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Lord's Cricket Ground, London | Tourist Information


St John's Wood
London, United Kingdom NW8 8

+44 20 7432 1000

Landmark Near Lord's Cricket Ground

Grosvenor House
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
86 - 90 Park Lane
London, W1K 7TN

020 74996363

Grosvenor House was one of the largest private townhouses situated on Park Lane in London. The house was the home of the Grosvenor family (better known as the Dukes of Westminster) for more than a century. Their original London dwelling was on Millbank but, after the family had developed their Mayfair estates, they moved to Park Lane to build a house worthy of their wealth, status and influence in the 19th century.Brief historyThe site was occupied by a small house named 'Gloucester House' with the front entrance on Upper Grosvenor Street. This house was purchased by Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster in 1805 for £20,000. He spent £17,000 on extending the house to make it more fashionable with the times. In 1821, a large picture gallery 50ft long was added to the west of the house. It was in here that many of the Grosvenor treasures were held.Another extension was added in 1842, in the form of a 110ft long classical-style colonnaded entrance screen on Upper Grosvenor Street. At each end was a triumphal arch with pediments above sculpted with the Grosvenor arms. Thomas Cundy, the architect of this vast house then proposed a larger mansion to go all the way along to Park Street extending all the way to 230ft. This was dropped as the 2nd Marquess thought it was to be too lavish.

Grosvenor House
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
86 - 90 Park Lane
London, W1K 7TN

020 74996363

Grosvenor House was one of the largest private townhouses situated on Park Lane in London. The house was the home of the Grosvenor family (better known as the Dukes of Westminster) for more than a century. Their original London dwelling was on Millbank but, after the family had developed their Mayfair estates, they moved to Park Lane to build a house worthy of their wealth, status and influence in the 19th century.Brief historyThe site was occupied by a small house named 'Gloucester House' with the front entrance on Upper Grosvenor Street. This house was purchased by Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster in 1805 for £20,000. He spent £17,000 on extending the house to make it more fashionable with the times. In 1821, a large picture gallery 50ft long was added to the west of the house. It was in here that many of the Grosvenor treasures were held.Another extension was added in 1842, in the form of a 110ft long classical-style colonnaded entrance screen on Upper Grosvenor Street. At each end was a triumphal arch with pediments above sculpted with the Grosvenor arms. Thomas Cundy, the architect of this vast house then proposed a larger mansion to go all the way along to Park Street extending all the way to 230ft. This was dropped as the 2nd Marquess thought it was to be too lavish.

Animals in War Memorial
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Park Lane
London, W1K 7

+44 207 641 6000

The Animals in War Memorial is a war memorial in Hyde Park, London. It is located on Park Lane, at the junction with Upper Brook Street, on the eastern edge of the park.The memorial was designed by English sculptor David Backhouse to commemorate the countless animals that have served and died under British military command throughout history. It was unveiled in November 2004 by Princess Anne, the Princess Royal.HistoryThe memorial was inspired by Jilly Cooper's book Animals in War, and was made possible by a specially created fund of £1.4 million from public donations of which Cooper was a co-trustee. The memorial consists of a 55 ft by 58 ft (16.8 m by 17.7 m) curved Portland stone wall: the symbolic arena of war, emblazoned with images of various struggling animals, along with two heavily-laden bronze mules progressing up the stairs of the monument, and a bronze horse and bronze dog beyond it looking into the distance.The Animals in War Memorial was officially opened on 24 November 2004 by Anne, Princess Royal.On May 27 2013, it was one of two London war memorials vandalised on the same night. The word 'Islam' was spray-painted on it causing £2,766 in damage and the nearby RAF Bomber Command Memorial causing £6,500 in damage. A 31 year old London man later admitted to vandalising the memorials. The man was charged for a total of 94 vandalism and destruction of property offences carried out over several weeks against homes, cars, memorials and a church causing a total of £56,909 in damage.

New West End Synagogue
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
St Petersburg Place
London, W2 4

02072292631

The New West End Synagogue, located in St. Petersburgh Place, Bayswater, London, is one of the oldest synagogues in the United Kingdom still in use. It is one of two synagogues which have been awarded Grade I listed status by the British government, and has been described by Historic England as "the architectural high-water mark of Anglo-Jewish architecture". It can accommodate approximately 800 people.HistoryDesigned by George Audsley of Scotland in collaboration with Nathan S. Joseph, its foundation stone was laid on June 7, 1877 by Leopold de Rothschild in the presence of the Chief Rabbi, Dr. Nathan Marcus Adler, and the building was formally opened on March 30, 1879.Chaim Weizmann, the first president of the State of Israel, and Herbert Samuel, the British High Commissioner for Palestine during the British Mandate, were both members of the synagogue. Their seats are marked with plaques. The synagogue's first rabbi was Simeon Singer, who translated and edited the Authorized Daily Prayer Book, which is still used in Orthodox synagogues across Great Britain.Perhaps the most famous rabbi of New West End Synagogue was Louis Jacobs, whose ties with the synagogue were severed in what became known as the Jacobs affair, and went on to found the Masorti movement.

