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Stephen's Green Shopping Centre, Dublin | Tourist Information


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St Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (01) 4780888

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre is a large indoor shopping centre located at the top of Grafton Street in the Southside of Dublin City. It is named after St. Stephen's Green, a nearby park (its street address is Stephens Green West).HistoryThe Dandelion Market, well known as the site of U2's earliest gigs and its array of stalls selling punk badges, clothes and posters was situated in the area the shopping centre now resides in. The site had been assembled over the years by the Slazanger family.The market, which closed in 1981, is commemorated with a plaque, while Sinnotts Bar on South King Street is the only part of the original site that remains. Work began on the St. Stephen's Green Shopping Centre in 1985, with the whole project taking three years to complete. The centre officially opened its doors on 8 November 1988.ShopsThe centre has over 100 outlets. Major franchises include Dunnes Stores, Boots, Gamestop and TK Maxx. Examples of other, more independent shops include the gothic and alternative clothes shop Asha, leading Irish men's branded fashion clothing store 'Counterpropaganda' and the wrestling devoted shop Wrestling Mania. It also houses a 'Big & Tall' mans shop called Kingsize Menswear and has a large food court.

Interest Near Stephen's Green Shopping Centre

The Abbey Theatre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
26 Lower Abbey Street
Dublin, Ireland

The Abbey Theatre, also known as the National Theatre of Ireland, in Dublin, Republic of Ireland, first opened its doors to the public on 27 December 1904. Despite losing its original building to a fire in 1951, it has remained active to the present day. The Abbey was the first state-subsidized theatre in the English-speaking world; from 1925 onwards it received an annual subsidy from the Irish Free State. Since July 1966, the Abbey has been located at 26 Lower Abbey Street, Dublin 1.In its early years, the theatre was closely associated with the writers of the Irish Literary Revival, many of whom were involved in its founding and most of whom had plays staged there. The Abbey served as a nursery for many of the leading Irish playwrights and actors of the 20th century, including William Butler Yeats, Lady Gregory, Seán O'Casey and John Millington Synge. In addition, through its extensive programme of touring abroad and its high visibility to foreign, particularly American, audiences, it has become an important part of the Irish tourist industry.HistoryOriginsThe Abbey arose from three distinct bases, the first of which was the seminal Irish Literary Theatre. Founded by Lady Gregory, Edward Martyn and W. B. Yeats in 1899—with assistance from George Moore—it presented plays in the Antient Concert Rooms and the Gaiety Theatre, which brought critical approval but limited public interest.

Landmark Near Stephen's Green Shopping Centre

Trinity College, Dublin
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
College Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+35318961812

St Stephen's Green
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Saint Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

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St Stephen's Green is a city centre public park in Dublin, Ireland. The current landscape of the park was designed by William Sheppard, which officially opened to the public on Tuesday, 27 July 1880. The park is adjacent to one of Dublin's main shopping streets, Grafton Street, and to a shopping centre named for it, while on its surrounding streets are the offices of a number of public bodies and the city terminus of one of Dublin's Luas tram lines. It is often informally called Stephen's Green. At 22acre, it is the largest of the parks in Dublin's main Georgian garden squares. Others include nearby Merrion Square and Fitzwilliam Square.The park is rectangular, surrounded by streets that once formed major traffic arteries through Dublin city centre, although traffic management changes implemented in 2004 during the course of the Luas works have greatly reduced the volume of traffic. These four bordering streets are called, respectively, St Stephen's Green North, St Stephen's Green South, St Stephen's Green East and St Stephen's Green West.HistoryUntil 1663 St Stephen's Green was a marshy common on the edge of Dublin, used for grazing. In that year Dublin Corporation, seeing an opportunity to raise much needed revenue, decided to enclose the centre of the common and to sell land around the perimeter for building. The park was enclosed with a wall in 1664. The houses built around the Green were rapidly replaced by new buildings in the Georgian style and by the end of the eighteenth century the Green was a place of resort for the better-off of the city. Much of the present-day landscape of the square comprises modern buildings, some in a replica Georgian style, and relatively little survives from the 18th and 19th centuries.

St Stephen's Green
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Saint Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

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St Stephen's Green is a city centre public park in Dublin, Ireland. The current landscape of the park was designed by William Sheppard, which officially opened to the public on Tuesday, 27 July 1880. The park is adjacent to one of Dublin's main shopping streets, Grafton Street, and to a shopping centre named for it, while on its surrounding streets are the offices of a number of public bodies and the city terminus of one of Dublin's Luas tram lines. It is often informally called Stephen's Green. At 22acre, it is the largest of the parks in Dublin's main Georgian garden squares. Others include nearby Merrion Square and Fitzwilliam Square.The park is rectangular, surrounded by streets that once formed major traffic arteries through Dublin city centre, although traffic management changes implemented in 2004 during the course of the Luas works have greatly reduced the volume of traffic. These four bordering streets are called, respectively, St Stephen's Green North, St Stephen's Green South, St Stephen's Green East and St Stephen's Green West.HistoryUntil 1663 St Stephen's Green was a marshy common on the edge of Dublin, used for grazing. In that year Dublin Corporation, seeing an opportunity to raise much needed revenue, decided to enclose the centre of the common and to sell land around the perimeter for building. The park was enclosed with a wall in 1664. The houses built around the Green were rapidly replaced by new buildings in the Georgian style and by the end of the eighteenth century the Green was a place of resort for the better-off of the city. Much of the present-day landscape of the square comprises modern buildings, some in a replica Georgian style, and relatively little survives from the 18th and 19th centuries.

Trinity College, Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
College Green, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

01 896 1000

Trinity College is the sole constituent college of the University of Dublin, a research university in Ireland. The college was founded in 1592 as the "mother" of a new university, modelled after the collegiate universities of Oxford and of Cambridge, but, unlike these, only one college was ever established; as such, the designations "Trinity College" and "University of Dublin" are usually synonymous for practical purposes. It is one of the seven ancient universities of Britain and Ireland, as well as Ireland's oldest university.Originally it was established outside the city walls of Dublin in the buildings of the dissolved Augustinian Priory of All Hallows. Trinity College was set up in part to consolidate the rule of the Tudor monarchy in Ireland, and it was seen as the university of the Protestant Ascendancy for much of its history. Although Catholics and Dissenters had been permitted to enter as early as the end of the XVIII century, certain restrictions on their membership of the college remained until 1873 . From 1871 to 1970, the Catholic Church in Ireland forbade its adherents from attending Trinity College without permission. Women were first admitted to the college as full members in January 1904.

Merrion Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Square
Dublin, Ireland D2

Merrion Square is a Georgian garden square on the southside of Dublin city centre.HistoryThe square was laid out after 1762 and was largely complete by the beginning of the 19th century. The demand for such Georgian townhouse residences south of the River Liffey had been fueled by the decision of the then Earl of Kildare (later the Duke of Leinster) to build his Dublin home on the then undeveloped southside. He constructed the largest aristocratic residence in Dublin, Leinster House, second only to Dublin Castle. As a result of this construction, three new residential squares appeared on the Southside, Merrion Square (facing the garden front of Leinster House), St Stephen's Green and the smallest and last of Dublin's five Georgian squares to be built, Fitzwilliam Square.Aristocrats, bishops and the wealthy sold their northside townhouses and migrated to the new southside developments.LegacyMerrion Square is considered one of the city's finest surviving squares. Three sides are lined with Georgian redbrick townhouses; the West side abuts the grounds of Leinster House (seat of the Oireachtas), Government Buildings, the Natural History Museum and the National Gallery. The central railed-off garden is now a public park.

Iveagh Gardens
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Clonmel Street, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

The Iveagh Gardens is a public park located between Clonmel Street and Upper Hatch Street, near the National Concert Hall in Dublin, Ireland. It is designated as a National Historic Property.HistoryThe site of the gardens was shown in 1756 as Leeson's Fields after Joseph Leeson, 1st Earl of Milltown.Clonmell LawnsIn the late 18th century Lord Milltown leased the land to John Hatch, the principal developer of Harcourt and Hatch Streets. Hatch sold it to The 1st Earl of Clonmell (also known as "Copper-Faced Jack") as his private gardens. The gardens then became known as "Clonmell Lawns" Located on Harcourt Street is Clonmell House that faces on to Clonmell Street which leads into the Iveagh Gardens. A subterranean passage brought the Earl from his house to the gardens without him having to walk over the street. The Wide Streets Commission had planned for Clonmell Street to run through what is now the gardens thereby linking Harcourt Street to the then newly constructed Earlsfort Terrace. However, this passage was not located during archaeological monitoring conducted during the construction of the LUAS.Coburg GardensWhen the 1st Earl died in 1798, his son the 2nd Earl inherited the estate including Clonmell Gardens. The estate was sold in 1810 and the gardens were opened for public use around 1817 and renamed "Coburg Gardens" after the royal family of Saxe-Coburg. Entrance to the park was from the South Side of St Stephen's Green, the "Royal Horse Bazaar".

