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Regents Park, London, London | Tourist Information


royalparks.org.uk/parks/the-regents-park

Regent's Park
London, United Kingdom NW1

0207 0788 359

Landmark Near Regents Park, London

Madame Tussauds London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LR
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

0871 894 3000

Broadcasting House
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
BBC Broadcasting House Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AA

020 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

Baker Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
113 Baker St
Oxford, United Kingdom W1U 6TD

Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid the street out in the 18th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived at a fictional 221B Baker Street address. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises.Baker Street is a busy thoroughfare, lying in postcode areas NW1/W1 and forming part of the A41 there. It runs south from Regent's Park, the junction with Park Road, parallel to Gloucester Place, meeting Marylebone Road, Portman Square and Wigmore Street. At the junction with Wigmore Street, Baker Street turns into Orchard Street, which ends when it meets with Oxford Street. After Portman Square the road continues as Orchard Street.The street is served by the London Underground by Baker Street tube station, one of the world's oldest surviving underground stations. Next door is Transport for London's lost property office.

University College Hospital
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
235 Euston Rd
London, United Kingdom WC1E 6

08451555000

University College Hospital is a teaching hospital located in London, United Kingdom. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London .The hospital has 665 in-patient beds, 12 operating theatres and houses the largest single critical care unit in the NHS. The Accident & Emergency department sees approximately 80,000 patients a year. It is a major teaching hospital and a key location for the UCL Medical School. It is also a major centre for medical research and part of both the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre.The hospital is located on Euston Road in the Fitzrovia area of the London Borough of Camden, adjacent to the main campus of UCL. The nearest London Underground stations are Euston Square and Warren Street, with Goodge Street nearby.

BT Tower
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
60 Cleveland Mews
London, United Kingdom W1T 6

020 7432 5050

The BT Tower is a communications tower located in Fitzrovia, London, owned by BT Group. It has been previously known as the GPO Tower, the Post Office Tower and the Telecom Tower. The main structure is 177m high, with a further section of aerial rigging bringing the total height to 191m. It should not be confused with the BT Centre (the global headquarters of BT). Its Post Office code was YTOW.Upon completion it overtook the Millbank Tower to become the tallest building in both London and the United Kingdom, titles it held until 1980, when it in turn was overtaken by the NatWest Tower.History20th centuryThe tower was commissioned by the General Post Office (GPO). Its primary purpose was to support the microwave aerials then used to carry telecommunications traffic from London to the rest of the country, as part of Britain's microwave network.It replaced a much shorter steel lattice tower which had been built on the roof of the neighbouring Museum telephone exchange in the late 1940s to provide a television link between London and Birmingham. The taller structure was required to protect the radio links' "line of sight" against some of the tall buildings in London then in the planning stage. These links were routed via other GPO microwave stations at Harrow Weald, Bagshot, Kelvedon Hatch and Fairseat, and to places like the London Air Traffic Control Centre at West Drayton.

Harley Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Harley Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1G 9

2076-360838

Harley Street is a street in Marylebone, central London, which has been noted since the 19th century for its large number of private specialists in medicine and surgery.OverviewSince the 19th century, the number of doctors, hospitals, and medical organizations in and around Harley Street has greatly increased. Records show that there were around 20 doctors in 1860, 80 by 1900, and almost 200 by 1914. When the National Health Service was established in 1948, there were around 1,500. Today, there are more than 3,000 people employed in the Harley Street area, in clinics, medical and paramedical practices, and hospitals such as The Harley Street Clinic and The London Clinic.It has been speculated that doctors were originally attracted to the area by the development of commodious housing and central proximity to the important railway stations of Paddington, Kings Cross, St Pancras, Euston and, later, Marylebone. The nearest Tube stations are Regent's Park and Oxford Circus.Land ownershipHarley Street is part of the Howard de Walden Estate.

221B Baker Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
221B Baker Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 6X

+44(0) 20 7224 3688

221B Baker Street is the London address of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, created by author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In the United Kingdom, postal addresses with a number followed by a letter may indicate a separate address within a larger, often residential building. Baker Street in Holmes' time was a high-class residential district, and Holmes' apartment was probably part of a Georgian terrace.At the time the Holmes stories were published, addresses in Baker Street did not go as high as 221. Baker Street was later extended, and in 1932 the Abbey National Building Society moved into premises at 219–229 Baker Street. For many years, Abbey National employed a full-time secretary to answer mail addressed to Sherlock Holmes. In 1990, a blue plaque signifying 221B Baker Street was installed at the Sherlock Holmes Museum, situated elsewhere on the same block, and there followed a 15-year dispute between Abbey National and the Holmes Museum for the right to receive mail addressed to 221B Baker Street. Since the closure of Abbey House in 2005, ownership of the address by the Holmes Museum has not been challenged, despite its location between 237 and 241 Baker Street.Conan Doyle's intentionsWe met next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B, Baker Street, of which he had spoken at our meeting. They consisted of a couple of comfortable bed-rooms and a single large airy sitting-room, cheerfully furnished, and illuminated by two broad windows.(Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet, 1887)

BBC Radio Theatre
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Broadcasting House, Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AA

+44 (0) 20 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

Langham Hotel, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
1c Portland Place, Regent Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 1JA

The Langham, London is one of the largest and best known traditional style grand hotels in London. It is in the district of Marylebone on Langham Place and faces up Portland Place towards Regent's Park. It is a member of the Leading Hotels of the World marketing consortium.HistoryThe Langham was designed by John Giles and built between 1863 and 1865 at a cost of £300,000. It was then the largest and most modern hotel in the city, featuring a hundred water closets, thirty-six bathrooms and the first hydraulic lifts in England. The opening ceremony on 16 June was performed by the Prince of Wales. After the original company was liquidated during an economic slump, new management acquired the hotel for little more than half of its construction cost, and it soon became a commercial success. In 1867, a former Union officer named James Sanderson was appointed general manager and the hotel developed an extensive American clientele, which included Mark Twain and the miserly multi-millionairess, Hetty Green. It was also patronised by the likes of Napoleon III, Oscar Wilde, Antonín Dvořák, and Arturo Toscanini. Electric light was installed in the entrance and courtyard at the exceptionally early date of 1879, and Arthur Conan Doyle set Sherlock Holmes stories such as A Scandal in Bohemia and The Sign of Four partly at the Langham.

