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Mile End Stadium, London | Tourist Information


190 Burdett Road
London, United Kingdom E3 4HL

020 8709 4420

Mile End Stadium, also known as the East London Stadium, is a multi-sports stadium situated in Mile End Park, East London, England. The stadium comprises an athletics stadium and a number of floodlit Astroturf football pitches, tennis and netball courts.Many of the facilities are being refurbished at the moment. The new sports complex with a 25m swimming pool has been refurbished.The stadium is home to three senior football clubs: Tower Hamlets, Sporting Bengal United of the Essex Senior League and Leyton Orient Women's Football Club from the Premier Division of the London and South-East Regional Women's League.It is noted for hosting a gig by Britpop band Blur in June 1995, where 27,000 fans saw the band supported by The Boo Radleys, Sparks, John Shuttleworth, Dodgy and The Cardiacs.TransportMile End Stadium is served by London Buses Routes 309, 277, D6, D7, and at Mile End 339, 323, 25, 205, 425, Night Route N205.

Landmark Near Mile End Stadium

Phoenix Heights
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
4 Mastmaker Road
London, E14 9AJ

Rotherhithe Station
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Railway Avenue
London, SE16 4LD

Smart-Ease
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Bacon's College, Timber Pond Road, Rotherhithe
London, SE16 6AT

This event is a one day that has plenty of activities for people living in, and from Southwark. There are funfair stalls, sports, food & drinks, and competitions with awesome prizes! It's held during the summer and is at Bacon's College. Stay updated!

25 Bank Street
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
25 Bank Street
London,

25 Bank Street is an office tower in Canary Wharf, in the Docklands area of London. It is currently home to the European headquarters of the investment bank J.P. Morgan & Co.The building was developed in 2001–2003 by Canary Wharf Group as one of five new buildings on its Heron Quays site. The building was designed by architects Cesar Pelli & Associates Architects and built by Canary Wharf Contractors.Before construction, 25 Bank Street had been earmarked by Canary Wharf Group for occupation by Enron's European subsidiary. This plan was abandoned in 2001, prior to Enron's collapse later that year.From 2004, 25 Bank Street served as the European headquarters of Lehman Brothers until the bank's insolvency in September 2008. The building continued to be used by the bank's administrators and various sub tenants before being sold to JPMorgan Chase for £495 million in 2010.HistoryDesign and developmentIn July 2000, Canary Wharf Group formally announced the development of the 11acre Heron Quays site, on the southern boundary of the Canary Wharf estate. This would involve the construction of five buildings providing a total of 33,00000sqft of Grade A office space. During the development phase, the five buildings were designated HQ1 to HQ5, with 25 Bank Street designated as HQ2.

25 Bank Street
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
25 Bank Street
London,

25 Bank Street is an office tower in Canary Wharf, in the Docklands area of London. It is currently home to the European headquarters of the investment bank J.P. Morgan & Co.The building was developed in 2001–2003 by Canary Wharf Group as one of five new buildings on its Heron Quays site. The building was designed by architects Cesar Pelli & Associates Architects and built by Canary Wharf Contractors.Before construction, 25 Bank Street had been earmarked by Canary Wharf Group for occupation by Enron's European subsidiary. This plan was abandoned in 2001, prior to Enron's collapse later that year.From 2004, 25 Bank Street served as the European headquarters of Lehman Brothers until the bank's insolvency in September 2008. The building continued to be used by the bank's administrators and various sub tenants before being sold to JPMorgan Chase for £495 million in 2010.HistoryDesign and developmentIn July 2000, Canary Wharf Group formally announced the development of the 11acre Heron Quays site, on the southern boundary of the Canary Wharf estate. This would involve the construction of five buildings providing a total of 33,00000sqft of Grade A office space. During the development phase, the five buildings were designated HQ1 to HQ5, with 25 Bank Street designated as HQ2.

Heron Quays DLR station
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Little Herons Emergency Childcare C, 50 Bank Street
London, E14 5

020 7719 0719

Heron Quays is a station on the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) in the Heron Quays area of Canary Wharf in Greater London, England. The station is situated on the Isle of Dogs within the East End of London and serves the southern part of the Canary Wharf office complex and is directly connected to that complex's Jubilee Place underground shopping centre. The station is elevated and contained within one of the complex's office towers.The station is in Travelcard Zone 2, and is on the Lewisham branch of the Docklands Light Railway, between Canary Wharf and South Quay.HistoryOriginally open-air, the station was moved 200 metres south and a longer platform was built at this new site to accommodate three-unit trains planned as part of the DLR Capacity Enhancement; the station re-opened on 18 December 2002.BusesLondon Buses routes 135, 277 and D7 and night route N550 serve the station.