Iveagh Gardens
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Clonmel Street, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

The Iveagh Gardens is a public park located between Clonmel Street and Upper Hatch Street, near the National Concert Hall in Dublin, Ireland. It is designated as a National Historic Property.HistoryThe site of the gardens was shown in 1756 as Leeson's Fields after Joseph Leeson, 1st Earl of Milltown.Clonmell LawnsIn the late 18th century Lord Milltown leased the land to John Hatch, the principal developer of Harcourt and Hatch Streets. Hatch sold it to The 1st Earl of Clonmell (also known as "Copper-Faced Jack") as his private gardens. The gardens then became known as "Clonmell Lawns" Located on Harcourt Street is Clonmell House that faces on to Clonmell Street which leads into the Iveagh Gardens. A subterranean passage brought the Earl from his house to the gardens without him having to walk over the street. The Wide Streets Commission had planned for Clonmell Street to run through what is now the gardens thereby linking Harcourt Street to the then newly constructed Earlsfort Terrace. However, this passage was not located during archaeological monitoring conducted during the construction of the LUAS.Coburg GardensWhen the 1st Earl died in 1798, his son the 2nd Earl inherited the estate including Clonmell Gardens. The estate was sold in 1810 and the gardens were opened for public use around 1817 and renamed "Coburg Gardens" after the royal family of Saxe-Coburg. Entrance to the park was from the South Side of St Stephen's Green, the "Royal Horse Bazaar".

O'Connell Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Town
Dublin, Ireland 1

O'Connell Bridge is a road bridge spanning the River Liffey in Dublin, and joining O'Connell Street to D'Olier Street, Westmoreland Street and the south quays.HistoryThe original bridge was designed by James Gandon, and built between 1791 and 1794.Originally humped, and narrower, Carlisle bridge was a symmetrical, three semicircular arch structure constructed in granite with a Portland stone balustrade and obelisks on each of the four corners. A keystone head at the apex of the central span symbolises the River Liffey, corresponding to the heads on the Custom House which personify the other great rivers of Ireland.Since 1860,, to improve the streetscape and relieve traffic congestion on the bridge, it was intended to widen Carlisle Bridge to bring it to the same width as 70 metres wide Sackville Street which formed the north side carriageway connection to the Bridge. In 1877-1880 the bridge was reconstructed. As can be seen on orthophotography it spans now 45 m of the Liffey and is about 50 m wide. O'Connell Bridge is said to be unique in Europe as the only traffic bridge wider than it is long.

Mansion House, Dublin
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
2, Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

The Mansion House on Dawson Street, Dublin, has been the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin since 1715.FeaturesThe Mansion House's most famous features include the "Round Room", where the First Dáil assembled on 21 January 1919 to proclaim the Irish Declaration of Independence. On 21 January 1969 a special fiftieth anniversary joint session of Dáil Éireann and Seanad Éireann assembled there and was addressed by the then President of Ireland, Éamon de Valera.Externally, the distinctive metal portico over the main door was erected for the visit of Queen Victoria in 1900.Visitors and occupantsIts most famous occupants included Lord Mayors: Daniel O'Connell, nineteenth century nationalist leader Alfie Byrne (1930s), longest serving Lord Mayor in the 800-year history of the office Jim Mitchell (1976–77), the youngest Lord Mayor of Dublin, aged 29, in the history of the office Famous visitors to the mayoral residence include: Prince Rainier III and Princess Grace of Monaco Pope John Paul II Queen Victoria Mother Teresa Nelson Mandela

M.J.O'Neill's
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2 Suffolk Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

(01) 679-3656

M.J.O'Neill's is a notable bar and restaurant in central Dublin. It has occupied 2 Suffolk Street and adjacent buildings, continuing round the corner into Church Lane. It is claimed there has been a tavern on the site for some three hundred years. From 1875 it was owned by the Hogan Brothers, until M.J. O’Neill bought and renamed the premises in August 1927.The part in Church Lane was the site of a printing house, where William Butler published The Volunteers Journal and the Irish Herald in 1783, and in 1789 Arthur O’Connor published The Press, supporting Wolfe Tone’s republican views.The corner structure is an impressive four-storey, vaguely of the Arts and Crafts Movement, red-brick and early twentieth century, with prominent Tudor-style projecting bay windows. There is a fine decorated iron three-dials clock on the Suffolk Street frontage. The building is protected and in a conservation area. Now, opposite the Dublin Tourist Centre, it is a fixture on the tourist trail and pub crawls.The house has a mixed clientele. It is directly opposite Andrew Street Post Office, and near the shopping centre of Grafton Street. The discreet Church Lane door is convenient for the Bank of Ireland and other financial establishments in College Green. It is also the pub nearest to the Front Gate of Trinity College, Dublin and therefore attracting Arts undergraduates and academics. The original structure was divided into definite areas: a “cocktail bar” in the corner for the gentry, a public bar off Suffolk Street, and a back bar. In recent years the next-door premises in Church Lane have been added, as a carvery, and the interior has been opened up. A small snug, immediately inside the Church Lane entrance, was the significant venue for the “Fabians” of the early 1960s and for later left-wing students from Trinity College, Dublin.

City Hall, Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D

The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.OverviewLocated at the top of Parliament Street on the city's southern side, it stands next to Dublin Castle, the centre of the British government in Ireland until 1922. The street had been built in 1753, providing a continuation of Capel Street on the north bank of the Liffey, across the newly widened Essex Bridge, and so the exchange ended (and still ends) a long streetscape.The external structure is primarily made out of white Portland stone from a quarry in Dorset. The large size and fine fittings of the Royal exchange, with carved capitals by Simon Vierpyl, and plasterwork by the leading stuccodore Charles Thorpe, reflect the standing and prestige of Dublin in the 18th Century. The neo-classical building contains a central entrance hall or Rotunda, with a large dome supported by twelve columns which are surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants strolled and discussed business meetings.The function of the building was to provide a meeting place for Dublin's businessmen, where they could buy and sell goods and trade bills of exchange. It was also close to the then Customs House that stood on the site of today's Clarence Hotel, making it convenient for overseas merchants. The cost of building the exchange was met by the Parliament of Ireland, and this is reflected by the initials "SPQH", standing for "Senatus PopulusQue Hibernicus", meaning "The senate and people of Ireland" (an Irish version of SPQR).

Ha'penny Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Wellington Quay/Bachelors Walk
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

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Natural History Museum
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Street, Dubin 2
Dublin, Ireland

Ireland's Natural History Museum (Músaem Stair an Dúlra), sometimes called the Dead Zoo a branch of the National Museum of Ireland, is housed on Merrion Street in Dublin, Ireland. The museum was built in 1856 for parts of the collection of the Royal Dublin Society and building and collection were later passed to the Irish State.The Museum's collection and building have changed little since Victorian times, and it is sometimes described as a "museum of a museum".CollectionThe building is a ‘cabinet-style’ museum designed to showcase a wide-ranging and comprehensive zoological collection, and has changed little in over a century. Often described as a ‘museum of a museum’, its 10,000 exhibits provide a glimpse of the natural world that has delighted generations of visitors since the doors opened in 1857.As the collection is unique in range and vintage, the exhibits are a product of their age, with faded and worn pelts and visible marks from bullets and rough taxidermy. Larger specimens are displayed in large, wood-framed glass cases while smaller ones are kept under glass, protected from sunlight by moveable leather panels. The main room is heated by an underfloor system similar to a Roman hypocaust.The Irish Room, the ground floor of the museum, displays Irish animals, notably several mounted skeletons of giant Irish deer. Numerous skulls of those and other deer line the walls. Stuffed and mounted mammals, birds, fish — and insects and other animals native to or found in Ireland — comprise the rest of the ground floor. Many of the specimens of currently extant animals, such as badgers, hares, and foxes, are over a century old. A basking shark hangs from this ceiling.