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Westmoreland Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 8

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street, named The Heart Hospital until refurbished and renamed in 2015, was a specialist cardiac hospital located in London, United Kingdom until 2015. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London (UCL). After the 2015 refurbishment the hospital provided thoracic surgery, and the UCLH urology department moved there.Before the 2015 refurbishment the Heart Hospital conducted over 1,000 surgical heart operations each year, had 95 in-patient beds, and was one of the largest cardiac centres in the UK. It treated around 1,700 new outpatients, 5,500 follow-up outpatients and 1,200 inpatients each year. It was a centre for cardiac research, home to the UCL Centre for Cardiology in the Young, and part of the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre. It is a teaching hospital for the UCL Medical School.

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Westmoreland Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 8

University College Hospital at Westmoreland Street, named The Heart Hospital until refurbished and renamed in 2015, was a specialist cardiac hospital located in London, United Kingdom until 2015. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London (UCL). After the 2015 refurbishment the hospital provided thoracic surgery, and the UCLH urology department moved there.Before the 2015 refurbishment the Heart Hospital conducted over 1,000 surgical heart operations each year, had 95 in-patient beds, and was one of the largest cardiac centres in the UK. It treated around 1,700 new outpatients, 5,500 follow-up outpatients and 1,200 inpatients each year. It was a centre for cardiac research, home to the UCL Centre for Cardiology in the Young, and part of the UCLH/UCL Biomedical Research Centre and the UCL Partners academic health science centre. It is a teaching hospital for the UCL Medical School.

Daunt Books
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
83 Marylebone High St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6

020 7224 2295

Daunt Books is a chain of bookshops in London, founded by James Daunt. It traditionally specialised in travel books. In 2010 it began publishing.BookshopsThe Marylebone High Street branch is housed in a former Edwardian bookshop with long oak galleries, graceful skylights and William Morris prints. The older section of the Marylebone shop was completed in 1912, and was originally an antiquarian bookshop called Francis Edwards. It is alleged to be the first custom-built bookshop in the world. A large, walk-in safe is visible near the entrance to the travel gallery, and is where expensive volumes were once stored. The shop was bought by former banker James Daunt and renamed Daunt Books in 1990. It now focuses on first-hand titles (especially travel-related material).The company has branches in Chelsea, Holland Park, Cheapside, Hampstead and Belsize Park. The Owl Bookshop in Kentish Town was bought by Daunt Books, but retained its original name. Daunt Books opened its first branch outside London in Saffron Walden, Essex, under the name Hart’s Books. It opened its second branch outside London in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, under the name The Marlow Bookshop.Specialising in travel, Daunt Books arranges its sections geographically, with guides, phrase books, travel writing, history and fiction grouped by their relevant country. Reviews have mentioned its customer service and knowledgeable staff.

Euston Tower
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
286 Euston Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 3AD

+44 (0) 844 4121796

Euston Road is a road in Central London, England, running from Marylebone Road to King's Cross. It forms part of the London Inner Ring Road and is part of the London congestion charge zone boundary.The road was originally the central section of the New Road from Paddington to Islington, opening in 1756 as London's first bypass in the area. It was originally designed to drive cattle to Smithfield Market, avoiding central London. Traffic increased as a result of the opening of several major railway stations in the mid-19th century, including Euston Station, which led to the road being renamed Euston Road in 1857. The route was extensively widened in the 1960s in order to cater for the increasing demands of motor traffic, which led to the construction of the Euston Tower, yet still contains several significant buildings including the Wellcome Library, the British Library and the St. Pancras Renaissance London Hotel.GeographyThe road starts as a continuation of the A501, a major road through Central London, at its junction with Marylebone Road and Great Portland Street. It meets the northern end of Tottenham Court Road at a large junction where there is an underpass, and ends at King's Cross with Gray's Inn Road. The road ahead to Islington is Pentonville Road.

Euston Tower
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
286 Euston Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 3AD

+44 (0) 844 4121796

Euston Road is a road in Central London, England, running from Marylebone Road to King's Cross. It forms part of the London Inner Ring Road and is part of the London congestion charge zone boundary.The road was originally the central section of the New Road from Paddington to Islington, opening in 1756 as London's first bypass in the area. It was originally designed to drive cattle to Smithfield Market, avoiding central London. Traffic increased as a result of the opening of several major railway stations in the mid-19th century, including Euston Station, which led to the road being renamed Euston Road in 1857. The route was extensively widened in the 1960s in order to cater for the increasing demands of motor traffic, which led to the construction of the Euston Tower, yet still contains several significant buildings including the Wellcome Library, the British Library and the St. Pancras Renaissance London Hotel.GeographyThe road starts as a continuation of the A501, a major road through Central London, at its junction with Marylebone Road and Great Portland Street. It meets the northern end of Tottenham Court Road at a large junction where there is an underpass, and ends at King's Cross with Gray's Inn Road. The road ahead to Islington is Pentonville Road.

Portland Hospital
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
205-209 Great Portland Street
London, United Kingdom W1W 5

20-73833486

The Portland Hospital for Women and Children, is a private hospital located on Great Portland Street, in the West End area of London, England. It belongs to the Hospital Corporation of America, the largest private operator of health care facilities in the world.The hospital has been the place of birth for several well-known people in Britain, such as Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie, Prince Oddysseus-Kimon of Greece and Denmark, as well as children of Jennifer Saunders, Victoria Beckham, Emma Bunton, Geri Halliwell, Melanie Brown, Melanie C, Noel Gallagher, Katie Price, Gillian Anderson, Louise Burfitt-Dons, Claudia Schiffer, Emma Willis and Boris Becker. It should also be noted that it is London's only private hospital dedicated entirely to the care of women and children, and their various health conditions.

