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Russell Square tube station, London | Tourist Information


Bernard St
London, United Kingdom WC1N 1

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

Russell Square is a London Underground station on Bernard Street, Bloomsbury in the London Borough of Camden. The station is on the Piccadilly line, between Holborn and King's Cross St Pancras and is in Travelcard Zone 1. It is a small but busy station, often used by office workers and by tourists who are staying in Bloomsbury's numerous hotels or visiting the British Museum.Russell Square Station is not far from the British Museum, the University of London's main campus, Great Ormond Street Hospital and Russell Square Gardens. Its location is adjacent to the Brunswick Centre.HistoryThe station was opened by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway on 15 December 1906. The station was designed by Leslie Green. On 20 July 2011, English Heritage gave the station buildings Grade II listed status, describing it as:2005 London bombingsOn 7 July 2005, in a co-ordinated bomb attack, an explosion in a train travelling between King's Cross St. Pancras and Russell Square resulted in the deaths of 26 people, making up nearly half of the total fatalities from the series of attacks and also causing damage to the tunnel. It was the last of the three bombs used in the attacks on the underground, although another bomb later exploded on a bus.

Landmark Near Russell Square tube station

Downing Street
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
st. Downing
London, SW1A 2

020 7270 3000

Downing Street in London, United Kingdom, has for more than three hundred years housed the official residences of two of the most senior British Cabinet ministers: the First Lord of the Treasury, an office now synonymous with that of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom; and the Second Lord of the Treasury, an office held by the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The Prime Minister's official residence is 10 Downing Street; the Chancellor's official residence is next door at Number 11. The government's Chief Whip has an official residence at Number 12, although the current Chief Whip's residence is at Number 9.Downing Street is in Whitehall in central London, a few minutes' walk from the Houses of Parliament and a little further from Buckingham Palace. The street was built in the 1680s by Sir George Downing on the site of a mansion, Hampden House. The houses on the south side of the street were demolished in the 19th century to make way for government offices now occupied by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. "Downing Street" is used as a metonym for the Government of the United Kingdom.

Downing Street
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
st. Downing
London, SW1A 2

020 7270 3000

Downing Street in London, United Kingdom, has for more than three hundred years housed the official residences of two of the most senior British Cabinet ministers: the First Lord of the Treasury, an office now synonymous with that of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom; and the Second Lord of the Treasury, an office held by the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The Prime Minister's official residence is 10 Downing Street; the Chancellor's official residence is next door at Number 11. The government's Chief Whip has an official residence at Number 12, although the current Chief Whip's residence is at Number 9.Downing Street is in Whitehall in central London, a few minutes' walk from the Houses of Parliament and a little further from Buckingham Palace. The street was built in the 1680s by Sir George Downing on the site of a mansion, Hampden House. The houses on the south side of the street were demolished in the 19th century to make way for government offices now occupied by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. "Downing Street" is used as a metonym for the Government of the United Kingdom.

London Waterloo East railway station
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Sandell Street
London, SE1 8NH

0845 748 4950

Waterloo East, also known as London Waterloo East, is a railway station in central London on the line from through London Bridge towards Kent, in the southeast of England. Although Waterloo East is a through-station, it is classed for ticketing purposes as a central London terminus. Services through the station are operated by Southeastern and it is situated within fare zone 1.An elevated walkway across Waterloo Road connects it to the larger Waterloo station and provides the main access. The eastern ends of Waterloo East's platforms provide pedestrian connection to Southwark station which is served by London Underground's Jubilee line; at street level there is a modest entrance in Sandell Street. Connections with the Underground's Bakerloo, Northern and Waterloo & City lines are available at Waterloo tube station. There is no station building; the ticket office of the main station serves it, though there are ticket machines at the eastern end of the walkway.The four platforms at Waterloo East are lettered rather than numbered to ensure that staff who work at both Waterloo East and the adjoining Waterloo station, which is managed and branded separately and features numbered platforms, do not confuse the platforms at the two stations. This stratagem is also used for the Thameslink platforms at St. Pancras International and their predecessors at, as well as at. Ticket barriers have been installed at the Sandell Street and Southwark station entrances, and also at the main entrance from Waterloo station following the completion of the retail balcony in 2012.

