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20 Fenchurch Street, London | Tourist Information


20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 6


20 Fenchurch Street is a commercial skyscraper in London that takes its name from its address on Fenchurch Street, in the historic City of London financial district. It has been nicknamed 'The Walkie-Talkie' because of its distinctive shape. Construction was completed in spring 2014, and the top-floor 'sky garden' was opened in January 2015. The 34-storey building is 160m tall, making it the sixth-tallest building in the City of London and the 12th tallest in London.Designed by architect Rafael Viñoly and costing over £200 million, 20 Fenchurch Street features a highly distinctive top-heavy form which appears to burst upward and outward. A large viewing deck, bar and restaurants are included on the top three floors; these are, with restrictions, open to the public.The tower was originally proposed at nearly 200m tall but its design was scaled down after concerns about its visual impact on the nearby St Paul's Cathedral and Tower of London. It was subsequently approved in 2006 with the revised height. Even after the height reduction there were continued concerns from heritage groups about its impact on the surrounding area. The project was consequently the subject of a public inquiry; in 2007 this ruled in the developers' favour and the building was granted full planning permission. In 2015 it was awarded the Carbuncle Cup for the worst new building in the UK in the previous 12 months.

Bar Near 20 Fenchurch Street

The Folly
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
41 Gracechurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 0BT

08454680102

Discover our secret garden. The Folly is the City destination for those who wish to escape the hustle & bustle.

Revolution Leadenhall
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
140-144 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 4QT

0207 621 9955

Official Fan Page & Check-in. To redeem offer please show staff your check-in status between 5pm-9pm.

The Crosse Keys, JD Wetherspoon
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
9 Gracechurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 0DR

0207 623 4824

Darwin Brasserie - Sky Garden, the Walkie Talkie Building
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6

0333 772 0020

Agenda
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Minster Court, 3 Mincing Lane
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7

020-7929-8399

Sky Pod Bar
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 3BY

0333 772 0020

Hung Drawn and Quartered
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
27 Great Tower Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 5

0207 626 6123

The Hung, Drawn & Quartered Tower Hill A grade 2 listed building, built in 1914, this site has been The Hung, Drawn and Quartered since 1996. The building was a bank prior to this and formed part Christ’s Hospital till 1987. Jon Fowkes of Claybury bequeathed it to the school in 1686. Christ’s Hospital are a charitable education foundation founded in 1552, the result of the vision of King Edward VI, assisted by Nicholas Ridley, Bishop of London, and Sir Richard Dobbs, Lord Mayor of the City of London, to educate poor children. The original school was based in Newgate Street where it was occupied as the major site for 350 years. The school still exists today and is based in Horsham, Sussex and remains true to its founder’s principals of supporting disadvantaged children. Samuel Pepys, famous diarist and one vice president of Christ’s Hospital, lived locally in Seething Lane and is buried in St Olave’s Church in Hart Street. Samuel Pepys kept a personal diary from 1660-1669. His diary is a primary source of history with an eyewitness account to some of London’s historic events, such as the Great Plague of 1665 and The Great Fire of London in 1666, which began in a bakery Pudding Lane near the Monument, which is erected in memory of the Great Fire. On the wall outside the pub you will find an altered quote from Samuel Pepys describing his attendance of the execution at Charing Cross of Major General Harrison on October 13, 1660, for the regicide of Charles I. “I went to see Major General Harrison hung, drawn and quartered. He was looking as cheerful as any man could in that condition.” To be hanged, drawn and quartered was the penalty in Medieval England for high treason, and was deemed more heinous a crime than murder, until abolished under the treason act of 1814. It was a gruesome form of public torture and execution applied to men only, woman found guilty of treason were burned at the stake. The full sentence passed upon those convicted of High Treason was as follows: “That you be drawn on a hurdle to the place of execution where you shall be hanged by the neck and being alive cut down, your privy members shall be cut off and your bowels taken out and burned before you, your head severed from your body and your body divided into four quarters to be disposed of at the King’s pleasure.”

Pitcher & Piano Cornhill
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
28-31 Cornhill
London, United Kingdom EC3V 3ND

020 7929 3989

Our bar in the City. A great bar to visit for lunch when you need a break from the office or some after-work drinks to wind down before the last train home. Either way the fantastic customer service at Pitcher & Piano Cornhill will bring you back time and time again. We serve the City’s finest breakfast from 8am Monday to Friday every week; whether you’re after a light snack or a big breakfast we’ve got it covered. Enjoy a spot of lunch away from the office; try one of the £6 dishes from our Munch for Less menu, or a classic sandwich or salad if you fancy a lighter bite. For after-work drinks try our grazing dishes with a glass of wine or our premium draught beers. If you’re heading over with a group of friends make sure you plan ahead and make a booking to ensure you get the best seats in the house. To keep up to date with all things Pitcher & Piano Cornhill sign up today at www.pitcherandpiano.com/register, follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook

Counting House
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
50 Cornhill
London, United Kingdom EC3V 3PD

020 7283 7123

The Counting House was built in 1893 as Prescott's Bank, and the foundations rest partly on the North sleeper wall of a 2,000 year old Roman basilica. Certainly there's plenty of history to the place, and even more recently, the magnificent building has found fame - it's been used in film-making and even hosted a Parliamentary debate. By day of course, it's a Fuller's Ale and Pie pub - with a spectacular island bar, an overlooking gallery, and private function rooms at every turn.

Vodka Revolutions
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
140 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 4QT

Agenda
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Minster Court, 3 Mincing Lane
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7

02079298399

HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY 5-7 PM 50% OFF ALL DRINKS - Make a reservation by calling us on 02079298399 or emailing [email protected]

Dirty Martini Monument
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Lovat Lane
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8DT

02076322089

Dirty Martini - the perfect mix of spirit and sophistication With a bespoke range of Martinis and signature cocktails, glamorous interiors and some of London’s best DJs, it’s the perfect destination for after-work indulgence, pre-club cocktails, sophisticated celebrations or a stylish late night party.

GILT London - Fenchurch Street, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
14 London Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7NA

02072641910

Situated in the heart of the City, Gilt London delivers a level of superior service to those who expect only the best. With a chic, modern and informal ambiance it is the perfect place for lunch, early evening dining, after work drinks through to the ultimate late night party experience. Conveniently located next to Fenchurch Street and a mere short walk from Tower Hill, Bank and Aldgate stations our duel roomed venue with two bars, exclusive VIP areas and large dining area is the perfect place to play host to a wide range of corporate events. The decor and design of the venue are superbly suited to move effortlessly from day to evening offering a stylish but laid back slice of modern City living.

Lamb Tavern
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
10-12 Leadenhall Market
London, United Kingdom EC3V 1LR

020 7626 2454

The Lamb Tavern, first built in 1309 by Sir Hugh Neville, is situated at the heart of Leadenhall Market. The original building had a large lead roof hence the name Leadenhall, and although it’s not certain it was built as a public place- by the end of the 14th century it was firmly established as a market and for many years was the site of the City granary. Unfortunately the original Leadenhall was badly damaged in the Great Fire of 1666 and was rebuilt in its present form by Sir Horace Jones. It continued to function as a market as the majority of the traders were fishmongers and butchers and even today there remains a fishmonger in Central Avenue. The Lamb Tavern site itself has grander origins than the 14th century market. It directly overlies the Roman Londinium Basilica, which was a large building used by the Romans for judicial and commercial purposes. Built in 50AD and then rebuilt in 120AD, the Basilica was then the largest building of its kind except for the Basilica Ulpia in Rome itself. It was over 500ft in length (about the size of St Paul's) and to the south lay the forum filled with a whole host of stalls, shops and workshops selling goods and services to those who used the Basilica. The Lamb Tavern as a place to take refreshment adjacent to the market continues the tradition first established in Roman Britain almost 2000 years ago! Situated adjacent to Lloyd's of London, and within minutes of Monument, Bank and Liverpool St Stations, it is a majestic venue over three floors, leading onto the cobblestones of the Marketplace. The Lamb Tavern also provides a unique venue to hold Weddings, Events and Celebrations.

The Britannia
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
20 Monument St
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8AJ

020 7623 8572

New Moon (Leadenhall)
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
88 Gracechurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 0DN

02076263625

A historic building inside the vibrant Victorian splendour of Leadenhall Market, The New Moon has it all. Top-end shopping, the bustle of the city and the best of Victorian architecture, plus a large outdoor seating area in the heart of the market itself. Atmosphere doesn’t get much better than this! The pub has been featured in a lot of films including Tomb Raider, James Bond.

Haz
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
6 Mincing Lane
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7AA

+44 (0) 20 7929 3173

Jamaica Wine House
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
St Michaels Alley
London, United Kingdom EC3V 9DS

02079296972

The Walrus and The Carpenter
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
45 Monument Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8BU

02076211647

You will find The Walrus and The Carpenter in Monument London within a short stroll of Lower Thames St, London Bridge and Great Tower Street - however you won't find another like it. Step in to discover a traditional pub of unique character, revered for its eclectic range of real ales and its quality pub food, which are served, as they should be, with a generous measure of famous British hospitality. The Walrus and The Carpenter takes its name from a poem by Lewis Carroll. The verse is recited by Tweedledum and Tweedledee in 'Through The Looking Glass'. We stand in the shadow of history, in view of The Monument to commemorate the Great Fire of London. The column's height marks the distance to the site of Thomas Farynor's bakery in Pudding Lane where the fire began. The Walrus and The Carpenter is one of many rare gems in the Nicholson's collection of great British pubs, reputed for their distinctive buildings, intriguing history and vibrant atmosphere. Find out more here: www.nicholsonspubs.co.uk/thewalrusandthecarpentermonumentlondon

Silk and Grain
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
33 Cornhill
London, United Kingdom EC3V 3ND

0207 929 1378

Here at Silk & Grain we like to do things a little differently, and take a bit of extra time and care when it comes to our tasty beverages. We've taken a selection of our fave classic cocktails, and had a little looksy at what happens if we give them some time in different ‘things’ such as oak barrels, metal, leather and glass. Cocktails, which have tasted the same for years such as a Negroni or a Hanky Panky have developed a new lease of life through the process by being combined with natural flavours of oak, vanilla, caramel and spice from charred oak aged barrels & leather infusions. The results include a rounded, smoother mouth feel with a long finish. Even metal ageing and bottle conditioning has created cleaner, more mineral take on classic cocktails.