Regent's Place
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
10 Brock Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 3

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Regent's Place is a mixed use business and retail and residential quarter on the north side of Euston Road in the London Borough of Camden. The site is also bounded by Osnaburgh Street to the west, Longford and Drummond Streets to the north, and Hampstead Road to the east.Regent's Place was developed by British Land from an earlier speculative property development 'Euston Centre' that included Euston Tower one of the first high-rise office developments in the West End. The tower is at the south western corner of the Regent's Place estate. The 'Euston Centre' scheme was developed between 1962 and 1972 designed by Sidney Kaye. Originally the scheme was for a series of medium rise blocks but to create space for underpass and road junction the LCC gave approval for the high-rise Euston Tower.Work by British Land commenced in 1996. The first stage involved the demolition of the head office and studios of the former ITV company Thames Television and the subsequent development of the central part of the site and much of the Euston Road frontage, with four new office buildings and a pedestrian plaza called Triton Square. One of these buildings called 2-3 Triton Square was a new headquarters for what was then the UK's fifth largest bank by gross assets, Abbey National. The lower levels of Euston Tower were modernised at the same time. The development includes a shopping mall and an open space Triton Square that includes art features by Langlands and Bell. The developers also commissioned a large mural by Michael Craig-Martin a lighting scheme by Liam Gillick and a smaller sculptural installation by Antony Gormley.

Regent's Place
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
10 Brock Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 3

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Regent's Place is a mixed use business and retail and residential quarter on the north side of Euston Road in the London Borough of Camden. The site is also bounded by Osnaburgh Street to the west, Longford and Drummond Streets to the north, and Hampstead Road to the east.Regent's Place was developed by British Land from an earlier speculative property development 'Euston Centre' that included Euston Tower one of the first high-rise office developments in the West End. The tower is at the south western corner of the Regent's Place estate. The 'Euston Centre' scheme was developed between 1962 and 1972 designed by Sidney Kaye. Originally the scheme was for a series of medium rise blocks but to create space for underpass and road junction the LCC gave approval for the high-rise Euston Tower.Work by British Land commenced in 1996. The first stage involved the demolition of the head office and studios of the former ITV company Thames Television and the subsequent development of the central part of the site and much of the Euston Road frontage, with four new office buildings and a pedestrian plaza called Triton Square. One of these buildings called 2-3 Triton Square was a new headquarters for what was then the UK's fifth largest bank by gross assets, Abbey National. The lower levels of Euston Tower were modernised at the same time. The development includes a shopping mall and an open space Triton Square that includes art features by Langlands and Bell. The developers also commissioned a large mural by Michael Craig-Martin a lighting scheme by Liam Gillick and a smaller sculptural installation by Antony Gormley.

All Souls Church, Langham Place
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
2 All Souls Place
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1B 3DA

020 7580 3522

All Souls Church is an Anglican Evangelical church in central London, situated in Langham Place in Marylebone, at the north end of Regent Street. It was designed in regency style by John Nash and consecrated in 1824.As it is very near BBC Broadcasting House, the BBC often broadcasts from the church. As well as the core church membership, many hundreds of visitors come to All Souls, bringing the average number of those coming through the doors for services on Sundays to around 2,500 every week. All Souls has an international congregation, with all ages represented.HistoryThe church was designed by John Nash, favourite architect of King George IV. Its prominent circular spired vestibule was designed to provide an eye-catching monument at the point where Regent Street, newly-laid out as part of Nash's scheme to link Piccadilly with the new Regent's Park, takes an awkward abrupt bend westward to align with the pre-existing Portland Place.All Souls was a Commissioners' church, a grant of £12,819 being given by the Church Building Commission towards the cost of its construction. The commission had been set up under an act of 1818, and Nash, as one of the three architects employed by the Board of Works, had been asked to supply specimen designs as soon as the act was passed. It was, however, one of only two Commissioners' churches to be built to his designs, the other being the Gothic Revival St Mary, Haggerston. All Souls is the last surviving church by John Nash.

St Marylebone Parish Church
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5LT

St Marylebone Parish Church is an Anglican church on the Marylebone Road in London. It was built to the designs of Thomas Hardwick in 1813–17. The present site is the third used by the parish for its church. The first was further south, near Oxford Street. The church there was demolished in 1400 and a new one erected further north. This was completely rebuilt in 1740–42, and converted into a chapel-of-ease when Hardwick's church was constructed. The Marylebone area takes its name from the church. Located behind the church is St Marylebone School, a Church of England school for girls.Previous churchesFirst churchThe first church for the parish was built in the vicinity of the present Marble Arch c.1200, and dedicated to St John the Evangelist.Second churchIn 1400 the Bishop of London gave the parishioners permission to demolish the church of St John and build a new one in a more convenient position, near a recently completed chapel, which could be used until the new church was completed. The bishop stipulated that the old churchyard should be preserved, but also gave permission to enclose a new burial ground at the new site, The church was dedicated to the Virgin Mary. It was closer to the village, at the north end of Marylebone High Street. Having fallen into a state of decay, it was demolished in 1740.

King Edward VII's Hospital
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
5-10 Beaumont St
London, United Kingdom W1G 6AA

020 7486 4411

King Edward VII's Hospital is a charity-registered private hospital in the City of Westminster in London, known as King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers from 1904 to 2000.HistoryEarly historyThe hospital was established in 1899 at the suggestion of the Prince of Wales . Agnes Keyser, a mistress of the Prince, and her sister Fanny used their house at 17 Grosvenor Crescent to help sick and wounded British Army officers who had returned from the Boer War. King Edward VII became the hospital's first patron. In 1904 it officially became King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers.20th centuryDuring the First World War, the hospital was at 9 Grosvenor Gardens, where officers would be nursed; the young novelist Stuart Cloete was one of them, as was the future British Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan, who underwent a series of long operations followed by recuperation there from 1916–18, from serious wounds sustained in conflict during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. In 1930, the hospital was awarded a Royal Charter "to operate an acute Hospital where serving and retired officers of the Services and their spouses can be treated at preferential rates."In 1941 the interior of the building was badly damaged by bombing, and Sister Agnes died from natural causes. In 1948 the hospital moved to Beaumont Street. It was officially opened on 15 October by Queen Mary.

