including the regalia and vestments worn by kings and queens of the country at their coronations, as well as processional and anointing objects, plate, and christening fonts.A symbol of 1,000 years of monarchy, the sovereign's coronation regalia is the only working collection in Europe – other present-day monarchies have abandoned coronations in favour of inauguration or enthronement ceremonies – and is the largest set of regalia in the world. Objects used to invest and crown the monarch variously denote his or her roles as Head of State, Supreme Governor of the Church of England, and Commander-in-Chief of the British Armed Forces. Wives of kings are crowned as queen consort with a plainer set of regalia. Since 1831, a new crown has been made specially for each queen consort.The use of regalia by monarchs in Britain can be traced back to its early history. Most of the present collection as a whole dates from around 350 years ago when King Charles II acceded to the throne. The medieval coronation regalia and Tudor state regalia had been either sold or melted down by Oliver Cromwell, a republican who overthrew the monarchy in 1649, during the English Civil War. Notable among the precious stones which adorn the regalia are Cullinan I (the largest clear cut diamond in the world), Cullinan II (second-largest of the Cullinan diamonds), the Koh-i-Noor diamond with a history going back to the 13th century, the Stuart Sapphire, St Edward's Sapphire, and the Black Prince's Ruby – a large spinel worn by King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt.

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
SE1 2UP
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

Fishmongers Hall
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9EL

0207 626 3531

Tower Hill Memorial
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 St Mary at Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7283 9504

The Tower Hill Memorial is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission war memorial on the south side of Trinity Square Gardens, in London, England. The memorial commemorates those from the Merchant Navy and fishing fleets who died during both world wars and have "no grave but the sea". The memorial was designed by Edwin Lutyens with sculpture work by William Reid Dick, the Second World War extension was designed by Edward Maufe with sculpture work by Charles Wheeler.The First World War memorial takes the form of a vaulted corridor, long, wide and high. Inside are 12 bronze plaques engraved with 12,000 names. Those commemorated include Victoria Cross recipient, Archibald Bisset Smith.The Second World War memorial takes the form of a semi-circular sunken garden located behind the corridor, to its north. It contains the names of 24,000 British seamen and 50 Australian seamen, listed on the walls of the sunken garden. In the centre of the garden is a pool of bronze, engraved with a compass pointing north. Between the two memorials are two columns with statues representing an officer (western column) and a seaman (eastern).

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

Cannon Street Railway Bridge
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
103 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5AG

020 7929 0831

Cannon Street Railway Bridge is a bridge in central London, crossing the River Thames. Downstream, the next bridge is London Bridge, and upstream Southwark Bridge. It carries trains over the river to Cannon Street station on the north bank. It was originally named Alexandra Bridge after Alexandra of Denmark who was the wife of the future King Edward VII.The bridge was designed by John Hawkshaw and John Wolfe-Barry for the South Eastern Railway. It was opened in 1866 after three years of construction. In its original form, it carried the railway over the Thames on five spans standing on cast-iron Doric pillars. It was subsequently widened between 1886–93 by Francis Brady and extensively renovated by British Rail between 1979–82, which resulted in many of its ornamental features being removed and the structure taking on an even more utilitarian appearance than before.It was the scene of the Marchioness disaster in 1989.

Place to Eat/Drink Near Hay's Galleria

The Gaucho Grill
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 More London Place
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

+44 (0) 20 7407 5222

The Breakfast Club - London Bridge
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
11 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1RQ

020 7078 9634

Sky Pod Bar
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 3BY

0333 772 0020

London Bridge City
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
More London Riverside
London, United Kingdom SE1 2DB

020 7403 4866

From London Bridge to Tower Bridge: a bustling, central riverside destination. London Bridge City includes More London, No.1 London Bridge, Cottons Centre and Hay's Galleria. Come and experience a changing programme of arts, entertainment and events, world-class food and drink against a backdrop of great architecture and historic markets.