Commercial and Industrial Near 20 Fenchurch Street

East London Liquor Company
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
Unit GF1, Bow Wharf, Grove Road
London, United Kingdom E3 5SN

020 8983 4353

We are a craft spirits producer with a distillery situated in the heart of the capital’s old spirits industry, producing and importing a range of quality handcrafted spirits including gins, vodka, rum and whisky. Bringing spirits production back to London’s East End after more than a century, we are reinstating an industry back to its roots. Located in one of Bow’s most well known historical sites, the old glue factory in Bow Wharf, we are always open for a visit.

Sea Containers House
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
20 Upper Ground
London, United Kingdom SE1 9

Sea Containers House is a prominent building on the south bank of the River Thames in London.LocationSea Containers House is located towards the eastern end of London's South Bank cultural area, and is within the London Borough of Southwark. A continuous river-side walkway, actually part of the Thames Path, passes in front of and below the building, and links it with near river-side attractions such as the Festival Hall, the National Theatre, the Tate Modern, the Oxo Tower and the Globe Theatre.HistorySea Containers House was originally conceived as a luxury hotel. Its location near to the City of London led to the decision to complete it instead as office space. Its name comes from the former long-term tenant, Sea Containers.In Spring 2011, a process began to gain planning permission for an extensive internal and external refurbishment of Sea Containers House. The east and west wings, which face the Thames, remained offices, with global advertising and marketing agency Ogilvy & Mather moving in August 2015. While the south wing was renovated as the Mondrian Hotel London, bringing at least part of the building back to its original intended use.Cultural influenceIn October 2009, three-piece music band Gyratory System released the album The Sound-Board Breathes with a track named Sea Containers House.

British American Tobacco Globe House
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Globe House 4 Temple Pl
London, United Kingdom WC2R 3

+44 207 845 1000

240 Blackfriars ' Great Portland Estates'
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
240 Blackfriars Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 8NW

Cannon Wharf Business Centre
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
35 Evelyn St
London, United Kingdom SE8 5RT

020 7231 2173

Bentley Systems - Gracechurch St, London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
20 Gracechurch Street, 9th Floor
London, United Kingdom

Mastermelt Group
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
56 Hatton Garden
London, United Kingdom EC1N 8HP

0207 400 3400

The Mastermelt Group has grown from its formation in Hatton Garden, servicing the jewellery industry, to become one of the largest precious metal recycling companies in the world. The Group is now actively seeking new opportunities in SE Asia following a number of successful precious metals reclaim projects. Following its formation in 1985 the company has grown through acquisition and the building of new processing plants to offer recycling services to a variety of industries and multinational organisations. With a sales force containing 445 years of experience in the precious metals industry and three processing plants, all of which are ISO 14001 accredited, the Mastermelt Group are fully equipped to offer our customers a first class service from collection to payment.

TH Real Estate
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
201 Bishopsgate
London, United Kingdom EC2M 3BN

+442037278000

TH Real Estate is an established investment management company, specialising in real estate equity and debt investment worldwide. As one of the largest real estate managers in the world, TH Real Estate has the scale, capital resources and knowledge to provide creative and effective real estate investment solutions for clients. With a focus on the retail, office, logistics, debt and multifamily residential sectors, TH Real Estate emphasises sustainable practices to protect assets and maximise their value. The company is owned by TIAA, the leading provider of financial services in the academic, research, medical, cultural and government fields. TIAA has c.$854bn assets under management* and offers a wide range of financial solutions, including investing, banking, advice and guidance, and retirement services. Launched in April 2014, TH Real Estate has a dedicated global presence with offices across America, Asia and Europe, representing c.$29.2bn* of real estate assets across c.50 funds and mandates. Together with TIAA’s US real estate assets, the global real estate platform of $91.7bn* represents one of the largest real estate investment management enterprises in the world. Its products are managed by specialist teams, which apply their own experience to the management and style of their portfolios. Each team is supported by an experienced senior management team and integrated investment platform, including finance, debt and currency management, performance analytics, client service, fund and transaction structuring, development, sustainability and research. *As at 31 December 2015

Community union
Distance: 2.9 mi Tourist Information
465c Caledonian Road
London, United Kingdom N7 9GX

0800 389 6332

Pirtek Greenwich
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
unit 17 orion business centre
London, United Kingdom se14 5rt

02072378230

Norris Steam Services
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Ratcliffe Cross St
London, United Kingdom E8 4QS

+44 (0)20 7791 0070

For over 40 years Norris Steam London Ltd have been industry leaders in offering a wide range of professional and commercial pressing machinery and garment steamers. We are the official UK agents for the following well known established and renowned companies; Jiffy Steamers, Jacobson Products, Due Effe Irons, Stirovap Pressing Equipment, CEME Solenoids.

Eco Home Constructions
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
72 Great Suffolk Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 0BL

+ (44) 788 245 9624

London based building company specializing in refurbishment of high-end residential properties with a well deserved reputation for quality builds and customer satisfaction. Our experience and expertise covers a wide range of building disciplines on all manner of projects, from small and simple to large and complex.

City Move Estate
Distance: 2.5 mi Tourist Information
446 Roman Road
London, United Kingdom E3 5LU

02089802499

City Move Estate Agents are a new independent, energetic Letting Agency based in East London. Straightforward and comprehensive packages are available for Landlords and a wide range of Properties for Tenants from Professional lets to Student accommodation, all at competitive prices. City Move Estate Agents wish to offer a refreshing and dynamic approach towards letting your property. We are providing great savings. For example City Move Estate Agents are able to offer no VAT payable for their services for a limited availability basis. Furthermore City Move Estate Agents are able to provide a guarantee of your rent once a tenant has been found for a term of six months. With the directors of the Company having many years of experience over different areas of the professional spectrum, City Move Estate Agents aim to provide a consistently high and efficient service, which includes offering out of hour’s assistance. Please feel free to contact us, where we will be happy to provide you with a valuation and run through our competitive fees with you, along with details of our maintenance programme and other services we can offer. Services we provide • Out of Hour’s service – 24 hour mobiles • Longer working hours to fit around you • Colour Advertising • Feedback Reports on advertising • General Advice • Insurance Quotations • Free Market Appraisals • High Quality ‘To Let’ boards • Tenancy Deposit Protection • Maintenance Programme • Professional Advice & Support • Experienced staff with local knowledge

Weber Industries
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
90 Haymerle Rd
London, United Kingdom Se15 6SB

02077324651

L&L Pro Group
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
111 Cannon Street
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5AR

020076219988

L&L Pro Group is focused on every aspect of property development and maintenance, repair and improvement,as well as relocating services including packing and storage. L & L Pro Group are a team of London based solicitors and entrepreneurs who, between them, have numerous years of experience related to the legal, planning, development and maintenance aspects of property in the UK. Each member is a successful expert in their field with a proven track record of performance and reliability, each brings their own expertise to the company whether it is in site acquisition, planning and legal matters, logistics, haulage and removals, or managing the efficient building of an apartment block. We are all experts and successful in our fields, we are ambitious, hard working and success oriented. Work with us today to see what we can do for you.

Bull Recruitment
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
10 Artillery Passage
London, United Kingdom E1 7LJ

+44 (0) 203 290 0008

Bull Recruitment's Mechanical & Electrical division specialise in the recruitment of qualified professionals for temporary, contract and permanent jobs. Your job vacancy is advertised to all relevant candidates on our database and is posted on a mixture of mainstream and niche jobsites to ensure that we attract the best candidates. With over 30,000 qualified Mechanical & Electrical professionals on our database, we can provide you with the right person for your recruitment needs every time. We have developed strong links with Amicus, ensuring access to the latest training programmes to ensure best working practices. This coupled with our membership with the Joint Industry Board (JIB) as an approved supplier is testament to our commitment to provide a high quality service to our customers. The high standard of service Bull Recruitment provides has ensured that we have built a solid and longstanding client base that includes: Bam service engineering, Wates Construction, Balfour Beatty and Cofely gdf suez Our experienced and dedicated consultants have years of experience recruiting for the Mechanical & Electrical industries and are solely focussed on meeting individual and business requirements. Coupled with our dedicated on¬going training programmes and sophisticated IT systems, Bull Recruitment's consultants are the most professional recruitment service available to you. Our recruitment process as detailed in our Client Charter ensures all supplied professionals hold relevant sector qualifications, equipment and are fully referenced.

Golden Trails Ltd.
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
372 Old Street
London, United Kingdom EC1V 9AU

+44 (0)20 32 9005 79

Golden Trails. Inspiring your prospects Gold is the greatest of all metallic elements. This invaluable precious metal represents commitment as well as triumph. When two people join in matrimony, they exchange golden rings. And those who succeed in an Olympic sport are rewarded with a gold medal. Golden Trails is proud to introduce a unique gift which combines commitment with success. Of course, your business is a most treasured asset Golden Trails is launching a personalized loyalty card with a gold ingot: a prestigious marketing tool as well as the perfect gift to remunerate business relations for their achievements in bringing out the best in themselves and their companies. Thanks to the secured bar code this loyalty card can also be used as a key, a VIP-card, bonus or credit card. You can exchange the gold ingot at any bank worldwide for euros, dollars or other currency against the going gold rate. An invaluable concept: Trailblazer Experiences Golden Trails is focused on "your very best" as is its sister company: Van Hoof Life Assessments. To make your dreams or ambitions come true, it is necessary to venture beyond your comfort zone. Do you dare take up the challenge and set off on a voyage with a Personal Trailblazer? This adventure will surely prove to be a life experience as priceless as gold. During the extraordinary Trailblazer (logo groen) Experiences, you will meet with the sweet taste of victory as you surpass yourself. Insight and self-awareness are the symbolic gold medals to be yours upon completing this exceptional voyage to your true essence.

Network Business
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
shelton street, covent garder 71-75
London, United Kingdom WC2H9JQ

00442071172863

Network business international commodities Ltd is a consulting company specialized in commodities such as ferrous and non-ferrous metals, polymers , soft commodities and building materials. In addition our structure is able to offer a consulting service for the metal market and in the import from far east area for different kind of products. We play a role of brokers or direct buyers and we are not owned by any manufacturer and we work only with the best of them in according with our customer’s needs and in order to offer an high quality service. Our goal is provide products and services to your place, from suppliers all round the world, with safety and in condition required, our head office is located in London (UK) and thanks our representative offices in Italy, China and India you can be sure that your order will be followed at every step !

Albion Building Consultants
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Stanmore
London, United Kingdom HA7 4FG

0208 416 0041

We are Chartered Building Surveyors and Architectural Designers working throughout the South East, France, Canada and with an associated office in Singapore.