Park Near Regents Park, London

Regent's Park Open Air Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Inner Circle, Regent's Park
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

Box Office 0844 826 4242

The award-winning Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre is a London landmark – a firm fixture of summer in the city, providing a cultural hub in the beautiful surroundings of a Royal Park.

Primrose Hill Park
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Primrose Hill Road
London, United Kingdom

Regents Park Rose Garden
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Inner Circle
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

Berkeley Square
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Berkeley Square, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

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Berkeley Square is a town square in Mayfair in the West End of London, in the City of Westminster. It was originally laid out in the mid 18th century by architect William Kent.The gardens in the centre are open to the public, and their very large London Plane trees are among the oldest in central London, planted in 1789.DescriptionWhilst Berkeley Square was originally a mostly residential area, there now remains only one residential block on the square – number 48. The square is mostly offices, including a number of hedge funds and wealth management businesses.The square features a sculptural fountain by Alexander Munro, a Pre-Raphaelite sculptor, made in 1865.The buildings around the square include several by other notable architects including Robert Adam, who designed Lansdowne House (since 1935 home of the Lansdowne Club) in the southwest corner of the square on Fitzmaurice Place. The daring staircase-hall of No. 44 is sometimes considered William Kent's masterpiece. Gunter's Tea Shop, founded under a different name in 1757, is also located here.

Regent's University London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Inner Circle Regent's Park
London, United Kingdom NW1 4NS

+44 (0)20 7487 7505

Regent’s University London is London’s only independent, not-for-profit university, with a highly cosmopolitan community based in royal Regent’s Park and Marylebone. The University is a hive for innovative thinkers – students who want to learn in a supportive, personal environment and who will enter the world of work as entrepreneurs and leaders who think and operate globally. Our main campus in Regent’s Park, set in 11 acres of private garden, is a quiet, secluded haven in which to live and study. A short walk away, our Marylebone campus sits in a neighbourhood known for its upmarket designer boutiques, cafés and design shops. The campuses are within easy reach of all that this exciting European city has to offer. We are close to the centre of London and the city’s famous theatres, galleries and museums, as well as major sporting and entertainment venues. Regent’s is small and intimate enough to feel like a home away from home to our students – with just under 5,000 students on campus, our staff and students get to know each other by name, and students benefit from plenty of one-to-one contact with their tutors. This is a meeting place for people from all over the world. We are proud to have students of more than 140 nationalities on campus. With more than 15,000 alumni in 155 countries, Regent’s graduates remain members of our community, wherever they may be in the world.

Meliá White House Hotel
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Albany Street, Regents Park
London, United Kingdom NW1 3UP

+44 20 7391 3000

Cavendish Square Gardens
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Cavendish Square, London
London, United Kingdom W1G 0

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The Hub - Regent's Park
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Outer Circle
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

0300 061 2324

Cartwright Gardens
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
49-50 Cartwright Gardens
London, United Kingdom WC1H 9EH

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Speakers' Corner
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Marble Arch, Hyde Park
London, United Kingdom W1K 1QB

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A Speakers' Corner is an area where open-air public speaking, debate and discussion are allowed. The original and most noted is in the northeast corner of Hyde Park in London, UK. Speakers here may talk on any subject, as long as the police consider their speeches lawful, although this right is not restricted to Speakers' Corner only. Contrary to popular belief, there is no immunity from the law, nor are any subjects proscribed, but in practice the police tend to be tolerant and therefore intervene only when they receive a complaint. On some occasions in the past, they have intervened on grounds of profanity. Historically there were a number of other areas designated as Speakers' Corners in other parks in London (e.g., Lincoln's Inn Fields Finsbury Park, Clapham Common, Kennington Park, and Victoria Park). More recently they have been set up in other British cities, and there are also Speakers' Corners in other countries.Hyde ParkThough Hyde Park Speakers' Corner is considered the paved area closest to Marble Arch, legally the public speaking area extends beyond the Reform Tree and covers a large area from Marble Arch to Victoria Gate, then along the Serpentine to Hyde Park Corner and the Broad Walk running from Hyde Park Corner to Marble Arch.Public riots broke out in the park in 1855, in protest over the Sunday Trading Bill, which forbade buying and selling on a Sunday, the only day working people had off. The riots were described by Karl Marx as the beginning of the English revolution.

Berkeley Square
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Berkeley Square
London, United Kingdom W1J 6EA

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Regents Park Mosque
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
146 Park Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

020 7724 3363

Regent's Place
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
10 Brock Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 3

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Regent's Place is a mixed use business and retail and residential quarter on the north side of Euston Road in the London Borough of Camden. The site is also bounded by Osnaburgh Street to the west, Longford and Drummond Streets to the north, and Hampstead Road to the east.Regent's Place was developed by British Land from an earlier speculative property development 'Euston Centre' that included Euston Tower one of the first high-rise office developments in the West End. The tower is at the south western corner of the Regent's Place estate. The 'Euston Centre' scheme was developed between 1962 and 1972 designed by Sidney Kaye. Originally the scheme was for a series of medium rise blocks but to create space for underpass and road junction the LCC gave approval for the high-rise Euston Tower.Work by British Land commenced in 1996. The first stage involved the demolition of the head office and studios of the former ITV company Thames Television and the subsequent development of the central part of the site and much of the Euston Road frontage, with four new office buildings and a pedestrian plaza called Triton Square. One of these buildings called 2-3 Triton Square was a new headquarters for what was then the UK's fifth largest bank by gross assets, Abbey National. The lower levels of Euston Tower were modernised at the same time. The development includes a shopping mall and an open space Triton Square that includes art features by Langlands and Bell. The developers also commissioned a large mural by Michael Craig-Martin a lighting scheme by Liam Gillick and a smaller sculptural installation by Antony Gormley.

