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Queen's Chapel, London | Tourist Information


Savoy Hill
London, United Kingdom

+44 20 7836 7221

The Queen's Chapel is a chapel in central London, England, that was designed by Inigo Jones and built between 1623 and 1625 as an external adjunct to St. James's Palace for Roman Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. It is one of the facilities of the British monarch's personal religious establishment, the Chapel Royal, and should not be confused with the 1540 building known as the Chapel Royal within the palace and just across Marlborough road.HistoryIt was built as a Roman Catholic chapel at a time when the construction of Catholic churches was prohibited in England, and was used by Charles I's Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. From the 1690s it was used by Continental Protestant courtiers. It was built as an integral part of St James's Palace, but when the adjacent private apartments burned down in 1809 they were not replaced and in 1856-57 Marlborough Road was built between the palace and the Queen's Chapel. The result is that physically the chapel now appears to be more part of the Marlborough House complex than of St James's Palace. It became a Chapel Royal again in 1938.Having been taken from the Royal Chapel of All Saints in Windsor Great Park, the body of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother lay at the Queen's Chapel for several days during the preparations for her lying-in-state in Westminster Hall before her ceremonial funeral.

Church Near Queen's Chapel

St. Peter's Church
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
310 Kennington Lane
London, SE11 5

020 7735 3585

St Saviour's, Pimlico
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
St Saviour's, St George's Square, Pimlico
London, SW1V 2

020 7834 9520

St Saviour's is an Anglo-Catholic Church of England church in Pimlico, Westminster, London, England, located at the north end of St George's Square. It was constructed in the 1860s as part of Thomas Cubitt's development of the area on behalf of the Marquess of Westminster. The church was designed by Thomas Cundy, who had previously built St Gabriel's Pimlico a short distance away. As with St Gabriel's, St Saviour's was designed in the Gothic style and built in ragstone to emphasise the contrast with the classical stucco of its secular neighbours. The church is Grade II* listed.BuildingThe foundation stone was laid on 16 June 1863 and the church was consecrated on 16 July 1864. At 170 feet (51.8m) high, the spire was at the time one of the tallest in London. At that time, the church interior looked rather bare. There were two long galleries extending from the chancel to the west end and there was no screen or pulpit, just a small brass lectern.In 1871, the present organ by Hill & Son was installed. In 1882, there was a major restoration called by a former churchwarden "the beautifying of the church": the galleries were removed, the arcade work was added to the sanctuary and the East window filled with stained glass designed by the vicar’s son (Romaine Walker) and made by Clayton Bell, representing Christ in Majesty. This work was made possible by the generosity of the parishioners (the sum of £1,500 being collected) and the supervision of the work by Romaine Walker himself. Further stained glass windows were completed after 1882 and pictures added.

St Gabriel's Church Plimlico
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Warwick Square
London, SW1V 2AD

St Barnabas, Pimlico
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
St Barnabas Street
London, SW1W 8PF

07540062413

St Barnabas is a Grade 1 Listed Building that remains in the use for which it was intended - a place where the beauty of the Gospel is celebrated in word and sacrament. The church contains important work by Bodley, Comper, Kempe and Travers. There is a Sung Mass at 10am each Sunday morning with traditional ceremonial on a scale appropriate to a parish church. A Low Mass is celebrated each Wednesday at 12.45 pm. Other masses (Feasts and other Holy Days) are as advertised on our Facebook pages.

St James the Less, Pimlico
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
St James the Less, Pimlico
London, SW1V 2

St James the Less is an Anglican church in Pimlico, Westminster, built in 1858–61 by George Edmund Street in the Gothic Revival style. A grade I listed building, it has been described as "one of the finest Gothic Revival churches anywhere". The church was constructed predominately in brick with embellishments from other types of stone. Its most prominent external feature is its free-standing Italian-style tower, while its interior incorporates design themes which Street observed in medieval Gothic buildings in continental Europe.HistoryThe church was Street's first commission in London, which he took on after his widely admired work in the diocese of Oxford and at All Saints, Boyne Hill, Maidenhead, where he delivered buildings in polychromatic red brick and stone. He had also published in 1855, to considerable acclaim, his book Brick and Marble Architecture in Italy. In 1858, he was commissioned by the three daughters of Bishop Monk of Gloucester to construct a church in their father's memory in what was, at the time, an area of slums and run-down tenements in a very poor part of London. The parish was inhabited by around 31,000 people at the time. The church, which stands on land formerly owned by Westminster Abbey, was consecrated in 1861. Street also built a parish school next to the church in 1861–64, in similar style, while his son Arthur Edmund Street revisited his father's designs in 1890 to add an infants' school (now a parish hall) attached to the west end of the church.