Arnhem Building Services
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Arnhem Ave
London, United Kingdom RM15

07720836734

if you want work done then give me a call, im fed up with seeing people unhappy about workmanship, i know enough and know enough people to get the job done, i have proffessional tradesman working with me to ensure that you are satisfied, internal or external work, plasterering , rendering , tiling, blockpaving, fencing, painting... call me .... 07720836734

Commercial Real Estate Near 20 Fenchurch Street

CityPoint
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
1 Ropemaker Street
London, United Kingdom EC2Y 9AW

CityPoint is a skyscraper located on Ropemaker Street on the northern fringe of the City of London, the main financial district and historic nucleus of London.Originally named Britannic House, CityPoint was built in 1967 as a 35-storey, 122m tall headquarters for British Petroleum, becoming the first building in the City of London area to exceed the height of St Paul's Cathedral. The designers were F. Milton Cashmore and H. N. W. Grosvenor. In 1991 British Petroleum moved back to their original headquarters on Finsbury Circus and the building was renamed Britannic Tower.It was refurbished in 2000, with additional floor space and the height increased to 127m. The designer for the refurbishment was Sheppard Robson. It was renamed CityPoint after its refurbishment.CityPoint is the seventh-tallest building in the City, after the Heron Tower, 122 Leadenhall Street, Tower 42, 30 St Mary Axe, Broadgate Tower and 20 Fenchurch Street but only the 23th-tallest in Greater London.In August 2005 its owner, Pillar Properties, sold the building for more than £500 million in one of the largest deals ever seen in the City office market.In early 2007 the building was again put on the market, this time for £650 million, and purchased by a private American company called Beacon Capital Partners. At the time it was the most expensive building sale in the United Kingdom. However 8 Canada Square at Canary Wharf eclipsed this by some margin just a few months later when it was sold for over £1 billion.

One America Square
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
17 Crosswall
London, United Kingdom EC3N 2SG

Friars Bridge Court
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
41 - 45 Blackfriars Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 8NZ

Nursing and Midwifery Council
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
23 Portland Pl
London, United Kingdom W1B 1

2076377181

Finsbury Tower
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
103-105 Bunhill Row
London, United Kingdom EC1Y 8LZ

020 8746 9678

City Tower London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
40 Basinghall St
London, United Kingdom EC2V 5

20-76382921

Cisco
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
16 Finsbury Circus
London, United Kingdom

Islington Business Centre
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
14-22 Coleman Fields
London, United Kingdom N1 7AD

020 7688 1111

Larc
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
62 Fieldgate St
London, United Kingdom E1 1

020 7377 9088

The London Action Resource Centre is a meeting centre and planning area for several protest groups, including Queeruption and Indymedia in London. It also functions as a planning and information centre for Peoples Global Action. It was originally known as the Fieldgate Action Resource Centre. In 1999 the building became the property of the 'London Action Resource Centre Limited'. The building is situated in Whitechapel, in the East End of London. The building was formerly a synagogue and at one time housed the Louise Michel International Modern School.

Pulse Films
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
17 Hanbury Street
London, United Kingdom E1 6

020 7426 5700

Sampson House
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
64 Hopton St
London, United Kingdom SE1 9JH

Sampson House is a commercial office building in Hopton Street, Southwark, London, United Kingdom. It is sited just west of the Tate Modern art gallery, by the railway lines running onto Blackfriars Bridge and fills a block between the Thames and Southwark Street.Sampson House is a rare example of a Brutalist commercial office building, with powerful massing, extensive use of exposed concrete with minimal glazing at street level and strong horizontal mirror glazing in austere dark metal cladding in the projecting upper levels. It was built in 1976-9 as a processing centre for Lloyds Bank and was designed by Fitzroy Robinson & Partners (now Aukett Fitzroy Robinson) which was also architect for the construction (and refurbishment in 2004-6) of 50 Queen Anne's Gate in Westminster.Minerva plc announced in August 2005 that, in a linked transaction, it had completed the sale of Sampson House for £150.5 million and Ludgate House for £78.5 million to a private investor. The announcement also stated that "Sampson House comprises 386,288sq.ft. of office space let to IBM UK Limited. The lease expires in December 2025 but, includes a mutual break clause in June 2018. The current rent is £8 million p.a. and will rise to £9.5 million p.a. in December this year". IBM utilises the building's extensive and deep basement levels to host data centres for the company's London based customers, with recovery facilities utilising the above-ground office space.

81 Rivington Street
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
81 Rivington Street
London, United Kingdom EC2A 3AY

020 3178 6000

Towers Watson
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
71 High Holborn
London, United Kingdom WC1V 6TP

+44 20 7170 2000

Classic Fm
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
29-30 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom

020 7343 9000

Cable&Wireless Worldwide
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
114 Great Suffolk St
London, United Kingdom SE1 0

20-73154000

Four Communications
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
20 St Thomas Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9BF

+44 (0) 20 3697 4200

Steer Davies Gleave
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
28-32 Upper Ground
London, United Kingdom SE1 9

20-79198500

Aimia
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
80 Strand
London, United Kingdom WC2R 0NN

020 7152 4700

Weapon7
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
77 Kingsway
London, United Kingdom WC2B 6S

02070743555

We like to think that we're an energetic, enthusiastic bunch. As such, we love creating ideas that take on a life of their own and live beyond media, campaign plans and budgets.

Elizabeth House
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
39 York Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 7NQ

07903828989

Community and Government Near 20 Fenchurch Street

London Bridge
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

Guy's Hospital
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
London near London Bridge Station
London, United Kingdom SE1 1

020 7188 7188

Guy's Hospital is a large NHS hospital in the borough of Southwark in central London. It is part of Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and one of the institutions that comprise the King's Health Partners, an academic health science centre. It is a large teaching hospital and is, with St Thomas' Hospital and King's College Hospital, the location of King's College London School of Medicine (formerly known as the GKT School of Medicine). The Tower Wing (formerly known as Guy's Tower) is the world's tallest hospital building, standing at with 34 floors.HistoryThe hospital was founded in 1721 by Thomas Guy, a publisher of unlicensed Bibles who had made a fortune in the South Sea Bubble. It was originally established as a hospital to treat "incurables" discharged from St Thomas' Hospital. Guy had been a Governor and benefactor of St Thomas' and his fellow Governors supported his intention by granting the south-side of St Thomas' Street for a peppercorn rent for 999 years. Guy is interred in the crypt of the Chapel of his foundation.

Heron Tower
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
110 Bishopsgate
London, United Kingdom EC2M 3

The Heron Tower is a commercial skyscraper in London. It stands 230m tall including its 28-metre mast making it the tallest building in the City of London financial district and the third tallest in Greater London and the United Kingdom, after the Shard in Southwark and One Canada Square at Canary Wharf. The Heron Tower is located on Bishopsgate and is bordered by Camomile Street, Outwich Street and Houndsditch.Construction of the building started in 2007 and was completed in 2011. It is owned by Heron International and is generally known as the Heron Tower, though following a naming dispute in 2014 involving the tenant Salesforce.com the City of London ruled in favour of the property being officially named 110 Bishopsgate. The tower initially struggled to attract tenants in the depths of the Great Recession, but is now fully let.Design and planningDesigned by architects Kohn Pedersen Fox, the height of the Heron Tower was planned to be only 183 m, identical to that of Tower 42, the City of London's then tallest building since 1980.It attracted some controversy when first announced due to its proximity to St Paul's Cathedral when viewed from Waterloo Bridge. English Heritage was notably vocal in expressing concerns. A public inquiry was subsequently held, the outcome of which was decided by deputy prime minister John Prescott, who ruled in the developers' favour. The tower was given final approval for construction in July 2002.

Liverpool Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Great Eastern Walk
London, United Kingdom EC2M 7Q

08457 484950

Liverpool Street est une station du métro de Londres en correspondance avec la gare de Liverpool Street. La station est sur la Central line, la Circle line, la Hammersmith & City line et la Metropolitan line en zone 1.Lieu remarquable à proximité Gare de Liverpool StreetVoir aussiArticles connexes Attentats du 7 juillet 2005 à Londres Liste des stations du métro de Londres Liste des stations fermées du métro de Londres Stansted Express

Tower 42
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
25 Old Broad Street
London, United Kingdom EC2N 1

020 7877 7842

Tower 42 is the third-tallest skyscraper in the City of London and the eighth tallest in Greater London. Its original name was the NatWest Tower, having been built to house NatWest's international headquarters. It is still commonly referred to as the NatWest Tower. Seen from above, the shape of the tower resembles that of the NatWest logo (three chevrons in a hexagonal arrangement).The tower, designed by Richard Seifert and engineered by Pell Frischmann, is located at 25 Old Broad Street. It was built by John Mowlem & Co between 1971 and 1980, first occupied in 1980, and formally opened on 11 June 1981 by Queen Elizabeth II.The construction cost was £72 million. It is 183m high, which made it the tallest building in the United Kingdom until the topping out of One Canada Square at Canary Wharf in 1990. It held the status of tallest building in the City of London for 30 years, until it was surpassed by the Heron Tower in December 2009.The building today is multi-tenanted and comprises Grade A office space and restaurant facilities, with one restaurant situated on the 24th floor, and the other, a champagne and seafood bar, on the 42nd floor. In 2011 it was bought by the South African businessman Nathan Kirsh for £282.5 million.

Globe Theatre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
21 New Globe Walk, Bankside, London
London, United Kingdom SE1 9

020 7407 0043

The Globe Theatre was a theatre in London associated with William Shakespeare. It was built in 1599 by Shakespeare's playing company, the Lord Chamberlain's Men, on land owned by Thomas Brend and inherited by his son, Nicholas Brend and grandson Sir Matthew Brend, and was destroyed by fire on 29 June 1613. A second Globe Theatre was built on the same site by June 1614 and closed by an Ordinance issued on 6 September 1642.A modern reconstruction of the Globe, named "Shakespeare's Globe", opened in 1997 approximately 230m from the site of the original theatre. From 1909, the current Gielgud Theatre was called "Globe Theatre", until it was renamed (in honour of John Gielgud) in 1994.LocationsExamination of old property records has identified the plot of land occupied by the Globe as extending from the west side of modern-day Southwark Bridge Road eastwards as far as Porter Street and from Park Street southwards as far as the back of Gatehouse Square. However, the precise location of the building remained unknown until a small part of the foundations, including one original pier base, was discovered in 1989 beneath the car park at the rear of Anchor Terrace on Park Street. The shape of the foundations is now replicated on the surface. As the majority of the foundations lies beneath 67—70 Anchor Terrace, a listed building, no further excavations have been permitted.