Mansion House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

Grafton Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Grafton Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Dáil Éireann
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Leinster House, Kildare Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 618 3000

Fitzwilliam Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
20 Fitzwilliam Street Upper
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Fitzwilliam Square is a Georgian garden square in the south of central Dublin, Ireland. It was the last of the five Georgian squares in Dublin to be built, and is the smallest.The square was developed by Richard FitzWilliam, 7th Viscount FitzWilliam, hence the name. It was designed from 1789 and laid out in 1792. The center of the square was enclosed in 1813 through an Act of the Parliament of Ireland. To the north is the much larger Merrion Square, with which Richard FitzWilliam was also involved. The square was a popular place for the Irish Social Season of aristocrats entertaining in Dublin between January and Saint Patrick's Day each year.Shootings took place in the square during Bloody Sunday of 1920. Sir Thomas O'Shaughnessy (1850–1933), the last Recorder of Dublin, lived in Fitzwilliam Square and died there on 7 March 1933.The N11 road passes through the northwest side of the square on its way into central Dublin.In March 2011, the entire space at 14 Fitzwilliam Square was let on a flexible seven-year lease to gold bullion brokers GoldCore.

The Gaeity Theatre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Sth King Street
Dublin, Ireland

Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Adelaide Road
Dublin, Ireland

1 664 4600

The Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital is a public teaching hospital in Dublin, Ireland. The Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital in Dublin was founded in 1897 and is the National Referral Centre for both Eye and Ear, Nose & Throat disorders. It is a Public Voluntary Hospital, known affectionately by generations of Dubliners as the Eye and Ear. The hospital treats over 6,000 inpatients a year in its 90 beds, and over 80,000 outpatients, including attendances at Accident & Emergency. It houses the National Ophthalmic Pathology Laboratory and Registry of Ireland. It is funded by the Irish Government's Health Service Executive and provides specialist care in ophthalmology and ear, nose and throat disease.HistoryThe 1897 Dublin Eye and Ear Hospital Act established the hospital by amalgamating the National Eye Hospital and St. Mark’s Ophthalmic Hospital for Diseases of the Eye and Ear . Along with the decision to merge the hospitals, the law provided for expansion. In 1899 a site was purchased on Adelaide Road, where the current hospital was constructed. On 18 February 1904, all patients were transferred from the National Eye Hospital and St. Mark’s Hospital.ManagementThe hospital is a registered charity governed by a President, Council and Hospital Management Group. The Management Group consist of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Director of Strategy and Corporate Affairs, Director of Finance and Organisation Services, Director of Nursing, Director of Operations and Human Resources, Medical Director and Director of Education and Research. Its current CEO is Danny Dunne. The hospital's annual core budget is approximately €24 million.

Landmark Near Stephen's Green Shopping Centre

Trinity College, Dublin
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
College Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+35318961812

St Stephen's Green
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Saint Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

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St Stephen's Green is a city centre public park in Dublin, Ireland. The current landscape of the park was designed by William Sheppard, which officially opened to the public on Tuesday, 27 July 1880. The park is adjacent to one of Dublin's main shopping streets, Grafton Street, and to a shopping centre named for it, while on its surrounding streets are the offices of a number of public bodies and the city terminus of one of Dublin's Luas tram lines. It is often informally called Stephen's Green. At 22acre, it is the largest of the parks in Dublin's main Georgian garden squares. Others include nearby Merrion Square and Fitzwilliam Square.The park is rectangular, surrounded by streets that once formed major traffic arteries through Dublin city centre, although traffic management changes implemented in 2004 during the course of the Luas works have greatly reduced the volume of traffic. These four bordering streets are called, respectively, St Stephen's Green North, St Stephen's Green South, St Stephen's Green East and St Stephen's Green West.HistoryUntil 1663 St Stephen's Green was a marshy common on the edge of Dublin, used for grazing. In that year Dublin Corporation, seeing an opportunity to raise much needed revenue, decided to enclose the centre of the common and to sell land around the perimeter for building. The park was enclosed with a wall in 1664. The houses built around the Green were rapidly replaced by new buildings in the Georgian style and by the end of the eighteenth century the Green was a place of resort for the better-off of the city. Much of the present-day landscape of the square comprises modern buildings, some in a replica Georgian style, and relatively little survives from the 18th and 19th centuries.

St Stephen's Green
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Saint Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

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St Stephen's Green is a city centre public park in Dublin, Ireland. The current landscape of the park was designed by William Sheppard, which officially opened to the public on Tuesday, 27 July 1880. The park is adjacent to one of Dublin's main shopping streets, Grafton Street, and to a shopping centre named for it, while on its surrounding streets are the offices of a number of public bodies and the city terminus of one of Dublin's Luas tram lines. It is often informally called Stephen's Green. At 22acre, it is the largest of the parks in Dublin's main Georgian garden squares. Others include nearby Merrion Square and Fitzwilliam Square.The park is rectangular, surrounded by streets that once formed major traffic arteries through Dublin city centre, although traffic management changes implemented in 2004 during the course of the Luas works have greatly reduced the volume of traffic. These four bordering streets are called, respectively, St Stephen's Green North, St Stephen's Green South, St Stephen's Green East and St Stephen's Green West.HistoryUntil 1663 St Stephen's Green was a marshy common on the edge of Dublin, used for grazing. In that year Dublin Corporation, seeing an opportunity to raise much needed revenue, decided to enclose the centre of the common and to sell land around the perimeter for building. The park was enclosed with a wall in 1664. The houses built around the Green were rapidly replaced by new buildings in the Georgian style and by the end of the eighteenth century the Green was a place of resort for the better-off of the city. Much of the present-day landscape of the square comprises modern buildings, some in a replica Georgian style, and relatively little survives from the 18th and 19th centuries.

Trinity College, Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
College Green, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

01 896 1000

Trinity College is the sole constituent college of the University of Dublin, a research university in Ireland. The college was founded in 1592 as the "mother" of a new university, modelled after the collegiate universities of Oxford and of Cambridge, but, unlike these, only one college was ever established; as such, the designations "Trinity College" and "University of Dublin" are usually synonymous for practical purposes. It is one of the seven ancient universities of Britain and Ireland, as well as Ireland's oldest university.Originally it was established outside the city walls of Dublin in the buildings of the dissolved Augustinian Priory of All Hallows. Trinity College was set up in part to consolidate the rule of the Tudor monarchy in Ireland, and it was seen as the university of the Protestant Ascendancy for much of its history. Although Catholics and Dissenters had been permitted to enter as early as the end of the XVIII century, certain restrictions on their membership of the college remained until 1873 . From 1871 to 1970, the Catholic Church in Ireland forbade its adherents from attending Trinity College without permission. Women were first admitted to the college as full members in January 1904.

Merrion Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Square
Dublin, Ireland D2

Merrion Square is a Georgian garden square on the southside of Dublin city centre.HistoryThe square was laid out after 1762 and was largely complete by the beginning of the 19th century. The demand for such Georgian townhouse residences south of the River Liffey had been fueled by the decision of the then Earl of Kildare (later the Duke of Leinster) to build his Dublin home on the then undeveloped southside. He constructed the largest aristocratic residence in Dublin, Leinster House, second only to Dublin Castle. As a result of this construction, three new residential squares appeared on the Southside, Merrion Square (facing the garden front of Leinster House), St Stephen's Green and the smallest and last of Dublin's five Georgian squares to be built, Fitzwilliam Square.Aristocrats, bishops and the wealthy sold their northside townhouses and migrated to the new southside developments.LegacyMerrion Square is considered one of the city's finest surviving squares. Three sides are lined with Georgian redbrick townhouses; the West side abuts the grounds of Leinster House (seat of the Oireachtas), Government Buildings, the Natural History Museum and the National Gallery. The central railed-off garden is now a public park.