Gauchos Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Gaucho Tower Bridge, 2 More London Riverside
London, United Kingdom E1W 1

020 7407 5222

Zizzi's
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
2nd Floor, Unit 4, Riverside House Southwark Bridge Road, SE1 9HA
London, United Kingdom SE1 9HA

020 7401 7407

Nicholson's Pub
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
The Queens Walk
London, United Kingdom

The London Stone
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5AD

020 7626 8246

The Bridge House Bar & Dining Room
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
218 Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

+44 2074075818

Minories
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
64-73 Minories
London, United Kingdom EC3N 1

Minories is the name of both a former civil parish, also known as Minories Holy Trinity, and a street in the City of London, close to the Tower of London.HistoryToponymyThe name is derived from the abbey of the Minoresses of St. Mary of the Order of St. Clare, founded in 1294, which stood on such sites; a "minoress" was a nun in the Second Order of the Order of Friars Minor (or Franciscans). (A small side-road off Minories is named St. Clare Street.) The name can also be found in other English towns including Birmingham, Colchester, Newcastle upon Tyne and Stratford-upon-Avon.RomansIn September 2013, an extremely well preserved Roman statue of an eagle, was discovered on a building site on the street. The statue is considered to be one of the best examples of Romano-British sculpture in existence.GovernanceMinories was part of the ancient parish of St Botolph without Aldgate until 1557, when it became extra-parochial.The area was a papal peculiar outside the jurisdiction of the English bishops. The abbey was dissolved in 1539, the property passing to the Crown. The chapel of the former abbey was used as the Church of Holy Trinity, Minories, and other buildings became an armoury and later workhouse. In 1686, the area became part of the Liberties of the Tower of London. The Minories area also historically hosted a large Jewish community.

PizzaExpress
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
31 Shad Thames
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

The Fen
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2

0871 951 1000

The Liberty Bounds, Tower Hill
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
15 Trinity Square
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7481 0513

Weatherspoons Tower Hill London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
15 Trinity Square
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4AA

020 7481 0513

The Pommelers Rest, Tower Bridge Road, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road, Tower Bridge South, London
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UN

Borough Market London England
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom

Little Ship Club
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Bell Wharf Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3TB

020 7236 7729

Little Ship Club, a yacht and sailing club established 1926 on the river Thames in the City of London. You can learn to sail as the Club provides RYA training as well as a bar, restaurant, sailing events and can be hired as a venue. The Club's membership is global but we have established fleets on the South and East coasts. In London at the Club there is a social programme for sailors of all sorts as well as a bar and restaurant

Caffé Paradiso
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
45 Shad Thames
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020-7378-6606

Porteña London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Stoney Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9AA

020 7740 2196

FIND US: Porteña Shop Borough Market 34A Stoney Street - London SE1 9AA Tube Station: London Bridge, exit Borough High Street Opening Times Monday 10am - 17hs Tuesday to Friday 10am to 11pm. Saturdays from 9am to 11pm. http://www.portena.co.uk/ http://www.boroughmarket.org.uk/

The Blue Eyed Maid
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
73 Borough High Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 3

020 7378 8259

We do the best Food and also Karaoke every night Monday -Sundays 7 days a week 12pm till 2am So come down and have a good day and a good night

Shopping Mall Near Hay's Galleria

Boxpark Shoreditch
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
BOXPARK, 2-10 BETHNAL GREEN ROAD, SHOREDITCH
London, United Kingdom E1 6GY

BOXPARK Shoreditch Pop-Up Mall, based in the heart of Shoreditch, East London. Find us next to Shoreditch High Street Station on Bethnal Green Road. OPENING HOURS: Stores: 11am-7pm Late night shopping Thursday until 8pm! Sunday: 12am-6pm Food and Beverage Outlets: 7am-8pm Sunday: 10am-6pm

We are Brixton Village & Market Row
Distance: 3.2 mi Tourist Information
Atlantic Road, Brixton
London, United Kingdom SW9 8PS

Brixton Village is a 1930s market arcade in central Brixton.In 2009, it was looking a bit downhearted and a proposal to knock it down and build flats was overturned by our supporters who desperately wanted to keep this important community hub...it worked and Spacemakers were asked to help by letting spaces to a wave of pop-up projects and new food, boutique, artists & fashion shops initially for free. These local traders took a risk and breathed life back into the empty market thus supporting the last original traders..they have cheered all the place up and with their hard work have made it a brilliant happy success. Monday Limited traders are open 10am to 5 pm Tuesdays to Sundays 10 am to 11 pm Check individual traders for times. Atlantic Road/Coldharbour Lane Junction, Brixton London, United Kingdom