Wagamama's Tower Hill, London Town
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Tower Hill, London
London, United Kingdom EC3R 5

020 7283 5897

Lloyd's of London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 7HA

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Lloyd's of London, generally known simply as Lloyd's, is an insurance market located in London's primary financial district, the City of London. Unlike most of its competitors in the industry, it is not an insurance company. It is a corporate body governed by the Lloyd's Act of 1871 and subsequent Acts of Parliament. It is a partially mutualised marketplace within which multiple financial backers, grouped in syndicates, come together to pool and spread risk. These underwriters, or "members", are a collection of both corporations and private individuals, the latter being traditionally known as "Names".The insurance business underwritten at Lloyd's is predominantly general insurance and reinsurance, although a small number of syndicates write term life assurance. The market has its roots in marine insurance and was founded by Edward Lloyd at his coffee house on Tower Street in around 1688. Today, it has a dedicated building on Lime Street, opened in 1986. Its motto is Fidentia, Latin for "confidence", and it is closely associated with the Latin phrase uberrima fides, or "utmost good faith".

30 ST MARY AXE
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
30 St Mary Axe
London, United Kingdom EC3A 8

More London Riverside
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
More London Riverside SE1 2AU
London, United Kingdom SE1 2AU

London Stone
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

02076268246

London Stone is a historic landmark traditionally housed at 111 Cannon Street in the City of London. It is an irregular block of oolitic limestone measuring 53 × 43 × 30 cm (21 × 17 × 12"), the remnant of a once much larger object that had stood for many centuries on the south side of the street. Currently the stone is housed at the Museum of London pending reconstruction of the 111 Cannon Street building.The name "London Stone" was first recorded around the year 1100. The date and original purpose of the Stone are unknown, although it is possibly of Roman origin, and there has been interest and speculation about it since at least the 16th century. There are modern claims that it was formerly an object of veneration, or has some occult significance. These assertions however, are completely unsubstantiated.DescriptionThe present London Stone is only the upper portion of a once much larger object, as described below under History. The surviving portion is a block of oolitic limestone approximately 53 cm wide, 43 cm high, and 30 cm front to back (21 × 17 × 12 inches). A study in the 1960s indicated that the stone is Clipsham Limestone, a good-quality stone from Rutland transported to London for building purposes in both the Roman and medieval periods. More recently Kevin Hayward has suggested that it may be Bath stone, the stone most used for monuments and sculpture in early Roman London and in Saxon times.

122 Leadenhall Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 4

122 Leadenhall Street, or the Leadenhall Building, is a 225 m tall building on Leadenhall Street in London. The commercial skyscraper, opened in July 2014, was designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners and is informally known as "The Cheesegrater" because of its distinctive wedge shape. It is one of a number of new tall buildings recently completed or currently under construction in the City of London financial area, including 20 Fenchurch Street, 22 Bishopsgate, and The Scalpel.The building is opposite the Lloyd's building, also designed by Rogers, which is the home of the insurance market Lloyd's of London. Until 2007 the Leadenhall site was occupied by the P&O Tower, a building owned by the developer British Land and designed by Gollins Melvin Ward Partnership that was completed in 1968 as a brother to the still existing Commercial Union tower, now called St. Helen's. That building was demolished in preparation for redevelopment of the site. The project, initially delayed due to the financial crisis, was revived in 2010 and Oxford Properties co-developed the property in partnership with British Land.

Minories
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
64-73 Minories
London, United Kingdom EC3N 1

Minories is the name of both a former civil parish, also known as Minories Holy Trinity, and a street in the City of London, close to the Tower of London.HistoryToponymyThe name is derived from the abbey of the Minoresses of St. Mary of the Order of St. Clare, founded in 1294, which stood on such sites; a "minoress" was a nun in the Second Order of the Order of Friars Minor (or Franciscans). (A small side-road off Minories is named St. Clare Street.) The name can also be found in other English towns including Birmingham, Colchester, Newcastle upon Tyne and Stratford-upon-Avon.RomansIn September 2013, an extremely well preserved Roman statue of an eagle, was discovered on a building site on the street. The statue is considered to be one of the best examples of Romano-British sculpture in existence.GovernanceMinories was part of the ancient parish of St Botolph without Aldgate until 1557, when it became extra-parochial.The area was a papal peculiar outside the jurisdiction of the English bishops. The abbey was dissolved in 1539, the property passing to the Crown. The chapel of the former abbey was used as the Church of Holy Trinity, Minories, and other buildings became an armoury and later workhouse. In 1686, the area became part of the Liberties of the Tower of London. The Minories area also historically hosted a large Jewish community.

The Leadenhall Building
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom

Red Bull UK
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
155-171 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JP

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Southwark Crown Court
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
1 English Grounds
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7522 7200

Crown Court, Southwark, commonly known as the Southwark Crown Court, is one of three Crown Courts in the London SE1 postcode area, along with Inner London Crown Court and Blackfriars Crown Court. Opened in 1983, the brick building is located on the South Bank of the River Thames between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, next to Hay's Galleria. It contains 15 courtrooms, making it the fourth largest court centre in the country, and is a designated as a serious fraud centre.

Skinners Hall
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8 1/2 Downgate Hill, London, EC4R 2SP
London, United Kingdom EC4R 2SP

020 7236 5629

QA Training Centre
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
110 Middlesex Street
London, United Kingdom

020-3371 7615

Nando's @ St Paul's Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
1 New Change
London, United Kingdom EC4M 9AD

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London Metal Exchange
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
56 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom

020 7264 5555

The London Metal Exchange is the futures exchange with the world's largest market in options and futures contracts on base and other metals. As the LME offers contracts with daily expiry dates of up to three months from trade date, weekly contracts to six months, and monthly contracts up to 123 months, it also allows for cash trading. It offers hedging, worldwide reference pricing, and the option of physical delivery to settle contracts. In July 2012, LME's shareholders voted to sell the exchange to Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing for £1.4 billion.It is located at 10 Finsbury Square in the London Borough of Islington, just to the north of the City of London.HistoryThe London Metal Market and Exchange Company was founded in 1877, but the market traces its origins back to 1571 and the opening of the Royal Exchange, London. Before the exchange was created, business was conducted by traders in London coffee houses using a makeshift ring drawn in chalk on the floor.At first only copper was traded. Lead and zinc were soon added but only gained official trading status in 1920. The exchange was closed during World War II and did not re-open until 1954. The range of metals traded was extended to include aluminium (1978), nickel (1979), tin (1989), aluminium alloy (1992), steel (2008), and minor metals cobalt and molybdenum (2010). The exchange ceased trading plastics in 2011. The total value of the trade is around $US 11.6 trillion annually.

Landmark Near 20 Fenchurch Street

London Bridge
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

Vertigo 42
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Tower 42, 25 Old Broad Street
London, United Kingdom EC2N 1HQ

0207 877 7842

Darwin Brasserie - Sky Garden, the Walkie Talkie Building
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6

0333 772 0020

Royal Exchange, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
st. Threadneedle
London, United Kingdom EC3V 3

020 7623 3857

The Royal Exchange in London was founded in the 16th century by the merchant Thomas Gresham on the suggestion of his factor Richard Clough to act as a centre of commerce for the City of London. The site was provided by the City of London Corporation and the Worshipful Company of Mercers, who still jointly own the freehold. It is trapezoidal in shape and is flanked by Cornhill and Threadneedle Street, which converge at Bank junction in the heart of the City. The design was inspired by a bourse Gresham had seen in Antwerp, and was Britain's first specialist commercial building.It has twice been destroyed by fire and subsequently rebuilt. The present building was designed by William Tite in the 1840s. The site was notably occupied by the Lloyd's insurance market for nearly 150 years. Today the Royal Exchange contains offices, luxury shops and restaurants.Traditionally, the steps of the Royal Exchange is the place where Royal Proclamations (such as the dissolution of Parliament) are read out by either a herald or a crier.

Monument to the Great Fire of London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Monument Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8AH

0207 626 2717

The Monument to the Great Fire of London, more commonly known simply as the Monument, is a Doric column in the City of London, near the northern end of London Bridge, that commemorates the Great Fire of London.It stands at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill, 202 ft (62 m) tall and 202 ft (62 m) from the spot in Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started on 2 September 1666. Another monument, the Golden Boy of Pye Corner, marks the point near Smithfield where the fire was stopped. Constructed between 1671 and 1677, it was built on the site of St. Margaret's, Fish Street, the first church to be burnt down by the Great Fire.The Monument comprises a fluted Doric column built of Portland stone topped with a gilded urn of fire. It was designed by Christopher Wren and Robert Hooke. Its height marks its distance from the site of the shop of Thomas Farynor, the king's baker, where the Great Fire began.The top of the Monument is reached by a narrow winding staircase of 311 steps. A mesh cage was added in the mid-19th century at the top to prevent people jumping off, after six people had committed suicide from the structure between 1788 and 1842.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

Tower 42
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
25 Old Broad Street
London, United Kingdom EC2N 1

020 7877 7842

Tower 42 is the third-tallest skyscraper in the City of London and the eighth tallest in Greater London. Its original name was the NatWest Tower, having been built to house NatWest's international headquarters. It is still commonly referred to as the NatWest Tower. Seen from above, the shape of the tower resembles that of the NatWest logo (three chevrons in a hexagonal arrangement).The tower, designed by Richard Seifert and engineered by Pell Frischmann, is located at 25 Old Broad Street. It was built by John Mowlem & Co between 1971 and 1980, first occupied in 1980, and formally opened on 11 June 1981 by Queen Elizabeth II.The construction cost was £72 million. It is 183m high, which made it the tallest building in the United Kingdom until the topping out of One Canada Square at Canary Wharf in 1990. It held the status of tallest building in the City of London for 30 years, until it was surpassed by the Heron Tower in December 2009.The building today is multi-tenanted and comprises Grade A office space and restaurant facilities, with one restaurant situated on the 24th floor, and the other, a champagne and seafood bar, on the 42nd floor. In 2011 it was bought by the South African businessman Nathan Kirsh for £282.5 million.