Iveagh Gardens
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Clonmel Street, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

The Iveagh Gardens is a public park located between Clonmel Street and Upper Hatch Street, near the National Concert Hall in Dublin, Ireland. It is designated as a National Historic Property.HistoryThe site of the gardens was shown in 1756 as Leeson's Fields after Joseph Leeson, 1st Earl of Milltown.Clonmell LawnsIn the late 18th century Lord Milltown leased the land to John Hatch, the principal developer of Harcourt and Hatch Streets. Hatch sold it to The 1st Earl of Clonmell (also known as "Copper-Faced Jack") as his private gardens. The gardens then became known as "Clonmell Lawns" Located on Harcourt Street is Clonmell House that faces on to Clonmell Street which leads into the Iveagh Gardens. A subterranean passage brought the Earl from his house to the gardens without him having to walk over the street. The Wide Streets Commission had planned for Clonmell Street to run through what is now the gardens thereby linking Harcourt Street to the then newly constructed Earlsfort Terrace. However, this passage was not located during archaeological monitoring conducted during the construction of the LUAS.Coburg GardensWhen the 1st Earl died in 1798, his son the 2nd Earl inherited the estate including Clonmell Gardens. The estate was sold in 1810 and the gardens were opened for public use around 1817 and renamed "Coburg Gardens" after the royal family of Saxe-Coburg. Entrance to the park was from the South Side of St Stephen's Green, the "Royal Horse Bazaar".

Iveagh Gardens
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Clonmel Street, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

The Iveagh Gardens is a public park located between Clonmel Street and Upper Hatch Street, near the National Concert Hall in Dublin, Ireland. It is designated as a National Historic Property.HistoryThe site of the gardens was shown in 1756 as Leeson's Fields after Joseph Leeson, 1st Earl of Milltown.Clonmell LawnsIn the late 18th century Lord Milltown leased the land to John Hatch, the principal developer of Harcourt and Hatch Streets. Hatch sold it to The 1st Earl of Clonmell (also known as "Copper-Faced Jack") as his private gardens. The gardens then became known as "Clonmell Lawns" Located on Harcourt Street is Clonmell House that faces on to Clonmell Street which leads into the Iveagh Gardens. A subterranean passage brought the Earl from his house to the gardens without him having to walk over the street. The Wide Streets Commission had planned for Clonmell Street to run through what is now the gardens thereby linking Harcourt Street to the then newly constructed Earlsfort Terrace. However, this passage was not located during archaeological monitoring conducted during the construction of the LUAS.Coburg GardensWhen the 1st Earl died in 1798, his son the 2nd Earl inherited the estate including Clonmell Gardens. The estate was sold in 1810 and the gardens were opened for public use around 1817 and renamed "Coburg Gardens" after the royal family of Saxe-Coburg. Entrance to the park was from the South Side of St Stephen's Green, the "Royal Horse Bazaar".

O'Connell Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Town
Dublin, Ireland 1

O'Connell Bridge is a road bridge spanning the River Liffey in Dublin, and joining O'Connell Street to D'Olier Street, Westmoreland Street and the south quays.HistoryThe original bridge was designed by James Gandon, and built between 1791 and 1794.Originally humped, and narrower, Carlisle bridge was a symmetrical, three semicircular arch structure constructed in granite with a Portland stone balustrade and obelisks on each of the four corners. A keystone head at the apex of the central span symbolises the River Liffey, corresponding to the heads on the Custom House which personify the other great rivers of Ireland.Since 1860,, to improve the streetscape and relieve traffic congestion on the bridge, it was intended to widen Carlisle Bridge to bring it to the same width as 70 metres wide Sackville Street which formed the north side carriageway connection to the Bridge. In 1877-1880 the bridge was reconstructed. As can be seen on orthophotography it spans now 45 m of the Liffey and is about 50 m wide. O'Connell Bridge is said to be unique in Europe as the only traffic bridge wider than it is long.

Mansion House, Dublin
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
2, Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

The Mansion House on Dawson Street, Dublin, has been the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin since 1715.FeaturesThe Mansion House's most famous features include the "Round Room", where the First Dáil assembled on 21 January 1919 to proclaim the Irish Declaration of Independence. On 21 January 1969 a special fiftieth anniversary joint session of Dáil Éireann and Seanad Éireann assembled there and was addressed by the then President of Ireland, Éamon de Valera.Externally, the distinctive metal portico over the main door was erected for the visit of Queen Victoria in 1900.Visitors and occupantsIts most famous occupants included Lord Mayors: Daniel O'Connell, nineteenth century nationalist leader Alfie Byrne (1930s), longest serving Lord Mayor in the 800-year history of the office Jim Mitchell (1976–77), the youngest Lord Mayor of Dublin, aged 29, in the history of the office Famous visitors to the mayoral residence include: Prince Rainier III and Princess Grace of Monaco Pope John Paul II Queen Victoria Mother Teresa Nelson Mandela

M.J.O'Neill's
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2 Suffolk Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

(01) 679-3656

M.J.O'Neill's is a notable bar and restaurant in central Dublin. It has occupied 2 Suffolk Street and adjacent buildings, continuing round the corner into Church Lane. It is claimed there has been a tavern on the site for some three hundred years. From 1875 it was owned by the Hogan Brothers, until M.J. O’Neill bought and renamed the premises in August 1927.The part in Church Lane was the site of a printing house, where William Butler published The Volunteers Journal and the Irish Herald in 1783, and in 1789 Arthur O’Connor published The Press, supporting Wolfe Tone’s republican views.The corner structure is an impressive four-storey, vaguely of the Arts and Crafts Movement, red-brick and early twentieth century, with prominent Tudor-style projecting bay windows. There is a fine decorated iron three-dials clock on the Suffolk Street frontage. The building is protected and in a conservation area. Now, opposite the Dublin Tourist Centre, it is a fixture on the tourist trail and pub crawls.The house has a mixed clientele. It is directly opposite Andrew Street Post Office, and near the shopping centre of Grafton Street. The discreet Church Lane door is convenient for the Bank of Ireland and other financial establishments in College Green. It is also the pub nearest to the Front Gate of Trinity College, Dublin and therefore attracting Arts undergraduates and academics. The original structure was divided into definite areas: a “cocktail bar” in the corner for the gentry, a public bar off Suffolk Street, and a back bar. In recent years the next-door premises in Church Lane have been added, as a carvery, and the interior has been opened up. A small snug, immediately inside the Church Lane entrance, was the significant venue for the “Fabians” of the early 1960s and for later left-wing students from Trinity College, Dublin.

City Hall, Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D

The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.OverviewLocated at the top of Parliament Street on the city's southern side, it stands next to Dublin Castle, the centre of the British government in Ireland until 1922. The street had been built in 1753, providing a continuation of Capel Street on the north bank of the Liffey, across the newly widened Essex Bridge, and so the exchange ended (and still ends) a long streetscape.The external structure is primarily made out of white Portland stone from a quarry in Dorset. The large size and fine fittings of the Royal exchange, with carved capitals by Simon Vierpyl, and plasterwork by the leading stuccodore Charles Thorpe, reflect the standing and prestige of Dublin in the 18th Century. The neo-classical building contains a central entrance hall or Rotunda, with a large dome supported by twelve columns which are surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants strolled and discussed business meetings.The function of the building was to provide a meeting place for Dublin's businessmen, where they could buy and sell goods and trade bills of exchange. It was also close to the then Customs House that stood on the site of today's Clarence Hotel, making it convenient for overseas merchants. The cost of building the exchange was met by the Parliament of Ireland, and this is reflected by the initials "SPQH", standing for "Senatus PopulusQue Hibernicus", meaning "The senate and people of Ireland" (an Irish version of SPQR).

Ha'penny Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Wellington Quay/Bachelors Walk
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

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Natural History Museum
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Street, Dubin 2
Dublin, Ireland

Ireland's Natural History Museum (Músaem Stair an Dúlra), sometimes called the Dead Zoo a branch of the National Museum of Ireland, is housed on Merrion Street in Dublin, Ireland. The museum was built in 1856 for parts of the collection of the Royal Dublin Society and building and collection were later passed to the Irish State.The Museum's collection and building have changed little since Victorian times, and it is sometimes described as a "museum of a museum".CollectionThe building is a ‘cabinet-style’ museum designed to showcase a wide-ranging and comprehensive zoological collection, and has changed little in over a century. Often described as a ‘museum of a museum’, its 10,000 exhibits provide a glimpse of the natural world that has delighted generations of visitors since the doors opened in 1857.As the collection is unique in range and vintage, the exhibits are a product of their age, with faded and worn pelts and visible marks from bullets and rough taxidermy. Larger specimens are displayed in large, wood-framed glass cases while smaller ones are kept under glass, protected from sunlight by moveable leather panels. The main room is heated by an underfloor system similar to a Roman hypocaust.The Irish Room, the ground floor of the museum, displays Irish animals, notably several mounted skeletons of giant Irish deer. Numerous skulls of those and other deer line the walls. Stuffed and mounted mammals, birds, fish — and insects and other animals native to or found in Ireland — comprise the rest of the ground floor. Many of the specimens of currently extant animals, such as badgers, hares, and foxes, are over a century old. A basking shark hangs from this ceiling.