Top Of The London Eye
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Belvedere Road
London, SE1 7PB

Shell Centre
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
York Rd
London, SE1 7NA

The Shell Centre, in London, is one of the two central offices of oil major Shell (the other is in The Hague). It is located on Belvedere Road in the London Borough of Lambeth. It is a prominent feature on the South Bank of the River Thames near County Hall, and now forms the backdrop to the London Eye.The current Shell Centre comprises the tower building and three adjoining nine-storey wings (collectively formerly known as the "Upstream Building"). The original development also included a separate building known as the "Downstream Building", which was separated from the Upstream Building by the railway viaduct between Charing Cross and Waterloo East. The Downstream Building was disposed of by Shell in the 1990s and is now a block of residential apartments known as the White House, and has been heightened by a storey.Site history and layoutThe Shell Centre occupies part of the site cleared for the 1951 Festival of Britain. The areas closer to the River Thames now include Jubilee Gardens and the South Bank Centre. Jubilee Gardens remained undeveloped prior to its laying out as an open space, largely because of a restrictive covenant in favour of Shell that restricts any building on the part of the site directly between the Shell Tower and the River Thames. The naming of the Shell Centre buildings perpetuated the split of the Festival site into distinct Upstream and Downstream areas – separated by the railway viaduct approach to Hungerford Bridge.

Southwark tube station
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
68-70 Blackfriars Rd
London, SE1 8JZ

0845 300 7000

Southwark is a London Underground station in the London Borough of Southwark at the corner of Blackfriars Road and The Cut. It is between and stations on the Jubilee line, and is in Travelcard Zone 1. It was opened on 20 November 1999 as part of the Jubilee Line Extension. The station is somewhat west of historic Southwark, which is served by Borough tube station and London Bridge station. Its entrance is across the street from the disused Blackfriars Road railway station.The original plan for the Extension did not include a station between those at Waterloo and London Bridge; Southwark station was added after lobbying by the local council, it is in fact sited right next to the borough's boundary with Lambeth at Joane Street. Although it is close to Waterloo, not near the Bankside attractions it was intended to serve, and its only National Rail interchange is to main line station; the passenger usage matches those of other minor central stations. It does however get over twice the traffic of nearby Borough station, and around three times that of Lambeth North.HistorySouthwark station was designed by Sir Richard MacCormac of MJP Architects. It is on a cramped site, with its platforms underneath the Victorian main line viaduct between Waterloo East and London Bridge stations. The site presented significant technical and architectural difficulties which were resolved by constructing two concourses at different levels.

The Mall, London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, SW1A 1

The Mall is a road in the City of Westminster, central London, between Buckingham Palace at its western end and Trafalgar Square via Admiralty Arch to the east. Before it terminates at Whitehall it is met by Horse Guards Road and Spring Gardens where the Metropolitan Board of Works and London County Council were once based. It is closed to traffic on Sundays, public holidays and on ceremonial occasions.HistoryThe Mall began as a field for playing pall-mall. In the 17th and 18th centuries it was a fashionable promenade, bordered by trees.The Mall was envisioned as a ceremonial route in the early 20th century, matching the creation of similar ceremonial routes in other cities such as Berlin, Mexico City, Oslo, Paris, Saint Petersburg, Vienna and Washington, D.C. These routes were intended to be used for major national ceremonies. As part of the development – designed by Aston Webb – a new façade was constructed for Buckingham Palace, and the Victoria Memorial was erected.

St James's Palace
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

St John's Church, Waterloo
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Waterloo Road
London, SE1 8