Mansion House, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Mansion House
London, United Kingdom EC3V 3

020 7626 2500

Mansion House is the official residence of the Lord Mayor of London. It is used for some of the City of London's official functions, including an annual dinner, hosted by the Lord Mayor, at which the Chancellor of the Exchequer customarily gives a speech – his "Mansion House Speech" – about the state of the British economy. It is a Grade I listed building.HistoryMansion House was built between 1739 and 1752, in the then fashionable Palladian style by the surveyor and architect George Dance the Elder. The site, at the east end of Poultry, had previously been occupied by the "Stocks Market", which by the time of its closure was mostly used for the sale of herbs. The construction was prompted by a wish to put an end to the inconvenient practice of lodging the Lord Mayor in one of the City Halls. Dance won a competition over designs solicited from James Gibbs and Giacomo Leoni, and uninvited submissions by Batty Langley and Isaac Ware. Construction was slowed by the discovery of springs on the site, which meant piles had to be sunk to form the foundations.\

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

The London Stone
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5AD

020 7626 8246

London Stone
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

02076268246

London Stone is a historic landmark traditionally housed at 111 Cannon Street in the City of London. It is an irregular block of oolitic limestone measuring 53 × 43 × 30 cm (21 × 17 × 12"), the remnant of a once much larger object that had stood for many centuries on the south side of the street. Currently the stone is housed at the Museum of London pending reconstruction of the 111 Cannon Street building.The name "London Stone" was first recorded around the year 1100. The date and original purpose of the Stone are unknown, although it is possibly of Roman origin, and there has been interest and speculation about it since at least the 16th century. There are modern claims that it was formerly an object of veneration, or has some occult significance. These assertions however, are completely unsubstantiated.DescriptionThe present London Stone is only the upper portion of a once much larger object, as described below under History. The surviving portion is a block of oolitic limestone approximately 53 cm wide, 43 cm high, and 30 cm front to back (21 × 17 × 12 inches). A study in the 1960s indicated that the stone is Clipsham Limestone, a good-quality stone from Rutland transported to London for building purposes in both the Roman and medieval periods. More recently Kevin Hayward has suggested that it may be Bath stone, the stone most used for monuments and sculpture in early Roman London and in Saxon times.

122 Leadenhall Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 4

122 Leadenhall Street, or the Leadenhall Building, is a 225 m tall building on Leadenhall Street in London. The commercial skyscraper, opened in July 2014, was designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners and is informally known as "The Cheesegrater" because of its distinctive wedge shape. It is one of a number of new tall buildings recently completed or currently under construction in the City of London financial area, including 20 Fenchurch Street, 22 Bishopsgate, and The Scalpel.The building is opposite the Lloyd's building, also designed by Rogers, which is the home of the insurance market Lloyd's of London. Until 2007 the Leadenhall site was occupied by the P&O Tower, a building owned by the developer British Land and designed by Gollins Melvin Ward Partnership that was completed in 1968 as a brother to the still existing Commercial Union tower, now called St. Helen's. That building was demolished in preparation for redevelopment of the site. The project, initially delayed due to the financial crisis, was revived in 2010 and Oxford Properties co-developed the property in partnership with British Land.

122 Leadenhall Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 4

122 Leadenhall Street, or the Leadenhall Building, is a 225 m tall building on Leadenhall Street in London. The commercial skyscraper, opened in July 2014, was designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners and is informally known as "The Cheesegrater" because of its distinctive wedge shape. It is one of a number of new tall buildings recently completed or currently under construction in the City of London financial area, including 20 Fenchurch Street, 22 Bishopsgate, and The Scalpel.The building is opposite the Lloyd's building, also designed by Rogers, which is the home of the insurance market Lloyd's of London. Until 2007 the Leadenhall site was occupied by the P&O Tower, a building owned by the developer British Land and designed by Gollins Melvin Ward Partnership that was completed in 1968 as a brother to the still existing Commercial Union tower, now called St. Helen's. That building was demolished in preparation for redevelopment of the site. The project, initially delayed due to the financial crisis, was revived in 2010 and Oxford Properties co-developed the property in partnership with British Land.

Lloyd's building
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 7

0845 300 0033

The Lloyd's building is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. It is located on the former site of East India House in Lime Street, in London's main financial district, the City of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior.Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by Historic England to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch".HistoryThe first Lloyd's building had been built on this site in 1928. In 1958, due to expansion of the market, a new building was constructed across the road at 51 Lime Street . Lloyd's now occupied the Heysham Building and the Cooper Building.By the 1970s Lloyd's had again outgrown these two buildings and proposed to extend the Cooper Building. In 1978, the corporation ran an architectural competition which attracted designs from practices such as Foster Associates, Arup and I.M. Pei. Lloyd's commissioned Richard Rogers to redevelop the site, and the original 1928 building on the western corner of Lime and Leadenhall Streets was demolished to make way for the present one which was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 18 November 1986. The 1928 building's entrance at 12 Leadenhall Street was preserved and forms a rather incongruous attachment to the 1986 structure. Demolition of the 1958 building commenced in 2004 to make way for the 26-storey Willis Building.

Lloyd's building
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 7

0845 300 0033

The Lloyd's building is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. It is located on the former site of East India House in Lime Street, in London's main financial district, the City of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior.Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by Historic England to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch".HistoryThe first Lloyd's building had been built on this site in 1928. In 1958, due to expansion of the market, a new building was constructed across the road at 51 Lime Street . Lloyd's now occupied the Heysham Building and the Cooper Building.By the 1970s Lloyd's had again outgrown these two buildings and proposed to extend the Cooper Building. In 1978, the corporation ran an architectural competition which attracted designs from practices such as Foster Associates, Arup and I.M. Pei. Lloyd's commissioned Richard Rogers to redevelop the site, and the original 1928 building on the western corner of Lime and Leadenhall Streets was demolished to make way for the present one which was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 18 November 1986. The 1928 building's entrance at 12 Leadenhall Street was preserved and forms a rather incongruous attachment to the 1986 structure. Demolition of the 1958 building commenced in 2004 to make way for the 26-storey Willis Building.

The Leadenhall Building
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom

The Gerkin
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
30 St Marys Axe
London, United Kingdom EC3A 8EP

Fishmongers Hall
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9EL

0207 626 3531

Tower Hill Memorial
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2 St Mary at Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7283 9504

The Tower Hill Memorial is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission war memorial on the south side of Trinity Square Gardens, in London, England. The memorial commemorates those from the Merchant Navy and fishing fleets who died during both world wars and have "no grave but the sea". The memorial was designed by Edwin Lutyens with sculpture work by William Reid Dick, the Second World War extension was designed by Edward Maufe with sculpture work by Charles Wheeler.The First World War memorial takes the form of a vaulted corridor, long, wide and high. Inside are 12 bronze plaques engraved with 12,000 names. Those commemorated include Victoria Cross recipient, Archibald Bisset Smith.The Second World War memorial takes the form of a semi-circular sunken garden located behind the corridor, to its north. It contains the names of 24,000 British seamen and 50 Australian seamen, listed on the walls of the sunken garden. In the centre of the garden is a pool of bronze, engraved with a compass pointing north. Between the two memorials are two columns with statues representing an officer (western column) and a seaman (eastern).

Manufacturing Near 20 Fenchurch Street

Machines Room
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
45 Vyner Street
London, United Kingdom E2 9DQ

0208 981 5810

Opening Times: Monday-Friday: 10am - 6pm Machines Room is East London's Maker Space on Vyner Street, London. We are open the public and businesses to come and fabricate ideas. We have a full range of machines for processes such as laser & vinyl cutting, 3d printing to CNC. Based on the Fab Lab model, we are open for pay-per-hour bookings. We also accept fabrication jobs to be completed in-house. At our centre is a 2000 sq ft space that hosts showcases, meetups, conferences and product launches (available for hire). Come visit and see what you can make.

Arlington & Co Jewellers, Hatton Garden.
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
11 Hatton Garden
London, United Kingdom EC1N 8AH

0207 405 4402

Quality remains long after price is forgotten. Arlington & Co. have been making diamond rings and jewellery for nearly 50 years and greatly value their reputation as one of the country's leading jewellery manufacturers. They have their own team of designers, goldsmiths and setters in house, this gives them complete creative control over all the work they carry out for their clients worldwide. At Arlington & Co. we only select diamonds that meet our exacting standards. Each stone is scrupulously inspected and graded according to international criteria. Only by maintaining such standards can we ensure that the jewellery you purchase today will continue to reward you for a lifetime.

Costume Studio
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
159 - 161 Balls Pond Road, Montgomery House
London, United Kingdom N1 4

02072759614

South London Timber Co Ltd
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
709 Old Kent Road
London, United Kingdom SE11 1J

020 7252 8383

Established in 1986, and now with an annual turnover in excess of 10 million, we are direct importers of the highest quality timber and sheet materials from around the globe. As importers we take very seriously our environmental duties, and so we have now achieved full FSC Certification meaning that most of the materials we hold in stock are from sustainable sources or from companies with similar environmental policies, and as importers the benefits of cheaper prices are passed on to you the customer. We offer other expert services such as machined to specification hardwoods, joinery softwoods, expertly cut to size sheet materials, doors and frames and would be pleased to quote on any requirements you should have.

Food and Drink Federation (FDF)
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
6 Catherine Street
London, United Kingdom WC2B 5JJ

02078362460

Raj Mahal Sweets
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
309 Whitechapel Rd
London, United Kingdom E1 1

+44 (0) 20 7247 5044

A.S.Handover Ltd
Distance: 3.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Farleigh Place
London, United Kingdom N16 7SX

0207 241 5877

instagram.com/ashandover/ Established over 60 years ago, we take pride in hand making professional quality brushes at our workshops in London and in Welwyn Garden City. We also specialise in supplies for gilders, signwriters, pinstripers, specialist decorators, artists and a wide range of other craftsmen working in stained glass, graining, marbling, stencilling, theatrical make-up, picture restoration, scenic painting, coach painting and a host of other skills. To supplement our own production we also stock a comprehensive range of decorating tools and brushes, scumble glazes, signwriting enamels, varnishes, french polishes, universal strainers, pigments and artists’ oil colours, water colours and acrylics. We are one of the UK’s foremost suppliers of gold leaf and gilding supplies with extensive stocks of genuine gold leaf (in several shades and carats), white gold, moongold, palladium, silver and copper as well as imitation gold and imitation silver. Our wide range of products is used by the country’s finest craftsmen in museums, film studios, stately homes and the Houses of Parliament. Our loyal customers range from independent decorators through to the royal household at Buckingham Palace.

Guaranteed Asphalt Ltd
Distance: 2.6 mi Tourist Information
2 Mercury Way
London, United Kingdom SE14 5RR

020-7277-8773

Mad Ferret
Distance: 3.3 mi Tourist Information
Unit 3 Hardess Street
London, United Kingdom SE240hn

07711845496

We host incredible parties. If you've never been to one of our parties, prepare to be amazed. They are immersive, interactive and experimental experiences. Expect theatrics, arts, bespoke giant set builds, unique visuals and a whole lot more. The next one is on December 21st @ The Hoxton Docks. Make sure you check it out on our events section. See you there.