Mansion House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

Grafton Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Grafton Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Dáil Éireann
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Leinster House, Kildare Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 618 3000

Fitzwilliam Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
20 Fitzwilliam Street Upper
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Fitzwilliam Square is a Georgian garden square in the south of central Dublin, Ireland. It was the last of the five Georgian squares in Dublin to be built, and is the smallest.The square was developed by Richard FitzWilliam, 7th Viscount FitzWilliam, hence the name. It was designed from 1789 and laid out in 1792. The center of the square was enclosed in 1813 through an Act of the Parliament of Ireland. To the north is the much larger Merrion Square, with which Richard FitzWilliam was also involved. The square was a popular place for the Irish Social Season of aristocrats entertaining in Dublin between January and Saint Patrick's Day each year.Shootings took place in the square during Bloody Sunday of 1920. Sir Thomas O'Shaughnessy (1850–1933), the last Recorder of Dublin, lived in Fitzwilliam Square and died there on 7 March 1933.The N11 road passes through the northwest side of the square on its way into central Dublin.In March 2011, the entire space at 14 Fitzwilliam Square was let on a flexible seven-year lease to gold bullion brokers GoldCore.

The Gaeity Theatre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Sth King Street
Dublin, Ireland

Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Adelaide Road
Dublin, Ireland

1 664 4600

The Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital is a public teaching hospital in Dublin, Ireland. The Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital in Dublin was founded in 1897 and is the National Referral Centre for both Eye and Ear, Nose & Throat disorders. It is a Public Voluntary Hospital, known affectionately by generations of Dubliners as the Eye and Ear. The hospital treats over 6,000 inpatients a year in its 90 beds, and over 80,000 outpatients, including attendances at Accident & Emergency. It houses the National Ophthalmic Pathology Laboratory and Registry of Ireland. It is funded by the Irish Government's Health Service Executive and provides specialist care in ophthalmology and ear, nose and throat disease.HistoryThe 1897 Dublin Eye and Ear Hospital Act established the hospital by amalgamating the National Eye Hospital and St. Mark’s Ophthalmic Hospital for Diseases of the Eye and Ear . Along with the decision to merge the hospitals, the law provided for expansion. In 1899 a site was purchased on Adelaide Road, where the current hospital was constructed. On 18 February 1904, all patients were transferred from the National Eye Hospital and St. Mark’s Hospital.ManagementThe hospital is a registered charity governed by a President, Council and Hospital Management Group. The Management Group consist of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Director of Strategy and Corporate Affairs, Director of Finance and Organisation Services, Director of Nursing, Director of Operations and Human Resources, Medical Director and Director of Education and Research. Its current CEO is Danny Dunne. The hospital's annual core budget is approximately €24 million.

Shopping Mall Near Stephen's Green Shopping Centre

Jervis Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
24-29 Mary Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

+353 1 878 1323

Jervis Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Jervis Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

The Jervis Shopping Centre is a major shopping centre in Dublin, Ireland. Opened in 1996, the centre is located in the area bordered by Jervis Street, Upper Abbey Street, Mary Street, and Liffey Street.HistoryThe centre was built on a 12,000 m2 former hospital site, which was bought in 1994 at a cost of £5.97 million. The centre was built at a cost of £76 million. Most of the facade of the former Hospital has been retained and incorporated into the Shopping Centre.Although its main entrance is on Mary Street, the centre is named for the Jervis Street Hospital, Dublin on whose site it was built following the hospital's closure in the late 1980s. The existing Marks and Spencer store on Mary Street was incorporated into the new centre, with the other anchor tenants being Quinnsworth and New Look in the unit formerly occupied by Debenhams.The centre is notable in that, as the first major shopping centre opened during the economic boom of the late 1990s, it marked the first appearance of many British 'high street' retailers in the Republic of Ireland. These included Boots, Dixons, Debenhams, Next, and Argos among others, which have gone on to become major names in the main streets of Ireland. This contrasted with existing Irish shopping centres at the time which were usually anchored by local names such as Dunnes, Roches Stores, and Penneys. Not all of the new arrivals were successes: British Home Stores opened a store in 1996 having previously sold all of its Irish interests to Primark; however, the outlet was not a success and was later sold to Heatons.

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
St Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dub

(01) 4780888

Powerscourt Townhouse Centre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
59 South William Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 1 6794144

Powerscourt Centre is a popular tourist spot and many people come from around the world to admire the house and its architecture. It is quite common to hear different European languages all around you, as people eat in the Centre’s many restaurants. The Centre prides itself on having a very high-standard in customer service. It is extremely customer friendly with good signage and a panoramic lift to upper floors. The following facilities are available in the Centre to all our patrons: - ATM banking on the ground floor - Baby-changing facilities - Internet Kiosk - Disabled entrance (at the Coppinger Row entrance) - Toilets

Grafton Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Ilac Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Henry Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

01-828 8900

This is the official page of the Ilac Shopping Centre. The Ilac has a special place in the hearts of Dubliners providing fashion and value on one floor, under one roof!

The chq Building
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Custom House Quay
Dublin, Ireland

FREE WIFI

A location like no other building in Dublin, the chq Building overlooks the River Liffey and George’s Dock. The chq Building is a grade one listed building situated within the heart of the city’s bustling International Financial Services Centre (IFSC) in the Docklands. Formerly known as Stack A, it was built in 1820 as a wine and tobacco warehouse with vaults beneath to store wine. Formerly known as Stack A, the building was made famous when it hosted the Crimean War Banquet in 1856 celebrating the return of 3,000 Irish soldiers. The building has been magnificently restored and revamped.

Powerscourt Townhouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
South William Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

353 1 6794144

Nutgrove Shopping Centre
Distance: 3.2 mi Tourist Information
Nutgrove Avenue
Rathfarnham, Ireland D14 NV07

014933289

Nutgrove Shopping Centre is a small shopping centre with a big heart. Our main focus is on community. The Centre has a village-like core that is bright and spacious. Our Centre Mall 'Food Court' is the ideal place to meet for a social coffee, a business lunch or simply a fuel- stop for the kids after a busy school day. With Starbucks, Quigley's, Calypso and Subway Cafés to choose from we've something to suit everyone's taste buds! Our strength is our faithful long-term customer base which stems from the Shopping Centre's surrounding locality.

Artane Castle
Distance: 3.6 mi Tourist Information
Kilmore Road
Dublin, Ireland

KFC Dundrum Town Centre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Unit 2.2
Dublin, Ireland D16E6N9

012990695

Tesco Prussia Street
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
Prussia Street
Dublin, Ireland

1890 928509, 01 838 4433

Crumlin Shopping Centre
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
crumlin rd
Dublin, Ireland

Paddy Power
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
3 Moore st
Dublin, Ireland

(180)0238888

The Merrion Shopping Centre
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Road
Ballsbridge, Ireland Dublin 4

012096959

The centre is currently populated with 19 fabulous stores, which include some of the finest fashion boutiques. The centre also boasts all of the additional stores and services that one would expect to find in a modern, vibrant shopping centre. We at the Merrion Shopping Centre take pride in our ability to meet and exceed our customer’s requirements while providing a relaxed and convenient shopping experience. If you are tired of the hustle and bustle of city centre shopping then give us a try - We look forward to seeing you soon.

Maple Centre
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
Navan Road, Cabra
Dublin, Ireland

Tesco Cabra
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
Maple Centre
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 7

018693315

As this page is not manned 24/7 if you need answers to any querys plese contact our customer service desk on 018693315 and they will be very happy to help.