020 7633 9819

St John's Church, Waterloo, is an Anglican Greek Revival church in South London, built in 1822–24 to the designs of Francis Octavius Bedford. It is dedicated to St John the Evangelist, and with St Andrew's, Short Street, forms a united benefice.LocationThe church is located in Waterloo, opposite the London IMAX, close to Waterloo Station and the Waterloo campus of King's College London. In 1818, when the country was settling down into a period of peace after the Napoleonic Wars and the population was beginning to expand rapidly, Parliament decided to allocate a sum not exceeding a million pounds for the building of additional churches in populous parishes and “more particularly in the Metropolis and its Vicinity.” Of this sum, the Commissioners for Building New Churches appropriated £64,000 in 1822 for the needs of the parish of Lambeth. It was decided that a new church should be built on the Waterloo Bridge approach, with a piece of ground on the east side of the road to be purchased from the Archbishop of Canterbury and his lessee and the sub-lessee, Gilbert East and a man named Anderson.HistoryThe Church of St John was built to the designs of the architect Francis Octavius Bedford in 1824. Bedford designed three other churches for the Commissioners, St George’s, Camberwell, St Luke, West Norwood and Holy Trinity, Newington. They were all built in the same Greek style inspired by Bedford’s background as a well-respected Greek scholar and antiquarian. Bedford’s churches were fiercely criticised by contemporary critics at a time when the tide was turning away from the Greek revival towards Gothic. St John’s however gained more critical appreciation mainly because of its fine spire which used classical detail to build up a more traditional English parish church shape.

The Banqueting House
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Whitehall House, 41 Whitehall
London, SW1A 2ER

+44 (0) 844 482 7777

This revolutionary building, the first in England to be designed in a Palladian style by Inigo Jones, was finished in 1622 for James I. Intended for the splendour and exuberance of court masques, the Banqueting House is probably most famous for one real life drama: the execution of Charles I which took place here in 1649 to the ‘dismal, universal groan’ of the crowd. One of Charles’ last sights was he walked through the Banqueting House to his death was the magnificent ceiling, painted by Peter Paul Rubens in 1630-4.

Bridgewater House, Westminster
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
14 Cleveland Row
London, SW1A 1

Bridgewater House is a townhouse located at 14 Cleveland Row in the St James's area of London, England. It is a Grade I listed building.HistoryThe earliest known house on the site was Berkshire House, built in about 1626-27 for Thomas Howard, second son of the Earl of Suffolk and Master of the Horse to Charles I of England when he was Prince of Wales. Howard was later created Earl of Berkshire.After being occupied by Parliamentarian troops in the English Civil War, used for the Portuguese Embassy, and lived in by Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, the house was lived in by Charles II's mistress Barbara Villiers, who was made Duchess of Cleveland in 1670, following which the house was known as Cleveland House. She refaced the old house and added new wings. After being owned for some years by a speculator, the house was sold in 1700 to John Egerton, 3rd Earl of Bridgewater, after which it passed by inheritance until 1948.Cleveland House was re-designed in the Palazzo style by Sir Charles Barry in 1840. The rebuilding was completed and renamed in 1854 for Lord Ellesmere, heir of the 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. It is built in Bath stone with a slate roof in three storeys with a basement.

Bridgewater House, Westminster
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
14 Cleveland Row
London, SW1A 1

Bridgewater House is a townhouse located at 14 Cleveland Row in the St James's area of London, England. It is a Grade I listed building.HistoryThe earliest known house on the site was Berkshire House, built in about 1626-27 for Thomas Howard, second son of the Earl of Suffolk and Master of the Horse to Charles I of England when he was Prince of Wales. Howard was later created Earl of Berkshire.After being occupied by Parliamentarian troops in the English Civil War, used for the Portuguese Embassy, and lived in by Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, the house was lived in by Charles II's mistress Barbara Villiers, who was made Duchess of Cleveland in 1670, following which the house was known as Cleveland House. She refaced the old house and added new wings. After being owned for some years by a speculator, the house was sold in 1700 to John Egerton, 3rd Earl of Bridgewater, after which it passed by inheritance until 1948.Cleveland House was re-designed in the Palazzo style by Sir Charles Barry in 1840. The rebuilding was completed and renamed in 1854 for Lord Ellesmere, heir of the 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. It is built in Bath stone with a slate roof in three storeys with a basement.

Horse Guards
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Horse Guards Parade
London, SW1A 2

020 7930 4832

Horse Guards is a large Grade I listed building in the Palladian style between Whitehall and Horse Guards Parade in London. The first Horse Guards building was built on the site of the former tiltyard of Westminster Palace in 1664. It was demolished in 1749 and was replaced by the current building which was built between 1750 and 1753 by John Vardy after the death of original architect in 1748 William Kent. Horse Guards Road runs north-south on the western boundary of the parade ground, while Horse Guards Avenue runs east from Whitehall on other side of the building, to Victoria Embankment.The building served as the offices of the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces until 1904 when the post was abolished and replaced by the Chief of the General Staff. The Chief of the General staff moved to the Old War Office Building in 1906 and Horse Guards subsequently became the headquarters of two major Army commands: the London District and the Household Cavalry. The building is the formal entrance to St James's Palace via St. James's Park (though this is now entirely symbolic). Only the monarch is allowed to drive through its central archway, or those given a pass (formerly made of ivory).