Citigroup Centre, London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
25 Canada Square
London, E14 5

The Citigroup Centre is a building complex in London. It houses Citigroup's EMEA headquarters and is located in Canary Wharf in the city's Docklands. The centre provides of floor space across two merged buildings - 33 Canada Square (known as "CGC1") and 25 Canada Square (known as "CGC2"), and houses the bulk of Citi's UK employee base. Together, both buildings form the Citigroup Centre complex.25 Canada Square, or Citigroup Centre 2, stands at 200m and, alongside HSBC Tower (with which it was built in tandem), is the joint 4th-tallest building in the United Kingdom (behind The Shard, One Canada Square and Heron Tower). Designed by César Pelli & Associates, construction of the 45-storey tower - undertaken by Canary Wharf Contractors - began in 1998 and was completed in 2001, with Citigroup leasing the building from the outset. The building was bought by RBS in 2004 along with 5 Canada Square (leased to Bank of America) for $1.12 billion. Subsequently, on 2 July 2007, CGC2 was individually sold to a joint venture between Quinlan Private and PropInvest for £1 billion (US$2 billion). Citigroup pay £46.5 million a year in rent for the tower, generating a yield of 4.6% to the owners. The east facing side of 25 Canada Square up to level 40 is configured for use by tenants.

Ice Rink Canary Wharf Ice Skating
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Canada Square Park
London, E14 5AB

+(44) 08456 531 431

This year, Ice Rink Canary Wharf is returning bigger and brighter than ever, illuminating Canada Square Park for 16 weeks from 4 November 2016 through to 25 February 2017. LUMINOCITY at Ice Rink Canary Wharf is the first of its kind in London. With more than 8km of LED lights laid beneath the ice and positioned throughout the venue, visitors will be amazed by the spectacle of lights set to music. LUMINOCITY will showcase more than 16 million different colours every session and swathe skaters in an abundance of magical light to create a truly immersive skating experience. The ice rink will also be fully covered by a clear roof to guarantee skating sessions whatever the weather. Not just a festive activity, LUMINOCITY at Ice Rink Canary Wharf will host activities throughout the year, including ice hockey, curling and speed skating. It’s also the perfect venue for team-building days, launch events, children’s parties, ice skating lessons and more. The ice rink is complemented by a vibrant bar offering delicious beverages and bar snacks throughout the season. For those less stable on the ice, the venue also has a large heated outdoor viewing terrace from which to admire the icy action. Ticket prices start from £9.95. Visit http://www.icerinkcanarywharf.co.uk/ for more information. Follow us on Twitter @IceRinkCW

Canary Wharf Pier
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Timpson Ltd Ticket Hall Canary Wharf Undergrnd Station
Poplar, E14 8

020 7519 6607

The Canary Wharf Pier is a pier on the River Thames in London, UK. It is located to the west of the Canary Wharf district, close to Narrow Street, Limehouse and Westferry Circus.The pier is served by two commuter oriented services, both operated by Thames Clipper under licence from London River Services. The main commuter service from central London calls at Canary Wharf Pier on a regular basis. The Canary Wharf - Rotherhithe Ferry, also operated by Thames Clippers, links Canary Wharf Pier with Nelson Dock Pier at the Hilton Hotel in Rotherhithe. The service uses smaller boats than the commuter service but runs at a higher frequency of roughly every 10 minutes. The ferry can be used both by guests of the hotel as well as by passengers not staying at the hotel.Since 2013 boats have run direct as far as Fulham & Putney (the RB6 service), taking roughly one hour. The evening direct service departs at 1750. Later services to Putney require a five-minute change at Embankment, leaving Canary Wharf at 1758, 1818, 1858, 1918, 1958.Private charter entertainment boats also use Canary Wharf Pier.Connections London Buses routes 135; 277; D3.

HSBC HQ - 8 Canada Square
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
8 Canada Square
London, E14 5HQ

One Churchill Place
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Churchill Place
London, E14 5HP

One Churchill Place is a 156 m tall skyscraper with 32 floors, serving as the headquarters of Barclays Bank. It is in the Docklands area of London Borough of Tower Hamlets in Canary Wharf. The building is the 13th-tallest office block in the United Kingdom and the sixth tallest building in the Docklands.The building was formally opened in June 2005 by the Chairman of Barclays, Matthew Barrett, and merged Barclays offices across London into one building. The former corporate HQ was at 54 Lombard Street in the City of London.Barclays occupy approximately 90% of the building, floors 18-20 are leased to BGC Partners/Cantor Fitzgerald.ConstructionThe building was designed by HOK International and constructed by Canary Wharf Contractors.Designed after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the building is constructed around four staircase columns with a large, central column containing the lifts and toilet facilities. The building manual states that there is enough room in these columns to contain everyone who works in the building, in the event of a security alert.The building was planned to be 50 storeys in height, but was scaled down to 31 after the 9/11 terrorist attacks.LayoutIncreasingly the premises are now used on a hotdesking basis to accommodate more agile and collaborative working.