Nutgrove Shopping
Distance: 3.2 mi Tourist Information
Nutgrove Avenue
Dublin, Ireland 14

0035314916300

Kildare Rose Centre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
16 Ash Park court
Lucan, Ireland n/a

Nutgrove SC
Distance: 3.3 mi Tourist Information
Nutgrove Avenue
Dublin, Ireland D14

014933289

Nutgrove Shopping Centre is a small shopping centre with a big heart. Our main focus is on community. The Centre has a village-like core that is bright and spacious. Our Centre Mall 'Food Court' is the ideal place to meet for a social coffee, a business lunch or simply a fuel-stop for the kids after a busy school day. With Starbucks, Quigley's and Subway Cafés to choose from we've something too suit everyone's taste buds!

Tourist Attraction Near Stephen's Green Shopping Centre

Temple Bar
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland 2

Trinity College, Dublin
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
College Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+35318961812

The Church Cafe Bar, Restaurant and Club
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Junction of Mary St & Jervis St
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

+353 1 828 0102

Guinness Storehouse, St Jame's Gate, Dublin
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
St. Jame's Gate
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 408 4800

ThunderRoad Cafe
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
52-57 Fleet Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

+353 1 6794057

Thunder Road Café is Dublin's hippest theme restaurant, slap bang in the heart of trendy Temple Bar. We offer a very extensive menu which contains a very generous selection of appetising dishes. Great music and party atmosphere 7 days/nights a week. DJ's every Friday & Saturday from 7pm, playing all your favourite music. Got as request? You can now text your request to the DJ. Thunderroad Cafe, Home of the Thunder text.

Trinity College Library
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Trinity College Dublin, College Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 1 8961127

The Library of Trinity College Dublin serves Trinity College and the University of Dublin. It is the largest library in Ireland and, as a legal deposit or "copyright library", it has rights to receive material published in the Republic of Ireland free of charge; it is also the only Irish library to hold such rights for the United Kingdom. The Library is the permanent home to the famous Book of Kells. Two of the four volumes are on public display, one opened to a major decorated page and the other to a typical page of text. The volumes and pages shown are regularly changed. Members of the University of Dublin also have access to the libraries of Tallaght Hospital and the Irish School of Ecumenics, Milltown.

Guiness Brewery- Dublin, Ireland
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

01 408 4800

Hard Rock Café
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
12 Fleet Street
Dublin, Ireland

(01) 671 7777

St. Patrick's Cathedral
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Saint Patrick's Close, Dublin 8, Irlanda
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

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Brown Thomas
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
88-95 Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

01 605 6666

Brown Thomas has long been established as a landmark destination for both Irish & international fashionistas – it proudly takes its place on the international stage of luxury retailing. Brown Thomas is part of a global retail family that attracts the best luxury brands and the most innovative designers. Featuring the world's most prestigious luxury boutiques such as Hermés, Chanel and Louis Vuitton, Brown Thomas is also home to over 200 labels, which are carefully selected from around the globe and edited specifically to our customers tastes and lifestyles. Brown Thomas has achieved pre-eminent status, a store that is listed among the best in the world, yet one that remains quintessentially Irish. Experience the Extraordinary. BROWN THOMAS DUBLIN 88-95 Grafton Street Dublin 2, Ireland T. +353 1 605 6666 BROWN THOMAS CORK 18-21 Patrick Street Cork, Ireland T. +353 21 480 5555 BROWN THOMAS LIMERICK 14 - 16 O'Connell Street Limerick, Ireland T. +353 61 417 222 BROWN THOMAS GALWAY 18-21 Eglinton Buildings Galway, Ireland T. +353 91 565 254

Arlington Temple Bar
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Lord Edward Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2,

+353 1 6708777

Legends bar offers an excellent choice of food and drink, friendly service and a variety of entertainment. Our Award Winning Celtic night Dinner and show features some of Dublin’s finest musicians and is performed every night by the highly acclaimed celtic rhythm dance troop. Our very talented chefs pride themselves on their traditional Irish menu including famous Irish stew and delicious sea food served daily until 9pm. We offer a taste of tradition with Modern flair…… The bar is located on the ground floor of the Arlington Hotel in the heart of Dublin’s medieval city. Simply email [email protected] for more information or call the Hotel to book your dinner and show Follow us on Twitter @arlohotelsdub Like us on Facebook; Arlington Temple bar

Guinness Skybar
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
St James Gate, Dublin 8
Dublin, Ireland DUBLIN 8

+353 (0) 1 4084800

The National Wax Museum plus
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
4 Foster Place, Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D2

(01) 671 8373

About The National Wax Museum Plus The National Wax Museum Plus is an exciting interactive visitor attraction located in the heart of Dublin's city centre Temple Bar district and just off Dame Street. The museum is housed over four floors and 13,000 square feet in a historic Foster Place landmark building, previously the home for Ireland's gold store and arms at the turn of the last century! The museum is an outstandingly original visitor attraction and has been designed to deliver an interactive experience taking you on a journey through Irish cultural heritage, an enchanting children's zone of discovery, Ireland's only dedicated tribute to our top scientific inventors, a green screen video room, a fully functioning recording studio and all the exceptional life like wax work characters you can expect at the national wax museum. The National Wax Museum Plus offers a museum experience unlike any other, whether you are young or old, a culture vulture or fun seeker, male or female, star struck or star studded, The National Wax Museum Plus is the ultimate entertainment experience for all.

Cliff Of Moher
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Co. Clare
Galway, Ireland

Viking Splash Tours
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
St Stephens Green North
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

01 707 6000

Viking Splash Tours offers an engaging, interactive experience for all kinds of groups! Not only are we Dublin’s only amphibious tour, showcasing our city by land and water, we are also a real, living theatre. With flexible and customised tours for groups or individuals, Viking Splash Tours can provide a platform for a range of occasions from team-building to birthdays, hen parties to family reunions.

Teeling Whiskey Distillery
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
17 Newmarket , Dublin 8
Dublin, Ireland

+35315310888

Come and visit the first new distillery in Dublin in over 125 years and experience the only operational distillery in the city. From the local artist exhibition space, the tour of the distillery and premium whiskey tasting at the end – come experience the Spirit of Dublin for yourself. The new Teeling Whiskey Distillery has just opened its doors to the public and all of #TeamTeeling are looking forward to welcoming you and showing you all we have to offer!

Dublinia
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Winetavern Street
Dublin, Ireland 8

+353 (0) 1 6794611

Dublinia is one of Dublin’s top visitor attractions with three exciting exhibitions, Viking Dublin, Medieval Dublin and History Hunters! All located at the historic crossroads of old Dublin. The Viking and Medieval Dublin exhibitions bring the city to life in an exciting and contemporary way for all ages. Unearth the city’s past at the History Hunters exhibition and see Dublin from a new perspective. Come away knowing more about the citizens of Dublin throughout the ages!

Powerscourt Townhouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
South William Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

353 1 6794144

City Hall
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

(01)2222204

GPO Witness History
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 (0)1 8169538

An Post's GPO Witness History is an engaging, interactive visitor attraction bringing history to life through technology, video, sound and authentic artefacts - many previously unseen. GPO Witness History, an immersive experience will give visitors plenty to think about, to digest and to discuss while they relax in the café, browse the giftshop or take time to savour the unique atmosphere of the rooftop courtyard. Most of all it will be a national visitor attraction of which we can all be proud and we look forward to welcoming you there from next Easter onwards.