One New Change
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
1 New Change
London, United Kingdom EC4M 9

020 7002 8900

One New Change, the City of London’s most exciting shopping and dining destination, is open seven days a week. Shop for your favourite high street brands and choose from a huge range of places to dine, or simply relax with a cocktail on our roof terrace overlooking St Paul’s Cathedral. Come for a browse, stay for the evening... it’s time to play in the City. http://www.onenewchange.com/

Royal Exchange, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
st. Threadneedle
London, United Kingdom EC3V 3

020 7623 3857

The Royal Exchange in London was founded in the 16th century by the merchant Thomas Gresham on the suggestion of his factor Richard Clough to act as a centre of commerce for the City of London. The site was provided by the City of London Corporation and the Worshipful Company of Mercers, who still jointly own the freehold. It is trapezoidal in shape and is flanked by Cornhill and Threadneedle Street, which converge at Bank junction in the heart of the City. The design was inspired by a bourse Gresham had seen in Antwerp, and was Britain's first specialist commercial building.It has twice been destroyed by fire and subsequently rebuilt. The present building was designed by William Tite in the 1840s. The site was notably occupied by the Lloyd's insurance market for nearly 150 years. Today the Royal Exchange contains offices, luxury shops and restaurants.Traditionally, the steps of the Royal Exchange is the place where Royal Proclamations (such as the dissolution of Parliament) are read out by either a herald or a crier.

Surrey Quays
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
Redriff Road
London, United Kingdom SE16 7LL

020 7237 5282

Shops include Bhs, New Look, River Island, Dorothy Perkins, Burton and lots more. Take a break whilst you’re shopping and stop for lunch at Burger King or one of our other food outlets.

Elephant & Castle Shopping Centre
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Elephant & Castle
London, United Kingdom SE1 6SD

Pizza Hut Surrey Quays
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
The Mast Leisure Complex, 5 Teredo Street
London, United Kingdom SE16 7LW

020 7231 1414

Discovery Planet
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
Surrey Quays Shopping Centre Redriff Rd
London, United Kingdom se16 7ll

0207-237-2388

Hays Galleria
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
1 Battle Bridge Lane
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

Nando's @ St Paul's Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
1 New Change
London, United Kingdom EC4M 9AD

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Harrods Department Store
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
87-135 Brompton Rd
London, United Kingdom

London Fetish Fair
Distance: 2.5 mi Tourist Information
Please standby for new venue announcement
London, United Kingdom

+44 (0)207 916 8360 / 07956 256 858

http://www.londonfetishfair.co.uk London Fetish Fair is a wickedly fun day of alternative and sexy shopping for the over 18's only. It's very focussed on handmade, designer and items that have an incredible level of creative merit. There's no dress code in the daytime. But it's a very accepting environment, dedicated to helping people find new things to wear, new kinky things to try whether they are beginners or advanced, there is no difference to us between gay, straight, tv/ bi whatever you are, we are very supportive of that! It's a safe non-judgmental environment for over 18's only. Come to the daytime event and then stay on for our cabaret burlesque and dungeon after party. Visit the free workshops and take part on the free raffle every month. Shop, have some drinks, push the boat out and speak to someone new, people always say hello back at the fetish fair. And be amazed at how totally friendly and sociable a place can be in London. You are going to be pleasantly surprised by how much fun the event actually is! It's like a little village for creatives, designers, kinksters and people who want to have a social life in London as well as find the very best bargains from the fetish scene. Like to shop, like to party? Want to do it somewhere unusually well loved, comfortable and with a great few bars, free quiet on street parking and a big group of nice fetish people,(you can dress up or not- it's no problem. We have a fetish or all black minimum dress code after 6) workshops and a raffle? What about a free after party in the evening? with a kinky cabaret? want to watch live bondage demos and shop for amazing handmade clothing and latex fashions? 2nd sunday of every month Come to London Fetish Fair. The World's Longest running fetish fair. In fact we invented the term fetish fair! So come and see a real one!