St James the Less, Pimlico
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
St James the Less, Thorndike Street, Off Moreton Street
London, SW1V 2PS

St Mary's, Bourne Street
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
30 Bourne Street
London, SW1W 8JJ

020 7730 2423

A High Mass, with traditional ceremonial and music, is celebrated at 11 am every Sunday. A High Mass is also generally celebrated at 7 pm on Solemnities, and a Sung Mass at 6.30 pm on Feasts of Our Lord. Details of masses are posted on our website and our Facebook pages. Evensong, followed by Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament, is sung on Sundays at 6 pm. There are low masses at 8.15 am and 6.30 pm Monday to Friday and at 11.30 am on Saturdays. Morning Prayer is said on weekdays at 8 am and Evening Prayer at 6 pm.

All Saints Church, Peckham
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Beulah Hill, Upper Norwood, London, SE19 2QQ
London, SE25 6

The Spiritualist association of Great Britain
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
11 Belgrave Road
London, SW1V 1RB

TEL: 0207 931 6488

Olivia Howarth
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
113 Lambeth Road
London, SE1 7LS

44 20 7793 5730

St Stephen's, Rochester Row
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
38-42 Rochester Row, Westminster
London, SW1P 1L

02078340950

Here at St Stephen's our style of worship is dignified but relaxed. We offer opportunities for discussion of the Christian faith, including introductory groups; a popular Sunday School and mid-week Toddlers Group; a choir that welcomes new members, both adult and children. Please join us at one of our regular services: Sundays 8am Holy Communion-a quiet service using the Book of Common Prayer 10am Parish Eucharist (with Sunday School and Youth Group) 6pm Evensong Wednesdays 12.30pm Holy Communion Morning and Evening Prayer are said each weekday, at 8.30am and 5.30pm (except Thursdays).

Lambeth Palace
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Lambeth Palace Road, Lambeth
London, SE1 7

020 7898 1200

Lambeth Palace is the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury in England, in north Lambeth, on the south bank of the River Thames, 400 m south-east of the Palace of Westminster, which houses the Houses of Parliament, on the opposite bank.HistoryThe building, originally called the Manor of Lambeth or Lambeth House, has been the London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury for nearly 800 years, whose original residence was in Canterbury, Kent. In addition, Lambeth Palace is home to the Community of Saint Anselm, an Anglican religious order that is under the patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury. Lambeth Palace was acquired by the archbishopric around 1200 AD and has the largest collection of records of the Church in its library. It is bounded by Lambeth Palace Road to the west and Lambeth Road to the south, but unlike all surrounding land is excluded from the parish of North Lambeth. The garden park is listed and resembles Archbishop's Park, a neighbouring public park; however, it was a larger area with a notable orchard until the early 19th century. The former church in front of its entrance has been converted to the Garden Museum. The south bank of the Thames along this reach, not part of historic London, developed slowly because the land was low and sodden: it was called Lambeth Marsh, as far downriver as the present Blackfriars Road. The name "Lambeth" embodies "hithe", a landing on the river: archbishops came and went by water, as did John Wycliff, who was tried here for heresy. In the English peasants' revolt of 1381 the Palace was attacked.

Westminster Cathedral
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
42 Francis Street
London, SW1P 1QW

Westminster Cathedral, or The Metropolitan Cathedral of the Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, in London is the mother church of the Catholic Church in England and Wales.The site on which the cathedral stands in the City of Westminster was purchased by the Archdiocese of Westminster in 1885. Westminster Cathedral is the largest Catholic church in England and Wales and the seat of the Archbishop of Westminster.John Betjeman called it "a masterpiece in striped brick and stone in an intricate pattern of bonding, the domes being all-brick in order to prove that the good craftsman has no need of steel or concrete."HistoryIn the late 19th century, the Catholic Church's hierarchy had only recently been restored in England and Wales, and it was in memory of Cardinal Wiseman (who died in 1865, and was the first Archbishop of Westminster from 1850) that the first substantial sum of money was raised for the new cathedral. The land was acquired in 1884 by Wiseman's successor, Cardinal Manning, having previously been occupied by the second Tothill Fields Bridewell prison.After two false starts in 1867 (under architect Henry Clutton) and 1892 (architect Baron von Herstel), construction started in 1895 under Manning's successor, the third archbishop Cardinal Vaughan with John Francis Bentley as architect, and built in a style heavily influenced by Byzantine architecture.