Landmark Near Stephen's Green Shopping Centre

Department of Justice and Equality
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
94 St. Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland

1 602 8202

The Department of Justice and Equality is a department of the Government of Ireland. It is led by the Minister for Justice and Equality who is assisted by two Ministers of State. The department's mission is to maintain and enhance community security and to promote a fairer society in Ireland.Departmental teamMinister for Justice and Equality: Frances Fitzgerald, TDMinister of State for Justice: David Stanton, TDMinister of State for Disability Issues: Finian McGrath, TDSecretary General of the Department: Noel Waters (acting)OverviewThe mission of the Department of Justice and Equality is to maintain and enhance community security and equality through the development of a range of policies and high quality services which underpin:The protection and assertion of human rights and fundamental freedoms consistent with the common goodThe security of the StateAn effective and balanced approach to tackling crime The official headquarters and Ministerial offices of the department are in 94 St Stephen's Green, Dublin 2. Over the years its name has changed several times, with some changes in its role. The department has been known as the following: Department of Home Affairs (1919–1923)Department of Justice (1923–1997)Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform (1997–2010)Department of Justice and Law Reform (2010–2011)Department of Justice and Equality (2011–present) In July 2014 the department embarked on a comprehensive program of change, including the recruitment of a new secretary-general following an independent review.

hydraulix tattoos studio
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
20 DRURY STREET (1st floor)
Dublin, Ireland DUBLIN 2

0862642309

M.J.O'Neill's
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2 Suffolk Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

(01) 679-3656

M.J.O'Neill's is a notable bar and restaurant in central Dublin. It has occupied 2 Suffolk Street and adjacent buildings, continuing round the corner into Church Lane. It is claimed there has been a tavern on the site for some three hundred years. From 1875 it was owned by the Hogan Brothers, until M.J. O’Neill bought and renamed the premises in August 1927.The part in Church Lane was the site of a printing house, where William Butler published The Volunteers Journal and the Irish Herald in 1783, and in 1789 Arthur O’Connor published The Press, supporting Wolfe Tone’s republican views.The corner structure is an impressive four-storey, vaguely of the Arts and Crafts Movement, red-brick and early twentieth century, with prominent Tudor-style projecting bay windows. There is a fine decorated iron three-dials clock on the Suffolk Street frontage. The building is protected and in a conservation area. Now, opposite the Dublin Tourist Centre, it is a fixture on the tourist trail and pub crawls.The house has a mixed clientele. It is directly opposite Andrew Street Post Office, and near the shopping centre of Grafton Street. The discreet Church Lane door is convenient for the Bank of Ireland and other financial establishments in College Green. It is also the pub nearest to the Front Gate of Trinity College, Dublin and therefore attracting Arts undergraduates and academics. The original structure was divided into definite areas: a “cocktail bar” in the corner for the gentry, a public bar off Suffolk Street, and a back bar. In recent years the next-door premises in Church Lane have been added, as a carvery, and the interior has been opened up. A small snug, immediately inside the Church Lane entrance, was the significant venue for the “Fabians” of the early 1960s and for later left-wing students from Trinity College, Dublin.

Iveagh Gardens
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Clonmel Street, Dublin 2
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

The Iveagh Gardens is a public park located between Clonmel Street and Upper Hatch Street, near the National Concert Hall in Dublin, Ireland. It is designated as a National Historic Property.HistoryThe site of the gardens was shown in 1756 as Leeson's Fields after Joseph Leeson, 1st Earl of Milltown.Clonmell LawnsIn the late 18th century Lord Milltown leased the land to John Hatch, the principal developer of Harcourt and Hatch Streets. Hatch sold it to The 1st Earl of Clonmell (also known as "Copper-Faced Jack") as his private gardens. The gardens then became known as "Clonmell Lawns" Located on Harcourt Street is Clonmell House that faces on to Clonmell Street which leads into the Iveagh Gardens. A subterranean passage brought the Earl from his house to the gardens without him having to walk over the street. The Wide Streets Commission had planned for Clonmell Street to run through what is now the gardens thereby linking Harcourt Street to the then newly constructed Earlsfort Terrace. However, this passage was not located during archaeological monitoring conducted during the construction of the LUAS.Coburg GardensWhen the 1st Earl died in 1798, his son the 2nd Earl inherited the estate including Clonmell Gardens. The estate was sold in 1810 and the gardens were opened for public use around 1817 and renamed "Coburg Gardens" after the royal family of Saxe-Coburg. Entrance to the park was from the South Side of St Stephen's Green, the "Royal Horse Bazaar".

Cut & Sew
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
All City Records, Crow Street, Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland Dubl

085 165 7769

Natural History Museum
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Street, Dubin 2
Dublin, Ireland

Ireland's Natural History Museum (Músaem Stair an Dúlra), sometimes called the Dead Zoo a branch of the National Museum of Ireland, is housed on Merrion Street in Dublin, Ireland. The museum was built in 1856 for parts of the collection of the Royal Dublin Society and building and collection were later passed to the Irish State.The Museum's collection and building have changed little since Victorian times, and it is sometimes described as a "museum of a museum".CollectionThe building is a ‘cabinet-style’ museum designed to showcase a wide-ranging and comprehensive zoological collection, and has changed little in over a century. Often described as a ‘museum of a museum’, its 10,000 exhibits provide a glimpse of the natural world that has delighted generations of visitors since the doors opened in 1857.As the collection is unique in range and vintage, the exhibits are a product of their age, with faded and worn pelts and visible marks from bullets and rough taxidermy. Larger specimens are displayed in large, wood-framed glass cases while smaller ones are kept under glass, protected from sunlight by moveable leather panels. The main room is heated by an underfloor system similar to a Roman hypocaust.The Irish Room, the ground floor of the museum, displays Irish animals, notably several mounted skeletons of giant Irish deer. Numerous skulls of those and other deer line the walls. Stuffed and mounted mammals, birds, fish — and insects and other animals native to or found in Ireland — comprise the rest of the ground floor. Many of the specimens of currently extant animals, such as badgers, hares, and foxes, are over a century old. A basking shark hangs from this ceiling.

Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
21 Upper Merrion Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud is a restaurant in Dublin, Ireland. It is a fine dining restaurant that was awarded one Michelin star in the period 1989–1995 and two stars from 1996–present. Egon Ronay Guide awarded the restaurant one star in the period 1983–1985 and 1987. It was mentioned in the Guide in 1988 and 1989.The restaurant's proprietor is the acclaimed French professional chef, Patrick Guilbaud, who lives in Ireland. Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud claims to be Ireland's most award-winning restaurant. It was established by Guilbaud in 1981 in James's Place East, Dublin 2, before moving to the Merrion Hotel in Upper Merrion Street, Dublin 2. The restaurant was the first in Dublin to receive two Michelin stars and has been praised by The New York Times. It has been named the most expensive restaurant in Dublin.ReviewsIn February 2004, Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud was mentioned in The New York Times, where it was reported that lunch cost $36 and dinner was available for $124. Guilbaud's food was described as "seriously good" and was served in "seriously elegant surroundings", with "reservations advised" by the newspaper. Food on offer included roast quail coated with hazelnuts.

City Hall, Dublin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D

The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.OverviewLocated at the top of Parliament Street on the city's southern side, it stands next to Dublin Castle, the centre of the British government in Ireland until 1922. The street had been built in 1753, providing a continuation of Capel Street on the north bank of the Liffey, across the newly widened Essex Bridge, and so the exchange ended (and still ends) a long streetscape.The external structure is primarily made out of white Portland stone from a quarry in Dorset. The large size and fine fittings of the Royal exchange, with carved capitals by Simon Vierpyl, and plasterwork by the leading stuccodore Charles Thorpe, reflect the standing and prestige of Dublin in the 18th Century. The neo-classical building contains a central entrance hall or Rotunda, with a large dome supported by twelve columns which are surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants strolled and discussed business meetings.The function of the building was to provide a meeting place for Dublin's businessmen, where they could buy and sell goods and trade bills of exchange. It was also close to the then Customs House that stood on the site of today's Clarence Hotel, making it convenient for overseas merchants. The cost of building the exchange was met by the Parliament of Ireland, and this is reflected by the initials "SPQH", standing for "Senatus PopulusQue Hibernicus", meaning "The senate and people of Ireland" (an Irish version of SPQR).