New West End Synagogue
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
St Petersburg Place
London, W2 4

02072292631

The New West End Synagogue, located in St. Petersburgh Place, Bayswater, London, is one of the oldest synagogues in the United Kingdom still in use. It is one of two synagogues which have been awarded Grade I listed status by the British government, and has been described by Historic England as "the architectural high-water mark of Anglo-Jewish architecture". It can accommodate approximately 800 people.HistoryDesigned by George Audsley of Scotland in collaboration with Nathan S. Joseph, its foundation stone was laid on June 7, 1877 by Leopold de Rothschild in the presence of the Chief Rabbi, Dr. Nathan Marcus Adler, and the building was formally opened on March 30, 1879.Chaim Weizmann, the first president of the State of Israel, and Herbert Samuel, the British High Commissioner for Palestine during the British Mandate, were both members of the synagogue. Their seats are marked with plaques. The synagogue's first rabbi was Simeon Singer, who translated and edited the Authorized Daily Prayer Book, which is still used in Orthodox synagogues across Great Britain.Perhaps the most famous rabbi of New West End Synagogue was Louis Jacobs, whose ties with the synagogue were severed in what became known as the Jacobs affair, and went on to found the Masorti movement.

US Embassy London
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
24 Grosvenor Square
London,

The Embassy of the United States of America in London is the diplomatic mission of the United States of America in the United Kingdom. Since 1960, it has been located in the London Chancery Building, in Grosvenor Square, Westminster, London. It is the largest American embassy in Western Europe, and is the focal point for events relating to the United States held in the United Kingdom.HistoryThe American embassy in London was first situated in Great Cumberland Place, later moving to Piccadilly, Portland Place and Grosvenor Gardens. In 1938, the embassy was moved to 1 Grosvenor Square (Macdonald House) (which now hosts part of the Canadian High Commission). During this time, Grosvenor Square began to accommodate many U.S. government offices, including the headquarters of General Dwight D. Eisenhower and the European headquarters of the United States Navy. Following World War II, the Duke of Westminster donated land for a memorial to wartime President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

US Embassy London
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
24 Grosvenor Square
London,

The Embassy of the United States of America in London is the diplomatic mission of the United States of America in the United Kingdom. Since 1960, it has been located in the London Chancery Building, in Grosvenor Square, Westminster, London. It is the largest American embassy in Western Europe, and is the focal point for events relating to the United States held in the United Kingdom.HistoryThe American embassy in London was first situated in Great Cumberland Place, later moving to Piccadilly, Portland Place and Grosvenor Gardens. In 1938, the embassy was moved to 1 Grosvenor Square (Macdonald House) (which now hosts part of the Canadian High Commission). During this time, Grosvenor Square began to accommodate many U.S. government offices, including the headquarters of General Dwight D. Eisenhower and the European headquarters of the United States Navy. Following World War II, the Duke of Westminster donated land for a memorial to wartime President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Speakers' Corner
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Marble Arch, Hyde Park
London, W1K 1QB

A Speakers' Corner is an area where open-air public speaking, debate and discussion are allowed. The original and most noted is in the northeast corner of Hyde Park in London, UK. Speakers here may talk on any subject, as long as the police consider their speeches lawful, although this right is not restricted to Speakers' Corner only. Contrary to popular belief, there is no immunity from the law, nor are any subjects proscribed, but in practice the police tend to be tolerant and therefore intervene only when they receive a complaint. On some occasions in the past, they have intervened on grounds of profanity. Historically there were a number of other areas designated as Speakers' Corners in other parks in London (e.g., Lincoln's Inn Fields Finsbury Park, Clapham Common, Kennington Park, and Victoria Park). More recently they have been set up in other British cities, and there are also Speakers' Corners in other countries.Hyde ParkThough Hyde Park Speakers' Corner is considered the paved area closest to Marble Arch, legally the public speaking area extends beyond the Reform Tree and covers a large area from Marble Arch to Victoria Gate, then along the Serpentine to Hyde Park Corner and the Broad Walk running from Hyde Park Corner to Marble Arch.Public riots broke out in the park in 1855, in protest over the Sunday Trading Bill, which forbade buying and selling on a Sunday, the only day working people had off. The riots were described by Karl Marx as the beginning of the English revolution.

St Sophia's Cathedral, London
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Moscow Road, Bayswater
London, W2 4LQ

+44 20 7229 7260

Saint Sophia Cathedral is a Greek Orthodox church on Moscow Road in the Bayswater area of London.It was consecrated as the Church of the Holy Wisdom (Sophia) of God (St Sophia in the vernacular) on 5 February 1882 by Antonios, Metropolitan of Corfu, as a focus for the prosperous Greek community that had settled in London, particularly around Paddington, Bayswater and Notting Hill.Today, in addition to its regular Saturday and Sunday services, it hosts a Greek polyphonic choir, Byzantine music, and an associated school in which pupils discover the history and language of Greece and take Greek dancing lessons.HistoryThis was the third church to bear this name, the previous two having been outgrown by the population of the Orthodox community, which had been swelled by settlers from the Greek diaspora and visitors who came through the busy shipping routes that converged on London.St Sophia was commissioned by a committee presided over by Emmanuel Mavrocordato, assisted by Constantinos A lonidis, Sophoclis Constantinidis, Petros P. Rodocanachi, Paraskevas Sechiaris and Demetrios S. Schilizzi and the lawyer and traveller, Edwin Freshfield. The cost of £50,000 was raised in three years by the Greek community, including prosperous and influential London merchants and financiers. The first Liturgy was celebrated on 1 June 1879, 18 months after Eustratios Ralli laid the first stone. The cathedral recently opened a small museum to display some of the treasures donated to the cathedral by its 19th-century patrons and its links to London's Greek community.