Queen's Chapel
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Savoy Hill
London,

+44 20 7836 7221

The Queen's Chapel is a chapel in central London, England, that was designed by Inigo Jones and built between 1623 and 1625 as an external adjunct to St. James's Palace for Roman Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. It is one of the facilities of the British monarch's personal religious establishment, the Chapel Royal, and should not be confused with the 1540 building known as the Chapel Royal within the palace and just across Marlborough road.HistoryIt was built as a Roman Catholic chapel at a time when the construction of Catholic churches was prohibited in England, and was used by Charles I's Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. From the 1690s it was used by Continental Protestant courtiers. It was built as an integral part of St James's Palace, but when the adjacent private apartments burned down in 1809 they were not replaced and in 1856-57 Marlborough Road was built between the palace and the Queen's Chapel. The result is that physically the chapel now appears to be more part of the Marlborough House complex than of St James's Palace. It became a Chapel Royal again in 1938.Having been taken from the Royal Chapel of All Saints in Windsor Great Park, the body of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother lay at the Queen's Chapel for several days during the preparations for her lying-in-state in Westminster Hall before her ceremonial funeral.

BFI IMAX
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Charlie Chaplin Walk
London, SE1 8XR

The BFI IMAX is an IMAX cinema in the South Bank district of London, just north of Waterloo Station. It is owned by the British Film Institute and since July 2012 has been operated by Odeon Cinemas.The cinema is located in the centre of a roundabout junction with Waterloo Road to the south-east, Stamford Street to the north-east, York Road to the south-west and Waterloo Bridge to the north-west.HistoryThe BFI IMAX was designed by Bryan Avery of Avery Associates Architects and completed in May 1999. The screen is the largest in Britain (20m high and 26m wide). It has a seating capacity of just under 500 and a 12,000 Watt digital surround sound system. Although the site is surrounded by traffic and has an underground line just four metres below, the architects and engineers accounted for this in their design and the entire upper structure sits on anti vibration bearings to prevent noise propagation.The cinema won several awards at the time of opening, including a Design Council Millennium Product Award in 1999 and a Civic Trust Award in 2000.In 2009, the screen was replaced and a digital IMAX projector was installed alongside the existing 70mm projector. In July 2012, the BFI announced that Odeon Cinemas had been selected to operate it for the next five years, with the option of termination after three years. Odeon will maintain the film programmes, and booking of tickets online and per telephone. This also gives customers the opportunity to watch Operas on the giant screen. The BFI will retain a great deal of power over the cinema's operation however, including parts of the film schedule and the technical operation. The name will remain the same.

BFI IMAX
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Charlie Chaplin Walk
London, SE1 8XR

The BFI IMAX is an IMAX cinema in the South Bank district of London, just north of Waterloo Station. It is owned by the British Film Institute and since July 2012 has been operated by Odeon Cinemas.The cinema is located in the centre of a roundabout junction with Waterloo Road to the south-east, Stamford Street to the north-east, York Road to the south-west and Waterloo Bridge to the north-west.HistoryThe BFI IMAX was designed by Bryan Avery of Avery Associates Architects and completed in May 1999. The screen is the largest in Britain (20m high and 26m wide). It has a seating capacity of just under 500 and a 12,000 Watt digital surround sound system. Although the site is surrounded by traffic and has an underground line just four metres below, the architects and engineers accounted for this in their design and the entire upper structure sits on anti vibration bearings to prevent noise propagation.The cinema won several awards at the time of opening, including a Design Council Millennium Product Award in 1999 and a Civic Trust Award in 2000.In 2009, the screen was replaced and a digital IMAX projector was installed alongside the existing 70mm projector. In July 2012, the BFI announced that Odeon Cinemas had been selected to operate it for the next five years, with the option of termination after three years. Odeon will maintain the film programmes, and booking of tickets online and per telephone. This also gives customers the opportunity to watch Operas on the giant screen. The BFI will retain a great deal of power over the cinema's operation however, including parts of the film schedule and the technical operation. The name will remain the same.