Emmanuel Evangical Church
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
9 Marsham Street
London, SW1P 3

20-77992828

Emmanuel Centre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
9 Marsham Street
London, SW1P 3

20-72229191

Church House, Westminster
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Dean's Yard, London SW1P 3NZ
London, SW1P 3QE

020 7898 1316

The Church House is the home of the headquarters of the Church of England, occupying the south end of Dean's Yard next to Westminster Abbey in London. Besides providing administrative offices for the Church Commissioners, the Archbishops' Council and the Church of England Pensions Board, and a chamber for the General Synod, the building also provided a meeting place for the Parliament of the United Kingdom during World War II, and for some of the organs of the newly formed United Nations afterward. It has more recently been the venue for several notable public enquiries.OriginsThe idea of a central meeting and administrative building for the Church of England had been raised twice in the mid 19th century and was finally acted upon in 1886 when the Bishop of Carlisle, Harvey Goodwin, suggested in a letter to The Times that the church should construct a "Church House" as a memorial of the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria. Accordingly, a charity called the Corporation of the Church House was founded by Royal Charter on 23 February 1888, with the aim of raising the necessary funds and executing the project.

Central Hall Westminster Storey's Gate London, Westminster, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
1 Storey's Gate, Westminster. SW1H 9NH London
London, SW1H 9NH

St Margaret's, Westminster
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, SW1P 3

+44(0)20 7222 5152

The Church of St Margaret, Westminster Abbey, is situated in the grounds of Westminster Abbey on Parliament Square, and is the Anglican parish church of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom in London. It is dedicated to Margaret of Antioch.History and descriptionOriginally founded in the twelfth century by Benedictine monks, so that local people who lived in the area around the Abbey could worship separately at their own simpler parish church, and historically part of the hundred of Ossulstone in the county of Middlesex, St Margaret's was rebuilt from 1486 to 1523. It became the parish church of the Palace of Westminster in 1614, when the Puritans of the seventeenth century, unhappy with the highly liturgical Abbey, chose to hold Parliamentary services in the more "suitable" St Margaret's: a practice that has continued since that time.The Rector of St Margaret's is a canon of Westminster Abbey.The north-west tower was rebuilt by John James from 1734 to 1738; at the same time, the whole structure was encased in Portland stone. Both the eastern and the western porch were added later by J. L. Pearson. The church's interior was greatly restored and altered to its current appearance by Sir George Gilbert Scott in 1877, although many of the Tudor features were retained.

St Paul's Knightsbridge
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
32A Wilton Place
London, SW1X 8SH

020 7201 9999

An Anglican church of Anglo-Catholic tradition, founded in 1843 as part of the development of the Grosvenor Estate in north Belgravia. St Paul's today maintains a traditonal pattern of worship and daily prayer, a lively musical tradition and a commitment to good preaching and thoughtful Christian witness. The congregation is as eclectic as it is welcoming - and seeks to be open to all who come from all over the city (and indeed all over the world!), but above all it is a parish church, rooted in the local community.

Christ Church Mayfair
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
21B Down Street
London, W1J 7

20-76295885

Opendoor Tamil Church of God, Greenford,UK
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Elton Avenue, Greenford
London, UB6 OPD

079 564 780 93 / 078 088 204 55

St Martin-in-the-Fields
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, WC2N 4JH

020 7766 1100

St James's Church, Piccadilly
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
197 Piccadilly
London, W1J 0

020 7734 4511

St James's Church, Piccadilly, also known as St James's Church, Westminster, and St James-in-the-Fields, is an Anglican church on Piccadilly in the centre of London, United Kingdom. The church was designed and built by Sir Christopher Wren.The church is built of red brick with Portland stone dressings. Its interior has galleries on three sides supported by square pillars, and the nave has a barrel vault supported by Corinthian columns. The carved marble font and limewood reredos are both notable examples of the work of Grinling Gibbons.HistoryIn 1662, Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans, was granted land for residential development on what was then the outskirts of London. He set aside land for the building of a parish church and churchyard on the south side of what is now Piccadilly. Christopher Wren was appointed the architect in 1672 and the church was consecrated on 13 July 1684 by Henry Compton, the Bishop of London. In 1685 the parish of St James was created for the church.