Breamfold Packaging
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
129 Richmond Road
London, United Kingdom E8 3NJ

020 7923 2425/020 7249 6735

Kennedy City Bicycles
Distance: 3.5 mi Tourist Information
14b The Tram Depot, 38-40 Upper Clapton
London, United Kingdom E5 8BQ

We build bicycles to ride around the city streets. Choose the colour of your frame, the shape of your handlebars and the colour of your leather saddle and wraps to make a bicycle that's personal to you.

Fashion Emporio
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Unit-5 Bow Exchange 5 Yeo Street
London, United Kingdom E3 3QP

Love Smoothies
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Chester House, 1-3 Brixton Rd
London, United Kingdom SW9 6DE

02073788332

Maury Sewing Machine Company
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Unit 3 Peterley Business Centre, 472 Hackney Road
London, United Kingdom E2 9EQ

07836215656

We are proud of our reputation as one of the UK's leading and longest established sewing machine companies, and have played an important role in the industry over time. Whether you need a domestic machine for your sewing project, or a large number of industrial machines, we can help. If you are unsure what you need please don't hesitate to contact us, we are always happy to help and suggest the best machine for the job. Call, email or drop in for a coffee and a chat. We are official agents for Brother, Juki, Global, Janome. We also supply Adler, Albook & Hashfield, Benina, Complett, Cornely, Durkopp, Eastman, Frister & Rossman, Japsew, Kansai Special, Lewis, Mauzer, Merrrow, Pegasus, Pfaff, Reece, Rotondi, Singer, Union Special, Wilcox & Gibbs, Yamato.

Drumbecue
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
Unit 77 Parkside Business Estate
London, United Kingdom SE8 5HZ

020 8469 8318 - New Enquiries Only

DrumBecue are the official manufacturers of the original oil drum charcoal barbecues. All DrumBecues are manufactuered in the UK from the highest qualty materials provided throughout the UK to provide the best They are all finished in a heat and weather resistent coating to provide your barbecue with a long lasting finish

Scales & Models ltd
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
Arch 12, Raymouth Road
London, United Kingdom SE16 4DB

0044 2081235925

We take great pride in our models and have a professional approach to their manufacture. We employ a rare blend of modern technologies embraced by traditional skills. And we offer a wide range of mediums to suit each and every client's needs. Our understanding of design processes means that we can also work to virtually any brief, using mere sketches through to final production CAD drawings. We produce accurate models in all scales, to any level of detail and finish. Adaptable to suit your budget. We make a commitment to provide our clients with: High quality finished models or sketch models. (Depending on requirements and budget) Competitive prices Personal service Confidentiality A fresh approach from a dynamic work force Strict adherence to your deadlines Free delivery and setup Free quotes! We are currently based at The Biscuit Factory in Bermondsey, London SE16. Though we are happy to work for clients outside London, depending on conditions and requirements even abroad!

K R S
Distance: 2.5 mi Tourist Information
437 Roman Rd
London, United Kingdom E3 5LX

020 8983 1977

Malek Joinery Ltd.
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
16 Belsham Street
London, United Kingdom E9 6NG

020 8985 2222 - 07932498000

Of The Earth Superfoods
Distance: 2.8 mi Tourist Information
110 − 112 Camley Street
London, United Kingdom N1C 4PF

Spanner Monkeyz
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
International House, 24 Holborn Viaduct
London, United Kingdom EC1A 2BN

+44 (0)203 5199 519

Passion. It’s in everything we do. Within every turn of a screw. Every hole drilled. Every knuckle bloodied. It’s what makes us Spanner Monkeyz. From the assembly line workers to the R&D engineers, we all share a common bond tougher than steel. Forged of sweat and raw determination. It’s a commitment to making the best ATVs, Side by Sides and Racing vehicles around. Spanner Monkeyz Passion. Three big words no one else can dare claim. It’s what separates us from all the rest. SPMZ Manufacturing, based in Europe and Asia, designs, engineers, manufactures and markets racing, all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) and Side by Sides under the Spanner Monkeyz brand name SPMZ, as well as related parts and upgrade accessories. The Company markets its products through a network of independent dealers located throughout the contiguous Europe, and through distributors representing dealers in Asia, Africa, in the Middle East and other international markets. The SPMZ brand name is among the most widely recognized and respected names in Racing, ATV and Side by Side industry.

Residence Near 20 Fenchurch Street

Brick Lane Market
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Brick Lane
London, United Kingdom E1 6SB

Ability Towers
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Macclesfield Road EC1
London, United Kingdom EC1V 8A

The Jam Factory
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
27 Green Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 4

Deloitte
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
66 Shoe Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4A 3

(0) 20 7936 3000

The Hatton
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
51-53 Hatton Garden
London, United Kingdom EC1N 8HN

020 7242 4123

Metro Central Heights
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
119 Newington Causeway
London, United Kingdom SE1

Citadines Barbican London
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
7-21 Goswell Road
London, United Kingdom EC1M 7AH

+44 207 566 8000

Don Gratton House
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
82 Old Montague St
London, United Kingdom E1 5NN

020 7655 6960

Lilian Knowles House
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
50 Crispin Street
London, United Kingdom E1 6

Metro Central Heights
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
119 Newington Causeway
London, United Kingdom SE1 6

Metro Central Heights is a group of residential buildings in the London Borough of Southwark. It was originally known as Alexander Fleming House, a multi-storey office complex designed by Hungarian-born modernist architect Ernő Goldfinger and constructed in the early 1960s for Arnold Lee of Imry Properties. The design was favoured both by the property developer Imry and by the London County Council as it promised the largest amount of lettable space and therefore the best financial return for the site. Some 55 m tall at its highest point, the original scheme consisted of three freestanding blocks, two of seven storeys and one of eighteen, grouped around a central piazza.It is located on Newington Causeway on the east side of the busy Elephant and Castle junction in inner south-east London.Ernő Goldfinger proposed three main components of modern architecture, 'the permanent structure; the much less permanent services and an even more fleeting component, the human requirements.' These applied directly to the development where its eventual use was not known at the time of construction. Therefore, the internal design of the building was made as flexible as possible, providing open decks which could be readily subdivided and services re-routed.The building's original tenant was the Department of Health and Social Security, known as the Ministry of Health at the time, which probably led to its being named Alexander Fleming House, after the discoverer of penicillin. The development became its headquarters, and shortly afterwards Ernő Goldfinger was commissioned to design two additional blocks, D and E.

Manna Ash House
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
8-16 Pocock St
London, United Kingdom SE1 0BW

020 7401 8191

NEO Bankside
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Holland Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9FU

020 7021 0681

NEO Bankside is an award winning development of luxury apartments in the heart of London, close to the River Thames

The Trampery
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
239 Old Street
London, United Kingdom EC1V 9EY

442072535358

The Trampery is a social enterprise specialising in strategy, design and management for innovation facilities. It was founded in 2009 by sociologist and entrepreneur Charles Armstrong with the opening of Tech City’s first startup workspace. The Trampery has developed seven buildings in London and launched a string of sector-focused incubators spanning software, fashion, digital arts, retail, and travel. In 2015 The Trampery was appointed by the Norwegian government to undertake its first urban planning project, creating the blueprint for a new innovation district in the city of Oslo. Partners include The Peabody Trust, London and Partners, Publicis Worldwide and the Barbican. The Trampery’s Patron is HRH the Duke of York.

Alexander Fleming Halls Of Residence
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
3 Hoxton Market
London, United Kingdom N1 6HG

020 7729 9680

Grange Road Bermondsey
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
50 Grange Road
London, United Kingdom

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Sidney Webb House
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
159 Great Dover Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 4WW

0207 403 1932

We are a predominantly international postgraduate residence on Great Dover Street in Borough, Central London. All our rooms are en-suite and each self-contained flat has a shared kitchen. There is also a Computer Suite (LSE only), a Laundrette and a Study Room on site as well as a large Common Room which includes vending machines, table tennis, table football, pool table and large screen TV & DVD player. SWH is only 20 minutes by bus to the LSE and is a 5 minute walk from the nearest tube station which is Borough (Northern Line). We are also just a 10 minute walk to the Thames river and the south bank with its many bars and restaurants, Tower Bridge, The Tower of London, Tate Modern Museum, Shakespeares Globe Theatre and Borough Food Market.

Quantum Court Accommodation
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
14 King David Lane, Shadwell, London, E1 0DY
London, United Kingdom E1 0

Clothworkers
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
dunster court mincing lane
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7AH

020 7623 7041

Floatworks London Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
1 Thrale St
London, United Kingdom SE1 9HW

020 7357 0111

Crisis @ Christmas Warehouse
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
46 Willow Walk, Unit 7, Southwark, London, SE1 5SF
London, United Kingdom SE1 5

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Workplace and Office Near 20 Fenchurch Street

Blue Fin Building
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
110 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 0SU

02072027011

Situated on London’s South Bank, Blue Fin Venue offers a flexible and highly accessible solution to all of your venue requirements. Our contemporary event space & roof terraces occupies the 10th & 11th floors of the award-winning Blue Fin Building. Stunning views of St Paul’s, Tate Modern and Docklands provide the backdrop for an assortment of tastefully designed meeting rooms whilst our large landscaped terraces offer unique and highly desired space for outdoor events. Whatever your specific requirement our friendly and professional on-site hospitality team can deliver; social events, corporate meetings, training events, product launches, formal or informal dining plus a huge array of after-work entertaining. A range of easy to navigate delegate packages is available however we are always happy to tailor our solution to your individual requirements.