The Poetry Library
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Level 5, Royal Festival Hall
London, SE1 8XX

020 7921 0943

The Poetry Library is a free public collection housed at Royal Festival Hall in London's Southbank Centre.BackgroundSituated on the fifth floor of the Royal Festival Hall, overlooking the river Thames, the library aims to hold all contemporary UK poetry publications since 1912, housing the largest collection in Britain, numbering over 200,000 items, including works by small presses. It also holds audio and video materials, critical texts and works for children for loan and reference. The library contains work by non-UK poets and publishers. Press cuttings are also archived for members research. Membership is free and material is borrowed through the national inter-lending library services or returned by post. The library provides support for schools nationally and locally. The venue has an exhibition and event space.History and future plansThe library was established in 1953 on the recommendation of the Poetry Panel of the Arts Council of Great Britain, with the remit of promoting modern and contemporary poetry. Opened by poets TS Eliot and Herbert Read, the library quickly grew beyond the capacity of premises and then the next, moving from Albemarle Street to Piccadilly, to Long Acre in Covent Garden and then to a larger space back in Piccadilly.It has been located at the Royal Festival Hall since 1988, when Seamus Heaney opened the new venue. With the relocation, the library was given the Signal Poetry Collection of children's poetry books which had been held by Book House. This formed the basis for the library's body of works for children and young adults, available for loan and reference. The beech furniture was designed for the site by Terrance Conran. The library was closed from 2005 to 2007 during refurbishment of the Festival Hall building. Its re-opening was celebrated with London's first festival of literature.

The Poetry Library
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Level 5, Royal Festival Hall
London, SE1 8XX

020 7921 0943

The Poetry Library is a free public collection housed at Royal Festival Hall in London's Southbank Centre.BackgroundSituated on the fifth floor of the Royal Festival Hall, overlooking the river Thames, the library aims to hold all contemporary UK poetry publications since 1912, housing the largest collection in Britain, numbering over 200,000 items, including works by small presses. It also holds audio and video materials, critical texts and works for children for loan and reference. The library contains work by non-UK poets and publishers. Press cuttings are also archived for members research. Membership is free and material is borrowed through the national inter-lending library services or returned by post. The library provides support for schools nationally and locally. The venue has an exhibition and event space.History and future plansThe library was established in 1953 on the recommendation of the Poetry Panel of the Arts Council of Great Britain, with the remit of promoting modern and contemporary poetry. Opened by poets TS Eliot and Herbert Read, the library quickly grew beyond the capacity of premises and then the next, moving from Albemarle Street to Piccadilly, to Long Acre in Covent Garden and then to a larger space back in Piccadilly.It has been located at the Royal Festival Hall since 1988, when Seamus Heaney opened the new venue. With the relocation, the library was given the Signal Poetry Collection of children's poetry books which had been held by Book House. This formed the basis for the library's body of works for children and young adults, available for loan and reference. The beech furniture was designed for the site by Terrance Conran. The library was closed from 2005 to 2007 during refurbishment of the Festival Hall building. Its re-opening was celebrated with London's first festival of literature.

A Room for London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Queen Elizabeth Hall
London, SE1 8XX

020 7960 4200

Royal Automobile Club
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
89 Pall Mall
London, SW1Y 5NQ

020 7930 2345

The Royal Automobile Club is a British private club and is not to be confused with RAC, an automotive services company, which it formerly owned.It has two club houses: one in London at 89–91 Pall Mall, and the other in the countryside at Woodcote Park, Surrey, next to the City of London Freemen's School. Like many other gentlemen's clubs in London today, the Royal Automobile Club has recently allowed women to be members.HistoryIt was founded on 10 August 1897 as the Automobile Club of Great Britain . The headquarters was originally in a block of flats at 4 Whitehall Court, moving to 119 Piccadilly in 1902.During 1902 the organisation, together with the recently formed Association of Motor Manufactures and Traders campaigned vigorously for the relaxation of speed limits claiming that the 14 mph speed limit imposed by the Locomotives on Highways Act 1896 was 'absurd' and was seldom observed. The organisations, with support from the Prime Minister Arthur Balfour, had considerable influence over the forthcoming Motor Car Act 1903 which originally proposed to remove all speed limits for cars while introducing the offence of driving recklessly. In the face of considerable opposition a speed limit of 20 mph was retained in addition to the creation of the offence of driving recklessly, dangerously or negligently.