Grosvenor Chapel
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
24 South Audley Street, Mayfair
London, W1K 2

020 7499 1684

Grosvenor Chapel is an Anglican church in what is now the City of Westminster, in England, built in 1730s. It inspired many churches in New England. It is situated on South Audley Street in Mayfair.HistoryThe foundation stone of the Grosvenor Chapel was laid on 7 April 1730 by Sir Richard Grosvenor, 4th Baronet, owner of the surrounding property, who had leased the site for 99 years at a peppercorn rent to a syndicate of four “undertakers” led by Benjamin Timbrell, a prosperous local builder.The new building was completed and ready to use by April 1731.Soon after the original 99-year lease ran out in 1829 the chapel was brought within the parochial system as a chapel of ease to St George's, Hanover Square.The chapel has been the spiritual home to a number of famous people including John Wilkes, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington, and his wife (parents to the Duke of Wellington), Florence Nightingale, U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Bishop Charles Gore.During the Second World War men and women of the American armed forces were welcomed to the chapel for their Sunday services, as recorded on a tablet outside the west wall, and after the war the congregation regularly included such people as the writer Rose Macaulay and Sir John Betjeman, Poet Laureate from 1972 until his death in 1984.

Farm Street Church
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
114 Mount Street
London, W1K 3AH

02074937811

Farm Street, the Jesuit church in the Mayfair district of London, has a special place in the hearts of many people, Catholics and non-Catholics alike. For over a hundred and fifty years it has served a community drawn to this church by its reputation for spiritual and intellectual vigour. Many have regularly travelled some distance to worship in this church and to seek the help and advice of the succeeding generations of priests who have served here. Since 1966 the church has been at the heart of a parish in the centre of Mayfair. The Jesuit community here has always consisted of Priests and Brothers attached specifically to the church, working in other apostolates or in retirement. The Parish is more than a geographic one, attracting its congregation not only from all over London and its surrounds but visitors from all over the world.

O'Sullivan
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
10 Savoy Court
London, WC2R 0EZ

+44 (0) 20 7379 8100

Queen's Chapel of the Savoy
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Savoy Hill
London, WC2R 0DA

020 7836 7221

The Queen’s Chapel of the Savoy has a long association with the Duchy of Lancaster. The Chapel is the last surviving building of a hospital founded by Henry VII for homeless people in 1512. It stands on the area of London known as the Savoy. The Chapel belongs to Her Majesty The Queen in Her Right as Duke of Lancaster. It is a ‘free’ chapel or ‘peculiar’ not falling within any bishop’s jurisdiction, but remaining firmly within the Church of England. The Chapel remains an important part of the Savoy Estate, the Duchy of Lancaster’s principal London land holding. It continues to provide spiritual service to the community, as it has done for over 500 years. The Queen’s Chapel of the Savoy is also the chapel of the Royal Victorian Order, an Order of Chivalry within the Sovereign’s personal gift. By The Queen’s appointment, the present Chaplain is also Chaplain of the Order. The expenses of the Chapel are borne by The Queen in Right of Her Duchy of Lancaster. Maintenance of this historic building remains the Duchy of Lancaster’s responsibility. Recent work has included the landscaping of the gardens in honour of Her Majesty’s Golden Jubilee, and the restoration of the Chapel ceiling in 1999. Members of the public are most welcome to attend services in The Queen’s Chapel of the Savoy. The Chapel is open Monday to Thursday 9am to 4pm and for Sunday service at 11am. However, it is always closed during August and September and for the first Sunday after Christmas and Easter. The Duchy of Lancaster appoints the Chaplain. For more information e-mail the Steward, Squadron Leader Thomas Leyland RAF rtd ([email protected])

Notre Dame de France
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
5 Leicester Place
London, WC2H 7BX

02074379363

Notre Dame de France is the Roman Catholic Francophone Chaplaincy in London run by the Marist Fathers.