Primrose Hill, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Primrose Hill Road
London, United Kingdom

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Hayd Park
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Bayswater Road
London, United Kingdom W2 2

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Hyde Park Mansions
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Old Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5DZ

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Argyle Square
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Argyle Street
London, United Kingdom WC1H 8

012345678

A pleasant green garden square for residents, workers and tourists alike to relax, picknic, walk or play basketball in the courts, watched over by an experienced on-site park warden and gardener. Only a few minutes walk away from the King's Cross St. Pancras international train station complex. Sound Trail http://www.camden.gov.uk/ccm/content/leisure/local-history/kings-cross-voices.en?page=13 [email protected] Friends of Argyle Square (Camden record 2011) [email protected] Activities: Aims to ensure the square is maintained appropriately, to promote its heritage and bio-diversity, involve local communities and businesses, conserve plant and wildlife and promote the enjoyment of the Gardens by all. Borough: Camden Ward: Kings Cross Ward

Russell Square Gardens Cafe In The Gardens
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Russell Square
London, United Kingdom

020 7637 5093

The Albert Primrose Hill
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
11 Princess Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 8JR

Camley Street Natural Park
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
12 Camley Street
London, United Kingdom N1C 4PW

020 7833 2311

Subway and Light Rail Station Near Regents Park, London

Piccadilly Circus
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Picadilly Circus
London, United Kingdom W1V 9LB

Piccadilly Circus è una celebre piazza di Londra, nonché luogo di ritrovo, cuore morale della città, situata nella City of Westminster.Costruita nel 1819 per collegare Regent Street con l'omonima Piccadilly (importante strada dello shopping) è diventata col passare degli anni uno dei principali punti di snodo del traffico cittadino. La sua felice posizione, nel cuore del West End londinese, e la vicinanza con importanti luoghi di interesse come i teatri di Shaftesbury Avenue o strade come Coventry Street e The Haymarket ricchissime di negozi e locali alla moda, hanno reso Piccadilly Circus un affollato punto di ritrovo, nonché una vera e propria attrattiva turistica tanto da diventare uno dei simboli stessi di Londra.Famosa per i display luminosi e le insegne a LED posizionate su di un edificio posto al lato settentrionale della stessa e per la celebre Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain che rappresenta «l'Angelo della Carità Cristiana» (ma realizzata da Alfred Gilbert come "Anteros" anche se è nota ai più col nome di "Eros"), la piazza è circondata da imponenti edifici quali il London Pavilion (sede di numerosi negozi e del Trocadero) ed il Criterion Theatre. Inoltre direttamente sotto il perimetro della piazza c'è l'omonima stazione della metropolitana di Londra.le banane sono blu e bo poi il kebab fa schifo

Oxford Circus
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 3A

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Oxford Circus is the busiest intersection of Oxford Street (A40) and Regent Street in the West End of London. It is served by many bus routes and by Oxford Circus tube station, which is directly beneath the junction itself.At the end of the 2000s, Oxford Circus had the highest pedestrian volumes recorded anywhere in London. At the busiest times, over 40,000 pedestrians per hour pass through the junction including those accessing the London Underground station.HistoryThe Circus was constructed at the beginning of the 19th century, and was designed by John Nash.2009 diagonal crossingIn 2009, Westminster City Council started a £4m pedestrianisation scheme for the area, allowing shoppers to cross the intersection diagonally as well as the traditional 'straight ahead', turning it into a "pedestrian scramble", much like Tokyo's Shibuya crossing. Work started in Summer 2009, and the crossing opened on 2 November of the same year, by which time the cost had risen to £5 million. Although London Mayor Boris Johnson declared it "a triumph for British engineering, Japanese innovation and good old common sense", it was noted that a fairly similar crossing in Balham, South London had previously opened in 2005 at a cost of £98,000, approximately 50 times cheaper. One was also created in Wood Green.

Kensington High Street
Distance: 2.6 mi Tourist Information
135 High St
London, United Kingdom W8 5

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Kensington High Street is the main shopping street in Kensington, London. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London.Kensington High Street is the continuation of Kensington Road and part of the A315. It starts by the entrance to Kensington Palace and runs westward through central Kensington. Near Kensington (Olympia) station, where the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea ends and London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham begins, it ends and becomes Hammersmith Road. The street is served by High Street Kensington underground station.HistoryKensington High Street is one of western London's most popular shopping streets, with upmarket shops serving a wealthy area. From the late 19th century until the mid-1970s the street had three classic department stores: Barkers of Kensington, Derry & Toms and Pontings. Barkers bought Pontings in 1906 and Derry & Toms in 1920, but continued to run all three as separate entities. In a big building project which started in 1930 and was not complete until 1958 (the Second World War halted the project), the company made Derry & Toms and Barkers into Art Deco palaces. On top of Derry & Toms, Europe's largest roof garden area (1.5acre) was created, consisting of three different gardens with 500 species of plants, fountains, a stream, duck, flamingos and a restaurant - said to serve the best high tea in Kensington.

Baker Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
113 Baker St
Oxford, United Kingdom W1U 6TD

Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid the street out in the 18th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived at a fictional 221B Baker Street address. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises.Baker Street is a busy thoroughfare, lying in postcode areas NW1/W1 and forming part of the A41 there. It runs south from Regent's Park, the junction with Park Road, parallel to Gloucester Place, meeting Marylebone Road, Portman Square and Wigmore Street. At the junction with Wigmore Street, Baker Street turns into Orchard Street, which ends when it meets with Oxford Street. After Portman Square the road continues as Orchard Street.The street is served by the London Underground by Baker Street tube station, one of the world's oldest surviving underground stations. Next door is Transport for London's lost property office.