Tiendas Del Sur
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
91-95 Newington Butts
London, United Kingdom SE1 6SE

020 7703 2136

Tesco Express
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
657 Commercial Road
London, United Kingdom E14 7LW

+44 (0) 00 000 000

Butterfly Walk
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
Denmark Hill
London, United Kingdom SE5 8RW

020 7708 0907

Boxpark London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Unit 56 & 57, Boxpark Retail Mall
London, United Kingdom E1 6GY

07999652858

N1 Centre
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
21 Parkfield St
London, United Kingdom N1 0

20-73592674

Tesco Express
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
40 Bernard Street
London, United Kingdom WC1N 1LW

+44 (0) 845 026 9304

Tesco Express
Distance: 2.5 mi Tourist Information
151-155 Queens Road
London, United Kingdom SE15 2ND

+44 (0) 20 7639 7898

Spitalfields Arts Market
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
65 Brushfield St
London, United Kingdom E1 6

020 7492 4868

Landmark Near Hay's Galleria

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

Unicorn Theatre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
147 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2HZ

The Unicorn Theatre is the UK's leading theatre for audiences aged 2–21. The theatre has its home in a custom-built, RIBA Award–winning building on Tooley Street, in the London Borough of Southwark, which opened in 2005. The theatre was designed by Keith Williams, built by Arup and comprises two theatre spaces (the Weston and Clore Theatres), an education studio, rehearsal space, café and the John Lyon meeting room.The theatre was founded in 1947, by Caryl Jenner, originally as a Mobile Theatre; In 1961, Jenner began presenting children's productions at the Arts Theatre in the West End, and in 1967 the company took over the lease of the theatre which then became Unicorn's permanent performing base until 1999; during this period the normal run of adult performances continued during the evenings.The Unicorn is a registered charity and is an Arts Council England National Portfolio organisation.OriginsFrom 1944 Caryl Jenner wrote Christmas pantomimes for small-time playhouses. During performances she would make note of the behaviour of the children, recording what scenes and sequences held their attention, and which did not. She began to formulate the principles that would guide her theatre and writing. In 1947 the ‘Mobile Theatre’ was born. Caryl's mission was to drive around the austere post-war towns of Britain, as well as isolated villages to bring theatre to new audiences. They supplemented their income by performing to adults in the evenings but their goal was always to captivate the minds and imagination of children.

London Bridge bus station
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge Unit 10
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SP

020 7357 0069

London Bridge bus station serves the London Bridge area of the city of London and is situated at the London Bridge tube and rail station.There are three stands at the station which are situated on the station forecourt.London Buses routes 17, 43, 48, 141, 149 and 521 and night routes N21 and N343 serve the station.New bus stationA new bus station was built as part of the new Shard London Bridge "Gem" development which was open in 2012.

The Shard London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

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The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group. HOUSE RULES Welcome to The Shard, in the heart of London Bridge. We hope our Facebook page can be a place where our community can feel free to express their feelings and opinions about The Shard or share their experiences with our building, our businesses or our neighbourhood. We welcome feedback, both positive and negative, and we aim to respond to comments that necessitate an answer promptly. Our Facebook house rules are designed to serve as a guideline to ensure our online community can enjoy our Facebook page in a pleasant environment. Guidelines First of all, we ask that you please use polite language and tone at all times. Please be mindful that our page attracts a wide audience and we ask that your comments are respectful and on-topic. It’s the policy of The Shard’s Facebook team that we don’t normally moderate Facebook posts, but we won’t tolerate abusive language, disruptive behaviour or illegal or objectionable content. This includes any material which might be defamatory, offensive, infringing, obscene, lewd, pornographic, violent, abusive, insulting, threatening, harassing, discriminatory, blasphemous, indecent or otherwise unlawful or objectionable. It also includes any material which is aggressive, argumentative or likely to be construed as bullying. No spamming or repetition, please, nor off-topic material in subject-specific threads or areas. We also will not tolerate language, content, postings or links that we consider racist, sexist, homophobic or grossly off-topic. If we consider a posting to fit any of these categories, it will be removed from our Facebook page. Get in Touch There’s a chance we might miss something, so if you are concerned that a user is breaking these rules on our Facebook page, please do let us know. Or if you feel we’ve hidden your post unnecessarily, we’re happy to provide an explanation. You can message us directly via this Facebook page or you can email us via press@londonbridgequarter.com. And do please keep in mind that the comments expressed within our Facebook page, unless an official post from The Shard, come from you – our community of fans – and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Shard.