PwC, 7 More London Riverside
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
7 More London, SE1 2RT
London, United Kingdom SE1 2RT

The Gerkin
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
30 St Marys Axe
London, United Kingdom EC3A 8EP

Rainmaking Loft
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
International House, 1 St Katharine's Way
London, United Kingdom E1W 1UN

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Rainmaking Loft is a coworking space for tech startups, located in the vibrant, historic St Katharine Docks marina, next to Tower Bridge and The Tower of London. A stone’s throw away from Shoreditch and the City, we are proud to be a major player in supporting this dynamic area as the new up and coming ‘Tech Hub’. Rainmaking Loft’s members are Heroes at work. Our mission is to give them the best possible environment in which to grow their company. Whether that is connecting them to an experienced fellow member, helping them to find a suitable investor or offering access to our extensive network of experts. The London Loft is part of a family that also consists of Lofts in Copenhagen and Berlin, which members are welcome to make use of. In addition to co-working spaces, Rainmaking founded Startupbootcamp, an international accelerator program and Rainmaking Innovation, a global innovation consultancy in addition to an extensive portfolio of successful startups. Our space overlooks the Docks, which brings tranquillity into a bustling environment, boosting creativity. Creation is at the heart of our community, Rainmaking Loft encourages collaborations between members through quick sit-downs in the Club, whiteboard meetings, community events (e.g. Wednesday Yoga and Friday Beers) and more purpose built meetups (e.g. The Loft Lunch and The Inspiration Hour). We pride ourselves on our diversity at the Loft, counting more than 35 different nationalities. We are a close-knit community where startups can exchange and evolve together. Rainmaking Loft is not only home to more than 200 bright entrepreneurs. Our amazing location on St Katharine Docks is a unique setting suitable for a range of events. From workshops and conferences to panel debates, to drinks receptions and hackathons. Everything we host is marked by the energy of the startups around us. Our 1,400 sqft event space offers views of iconic London landmarks. Our unique and flexible space includes furniture for all types of events, high quality projector and screen and first class sound system. It accommodates a maximum of 150 people, but the space can be divided into intimate sections.

Aldgate Tower
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Aldgate Tower, 2 Leman Street
London, United Kingdom E1 8F

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The Financial Times HQ
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
17 Southwark Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1

+44 (0)20 7873 3097

Southwark Crown Court
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
1 English Grounds
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7522 7200

Crown Court, Southwark, commonly known as the Southwark Crown Court, is one of three Crown Courts in the London SE1 postcode area, along with Inner London Crown Court and Blackfriars Crown Court. Opened in 1983, the brick building is located on the South Bank of the River Thames between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, next to Hay's Galleria. It contains 15 courtrooms, making it the fourth largest court centre in the country, and is a designated as a serious fraud centre.

Oracle
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
1 South Pl
London, United Kingdom EC2M 6

020 7816 7502

Central Working
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
6-8 Bonhill Street
London, United Kingdom EC2A 4BX

(0)203 095 6449

Central Working is transforming the way people work. With a curated membership of thousands of high-growth SMEs in clubs across the UK we provide the support, infrastructure and tools needed to create the environment, connections and momentum for growth. Central Working has been acknowledged as an innovative and rapidly growing business, cited as one of the UK’s Top 100 Start-ups 2012. In 2013 Central Working was selected by Lord Young as one of the Accelerate 250, the 250 high growth, high potential businesses in the UK and won Service Business of the Year at the Startup Awards. In 2015 Central Working was recognised for the innovative way it empowers staff to curate an inspiring and unique business culture, winning the HR in Hospitality Award for Employee Engagement of the year. Whether you are dropping in to work for the day or want a permanent home for your business, we offer the ideal environment for growth and strong networking opportunities. - As of February 2016 our network includes seven locations offering working and private spaces in Shoreditch, Bloomsbury, Whitechapel, City, Farringdon, Paddington and Deansgate Manchester. - Our clubs offer: Explorer membership - whether you're in town for the day or just a few hours; Local membership - a permanent home for your and your team; Native membership - a permanent office space for you and your team. - We have helped our members enjoy incredible successes, from the launch of Angry Birds in the UK, Hootsuite, Twilio, Naked Wines, to providing a home to Microsoft Ventures in the UK, as well as hundreds of other businesses from all sectors. Our membership spans a wide variety of industries, from tech and financial services to marketing to design sectors. - We helped create Google Campus, working alongside Google to design and operate one of Tech City’s first big success stories. www.centralworking.com @centralworking

BTC
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
BT Centre 81 Newgate St
London, United Kingdom EC1A 7AJ

+44 20 7356 5000

ICAP plc
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
2 Broadgate
London, United Kingdom EC2M 7UR

+44 20 7000 5000

Efficient financial markets are vital to global and national economies. As a leading markets operator ICAP provides a wide variety of electronic execution, risk mitigation, messaging, broking and information services for wholesale market participants. ICAP facilitates the flow of capital and investment through the financial system and supports government and corporate borrowing. Graduate recruitment: http://www.icapcampusrecruitment.com/ Current Opportunities: http://www.icap.com/careers/current-opportunities.aspx

Sundial Court
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
38-42 Chiswell St
London, United Kingdom EC1Y 4SB

020 7382 7163

Vidal Sassoon
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
5 Ave Maria Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4M 7

+44 (0) 20 7246 6850

Chartered Insurance Institute, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
20 Aldermanbury
London, United Kingdom EC2V 7HY

020 8989 8464

Finsbury Tower
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
103-105 Bunhill Row
London, United Kingdom EC1Y 8LZ

020 8746 9678

BT Baynard House
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
135 Queen Victoria St
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4A

5 Broadgate
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
5 Broadgate Road
London, United Kingdom

December 19
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
62-63 Maltings Place
London, United Kingdom SE1 3LJ

02073570444

The Rex Building
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
62 Queen Street
London, United Kingdom

MJ Quinn Integrated Services
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
26 Finsbury Square
London, United Kingdom EC2A 1DS

Landmark Near 20 Fenchurch Street

Lime Street, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Bootlegger, 25-26 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom

Lime Street is a minor road in the City of London between Fenchurch Street to the south and Leadenhall Street to the north. Its name comes from the lime burners who once sold lime from there for use in construction.It is perhaps best known as the current home of the world's largest insurance market, Lloyd's of London, since its newest building was opened on the street in 1986. Opposite Lloyd's, the Willis Building is the global headquarters of insurance broker Willis. A 35-storey building has been proposed at 52-54 Lime Street, and upon approval and completion by 2017 will become the European headquarters of global insurer W. R. Berkley.The northern portion of the street is pedestrianised. Vehicular through-access to Leadenhall Street is prevented by a firegate, forcing drivers to bear right onto Fenchurch Avenue, from which a left turn onto Billiter Street returns vehicles to Leadenhall Street.Nearby is the Norman Foster-designed and gherkin-shaped skyscraper 30 St Mary Axe, and the Leadenhall Building. Leadenhall Market is on Lime Street's western side, adjacent to Lloyd's.

St Margaret Pattens
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
18 Rood Lane
London, United Kingdom EC3M 1HS

20-76236630

St Margaret Pattens is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on Eastcheap near the Monument. The dedication is to St. Margaret of Antioch.HistoryThe church was first recorded in 1067, at which time the church was probably built from wood. It was rebuilt in stone at some unknown subsequent date but fell into disrepair and had to be demolished in 1530. It was rebuilt in 1538 but was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. The present church was built by Sir Christopher Wren in 1687. It is one of only a few City churches to have escaped significant damage in the Second World War.In 1954 St Margaret Pattens ceased to be a parish church and became one of the City’s guild churches, within the living of the Lord Chancellor and under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of London. They have a regular weekday, rather than Sunday congregation, drawn mostly from people who work in offices nearby.The church was designated a Grade I listed building on 4 January 1950.BuildingThe church's exterior is notable for its 200-ft high spire, Wren's third highest and the only one that he designed in a medieval style. This is sometimes referred to as Wren's only "true spire". Its interior is a simple rectangle with some unusual fittings – the only canopied pews in London, dating from the 17th century. These were intended for the churchwardens. The initials "CW" which appear in one of the pews have been thought to refer to Christopher Wren, but they may also signify "church warden." Other features in the interior include a punishment box carved with the Devil's head where wrongdoers had to sit during the church service.

Pudding Lane
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Pudding lane
London, United Kingdom

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Pudding Sokağı İngiltere'nin başkenti Londra'da bulunan dar bir geçittir. 1666 yılında çıkan Büyük Londra Yangını'nın başlangıç noktası olan Thomas Farryner'ın ekmek fırını bu sokakta yer almıştır. Londra Köprüsü'ne yakın bir alandadır. Tarihçi John Stow'un söylediklerine göre sokak adını, eski İngilizcede iç organ demek olan Pudding sözcüğünden almıştır. Bu da söylenceye göre Thames Nehri'ndeki çöp kayıklarına kasapların atmış olduğu sakatatı taşıyan at arabalarından düşen hayvan iç organlarıdır.

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

Lloyd's building
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 7

0845 300 0033

The Lloyd's building is the home of the insurance institution Lloyd's of London. It is located on the former site of East India House in Lime Street, in London's main financial district, the City of London. The building is a leading example of radical Bowellism architecture in which the services for the building, such as ducts and lifts, are located on the exterior to maximise space in the interior.Twenty-five years after completion in 1986, the building received Grade I listing in 2011; it was the youngest structure ever to obtain this status. It is said by Historic England to be "universally recognised as one of the key buildings of the modern epoch".HistoryThe first Lloyd's building had been built on this site in 1928. In 1958, due to expansion of the market, a new building was constructed across the road at 51 Lime Street . Lloyd's now occupied the Heysham Building and the Cooper Building.By the 1970s Lloyd's had again outgrown these two buildings and proposed to extend the Cooper Building. In 1978, the corporation ran an architectural competition which attracted designs from practices such as Foster Associates, Arup and I.M. Pei. Lloyd's commissioned Richard Rogers to redevelop the site, and the original 1928 building on the western corner of Lime and Leadenhall Streets was demolished to make way for the present one which was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 18 November 1986. The 1928 building's entrance at 12 Leadenhall Street was preserved and forms a rather incongruous attachment to the 1986 structure. Demolition of the 1958 building commenced in 2004 to make way for the 26-storey Willis Building.

St Clement's, Eastcheap
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Clement's Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4N 7AE

020 7623 5454

St Clement Eastcheap is a Church of England parish church in Candlewick Ward of the City of London. It is located on Clement's Lane, off King William Street and close to London Bridge and the River Thames.Clement was a disciple of St Peter the Apostle and was ordained as Bishop of Rome in the year 93 AD. By legend, Clement was martyred by being tied to an anchor and thrown into the Black Sea, which led to his adoption as a patron saint of sailors. The dedication to St Clement is unusual in London, with only one other ancient church there dedicated to this saint, namely St Clement Danes, Westminster. It is also located a little north of the Thames, but further west from Eastcheap and outside the old City boundary, just beyond the Temple Bar on the Strand.HistoryMedieval periodEastcheap was one of the main streets of medieval London. The name 'Eastcheap' derives from the Saxon word 'cheap', meaning a market, and Eastcheap was so called to distinguish it from Westcheap, later to become Cheapside. The southern end of Clement's Lane opened onto Eastcheap until the 1880s when the construction of King William Street separated Clement's Lane from Eastcheap, which still remains nearby as a street.