London Metropolitan University
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
166-220 Holloway Rd
London, United Kingdom N7 8DB

020 7423 0000

Marylebone Rail & Tube Station
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Railway Station, Great Central House, Melcombe Place
London, United Kingdom NW1 6JJ

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Piccadilly
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 8

Piccadilly is a road in the City of Westminster, London to the south of Mayfair, between Hyde Park Corner in the west and Piccadilly Circus in the east. It is part of the A4 road that connects central London to Hammersmith, Earl's Court, Heathrow Airport and the M4 motorway westward. St James's is to the south of the eastern section, while the western section is built up only on the northern side. At just under in length, Piccadilly is one of the widest and straightest streets in central London.Piccadilly has been a main road since at least medieval times, and in the middle ages was known as "the road to Reading" or "the way from Colnbrook". Around 1611 or 1612, a Robert Baker acquired land in the area and prospered by making and selling piccadills. Shortly after purchasing the land, he enclosed it and erected several dwellings, including his home, Pikadilly Hall. What is now Piccadilly was named Portugal Street in 1663 after Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, and grew in importance after the road from Charing Cross to Hyde Park Corner was closed to allow the creation of Green Park in 1668. Some of the most notable stately homes in London were built on the northern side of the street during this period, including Clarendon House and Burlington House in 1664. Berkeley House, constructed around the same time as Clarendon House, was destroyed by a fire in 1733 and rebuilt as Devonshire House in 1737 by William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire. It was later used as the main headquarters for the Whig party. Burlington House has since been home to several noted societies, including the Royal Academy of Arts, the Geological Society of London and the Royal Astronomical Society. Several members of the Rothschild family had mansions at the western end of the street. St James's Church was consecrated in 1684 and the surrounding area became St James Parish.

Embankment
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom WC2N 6NS

Blackfriars, London
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
179 Queen Victoria Street
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4DY

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Blackfriars is an area of central London, which lies in the south-west corner of the City of London.The name Blackfriars was first used in 1317 (as Black Freres from the French 'frère' meaning 'brother') and derives from the black cappa worn by the Dominican Friars who moved their priory from Holborn to the area between the River Thames and Ludgate Hill in 1276. Edward I gave permission to rebuild London's city wall, which lay between the river and Ludgate Hill, around their area. The site was used for great occasions of state, including meetings of Parliament and the Privy Council, as well as the location for a divorce hearing in 1529 of Catherine of Aragon and Henry VIII. The priory was eventually closed in 1538 during Henry's Dissolution of the monasteries. Katherine Parr, Henry VIII's sixth and final wife, was born in the area.Some of the buildings were subsequently leased to a group of entrepreneurs who created the Blackfriars Theatre on the site, not far from Shakespeare's Globe Theatre which sat almost directly across on the other side of the river. In 1632, the Society of Apothecaries (a livery company), acquired the monastery's guesthouse and established their base there. The building was destroyed in the Great Fire of London but the Society rebuilt and Apothecaries Hall is still to be found in Blackfriars today.

Finsbury Park station
Distance: 3.2 mi Tourist Information
Seven Sisters Road
London, United Kingdom N4 2DH

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Finsbury Park station is a busy transport interchange in north London. The interchange consists of a National Rail station, a London Underground station and two bus stations, all interconnected. The main entrances are by the eastern bus station on Station Place. The National Rail ticket office here lies in between one entrance marked by the Underground roundel symbol, while the other is marked by the National Rail symbol, and provides direct access to the main line platforms. There is another exit by the western bus station along Wells Terrace, incorporating the Underground ticket office, plus a narrow side entrance to the south on the A503 Seven Sisters Road. The complex is located in Travelcard Zone 2.The station is named after the nearby Finsbury Park, one of the oldest of London's Victorian parks. It is also used by many Arsenal supporters on matchdays, as the club's ground is just a short walk away.When the Victoria line was built in the 1960s, the walls in Finsbury Park station were decorated with mosaics of duelling pistols, which can still be seen. This was based on a mistaken identification of Finsbury Park with Finsbury Fields, which was used by Londoners since medieval times for archery and sports, and also associated with 18th-century duels and one of the first hot air balloon flights. Finsbury Fields was close to the present-day Finsbury Square, 3mi south. At the same time the long entrance subways and the Wells Terrace booking hall (at the bus station end) were rebuilt to a high standard.

Holborn tube station
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
88-94 Kingsway
London, United Kingdom WC2B 6

020 7222 1234

Holborn is a London Underground station in Holborn, central London. It is served by the Central and Piccadilly lines. On the Central line the station is between Tottenham Court Road and Chancery Lane stations; on the Piccadilly line it is between Covent Garden and Russell Square. The station is located at the junction of High Holborn and Kingsway and is in Travelcard Zone 1. Close by are the British Museum, Lincoln's Inn Fields, Red Lion Square, Bloomsbury Square and Sir John Soane's Museum.Located at the junction of two earlier tube railway schemes, the station was opened in 1906 by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR). The station entrances and below ground circulation were largely reconstructed for the introduction of escalators and the opening of Central line platforms in 1933, making the station the only interchange between the lines. Before 1994, Holborn was the northern terminus of the short and little-frequented Piccadilly line branch to Aldwych and two platforms originally used for this service are disused. One of the disused platforms has been used for location filming when a London Underground station platform is needed.

Gloucester Road tube station
Distance: 2.6 mi Tourist Information
130 Gloucester Rd
London, United Kingdom SW7 4

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Gloucester Road is a London Underground station in Kensington, west London. It is served by the District, Circle and Piccadilly lines. On the District and Piccadilly lines, the station is between South Kensington and Earl's Court, and on the Circle line, it is between South Kensington and High Street Kensington. It is in London fare zone 1. The station entrance is located close to the junction of Gloucester Road and Cromwell Road. Close by are the Cromwell Hospital and Baden-Powell House.The station is in two parts: sub-surface platforms, opened in 1868 by the Metropolitan Railway as part of the company's extension of the Inner Circle route from Paddington to South Kensington and to Westminster, and deep-level platforms opened in 1906 by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway. A variety of underground and main line services have operated over the sub-surface tracks. The deep-level platforms have remained largely unaltered. A disused sub-surface platform features periodic art installations as part of Transport for London's Art on the Underground scheme.

London Victoria station
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Street,
London, United Kingdom SW1E 5ND

London Victoria station, generally known as Victoria, is a central London railway terminus and London Underground complex named after nearby Victoria Street, the latter being named after Queen Victoria. With over 81 million passenger entries and exits between April 2013 and March 2014, London Victoria is the second-busiest terminus in London (and the UK) after London Waterloo. It is one of 19 stations managed by Network Rail. The area around the station is an important interchange for other forms of transport: a local bus station is in the forecourt, and Victoria Coach Station for long-distance road coaches is nearby. Victoria is in Travelcard Zone 1.Victoria is a London terminus for both Southern and Southeastern. Southern provides the majority of commuter/regional services to South London and Sussex as well as parts of East Surrey via the Brighton Main Line. Southeastern provides services in South East London and along the Chatham Main Line to Kent. It is also the terminus for the Gatwick Express service to Gatwick Airport.