One Churchill Place
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Churchill Place
London, E14 5HP

One Churchill Place is a 156 m tall skyscraper with 32 floors, serving as the headquarters of Barclays Bank. It is in the Docklands area of London Borough of Tower Hamlets in Canary Wharf. The building is the 13th-tallest office block in the United Kingdom and the sixth tallest building in the Docklands.The building was formally opened in June 2005 by the Chairman of Barclays, Matthew Barrett, and merged Barclays offices across London into one building. The former corporate HQ was at 54 Lombard Street in the City of London.Barclays occupy approximately 90% of the building, floors 18-20 are leased to BGC Partners/Cantor Fitzgerald.ConstructionThe building was designed by HOK International and constructed by Canary Wharf Contractors.Designed after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the building is constructed around four staircase columns with a large, central column containing the lifts and toilet facilities. The building manual states that there is enough room in these columns to contain everyone who works in the building, in the event of a security alert.The building was planned to be 50 storeys in height, but was scaled down to 31 after the 9/11 terrorist attacks.LayoutIncreasingly the premises are now used on a hotdesking basis to accommodate more agile and collaborative working.

West India Quay
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Hertsmere Road
London, E14 4AE

020 7515 4741

Dundee Wharf
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
100 Three Colt Street
London, E14 8

020 7987 7778

Dundee Wharf is a residential development in London Docklands. The modern buildings occupy the site of a former shipyard known as Limekiln Dockyard. John Graves established this shipyard in 1633 and then expanded his holdings with Dundee Wharf itself. By 1650 George Margetts developed a ropemaking yard including a ropehouse, storehouse and a ropewalk on the site. A modern wharf with electric cranes was constructed in the 1930s. This was used by the Dundee, Perth & London Shipping Company to operate a twice-weekly service between Leith and London.The wharf was destroyed during the blitz and reconstructed in the 1950s, going out of use in 1969. After demolition for construction of the Limehouse Link the current residential development by architects CZWG was built.Dundee Wharf is a well-known building in Docklands, with an extremely prominent position on the River Thames. It was built in 1997 by Ballymore Properties to designs by the architect Piers Gough, a partner at Campbell Zogolvich Wiltinson and Gough (CZWG). Piers Gough additionally designed the bridge over Limekiln Dock.The name Limehouse comes from the lime oasts in Limekiln Dock in the 14th century and used to produce quick lime for building mortar. Pottery manufacture followed. In 1660 Samuel Pepys visited a porcelain factory in Duke’s Shore. Limekiln Wharf was established in 1740 as England’s first soft past porcelain factory. Industry moved into building barges and thrived well into the 19th century.Dundee Wharf is on the embankment known as the Dunbars. Dundee, Aberdeen, Caledonia and Dunbar Wharves were owned by Dundee Perth and London Shipping Company. Their office building stands today adjacent to the entrance to Dundee Wharf. In 1835 their passenger paddle steamers SS London and SS Perth carried passengers on a twice-weekly service to Dundee, Scotland. A first class cabin cost 42 shillings and sixpence. More or less opposite the main entrance were banana warehouses, to the right River Plate Wharf. The river ferry from Limehouse Pier left from Limehouse Stairs. Prior to its demolition Dundee Wharf was a “massive fortress like warehouse” trading in general goods. The air was scented by the juniper berries used for the manufacture of London gin and stored at St Dunstan’s Wharf on the opposite side of Limekiln. The Lockett Wilson was the last vessel that regularly used Dundee Wharf; it plied its trade between Dundee Wharf and up the Seine to Paris. The first voluntary emigrants to Australia left from the Dunbars - the involuntary emigrants from Wapping Old Stairs.

St Paul's Church, Shadwell
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
302 The Highway
London, E1W 3DH

020 7680 2772

St Paul's Church, Shadwell, is a Grade II* listed Church of England church, located between The Highway and Shadwell Basin, on the edge of Wapping, in the East End of London, England. The church has had varying fortunes over many centuries, and is now very active, having been supported recently by Holy Trinity Brompton Church.