Landmark Near Queen's Chapel

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Westminster
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Ambrosden Avenue, Westminster, London SW1P 1QJ, England, Great Britain
London, United Kingdom SW1P 1

020 7798 9033

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Westminster is an archdiocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church in England, historically however it has always been styled the Diocese of Westminster. The archdiocese consists of all of London north of the River Thames and west of the River Lea, together with the borough of Spelthorne and the county of Hertfordshire, which lies immediately to London's north.The diocese is led by the Archbishop of Westminster, who serves as pastor of the mother church, Westminster Cathedral, as well as the metropolitan bishop of the Metropolitan Province of Westminster. Since the re-establishment of the English Catholic dioceses in 1850 each Archbishop of Westminster, including the incumbent, Archbishop Vincent Gerard Nichols, has been created a cardinal by the Pope in consistory, often as the only cardinal in England. It is also customary for the Archbishop of Westminster to be elected President of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of England and Wales providing a degree of a formal direction for the other English bishops and archbishops. However he is not formally a primate, though has special privileges conferred by the Papal Bull Si qua es. The diocese is one of the smallest dioceses in England and Wales in geographical area, but the largest in terms of Catholic population and priests. It is legally established as a diocese, though canonically an archdiocese.

Portland House
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Bressenden Pl
London, United Kingdom SW1E 5DS

Portland House is a skyscraper in Westminster, London. It is 101m tall with 29 floors and was completed in 1963.The building has two banks of lifts — the first serving the first up to the fifteenth floor, and the second the fifteenth floor upwards.Firms that currently use Portland House for office space include American Express, Crossrail, Caxton FX, HomeAway UK, Owners Direct, Increase the Wedge, NetBooster, Somo Global, TradeDoubler, uSwitch, Upmystreet.com, Reef Television, Rentokil Initial, AkzoNobel and Regus. Regus provides serviced offices to a number of companies. The building once contained the head offices of British United Airways.The building is a five-minute walk from London Victoria station (mainline and tube) and a ten-minute walk from Victoria Coach Station. Difficult to find entrance but off Victoria Street, Cathedral Walk goes to main entrance. The surrounding area has been redeveloped between 2003 and 2005 with a new shopping and refreshments area called Cardinal Place. The building also has a gym in the basement.

St Ermin's Hotel
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 Caxton Street,
London, United Kingdom SW1H 0

(20) 7222 6914

St. Ermin's Hotel is a four-star central London hotel adjacent to St James's Park underground station, close to Westminster Abbey, Buckingham Palace and the Houses of Parliament. The Grade II-listed late Victorian building, built as one of the early mansion blocks in the city is thought to be named after an ancient monastery reputed to have occupied the site pre-10th century. Converted to a hotel in 1896–99, it became during the 1930s, through the Second World War and beyond, a meeting place of the British intelligence services, notably the birthplace of the Special Operations Executive (SOE), and where notorious Cambridge Five double agents Philby and MacLean met their Russian handlers.BackgroundThe St Ermin's Hotel in St James's Park, London was originally a horse-shoe shaped mansion block built in 1887–89 to the designs of E. T. Hall (1851–1923). Mansion blocks (high-status, serviced apartments) were first seen in Victoria Street, London in the 1850s and remain a feature of the area today. St Ermin's Mansions was typical in both plan and elevation; Hall employed the fashionable red-brick Queen Anne style for the exterior and grouped the apartments around a courtyard which functioned both as a carriageway and garden for the residents. Four entrances led off the courtyard into the apartments (the two entrances in the side wings still exist in their original form to this day). By 1894 the building appears to have been extended along Broadway as far as St Ermin's Hill.