The Shard
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (King William Street)
London, United Kingdom SE1

Southwark Cathedral
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DA

+44 20 7367 6700

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for more than 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since the creation of the diocese of Southwark in 1905.Between 1106 and 1538 it was the church of an Augustinian priory, Southwark Priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a parish church, with the new dedication of St Saviour's. The church was in the diocese of Winchester until 1877, when the parish of St Saviour's, along with other South London parishes, was transferred to the diocese of Rochester. The present building retains the basic form of the Gothic structure built between 1220 and 1420, although the nave is a late 19th-century reconstruction.HistoryLegendary originsThe 16th-century London historian John Stow recorded an account of the origins of the Southwark Priory of St Mary that he had heard from Bartholomew Linsted, who had been the last prior when the priory was dissolved. Linsted claimed it had been founded as a nunnery "long before the Conquest" by a maiden named Mary, on the profits of a ferry across the Thames she had inherited from her parents. Later it was converted into a college of priests by "Swithen, a noble lady". Finally in 1106 it was refounded as an Augustinian priory.

Anglican Diocese of Southwark
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trinity House, 4 Chapel Court, Borough High Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1HW

020 7939 9400

The Diocese of Southwark is one of the 42 dioceses of the Church of England, part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The diocese forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. It was created on 1 May 1905 from part of the ancient Diocese of Rochester that was served by a Suffragan Bishop of Southwark (1891–1905). Before 1877 the area was part of the Diocese of Winchester.The diocese covers Greater London south of the River Thames (except for the London Borough of Bexley and London Borough of Bromley) and east Surrey. Since the creation of the episcopal area scheme in 1991, the diocese is divided into three episcopal areas each of which contains two archdeaconries: Croydon Episcopal Area (overseen by the area Bishop of Croydon)Archdeaconry of Croydonincludes Deaneries of Croydon Addington, Croydon Central, Croydon North, Croydon South, and Suttonincludes Deaneries of Caterham, Godstone, and ReigateArchdeaconry of Lambethincludes Deaneries of Brixton, Clapham, Lambeth North, Lambeth South, Streatham, and Mertonincludes Deaneries of Battersea, Kingston, Richmond and Barnes, Tooting, and WandsworthArchdeaconry of Lewisham & Greenwichincludes Deaneries of Charlton, Deptford, East Lewisham, Eltham and Mottingham, Plumstead, and West Lewishamincludes Deaneries of Bermondsey, Camberwell, Dulwich, and Southwark and Newington In other ecclesiastical use, although having lost religious orders in the English Reformation, the diocese has the London home of the Archbishop of Canterbury and records centre of the Church of England in the diocese, Lambeth Palace.

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

Fishmongers Hall
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9EL

0207 626 3531

Pudding Lane
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Pudding lane
London, United Kingdom

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Pudding Sokağı İngiltere'nin başkenti Londra'da bulunan dar bir geçittir. 1666 yılında çıkan Büyük Londra Yangını'nın başlangıç noktası olan Thomas Farryner'ın ekmek fırını bu sokakta yer almıştır. Londra Köprüsü'ne yakın bir alandadır. Tarihçi John Stow'un söylediklerine göre sokak adını, eski İngilizcede iç organ demek olan Pudding sözcüğünden almıştır. Bu da söylenceye göre Thames Nehri'ndeki çöp kayıklarına kasapların atmış olduğu sakatatı taşıyan at arabalarından düşen hayvan iç organlarıdır.