Poplar Baths
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
170 East India Dock Road
London, E14 0

020 7093 1999

Poplar Baths on the East India Dock Road in Poplar, London is a former public bath house and Grade II listed building that was constructed in 1933 and closed to the public in 1988. A campaign to restore the baths won the support of Tower Hamlets Council in 2010 and the construction company Guildmore was appointed to complete the works to create a new leisure centre incorporating a swimming pool, gymnasium and affordable housing on adjacent land. The site reopened in July 2016.The original Poplar Baths opened in 1852, costing £10,000. It was built to provide public wash facilities for the East End's poor as a result of the Baths and Washhouses Act 1846. The baths incorporated slipper and vapour baths. The slipper baths section contained 12 baths in the men's first-class division, 24 in the men's second-class and six in both women's divisions. Steam and shower baths were located behind the slipper baths. A comprehensive public laundry was located at the rear of the building, on Arthur Street. It contained 48 wooden washing tubs, drying equipment and ironing rooms. An uncovered water tank supplied the baths and was erected above the boiler house with a capacity of 24,000 gallons.The Baths were rebuilt in 1933 to a design by Harley Heckford and the larger pool was covered over to convert the building into a theatre. Designated the East India Hall, it had seating capacity for 1,400 people and incorporated a dance hall, cinema, exhibition room and sports hall for boxing and wrestling programmes. This dual purpose sustained interest over the winter months, with the smaller pool remaining in use.Between 1938 and 1941 an office in the Baths was used by the Borough's electricity office and then later used by the Transport and General Workers' Union and the Poplar Labour Party. The main bath hall sustained bomb damage during the Second World War and was forced to close with the hall left unglazed for several years.

Poplar Baths
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
170 East India Dock Road
London, E14 0

020 7093 1999

Poplar Baths on the East India Dock Road in Poplar, London is a former public bath house and Grade II listed building that was constructed in 1933 and closed to the public in 1988. A campaign to restore the baths won the support of Tower Hamlets Council in 2010 and the construction company Guildmore was appointed to complete the works to create a new leisure centre incorporating a swimming pool, gymnasium and affordable housing on adjacent land. The site reopened in July 2016.The original Poplar Baths opened in 1852, costing £10,000. It was built to provide public wash facilities for the East End's poor as a result of the Baths and Washhouses Act 1846. The baths incorporated slipper and vapour baths. The slipper baths section contained 12 baths in the men's first-class division, 24 in the men's second-class and six in both women's divisions. Steam and shower baths were located behind the slipper baths. A comprehensive public laundry was located at the rear of the building, on Arthur Street. It contained 48 wooden washing tubs, drying equipment and ironing rooms. An uncovered water tank supplied the baths and was erected above the boiler house with a capacity of 24,000 gallons.The Baths were rebuilt in 1933 to a design by Harley Heckford and the larger pool was covered over to convert the building into a theatre. Designated the East India Hall, it had seating capacity for 1,400 people and incorporated a dance hall, cinema, exhibition room and sports hall for boxing and wrestling programmes. This dual purpose sustained interest over the winter months, with the smaller pool remaining in use.Between 1938 and 1941 an office in the Baths was used by the Borough's electricity office and then later used by the Transport and General Workers' Union and the Poplar Labour Party. The main bath hall sustained bomb damage during the Second World War and was forced to close with the hall left unglazed for several years.

Arbour Square
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
2-13 Arbour Square
London, E1 0

Arbour Square is a late Georgian square in Stepney, in the borough of Tower Hamlets, east London, England.It is located just off the Commercial Road (A13) approximately one mile (1.6 km) east of the City of London. The square is currently laid out as a formal garden with mature trees and planting and is surrounded on two sides by elegant early 19th century townhouses.Arbour Square was laid out as a garden enclosure in 1819. By 1830, contemporary maps show buildings on all sides of the square and many of the surrounding roads. The south and west sides of the square are still made up of the original three and four storey Georgian townhouses which are Grade II listed. The east side was demolished and replaced by the Raine's School building (also Grade II listed) in 1913, while the terrace on the north side was replaced by a block of flats in 1937. The Raine's School building now houses part of Tower Hamlets College. The school building was entirely refurbished in 1994 by Sprunt Architects, featuring a new open learning centre within the listed heart of the building.Running north from the square on the west side is West Arbour Street; and running north on the east side is East Arbour street which is a smaller two storey Georgian terrace. The former Arbour Square police station which once held the Kray Twins and alleged Provisional Irish Republican Army terrorists is located between these two streets; it closed in 1999 and has recently been redeveloped into flats.