55 Broadway
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
55 Broadway
London, United Kingdom SW1H 0BD

0843 222 1234

55 Broadway is a Grade I listed building overlooking St. James's Park in London. It was designed by Charles Holden and built between 1927 and 1929; in 1931 the building earned him the RIBA London Architecture Medal.It was constructed as a new headquarters for the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL), the main forerunner of London Underground. Upon completion, it was the tallest office block in the city.London Underground was due to vacate the building in 2015 for new headquarters, and 55 Broadway will be converted for residential use.DescriptionFaced with Portland stone and covering a site with an irregular footprint, the upper office floors of the building are on a cruciform plan, stepping back towards the central clock tower at the top. The cruciform design afforded the optimum level of natural light to the offices. The ground floor now contains a shopping arcade and many art deco details. Previously the ground floor was also given over to London Transport offices, including a travel information centre, cash office and a library. The whole building straddles St. James's Park tube station, the east and west wings being immediately above the railway tunnel. When finished it was the tallest steel-framed office building in London, until another Holden building, the University of London's Senate House (based on similar designs and materials), took the accolade.

Buckingham Palace
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1AA

Buckingham Palace est la résidence officielle de la monarchie britannique à Londres. Le palais est à la fois le lieu où se produisent les événements en relation avec la famille royale, le point de chute de beaucoup de chefs d’État en visite, et une attraction touristique importante. C’est le point de convergence du peuple britannique lors des moments de joie, de crise et de peine. « Buckingham Palace », ou tout simplement « le Palais », désigne la source des déclarations de presse émanant des bureaux royaux. Buckingham Palace a été construit par John Sheffield à l'origine du duc de Buckingham en 1703, c'est le lieu de résidence de la monarchie britannique. Buckingham Palace a été reconstruit au cours des siècles par John Nash pour George IV.Au Moyen Âge, le site du palais de Buckingham formait une partie du manoir d’Ebury. Il y eut plusieurs occupants royaux depuis Édouard le Confesseur, et a été l’objet de nombreuses spéculations à propos de son propriétaire : une faille dans le bail de Charles d’Angleterre permit au terrain de revenir dans le giron royal au. Les précurseurs de Buckingham Palace sont Blake House, Goring House et Arlington House.D’abord connu sous le nom de Buckingham House, le bâtiment formant le cœur du palais d’aujourd’hui était auparavant un grand hôtel particulier construit en 1703 par le duc de Buckingham John Sheffield et acquis par le roi George III en 1762 pour en faire sa résidence privée. Il a été agrandi au cours des 75 années suivantes, principalement par les architectes John Nash et Edward Blore, qui ajoutèrent trois ailes autour d’une cour carrée. Buckingham Palace devint finalement la résidence officielle de la monarchie britannique lors de l’accession au trône de la reine Victoria en 1837. Les derniers ajouts structurels d’importance datent de la fin du et du début du : l’imposante aile est qui fait face au Mall a été ajoutée, et l’ancienne entrée officielle, Marble Arch, a été déplacée près du Speaker’s Corner à Hyde Park, où elle se trouve toujours. La façade côté est a été refaite en 1913 avec des blocs de calcaire de Portland, en arrière plan du Victoria Memorial, créant la « façade publique » de Buckingham, avec le fameux balcon en son centre.

St James's Palace
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

Bridgewater House, Westminster
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
14 Cleveland Row
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

Bridgewater House is a townhouse located at 14 Cleveland Row in the St James's area of London, England. It is a Grade I listed building.HistoryThe earliest known house on the site was Berkshire House, built in about 1626-27 for Thomas Howard, second son of the Earl of Suffolk and Master of the Horse to Charles I of England when he was Prince of Wales. Howard was later created Earl of Berkshire.After being occupied by Parliamentarian troops in the English Civil War, used for the Portuguese Embassy, and lived in by Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, the house was lived in by Charles II's mistress Barbara Villiers, who was made Duchess of Cleveland in 1670, following which the house was known as Cleveland House. She refaced the old house and added new wings. After being owned for some years by a speculator, the house was sold in 1700 to John Egerton, 3rd Earl of Bridgewater, after which it passed by inheritance until 1948.Cleveland House was re-designed in the Palazzo style by Sir Charles Barry in 1840. The rebuilding was completed and renamed in 1854 for Lord Ellesmere, heir of the 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. It is built in Bath stone with a slate roof in three storeys with a basement.

Embassy of Japan, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Hell on Earth for Dolphins
London, United Kingdom

The Embassy of Japan in London is the diplomatic mission of Japan in the United Kingdom. It occupies a large Victorian building on Piccadilly opposite Green Park, which is Grade II listed.