Embassy of Kosovo, London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
8 John Street
London, WC1N 2ES

The Embassy of Kosovo in London is the diplomatic mission of Kosovo in the United Kingdom. It is located at 8 John Street, London, WC1N 2ES.

Paris Gardens
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
19 Hatfields
London, SE1 8DJ

Trafalgar Studios
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
14 Whitehall
London, SW1A 2

Trafalgar Studios, formerly the Whitehall Theatre until 2004, is a West End theatre in Whitehall, near Trafalgar Square, in the City of Westminster, London.Also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation, the building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. Studio 1, the larger of the two spaces with 380 seats, opened on 3 June 2004 with the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Othello. Studio 2, with 100 seats, opened in October 2005 with the play Cyprus.History1930 to 1996The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. It had 634 seats. The theatre opened on 29 September 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre's licensee. In November 1933 Henry Daniell appeared there as Portman in Afterwards. Hackett presented several other plays of his own before leaving in 1934, and the theatre built its reputation for modern comedies throughout the rest of the decade. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the West End. In 1942, The Whitehall Follies, featuring Phyllis Dixey, the first stripper to perform in the theatre district, opened with great fanfare and became an immediate success. Dixey leased the theatre and remained in it for the next five years.

St James's Street
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Spencer House/27 St. James's Pl
London, SW1A 1LE

20-74951771

St James's Street is the principal street in the district of St James's, central London. It runs from Piccadilly downhill to St James's Palace and Pall Mall. The main gatehouse of the palace is at the southern end of the road, and in the 17th century Clarendon House faced down the street across Piccadilly on the site of most of Albemarle Street.St James's Street was built up without an over-all plan but received a boost with Lord St Albans' planned construction of St. James's Square. Today St James's Street contains several of London's best known gentlemen's clubs, such as Brooks's, the Carlton Club and White's, some exclusive shops and various offices. A series of small side streets on its western side lead to some extremely expensive properties overlooking Green Park, including Spencer House and the Royal Over-Seas League at the end of Park Place.Two 18th-century yards survive behind the noble frontages and giant orders of columns or pilasters of the street. One is Blue Ball Yard, with stables built in 1742. The other is Pickering Place, with four informal Georgian brick houses of 1731. Jermyn Street leads off St James's Street to the east. The nearest tube station is Green Park to the west on Piccadilly.

Playhouse Theatre
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Northumberland Ave
London, WC2N 5

870-0606631

The Playhouse Theatre is a West End theatre in the City of Westminster, located in Northumberland Avenue, near Trafalgar Square. The Theatre was built by F. H. Fowler and Hill with a seating capacity of 1,200. It was rebuilt in 1907 and still retains its original substage machinery. Its current seating capacity is 786.HistoryEarly yearsBuilt by Sefton Henry Parry as the Royal Avenue Theatre, it opened on 11 March 1882 with 1200 seats. The first production at the theatre was Jacques Offenbach's Madame Favart. In its early seasons, the theatre hosted comic operas, burlesques and farces for several years. For much of this time, the low comedian Arthur Roberts, a popular star of the music halls, starred at the theatre. By the 1890s, the theatre was presenting drama, and in 1894 Annie Horniman, the tea heiress, anonymously sponsored the actress Florence Farr in a season of plays at the theatre. Farr's first production was unsuccessful, and so she prevailed upon her friend, George Bernard Shaw, to hurry and make his West End début at the theatre with Arms and the Man in 1894. It was successful enough to allow him to discontinue music criticism to focus full-time on play writing. The legendary actress Gladys Cooper managed the theatre for some years.