Hop Exchange
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
24 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1

The Hop Exchange is a Grade II listed building at No. 24 Southwark Street, London, in the Bankside area of the London Borough of Southwark. Opened in 1867 and designed by R.H. Moore it served as the centre for hop trading for the brewing industry.OverviewHops, introduced to England from the Netherlands, are still used in the brewing industry. They are harvested from farms (known as "hop gardens") in Kent, and in the 19th century they were brought by railway to London Bridge Station, or by boat up the River Thames. They were then stored in the many warehouses in the Borough area.The purpose of the Hop Exchange was to provide a single market centre for dealers in hops. A glass roof allowed business on the trading floor of the Great Hall to be conducted under natural light. There were many similar outcry floor exchanges across London, such as the Coal, Metal and Stock exchanges, but wartime bombing, fires, redevelopment and modernisation have left the Hop Exchange the only one still standing. However, a fire in 1920 led to the top two storeys being removed, and the Hop Exchange was then converted into offices.

St Margaret Pattens
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
18 Rood Lane
London, United Kingdom EC3M 1HS

20-76236630

St Margaret Pattens is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on Eastcheap near the Monument. The dedication is to St. Margaret of Antioch.HistoryThe church was first recorded in 1067, at which time the church was probably built from wood. It was rebuilt in stone at some unknown subsequent date but fell into disrepair and had to be demolished in 1530. It was rebuilt in 1538 but was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. The present church was built by Sir Christopher Wren in 1687. It is one of only a few City churches to have escaped significant damage in the Second World War.In 1954 St Margaret Pattens ceased to be a parish church and became one of the City’s guild churches, within the living of the Lord Chancellor and under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of London. They have a regular weekday, rather than Sunday congregation, drawn mostly from people who work in offices nearby.The church was designated a Grade I listed building on 4 January 1950.BuildingThe church's exterior is notable for its 200-ft high spire, Wren's third highest and the only one that he designed in a medieval style. This is sometimes referred to as Wren's only "true spire". Its interior is a simple rectangle with some unusual fittings – the only canopied pews in London, dating from the 17th century. These were intended for the churchwardens. The initials "CW" which appear in one of the pews have been thought to refer to Christopher Wren, but they may also signify "church warden." Other features in the interior include a punishment box carved with the Devil's head where wrongdoers had to sit during the church service.

Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Tower of London
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4AB

0870 756 6060

The Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom are 141 historic ceremonial objects, including the regalia and vestments worn by kings and queens of the country at their coronations, as well as processional and anointing objects, plate, and christening fonts.A symbol of 1,000 years of monarchy, the sovereign's coronation regalia is the only working collection in Europe – other present-day monarchies have abandoned coronations in favour of inauguration or enthronement ceremonies – and is the largest set of regalia in the world. Objects used to invest and crown the monarch variously denote his or her roles as Head of State, Supreme Governor of the Church of England, and Commander-in-Chief of the British Armed Forces. Wives of kings are crowned as queen consort with a plainer set of regalia. Since 1831, a new crown has been made specially for each queen consort.The use of regalia by monarchs in Britain can be traced back to its early history. Most of the present collection as a whole dates from around 350 years ago when King Charles II acceded to the throne. The medieval coronation regalia and Tudor state regalia had been either sold or melted down by Oliver Cromwell, a republican who overthrew the monarchy in 1649, during the English Civil War. Notable among the precious stones which adorn the regalia are Cullinan I (the largest clear cut diamond in the world), Cullinan II (second-largest of the Cullinan diamonds), the Koh-i-Noor diamond with a history going back to the 13th century, the Stuart Sapphire, St Edward's Sapphire, and the Black Prince's Ruby – a large spinel worn by King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt.

Tower Hill Memorial
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 St Mary at Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7283 9504

The Tower Hill Memorial is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission war memorial on the south side of Trinity Square Gardens, in London, England. The memorial commemorates those from the Merchant Navy and fishing fleets who died during both world wars and have "no grave but the sea". The memorial was designed by Edwin Lutyens with sculpture work by William Reid Dick, the Second World War extension was designed by Edward Maufe with sculpture work by Charles Wheeler.The First World War memorial takes the form of a vaulted corridor, long, wide and high. Inside are 12 bronze plaques engraved with 12,000 names. Those commemorated include Victoria Cross recipient, Archibald Bisset Smith.The Second World War memorial takes the form of a semi-circular sunken garden located behind the corridor, to its north. It contains the names of 24,000 British seamen and 50 Australian seamen, listed on the walls of the sunken garden. In the centre of the garden is a pool of bronze, engraved with a compass pointing north. Between the two memorials are two columns with statues representing an officer (western column) and a seaman (eastern).