Wimbledon Village
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
60 High Street
London, United Kingdom SW19

Stephanie Anne Louise Bailey
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Strand, Charing Cross, London E1W3ST
London, United Kingdom E1W3ST

+44 20 7839 7282

The Cockney Sparrow
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Westminster Pier
London, United Kingdom

0800 007 5196

Stepping Stones
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Creighton Avenue, East Finchley
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

07836 284538

Fun interactive play session accompanied by guitar and violin. Songs, rhymes parachute games, puppets, storytime, bubbles. Suitable for 0-4 years. Tuesdays 10am at East Finchley Baptist Church. Drop-in. Cost £5 (£2.50 siblings).

St James's Church, Piccadilly
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
197 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0

020 7734 4511

St James's Church, Piccadilly, also known as St James's Church, Westminster, and St James-in-the-Fields, is an Anglican church on Piccadilly in the centre of London, United Kingdom. The church was designed and built by Sir Christopher Wren.The church is built of red brick with Portland stone dressings. Its interior has galleries on three sides supported by square pillars, and the nave has a barrel vault supported by Corinthian columns. The carved marble font and limewood reredos are both notable examples of the work of Grinling Gibbons.HistoryIn 1662, Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans, was granted land for residential development on what was then the outskirts of London. He set aside land for the building of a parish church and churchyard on the south side of what is now Piccadilly. Christopher Wren was appointed the architect in 1672 and the church was consecrated on 13 July 1684 by Henry Compton, the Bishop of London. In 1685 the parish of St James was created for the church.

Albany (London)
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Albany Courtyard, Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0DS

The Albany, or simply Albany, is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, London.BuildingThe Albany was built in 1770–74 by Sir William Chambers for the newly created 1st Viscount Melbourne as Melbourne House. It is a three-storey mansion, seven bays (windows) wide, with a pair of service wings flanking a front courtyard. In 1791, Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany abandoned Dover House, Whitehall (now a government office), and took up residence. In 1802 the Duke in turn gave up the house and it was converted by Henry Holland into 69 bachelor apartments (known as "sets"). This was achieved by subdividing the main block and its two service wings, and by adding two new parallel long buildings covering most of the garden, running as far as a new rear gate building on Burlington Gardens. Holland's new buildings of 1802-3 flank a covered walkway supported on thin iron columns and with an upswept roof. The blocks are white painted render in a simpler Regency style than Chambers' work. Most sets are accessed off common staircases without doors, like Oxbridge colleges and the Inns of Court.HistorySince its conversion, the Albany has been a prestigious set of bachelor apartments in London. The residents have included such famous names as the poet Lord Byron and the future Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone, and numerous members of the aristocracy.

Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
6 Grafton Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 4FE

2074999821

The Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, London is Hong Kong's representation in the United Kingdom. As a Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong does not have an embassy.The office is located at 18 Bedford Square in the City of Westminster in central London; the building also houses the London office of the London Representative Office of the Hong Kong Monetary Authority. It was previously located at 6 Grafton Street..The current Director-General of the office is Priscilla To, who reports to the Special Representative for Hong Kong Economic & Trade Affairs to the European Union, Brussels ETO.The Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office Act 1996 enacted by UK's Parliament conferred a number of personal immunity and tax privileges on HKETO London. When Hong Kong was under British administration, the office was known as the Hong Kong Government Office and was headed by a Commissioner.Apart from the UK, HKETO London is also responsible for maintaining ties with Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Russia and Sweden.

Odeon West End
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
40 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7