Playhouse Theatre
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Northumberland Ave
London, WC2N 5

870-0606631

The Playhouse Theatre is a West End theatre in the City of Westminster, located in Northumberland Avenue, near Trafalgar Square. The Theatre was built by F. H. Fowler and Hill with a seating capacity of 1,200. It was rebuilt in 1907 and still retains its original substage machinery. Its current seating capacity is 786.HistoryEarly yearsBuilt by Sefton Henry Parry as the Royal Avenue Theatre, it opened on 11 March 1882 with 1200 seats. The first production at the theatre was Jacques Offenbach's Madame Favart. In its early seasons, the theatre hosted comic operas, burlesques and farces for several years. For much of this time, the low comedian Arthur Roberts, a popular star of the music halls, starred at the theatre. By the 1890s, the theatre was presenting drama, and in 1894 Annie Horniman, the tea heiress, anonymously sponsored the actress Florence Farr in a season of plays at the theatre. Farr's first production was unsuccessful, and so she prevailed upon her friend, George Bernard Shaw, to hurry and make his West End début at the theatre with Arms and the Man in 1894. It was successful enough to allow him to discontinue music criticism to focus full-time on play writing. The legendary actress Gladys Cooper managed the theatre for some years.

Embankment tube station
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Villiers Street
London, WC2N 6

Embankment is a London Underground station in the City of Westminster, known by various names during its history. It is served by the Circle, District, Northern and Bakerloo lines. On the Northern and Bakerloo lines, the station is between Waterloo and Charing Cross stations; on the Circle and District lines, it is between Westminster and Temple and is in Travelcard Zone 1. The station has two entrances, one on Victoria Embankment and the other on Villiers Street. The station is adjacent to Victoria Embankment Gardens and is close to Charing Cross station, Embankment Pier, Hungerford Bridge, Cleopatra's Needle, the Royal Air Force Memorial, the Savoy Chapel and Savoy Hotel and the Playhouse and New Players Theatres.

St James's Square
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
St. James's, London, SW1
London, SW1Y 4RB

020 7234 5800

St James's Square is the only square in the exclusive St James's district of the City of Westminster. It has predominantly Georgian and Neo-Georgian architecture and a garden in the centre. For its first two hundred or so years it was one of the three or four most fashionable residential address in London. It is now home to the headquarters of a number of well-known businesses, including BP and Rio Tinto Group; to three private members' clubs, the East India Club, the Canning Club and the Naval and Military Club; to the High Commission of Cyprus; and to the London Library. Also based in the square is the premises of the think tank Chatham House. The square's main feature is an equestrian statue of William III erected in 1808.HistoryIn 1662 Charles II extended a lease over the 45 acres of Pall Mall (St James's) Field held by Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans to 1720 and soon afterwards the earl began to lay out the property for development. The earl petitioned the king that the class of occupants they both hoped to attract to the new district would not take houses without the prospect of eventually acquiring them outright, and in 1665 the king granted the freehold of the site of St. James's Square and some closely adjacent parts of the field to the earl's trustees. The location was convenient for the royal palaces of Whitehall and St James. The houses on the east, north and west sides of the square were soon developed, each of them being constructed separately as was usual at that time.

Wimbledon Village
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
60 High Street
London, SW19

Local Business Near Russell Square tube station

Starbucks UK
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Waterloo Station
London, United Kingdom

02079284920

Calder Bookshop
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
51 The Cut
London, United Kingdom SE1 8

02076202900

Max Hairdresser
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
126A Cornwall Rd
London, United Kingdom

+44 (0) 79 5877 6774

Bridge Tandoori
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
214 Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

London Eye Ice Rink
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
The London Eye, Riverside Building, County Hall, Westminster Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 7PB

0871 781 3000

The Merlin Entertainments London Eye is excited to announce that, for the first time ever, customers will have the opportunity to don their best winter attire and take to the London Eye’s very own, open air ice skating rink. Offering the unique opportunity to celebrate the festive season taking in the best views of London – both from the London Eye with a warm cup of mulled wine and from the Southbank’s first ice rink, looking up at the global icon – it’s sure to be the must-do winter activity this year.