Radha Shyam Sundar Mondir
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Shyam sundar temple bati road,goswami para,24 parganas(North)
Dublin, Ireland 70011

The Italian Quarter
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Bloom's Lane
Dublin, Ireland dublin 1

00353873674027

St Andrew's Church, Westland Row, Dublin
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Westland Row
Dublin, Ireland

St. Andrew's Church is a Roman Catholic church located in Westland Row, Dublin, Republic of Ireland. Construction started in 1832, it opened for public worship in 1834 but was not completed until 1837.HistoryThe architect appointed to design the church was John Bolger. However, he used the plans for a previous church, in Townsend Street, which had been designed by James Leeson. Assistance was received from Francis Johnston and James Lever. The roof was by Richard Turner. The exterior of the church has a Doric portico with a statue of St. Andrew, sculpted by John Smyth 1776 - 1840, son of Edward Smyth, d.1812, sculptor of the Riverine heads at the Custom House.On 7 January 1940 ornamentation fell from the ceiling, which prompted an investigation and refurbishment. This started in 1942 when the interior was renovated and painted. All sculptures were restored at the same time.Notable peopleDominic Corrigan (1802-1880), a noted physician, is buried in the crypt of the church.OrganThe organ of St. Andrew's was built by John White of Dublin in 1872. It is a large three manual instrument which originally contained many ranks of orchestral Cavaille-Coll pipework. This is no surprise as John White learned his trade in France. However, during the 1976 rebuild a large number of these were lost in favor of more neo-classical stops. If it were to be restored, the organ would be one of the finest in Dublin.OrganistThe organist of St. Andrew's since October 2011 is Aleksandre Nisse.References and sourcesNotesSourcesGeorge Newenham Wright An Historical Guide to the City of Dublin

Ha'penny Bridge, Dublin, Ireland
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Quays
Dublin, Ireland Dublin, Ireland

none

St Mary's Graveyard
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Crumlin
Dublin, Ireland

014562142

The old church of St. Mary's Crumlin stands on a prominent site at the junction of St. Mary's Rd. and St. Agnes Rd, a short distance to the north of the main shopping street of Crumlin village. Archaeological finds have confirmed the existence of pre-historic sites in the area, and in the early medieval period Crumlin was one of four royal manors near Dublin. The St. Mary's site is one of great antiquity, having been occupied by a succession of churches since the twelfth century. Most of the present body of the church dates from the early nineteenth century, but the tower is medieval with a fine early eighteenth century door case.  Surrounding the church is an old graveyard which contains numerous early headstones. The graveyard is enclosed by a high stone wall, probably dating from the eighteenth century, and in the southwest corner is a large shallow vaulted structure which may be a mort-safe, or corpse house employed to deter grave robbers.  In the early twentieth century, Crumlin was a small village well outside the urban spread of Dublin, which provided St. Mary's with only a small congregation. On the completion of the new church, the old church was used as a parish hall for various church societies such as the bowling and badminton clubs and remained in this use until 1994 when the nave and vestry were damaged by fire. Fortunately, the old church has survived as the major landmark of the area and more importantly as a record of the village's long and interesting history.

Plumtree's Potted Meat
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
23 Merchants’ Quay
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

The name on the label is Plumtree. A plumtree in a meatpot, registered trade mark. Beware of imitations. Peatmot. Trumplee. Moutpat. Plamtroo.

Jervis Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Jervis Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

The Jervis Shopping Centre is a major shopping centre in Dublin, Ireland. Opened in 1996, the centre is located in the area bordered by Jervis Street, Upper Abbey Street, Mary Street, and Liffey Street.HistoryThe centre was built on a 12,000 m2 former hospital site, which was bought in 1994 at a cost of £5.97 million. The centre was built at a cost of £76 million. Most of the facade of the former Hospital has been retained and incorporated into the Shopping Centre.Although its main entrance is on Mary Street, the centre is named for the Jervis Street Hospital, Dublin on whose site it was built following the hospital's closure in the late 1980s. The existing Marks and Spencer store on Mary Street was incorporated into the new centre, with the other anchor tenants being Quinnsworth and New Look in the unit formerly occupied by Debenhams.The centre is notable in that, as the first major shopping centre opened during the economic boom of the late 1990s, it marked the first appearance of many British 'high street' retailers in the Republic of Ireland. These included Boots, Dixons, Debenhams, Next, and Argos among others, which have gone on to become major names in the main streets of Ireland. This contrasted with existing Irish shopping centres at the time which were usually anchored by local names such as Dunnes, Roches Stores, and Penneys. Not all of the new arrivals were successes: British Home Stores opened a store in 1996 having previously sold all of its Irish interests to Primark; however, the outlet was not a success and was later sold to Heatons.

Spire of Dublin
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

The Spire of Dublin, alternatively titled the Monument of Light, is a large, stainless steel, pin-like monument 121.2m in height, located on the site of the former Nelson's Pillar on O'Connell Street in Dublin, Ireland.DescriptionThe spire was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects, who sought an "Elegant and dynamic simplicity bridging art and technology". The contract was awarded to SIAC-Radley JV and it was manufactured by Radley Engineering of Dungarvan, County Waterford, and erected by SIAC Construction Ltd & GDW Engineering Ltd. The first section was installed on 18 December 2002. Five additional 20m sections were added with the last one installed on 21 January 2003. The spire is an elongated cone of diameter 3m at the base, narrowing to 15cm at the top. Construction of the world's tallest sculpture was delayed because of difficulty in obtaining planning permission and environmental regulations. It is constructed from eight hollow tubes of stainless steel and features a tuned mass damper, designed by engineers Arup, to counteract sway. The steel underwent shot peening to alter the quality of light reflected from it.The pattern around the base of the Spire is based on a core sample of earth and rock formation taken from the ground where the spire stands. The pattern was applied by bead blasting the steel through rubber stencil masks whose patterns were created by water jet cutting based on core sample drawings supplied by the contractor.

Vicar Street
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Vicar St.
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

Vicar Street is a concert, performing arts centre and events venue in Dublin, Ireland. Located on Thomas Street, Dublin 8, Vicar Street has capacity for 1,050 people for seated performances and 1,500 people for standing gigs. The venue is owned by Harry Crosbie and operated by Peter Aiken. Since opening in 1998, the venue has become a popular setting for a wide range of acts including stand-up comedy, drama performances and a variety of concerts. The first artist to play on the Vicar Street Stage was local singer/songwriter Shay Cotter. Major international recording artists have performed in Vicar Street, such as Bob Dylan in 2000, Neil Young in 2003 and Paul Simon in 2011 and Lana Del Rey in 2013Because of its intimate size, the venue is one looked on with warmth by fans and acts alike.Notable eventsLongest-running solo showThe longest-running show to take place in Vicar Street was Tommy Tiernan's Loose show with a string of 166 performances.Other eventsVicar Street hosts the Choice Music Prize ceremony in February/March each year. Occasionally the venue is used to accommodate higher attendances than expected at smaller venues. In 2008, Canadian indie rock band Wolf Parade's November show which had been scheduled for Andrew's Lane Theatre was moved to Vicar Street.Bob Dylan performed at the venue in 2000 for his first, and as yet, only gig at the venue.

Capital Dock
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Sir John Rogersons Quay
Dublin, Ireland D2

Savoy Cinema
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
16-17 Upper O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland

The Savoy Cinema is the oldest operational cinema in Dublin, and it is the preferred cinema in Ireland for film premières.HistoryThe cinema was built in 1929 on the site of the old Granville Hotel. The luxurious auditorium, housing 2,789 seats, opened to the public with the American colour talkie On with the Show. It was altered in 1954 to incorporate a large CinemaScope screen, and showed Ireland's first widescreen feature, The Robe, at the time owned by Odeon Ireland Ltd.It was reported in February 2012 that the cinema was in danger of closing. In the previous decade, audience numbers fell from 740,000 to 250,000 per annum.ScreensThe Savoy is the most altered cinema in Dublin's history, and in 1969 the cinema was converted into a twin cinema. In 1975, the Savoy's restaurant was converted into a third screen, holding 200 seats, followed in 1979 by further sub-divisions, creating five screens in all. In 1988, the cinema was given its sixth screen. In the process, the Savoy had lost a third of its capacity.In 2004, renovation work was carried out, moving the box office from the two booths located on either side of the entrance to what used to be an adjoining shop. The confectionery counter has also been moved many times, but is now at its original location, between the doors of Screen 1.The Advance Screening Room became a seventh screen in 2014.PremièresThe cinema has hosted the Irish premières of many films, most of them having an Irish connection. Films shown here have included Alexander, Once and The Man in the Iron Mask. The cinema is also used during the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival, primarily for big-event screenings such as opening and closing night shows. It also hosts the surprise film, which in 2006 was the first Irish screening of the film, 300.

Locks Brasserie
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
1 Windsor Terrace, Portobello
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

Locks Brasserie is a former restaurant in Portobello, Dublin, Ireland. It was a fine dining restaurant that received one Michelin star for 2013 but lost it in 2014 due to the chef leaving.The head chef of Locks Brasserie who earned the star was Rory Carville. He left the restaurant in July 2013 after which Keelan Higgs took over the kitchen. In February 2015 Karl Breen was appointed head chef.Locks Brasserie was originally owned by Claire and Richard Douglas in the 1980s. In 2010, Sébastien Masi and Kirsten Batt took over. Locks Brasserie ceased trading on 18 July 2015.