0871 224 4007

The Odeon West End, from 1930 to 1988 known as Leicester Square Theatre, was a cinema on the south side of Leicester Square, London. It contained two screens—screen 1 seats 500 and screen 2 seats 832. It was often used for smaller film premieres, and hosted the annual BFI London Film Festival. The building is opposite the much larger flagship Odeon Leicester Square.Odeon Cinemas sold the building to three Irish investors in 2006, though continued to lease it. In 2012 it was bought by the Radisson Edwardian hotel group and closed as a cinema on 1 January 2015, ahead of planned redevelopment as a luxury hotel.HistoryThe Odeon was built in 1930 as the Leicester Square Theatre, a name it largely remained with until 1988. The theatre was built as a cine-variety venue for Jack Buchanan - a penthouse apartment was housed on the roof for the star - and showcased both film and short variety performances, before going over to film on a more permanent basis. A large single screen was housed in an ornate, three-tiered auditorium.It was sold to J. Arthur Rank in 1937 and became Rank's first cinema, although not named Odeon for many years to come.The cinema was modernised in 1968 into a much blander shell, based around a remodelled stalls and single circle. In 1988 it was changed into a two-screen venue (Screen 1 in the former circle and Screen 2 in the stalls) and renamed Odeon West End.The site was sold by Odeon Cinemas to three Irish investors in February 2006, though continued to operate as part of the Odeon chain. Ownership subsequently passed to the Irish National Asset Management Agency and in 2012 it was sold to the Radisson Edwardian hotel company.

The Comedy Store
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
7 Oxendon St
Hackney, United Kingdom SW1Y 4EE

The Comedy Store is a comedy club located in Soho, London, England, opened in 1979 by Don Ward and Peter Rosengard.It was named after The Comedy Store club in the United States, which Rosengard had visited the previous year. Starting out above a strip club, in 1982 they moved to Leicester Square at a premises they were able to take over formally in 1985.The club was the focus of the "alternative comedy" boom in the early 1980s and helped start the careers of many comedians, including Paul Merton, French & Saunders, Alexei Sayle, Rik Mayall, Adrian Edmondson, Ben Elton, Mark Thomas, Andrew Bailey, Pat Condell and John Sparkes.In October 1985, an improvisational group called The Comedy Store Players was formed, consisting of Mike Myers, Neil Mullarkey, Kit Hollerbach, Dave Cohen and Paul Merton. The group has had several lineup changes over the years, and now features a rotating team of Neil Mullarkey, Paul Merton, Josie Lawrence, Richard Vranch (a comedy improviser who also plays piano), Jim Sweeney, Lee Simpson and Andy Smart, together with frequent guest appearances. Several of The Comedy Store Players appeared on the BBC Radio 4 and Channel 4 comedy game show Whose Line Is It Anyway?.

Duke of York's Theatre
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
St Martin's Lane
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2N 4

844-8717627

The Duke of York's Theatre is a West End Theatre in St Martin's Lane, in the City of Westminster, London. It was built for Frank Wyatt and his wife, Violet Melnotte, who retained ownership of the theatre until her death in 1935. It opened on 10 September 1892 as the Trafalgar Square Theatre, with Wedding Eve. The theatre, designed by architect Walter Emden became known as the Trafalgar Theatre in 1894 and the following year became the Duke of York's to honour the future King George V.One of the earliest musical comedies, Go-Bang, was a success at the theatre in 1894. In 1900, Jerome K. Jerome's Miss Hobbs was staged as well as David Belasco's Madame Butterfly, which was seen by Puccini, who later turned it into the famous opera. This was also the theatre where J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up debuted on 27 December 1904. Many famous British actors have appeared here, including Basil Rathbone, who played Alfred de Musset in Madame Sand in June 1920, returning in November 1932 as the Unknown Gentleman in Tonight or Never.

Thriller Live Musical at Lyric Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7ES

+44 207 7492 1618

Apollo Theatre
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
31 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 7

020 7494 5070

The Apollo Theatre is a Grade II listed West End theatre, on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster, in central London. Designed by the architect Lewin Sharp for owner Henry Lowenfeld, it became the fourth legitimate theatre to be constructed on the street when it opened its doors on 21 February 1901, with the American musical comedy The Belle of Bohemia.HistoryConstructionBecause Henry Lowenfeld had bought land on the newly created Shaftesbury Avenue at the turn of the 20th century – next door to the Lyric Theatre which opened in 1888 – the Apollo is one of the few theatres in London to be freehold.The only complete theatre design of architect Lewin Sharp, the Apollo was specifically designed for musical theatre and named after the Greek god of the arts and leader of the muses. Constructed by builder Walter Wallis of plain London brick in keeping with the neighbouring streets, the front piece is in the Renaissance style with sculpted stone fascia by T. Simpson. The structure encloses a four-level auditorium, with three cantilevered balconies and a first floor central loggia, decorated in the Louis XIV Style by Hubert van Hooydonk. In keeping with then European style, each level has its own foyer and promenade.