Benugo, Waterloo
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
19 - 20 The Balcony, Waterloo Station
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

0207 928 0786

Yo Sushi
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Waterloo station
London, United Kingdom

Southbank Tandoori
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
39 The Cut
London, United Kingdom SE1 8

+44 (0) 20 7261 1523

Downing Street
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
st. Downing
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

020 7270 3000

Downing Street in London, United Kingdom, has for more than three hundred years housed the official residences of two of the most senior British Cabinet ministers: the First Lord of the Treasury, an office now synonymous with that of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom; and the Second Lord of the Treasury, an office held by the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The Prime Minister's official residence is 10 Downing Street; the Chancellor's official residence is next door at Number 11. The government's Chief Whip has an official residence at Number 12, although the current Chief Whip's residence is at Number 9.Downing Street is in Whitehall in central London, a few minutes' walk from the Houses of Parliament and a little further from Buckingham Palace. The street was built in the 1680s by Sir George Downing on the site of a mansion, Hampden House. The houses on the south side of the street were demolished in the 19th century to make way for government offices now occupied by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. "Downing Street" is used as a metonym for the Government of the United Kingdom.

Waterloo London Underground Station
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
York Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 7ND

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Burger King Waterloo Station
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Waterloo Railway Station
London, United Kingdom SE1 8SE

020 7261 9492

London Waterloo East railway station
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Sandell Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 8NH

0845 748 4950

Waterloo East, also known as London Waterloo East, is a railway station in central London on the line from through London Bridge towards Kent, in the southeast of England. Although Waterloo East is a through-station, it is classed for ticketing purposes as a central London terminus. Services through the station are operated by Southeastern and it is situated within fare zone 1.An elevated walkway across Waterloo Road connects it to the larger Waterloo station and provides the main access. The eastern ends of Waterloo East's platforms provide pedestrian connection to Southwark station which is served by London Underground's Jubilee line; at street level there is a modest entrance in Sandell Street. Connections with the Underground's Bakerloo, Northern and Waterloo & City lines are available at Waterloo tube station. There is no station building; the ticket office of the main station serves it, though there are ticket machines at the eastern end of the walkway.The four platforms at Waterloo East are lettered rather than numbered to ensure that staff who work at both Waterloo East and the adjoining Waterloo station, which is managed and branded separately and features numbered platforms, do not confuse the platforms at the two stations. This stratagem is also used for the Thameslink platforms at St. Pancras International and their predecessors at, as well as at. Ticket barriers have been installed at the Sandell Street and Southwark station entrances, and also at the main entrance from Waterloo station following the completion of the retail balcony in 2012.

The Anchor & Hope, The Cut SE1
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
36 The Cut
London, United Kingdom SE1 8LP

020 7928 9898

Sports Bar & Grill
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Waterloo Station Unit 1
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

Scumbag monkey training
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
7 Downing st
London, United Kingdom wc1 1aa

01305 888123

Auberge Bar & Restaurant
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
1 Sandell St
London, United Kingdom SE1 8UH

+44 (0) 20 7633 0610

Grammex
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
25 Lower Marsh
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

020 7401 3830

Westminster Pier River Cruise
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom

City Cruises - London Eye To Greenwich
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Riverside Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

Shell Centre
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
York Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 7NA

The Shell Centre, in London, is one of the two central offices of oil major Shell (the other is in The Hague). It is located on Belvedere Road in the London Borough of Lambeth. It is a prominent feature on the South Bank of the River Thames near County Hall, and now forms the backdrop to the London Eye.The current Shell Centre comprises the tower building and three adjoining nine-storey wings (collectively formerly known as the "Upstream Building"). The original development also included a separate building known as the "Downstream Building", which was separated from the Upstream Building by the railway viaduct between Charing Cross and Waterloo East. The Downstream Building was disposed of by Shell in the 1990s and is now a block of residential apartments known as the White House, and has been heightened by a storey.Site history and layoutThe Shell Centre occupies part of the site cleared for the 1951 Festival of Britain. The areas closer to the River Thames now include Jubilee Gardens and the South Bank Centre. Jubilee Gardens remained undeveloped prior to its laying out as an open space, largely because of a restrictive covenant in favour of Shell that restricts any building on the part of the site directly between the Shell Tower and the River Thames. The naming of the Shell Centre buildings perpetuated the split of the Festival site into distinct Upstream and Downstream areas – separated by the railway viaduct approach to Hungerford Bridge.