Kennington Station
Distance: 3.1 mi Tourist Information
83 Kennington Park Road
London, United Kingdom SE11 4JQ

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

Kilburn Park
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
Cambridge Avenue
London, United Kingdom NW6 5AD

Finchley Road tube station
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
Finchley Road
London, United Kingdom NW3 5HT

020 7222 1234

Finchley Road is a London Underground station at the corner of Finchley Road and Canfield Gardens in the London Borough of Camden, north London. It is on the Jubilee line, between West Hampstead and Swiss Cottage and on the Metropolitan line between Baker Street and Wembley Park. It is in Travelcard Zone 2.The station is 100 yards south of the O2 Shopping Centre. It serves the Frognal and South Hampstead areas. It is also a five-minute walk from the Finchley Road & Frognal station on the London Overground's North London Line, and this is marked as an official out-of-system interchange.HistoryThe station was opened on 30 June 1879 by the Metropolitan Railway (MR, now the Metropolitan line) on its extension from its now closed station at St. John's Wood (a different station from the current St. John's Wood Jubilee line station). The station was rebuilt in 1914 with entrances incorporated into a new parade of shops.

Holloway Road Station
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
299 Holloway Road
London, United Kingdom N7 8HS

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

West Brompton station
Distance: 3.3 mi Tourist Information
Old Brompton Road
London, United Kingdom SW5 9JE

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

West Brompton is a Tube and National Rail station on the District line and West London Line (WLL) in west London, on Old Brompton Road (A3218) immediately south of Earls Court Exhibition Centre and west of Brompton Cemetery.The station is on the branch of the District line between and stations.On the WLL, National Rail services are provided by Southern and London Overground. The station is between and stations.Since 2000 it has been a Grade II (starting category) Listed Building.HistoryThe West London Extension Joint Railway (WLEJR) was opened in the early 1860s. It joined the southern end of the West London Joint Railway at Kensington (Olympia) station with Clapham Junction station and ran through West Brompton although a station was not opened until 1866. The original station was designed by the chief engineer of the Metropolitan and District Railway, Sir John Fowler and thus has local railway associations that go back to 1838. The current Lillie (road) bridge 1860 is the work of Fowler. The soon to disappear Lillie Bridge Railway and Engineering Depot 1872 is close by. Other historic associations are with the Lillie Bridge Grounds, a noted 19th c. athletics, cricket, ballooning and cycling venue adjacent to the West of the station and Brompton Cemetery adjacent to the East. From 1887, the station gave access to John Robinson Whitley's Earl's Court exhibition grounds and from 1937 to 2014 it was the alternative access to Earl's Court exhibition centre, currently being demolished.

Holloway Road tube station
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
299 Holloway Rd
London, United Kingdom N7 6

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

Holloway Road is a station on the London Underground. It is on the Piccadilly line between Caledonian Road and Arsenal stations, and in Travelcard Zone 2. The station opened on 15 December 1906.The station was constructed by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway and was built with two lift shafts, but only one was ever used for lifts. The second shaft was the site of an experimental spiral escalator which was built by the American inventor of escalators, Jesse W. Reno. The experiment was not successful and was never used by the public. In the 1990s, remains of the escalator equipment were excavated from the base of the lift shaft and stored at the London Transport Museum Depot in Acton. From the platforms, a second exit no longer in use is visible and leads to the back of the used lift shaft.The station is adjacent to the site of the former Holloway and Caledonian Road railway station.The station is close to the new Emirates Stadium, the new home of Arsenal football club. As part of the planning permission £5m was due to be spent expanding the current station to cope with increased passenger numbers on match days. However subsequent studies showed that to ensure the station could cope with the numbers the lifts would have to be replaced with escalators which would cost £60m. As a result, the redevelopment plans were put on hold and now at match times the station is exit only, and before a match eastbound trains do not call.

Crossrail C435 Farringdon
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
Farringdon Railway Station
London, United Kingdom

Local Business Near Regents Park, London

Queens Head and Artichoke
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
30 Albany Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 3

020 7916 6206

Regent's Park tube station
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Rd
City of Westminster, United Kingdom NW1 5HT

020 7222 1234

Regent's Park tube station is a London Underground station by Regent's Park. It is on the Bakerloo line, between Baker Street and Oxford Circus. It is located on Marylebone Road between the two arms of Park Crescent in Travelcard Zone 1.HistoryThe station was opened on 10 March 1906 by the Baker Street & Waterloo Railway (BS&WR); in the original parliamentary authority for the construction of the BS&WR no station was allowed at Regent's Park. Permission was granted to add it to the already partially constructed line in 1904.Station designUnlike most of the BS&WR's other stations, Regent's Park has no surface buildings and is accessed from a subway. The station is served by lifts, and between 10 July 2006 and 14 June 2007 it was closed to allow essential refurbishment work on these and other parts of the station. There is also a staircase which can be used which has 96 steps.Nearby points of interest are Regent's Park itself, the Royal Academy of Music, the Royal College of Physicians, Holy Trinity Church, Portland Place and Harley Street.Great Portland Street station is within walking distance to the east for interchanges to the Circle and Metropolitan lines.

Shannon baby sitting
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 park crescent west kingsheath
London, United Kingdom

07923902175

International Students House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
229 Great Portland Street
London, United Kingdom W1W 5PN

+44 (0) 20 7631 8300

Close to London's West End and adjacent to the beautiful Regents Park, ISH is the ideal place for both British and overseas students to live whilst studying in London. We are also only three stops from Paris - who else can say that? ISH offers a wide range of accommodation to suit all requirements. Events 365 days a year; culture evenings, themed suppers, lectures and debates, Travel Club and a full Christmas programme...ISH is a fabulous place to live!