Bow Common
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Bow Common Lane
London, E3 4AU

Bow Common is a small area near Bow in the borough of Tower Hamlets, London, located to the south-east of Mile End.It has historically been a poor, industrial district - a gas works remains in the area. In 1883 anti-poverty campaigner Andrew Mearns commented on the lack of church attendance amongst locals, and Charles Booth described it as 'worse than almost any district in London.' Many slums were cleared during the course of the 20th century, a process hastened by bomb damage in the Second World War.St Paul's Church dates from 1960 (replacing one damaged in the war) and is now a Grade II* listed building.

Mile End Athletics Stadium
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
190 Burdett Rd
London, E3 4HL

Matt's Gallery
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
42-44 Copperfield Road
London, E3 4RR

020 8983 1771

Matt's Gallery is a contemporary art space currently situated in a new temporary space at Unit 2, 65 Decima Street London SE1 4QR. In 2019 Matt's Gallery will move to its new 9000 sq ft permanent space in Nine Elms, Battersea as part of Wandsworth Council's cultural strategy. Its director, Robin Klassnik OBE, opened the gallery in his studio in 1979 on Martello Street, before moving premises to Bow in 1993. The gallery is named after Klassnik’s dog, Matt E. Mulsion.HistoryAmong the artists represented by Matt's Gallery are Willie Doherty, a 2003 Turner Prize nominee,Susan Hiller, Richard Grayson, Graham Fagen, Nathaniel Mellors, 2001 Turner Prize nominee Mike Nelson, Benedict Drew and Lindsay Seers. In 2009 Mellors, Nelson and Seers exhibited at Tate Britain. In 2011 Susan Hiller had a major retrospective at Tate Britain.In 2014 Robin Klassnik was awarded the OBE for services to the arts and media. In 1996, Matt’s Gallery was short-listed for the Prudential Award for the Visual Arts along with Bookworks and South London Gallery. In 1994 Robin Klassnik was short-listed for Prudential/Arts Council Award for an individual contribution to innovation and creativity in the Arts.In 2016 Matt's Gallery successfully applied for charitable status, allowing it to receive funds from a broad range of charities and agencies. As a National Portfolio Organisation, Matt’s Gallery receives revenue funding from Arts Council England and the programme is frequently supported by the Henry Moore Foundation and The Foyle Foundation amongst others.

All Hallows, Bow
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Blackthorn Street, E3
London, E3 3

All Hallows, Bow, is an Anglican church in Bow, London, England, in the Diocese of London.HistoryOriginally built in the 19th century, it was damaged in World War II and rebuilt. The church is in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets.The church's Rector is Cris Rogers. In 2010, he led a planting team from St Paul's, Shadwell to All Hallows, Bow. He served as a curate at the church from 2010 to 2014, while Ric Thorpe was Priest-in-Charge. An official re-licensing ceremony took place in 2015. Adrian Newman, Bishop of Stepney, presided over the ceremony. A growing number of people had been gathering in the church to worship prior to this date.

The Horn of Plenty
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
32 Globe Road
London, E1 4

Pakistan vs NewZeland 2016
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
English street
London,

Mile End tube station
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
51 Grove Rd
London, E3 4

0843 222 1234

Mile End is a London Underground station in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets in east London. It is served by the Hammersmith & City, District and Central lines. This station features a cross-platform interchange in both directions, with the Central line's tracks to the outside of the District and Hammersmith & City lines' tracks. It is in Travelcard Zone 2.HistoryThe station was opened in 1902 by the Whitechapel & Bow Railway. Electrified services started in 1905. The first services were provided by the District Railway (now the District line); the Metropolitan line followed in 1936. (In 1988 this section of the Metropolitan was renamed the Hammersmith & City line.) In 1946 the station was expanded and rebuilt as part of the Central line eastern extension, with services starting on 4 December 1946. The station passed to London Underground in 1950.IncidentsOn 5 July 2007 a Central line train was derailed when it hit a roll of fire blanket, which had been blown out of a cross-passage between the two tunnels by the strong crosswinds.In November 2009, part of a plastic barrier broke off from a departing train and struck three commuters. One woman suffered a 5 cm cut in her forehead, and London Underground Ltd faced a fine of up to £20,000 after admitting liability in the case.

Sports Venue and Stadium Near Mile End Stadium

Revolution Karting
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Arches 422-424 Mile End Park
London, United Kingdom E3 4AA

0207 538 5195

Go Karting London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
418-419 Mile End Park
London, United Kingdom E3 4AA

020 7005 0318