20 Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 6

20 Fenchurch Street is a commercial skyscraper in London that takes its name from its address on Fenchurch Street, in the historic City of London financial district. It has been nicknamed 'The Walkie-Talkie' because of its distinctive shape. Construction was completed in spring 2014, and the top-floor 'sky garden' was opened in January 2015. The 34-storey building is 160m tall, making it the sixth-tallest building in the City of London and the 12th tallest in London.Designed by architect Rafael Viñoly and costing over £200 million, 20 Fenchurch Street features a highly distinctive top-heavy form which appears to burst upward and outward. A large viewing deck, bar and restaurants are included on the top three floors; these are, with restrictions, open to the public.The tower was originally proposed at nearly 200m tall but its design was scaled down after concerns about its visual impact on the nearby St Paul's Cathedral and Tower of London. It was subsequently approved in 2006 with the revised height. Even after the height reduction there were continued concerns from heritage groups about its impact on the surrounding area. The project was consequently the subject of a public inquiry; in 2007 this ruled in the developers' favour and the building was granted full planning permission. In 2015 it was awarded the Carbuncle Cup for the worst new building in the UK in the previous 12 months.

St Olave Hart Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
8 Hart St
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7

20-74884318

St Olave Hart Street is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on the corner of Hart Street and Seething Lane near Fenchurch Street railway station.John Betjeman described St Olave's as "a country church in the world of Seething Lane." The church is one of the smallest in the City and is one of only a handful of medieval City churches that escaped the Great Fire of London in 1666. In addition to being a local parish church, St Olave's is the Ward Church of the Tower Ward of the City of London.HistoryThe church is first recorded in the 13th century as St Olave-towards-the-Tower, a stone building replacing the earlier construction. It is dedicated to the patron saint of Norway, King Olaf II of Norway, who fought alongside the Anglo-Saxon King Ethelred the Unready against the Danes in the Battle of London Bridge in 1014. He was canonised after his death and the church of St Olave's was built apparently on the site of the battle. The Norwegian connection was reinforced during the Second World War when King Haakon VII of Norway worshipped there while in exile.Saint Olave's was rebuilt in the 13th century and then again in the 15th century. The present building dates from around 1450. According to John Stow's Survey of London, a major benefactor of the church in the late 15th century was wool merchant Richard Cely Sr., who held the advowson on the church . On his death, Cely bequeathed money for making the steeple and an altar in the church. The merchant mark of the Cely family was carved in two of the corbels in the nave . No memorial to the Celys now remains in the church.

St Clement's, Eastcheap
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Clement's Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4N 7AE

020 7623 5454

St Clement Eastcheap is a Church of England parish church in Candlewick Ward of the City of London. It is located on Clement's Lane, off King William Street and close to London Bridge and the River Thames.Clement was a disciple of St Peter the Apostle and was ordained as Bishop of Rome in the year 93 AD. By legend, Clement was martyred by being tied to an anchor and thrown into the Black Sea, which led to his adoption as a patron saint of sailors. The dedication to St Clement is unusual in London, with only one other ancient church there dedicated to this saint, namely St Clement Danes, Westminster. It is also located a little north of the Thames, but further west from Eastcheap and outside the old City boundary, just beyond the Temple Bar on the Strand.HistoryMedieval periodEastcheap was one of the main streets of medieval London. The name 'Eastcheap' derives from the Saxon word 'cheap', meaning a market, and Eastcheap was so called to distinguish it from Westcheap, later to become Cheapside. The southern end of Clement's Lane opened onto Eastcheap until the 1880s when the construction of King William Street separated Clement's Lane from Eastcheap, which still remains nearby as a street.