Meliá White House Hotel
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Albany Street, Regents Park
London, United Kingdom NW1 3UP

+44 20 7391 3000

Debra Robson LDN
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
144 Harley Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 7LE

0333 600 3031

Do you dream about wearing make-up that will stay put – whatever the weather? Do you find cosmetics fiddly and time-consuming, and wish you could jump out of bed with perfect features? Do you long for a pout as fabulous as Angelina’s, eyes as beautiful as Rihanna’s, or brows as perfect as Megan Fox? Semi-Permanent Make-up is set to transform your life. It will last for months, won’t wipe off, and you will look beautiful bare-faced from first thing in the morning to last thing at night and whether you are swimming or sunbathing! Debra Robson, crowned as ‘The Queen of Semi-Permanent Make Up’ by Sunday Times Style Magazine, has been at the forefront of beauty expertise for over two decades, giving women all over the world endless possibilities for highlighting their features. With her own patented techniques and treatments, Debra has trained a team of elite consultants to take us into the next generation of Semi-Permanent Make Up. Whatever your desires, Debra Robson and her team are set to make your dreams come true. After a consultation, your treatment will be tailored to improve and compliment your features and skin tone. Our treatments will instantly boost your self-esteem – whether you choose to enhance thin, non-existent brows, add a splash of colour to your pout, or to add definition and volume to your lash-line. We have a selection of treatments created specifically for men - including 'Man Power™’ for the brows“Boy Blush™”, for the lips and “Secret Guy Liner™”. Our range of medical and corrective treatments - including nipple and areola repigmentation give women extra confidence after breast cancer surgery. There is no easier way to instantly update your image, feel better about the way you look, and give your complexion that extra bit of sparkle!

229 The Venue
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
229 Great Portland Street
London, United Kingdom WC1X 8BZ

+44 (0)20 7631 8379

Salsa Fusion Great Portland Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
229 Great Portland Street
London, United Kingdom

07951 811 488

Great Portland Street London Underground Station
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Euston Road
London, United Kingdom W1W 5PP

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

The Albany Club
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Little Albany Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 4DY

0203 2145 038

This delightfully tranquil converted church is a wonderful sanctuary in a beautiful building, away from the demands of modern life. An exclusive Gym which also offers beauty and holistic treatments , you will come away feeling relaxed and invigorated. The Albany Club promises to provide a friendly and approachable atmosphere where all are welcome. Our beautiful well planned environment lends itself perfectly to a range of different uses. With 6,500 sq feet of space spread over five floors and more than 10 rooms, we can host a wide range of events, from fitness and health industry training and lectures, to product launches, photo-shoots and TV location shoots. The Albany Club can provide refreshments, food, flower arrangement, and any of the in-house facilities and services necessary to make the most of your event. The Albany Club offers fantastic opportunities for expert practitioners, therapists and personal trainers to utilise this multifunctional venue, at reasonable rates, to enable business development and career progression.

blue-zoo animation
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
385 Euston Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 3AU

020 7434 4111

We're a creative led animation production company that combines the skill, experience and resources of a large studio, with the passion, ambition and friendliness of a small studio.

Cavali Lounge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
78 Albany street, Regent's Park. London NW1 4EE
London, United Kingdom

00447930692218

Baby Scan Clinic
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
130 Harley Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 7JU

020 7099 9644

We want to offer the chance for mothers and fathers to be, to see their baby for the first time in a special and memorable way. In a way that is far from the normal black and white 2D images we have become accustom to. This service allows soon to be parents to see their children in clear colour in 4D.

The Green Man
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
383 Euston Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 3AU

20-73876977

Inanch London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
220 Great Portland Street
London, United Kingdom W1W 5QP

020 7383 7607

The London General Practice
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
5 Devonshire Pl
London, United Kingdom W1G 6

20-79351000

New Diorama Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
15-16 Triton Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 3BF

0207 383 9034

New Diorama Theatre is an 80 seat theatre based just off Regent’s Park in the heart of central London. Unique in the capital for our development and support of emerging and established theatre companies, in our first three years we've welcomed close to 55,000 audience members to theatre productions, readings and other events. Soon after opening, New Diorama was soon recognised as a “must visit destination for London theatre-goers” (Time Out) and was awarded two consecutive prestigious Peter Brook Awards for the first two years of our programming. We were recently named 'Most Welcoming Central London Venue' at the 2013 OffWestend Awards. Productions created for and with New Diorama Theatre have transferred to festivals, and countless venues around the country and internationally. As well as supporting and developing high-quality theatre, New Diorama Theatre works extensively with our local community, creating projects, workshops and productions as well as ensuring the theatre space is somewhere our neighbours can come and be creative themselves. - See more at: http://newdiorama.com/about-us#sthash.mwJCRTE9.dpuf

St Marylebone Parish Church
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5LT

St Marylebone Parish Church is an Anglican church on the Marylebone Road in London. It was built to the designs of Thomas Hardwick in 1813–17. The present site is the third used by the parish for its church. The first was further south, near Oxford Street. The church there was demolished in 1400 and a new one erected further north. This was completely rebuilt in 1740–42, and converted into a chapel-of-ease when Hardwick's church was constructed. The Marylebone area takes its name from the church. Located behind the church is St Marylebone School, a Church of England school for girls.Previous churchesFirst churchThe first church for the parish was built in the vicinity of the present Marble Arch c.1200, and dedicated to St John the Evangelist.Second churchIn 1400 the Bishop of London gave the parishioners permission to demolish the church of St John and build a new one in a more convenient position, near a recently completed chapel, which could be used until the new church was completed. The bishop stipulated that the old churchyard should be preserved, but also gave permission to enclose a new burial ground at the new site, The church was dedicated to the Virgin Mary. It was closer to the village, at the north end of Marylebone High Street. Having fallen into a state of decay, it was demolished in 1740.

Mason
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
51 Seven Sisters Rd
London, United Kingdom N7 6

+44 (0) 20 7272 4442

Milo Clinic
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
121 Harley Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 6AX

02071001234

Dr Milojevic, the owner of Milo clinic, is a renowned specialist of aesthetic medicine, and named in the national newspapers regularly for being UK's top expert for botox and dermal fillers. In a partnership with our sister clinic Poliklinika Milojevic, we also offer the best laser treatments as well as surgeries like the incredible Vaser Lipo, ultrasound liposuction.