Lloyd's Coffee House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Gracechurch Street 55
London, United Kingdom EC3V 9

020 7621 0911

Lloyd's Coffee House was a coffee shop in London opened by Edward Lloyd (c. 1648–15 February 1713) originally on Tower Street in around 1688. The establishment was a popular place for sailors, merchants and shipowners, and Lloyd catered to them with reliable shipping news. The shipping industry community frequented the place to discuss insurance deals among themselves. The dealing that took place led to the establishment of the insurance market Lloyd's of London, Lloyd's Register and several related shipping and insurance businesses.Just after Christmas 1691, the coffee shop relocated to Lombard Street. Merchants continued to discuss insurance matters here until 1774 when the participating members of the insurance arrangement formed a committee and moved to the Royal Exchange on Cornhill as the Society of Lloyd's.Traces of the coffee houseThe 17th century original shop frontage of Lloyd's Coffee House is owned by Lloyd's of London and has been re-erected on display at the National Maritime Museum. A blue plaque in Lombard Street commemorates the coffee house's second location (now occupied at ground level by Sainsbury's supermarket). It was fictionalized in the 1936 film Lloyd's of London.

St Olave Hart Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
8 Hart St
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7

20-74884318

St Olave Hart Street is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on the corner of Hart Street and Seething Lane near Fenchurch Street railway station.John Betjeman described St Olave's as "a country church in the world of Seething Lane." The church is one of the smallest in the City and is one of only a handful of medieval City churches that escaped the Great Fire of London in 1666. In addition to being a local parish church, St Olave's is the Ward Church of the Tower Ward of the City of London.HistoryThe church is first recorded in the 13th century as St Olave-towards-the-Tower, a stone building replacing the earlier construction. It is dedicated to the patron saint of Norway, King Olaf II of Norway, who fought alongside the Anglo-Saxon King Ethelred the Unready against the Danes in the Battle of London Bridge in 1014. He was canonised after his death and the church of St Olave's was built apparently on the site of the battle. The Norwegian connection was reinforced during the Second World War when King Haakon VII of Norway worshipped there while in exile.Saint Olave's was rebuilt in the 13th century and then again in the 15th century. The present building dates from around 1450. According to John Stow's Survey of London, a major benefactor of the church in the late 15th century was wool merchant Richard Cely Sr., who held the advowson on the church . On his death, Cely bequeathed money for making the steeple and an altar in the church. The merchant mark of the Cely family was carved in two of the corbels in the nave . No memorial to the Celys now remains in the church.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

St Mary Abchurch
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Abchurch Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

20-76260306

St Mary Abchurch is a Church of England church off Cannon Street in the City of London. Dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, it is first mentioned in 1198–1199. The medieval church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666, and replaced by the present building.HistoryMedieval churchThe church dates back to the twelfth century and is dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The additional name "Abchurch" may be a variant of "Upchurch", referring to its position on comparatively high ground.The patronage of the church belonged to the convent of St Mary Overy, Southwark, until around 1455, when it passed to the master and chaplains of the college of Corpus Christi at the church of St Laurence Pountney. After the Reformation, Archbishop Parker persuaded Elizabeth I to grant the church to his college, Corpus Christi, Cambridge, which has appointed the incumbent ever since."Restored and beautified" in 1611 at the cost of the parishioners, St Mary's was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666.RebuildingThe church was rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren in 1681–1686. The parish was united with that of the nearby church of St Laurence Poutney, also destroyed in the Great Fire but not rebuilt.Wartime damage and repairA bomb hit the church in September 1940 during the London Blitz. The greatest damage was to the dome. Godfrey Allen repaired the church between 1948–1953.

Fishmongers Hall
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9EL

0207 626 3531

London Metal Exchange
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
56 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom

020 7264 5555

The London Metal Exchange is the futures exchange with the world's largest market in options and futures contracts on base and other metals. As the LME offers contracts with daily expiry dates of up to three months from trade date, weekly contracts to six months, and monthly contracts up to 123 months, it also allows for cash trading. It offers hedging, worldwide reference pricing, and the option of physical delivery to settle contracts. In July 2012, LME's shareholders voted to sell the exchange to Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing for £1.4 billion.It is located at 10 Finsbury Square in the London Borough of Islington, just to the north of the City of London.HistoryThe London Metal Market and Exchange Company was founded in 1877, but the market traces its origins back to 1571 and the opening of the Royal Exchange, London. Before the exchange was created, business was conducted by traders in London coffee houses using a makeshift ring drawn in chalk on the floor.At first only copper was traded. Lead and zinc were soon added but only gained official trading status in 1920. The exchange was closed during World War II and did not re-open until 1954. The range of metals traded was extended to include aluminium (1978), nickel (1979), tin (1989), aluminium alloy (1992), steel (2008), and minor metals cobalt and molybdenum (2010). The exchange ceased trading plastics in 2011. The total value of the trade is around $US 11.6 trillion annually.

London Stone
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

02076268246

London Stone is a historic landmark traditionally housed at 111 Cannon Street in the City of London. It is an irregular block of oolitic limestone measuring 53 × 43 × 30 cm (21 × 17 × 12"), the remnant of a once much larger object that had stood for many centuries on the south side of the street. Currently the stone is housed at the Museum of London pending reconstruction of the 111 Cannon Street building.The name "London Stone" was first recorded around the year 1100. The date and original purpose of the Stone are unknown, although it is possibly of Roman origin, and there has been interest and speculation about it since at least the 16th century. There are modern claims that it was formerly an object of veneration, or has some occult significance. These assertions however, are completely unsubstantiated.DescriptionThe present London Stone is only the upper portion of a once much larger object, as described below under History. The surviving portion is a block of oolitic limestone approximately 53 cm wide, 43 cm high, and 30 cm front to back (21 × 17 × 12 inches). A study in the 1960s indicated that the stone is Clipsham Limestone, a good-quality stone from Rutland transported to London for building purposes in both the Roman and medieval periods. More recently Kevin Hayward has suggested that it may be Bath stone, the stone most used for monuments and sculpture in early Roman London and in Saxon times.

The Gerkin
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
30 St Marys Axe
London, United Kingdom EC3A 8EP

Tower Hill Memorial
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2 St Mary at Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7283 9504

The Tower Hill Memorial is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission war memorial on the south side of Trinity Square Gardens, in London, England. The memorial commemorates those from the Merchant Navy and fishing fleets who died during both world wars and have "no grave but the sea". The memorial was designed by Edwin Lutyens with sculpture work by William Reid Dick, the Second World War extension was designed by Edward Maufe with sculpture work by Charles Wheeler.The First World War memorial takes the form of a vaulted corridor, long, wide and high. Inside are 12 bronze plaques engraved with 12,000 names. Those commemorated include Victoria Cross recipient, Archibald Bisset Smith.The Second World War memorial takes the form of a semi-circular sunken garden located behind the corridor, to its north. It contains the names of 24,000 British seamen and 50 Australian seamen, listed on the walls of the sunken garden. In the centre of the garden is a pool of bronze, engraved with a compass pointing north. Between the two memorials are two columns with statues representing an officer (western column) and a seaman (eastern).

Mansion House, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Mansion House
London, United Kingdom EC3V 3

020 7626 2500

Mansion House is the official residence of the Lord Mayor of London. It is used for some of the City of London's official functions, including an annual dinner, hosted by the Lord Mayor, at which the Chancellor of the Exchequer customarily gives a speech – his "Mansion House Speech" – about the state of the British economy. It is a Grade I listed building.HistoryMansion House was built between 1739 and 1752, in the then fashionable Palladian style by the surveyor and architect George Dance the Elder. The site, at the east end of Poultry, had previously been occupied by the "Stocks Market", which by the time of its closure was mostly used for the sale of herbs. The construction was prompted by a wish to put an end to the inconvenient practice of lodging the Lord Mayor in one of the City Halls. Dance won a competition over designs solicited from James Gibbs and Giacomo Leoni, and uninvited submissions by Batty Langley and Isaac Ware. Construction was slowed by the discovery of springs on the site, which meant piles had to be sunk to form the foundations.\

St Stephen's, Walbrook
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
39 Walbrook
London, United Kingdom EC4N 4

20-76269000

St Stephen Walbrook is a church in the City of London, part of the Church of England's Diocese of London. The present domed building was erected to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren following the destruction of its medieval predecessor in the Great Fire of London in 1666. It is located in Walbrook, next to the Mansion House, and near to Bank and Monument Underground stations.Early historyThe original church of St Stephen stood on the west side of the Walbrook, a stream running southwards across the City of London from the City Wall near Moorfields to the Thames.The church was moved to its present site, on the east side of the Walbrook (later concealed in a culvert), in the 15th century. In 1429 Robert Chichely, acting as executor of will of the former Lord Mayor, Sir William Stondon, bought a piece of land on the east side of the Walbrook, and presented it to the parish. Several foundation stones were laid at a ceremony on 11 May 1429, and the church was consecrated ten years later, on 30 April 1439. At 125ft long and 67ft wide, it was considerably larger than the present building.The church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. It contained a memorial to the composer John Dunstaple. The wording of the epitaph had been recorded in the early 17th century, and was reinstated in the church in 1904, some 450 years after his death. The nearby church of St Benet Sherehog, also destroyed in the Great Fire, was not rebuilt; instead its parish was united with that of St Stephen.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

Londinium
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8-18 London Bridge St
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

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Londinium was a settlement established on the current site of the City of London around 43. Its bridge over the River Thames turned the city into a road nexus and major port, serving as a major commercial centre in Roman Britain until its abandonment during the 5th century.Following its foundation in the mid-1st century, early Londinium occupied the relatively small area of 1.4sqkm, roughly equivalent to the size of present-day Hyde Park, with a fortified garrison on one of its hills. In the year 60 or 61, the rebellion of the Iceni under Boudica forced the garrison to abandon the settlement, which was then razed. Following the Iceni's defeat at the Battle of Watling Street, the city was rebuilt as a planned Roman town and recovered within about a decade. During the later decades of the 1st century, Londinium expanded rapidly, becoming Great Britain's largest city. By the turn of the century, Londinium had grown to about 60,000 people, almost certainly replacing Camulodunum (Colchester) as the provincial capital and by the 2nd century, Londinium was at its height. Its forum and basilica were one of the largest structures north of the Alps, when the Emperor Hadrian visited Londinium in 122. Excavations have discovered evidence of a major fire that destroyed most of the city shortly thereafter, but the city was again rebuilt. By the second half of the 2nd century, Londinium appears to have shrunk in both size and population.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.