Leinster Gardens
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Leinster Gardens
London, W2 6

Leinster Gardens is a street in Bayswater, London. It has two false façades at numbers 23 and 24, constructed in the late 1860s, at the time of the original steam engine-hauled underground railway that had a short section exposed to the surface in the space between residences at numbers 22 and 25.Locomotives were fitted with condensers to reduce fumes, but "venting off" was still needed in open-air sections to relieve the condensers and keep the tunnels free from smoke. In this upmarket area, the railway company hid this unsightly practice from residents. The false façade also maintained a continuous frontage along a prestigious terrace. The façade is 5 feet (1.5 m) thick, behind which is a ground level opening above the rail line. The façade includes 18 blackened windows and front doors with no letter boxes.In the 1930s, a hoax was played on guests who were sold ten-Guinea tickets to a charity ball at Leinster Gardens, only to turn up in evening dress to discover the address was fake.Adjacent streets and areas include Queensway and Craven Hill Gardens. The façade of 23 & 24 played a part in the BBC TV series Sherlock, being used in the episode "His Last Vow".

Marbel Arch
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Tyburn Way
London, W1H 7

Queensway, London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
26 Queensway
London, W2 3

20-77276173

Queensway is a bustling cosmopolitan street in Bayswater, an area of west London. It is home to Whiteleys, many restaurants, cafés, pubs, souvenir shops and a few high-street retail chains. Queensway and Westbourne Grove are identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London.HistoryBayswater and Lancaster Gate were first developed as residential suburbs of London in the early nineteenth century. Bayswater Road, for example, the road at the Bayswater southern end (Bayswater Road) was already a long-established route across the countryside, and a road roughly following the present Queensway can be seen on early maps running north from Bayswater Road across fields under the name of Black Lion Lane. It was subsequently renamed Queen's Road in honour of Queen Victoria, who had been born at nearby Kensington Palace: a name, however, which somewhat lacked distinctiveness, for this reason the present name of Queensway was eventually substituted.Near the northern end of the street is Whiteleys shopping, on the site of London's first department store, opened by William Whiteley in 1867. The store was awarded a Royal Warrant by Queen Victoria in 1896. The facade of the current building is from 1911, but the building itself was demolished and rebuilt in 1989.

Queensway, London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
26 Queensway
London, W2 3

20-77276173

Queensway is a bustling cosmopolitan street in Bayswater, an area of west London. It is home to Whiteleys, many restaurants, cafés, pubs, souvenir shops and a few high-street retail chains. Queensway and Westbourne Grove are identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London.HistoryBayswater and Lancaster Gate were first developed as residential suburbs of London in the early nineteenth century. Bayswater Road, for example, the road at the Bayswater southern end (Bayswater Road) was already a long-established route across the countryside, and a road roughly following the present Queensway can be seen on early maps running north from Bayswater Road across fields under the name of Black Lion Lane. It was subsequently renamed Queen's Road in honour of Queen Victoria, who had been born at nearby Kensington Palace: a name, however, which somewhat lacked distinctiveness, for this reason the present name of Queensway was eventually substituted.Near the northern end of the street is Whiteleys shopping, on the site of London's first department store, opened by William Whiteley in 1867. The store was awarded a Royal Warrant by Queen Victoria in 1896. The facade of the current building is from 1911, but the building itself was demolished and rebuilt in 1989.

Marble Arch
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
63-79 SEYMOUR STREET
London, W2 2HF

St George's Fields, Westminster
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
1 St. Georges Fields
London, W2 2

St George's Fields are a former burial ground of St George's, Hanover Square, lying between Connaught Street and Bayswater Road de-consecrated and sold off by the Church Commissioners in the 1970s to be built upon by The Utopian Housing Association, a housing trust.The architects, Design 5, used a ziggurat style of building (similar to the Brunswick by Patrick Hodgkinson), retaining much of the open space whilst creating 300 dwellings. Parts of the double walls surrounding the burial ground - reputedly designed to frustrate grave robbers - have been preserved along with a number of tombstones.The burial ground was also used for years as an archery ground, hence the nearby Archery Close and one of the new buildings being called Archery Steps.The estate is now in private ownership although the grounds of St George's Fields are opened to the public once a year under the London Garden Square Scheme when one of London's oldest plane trees, with a girth of over 18ft, may be seen set amongst the other trees.Although the buildings on the estate are not listed they have been included within the Bayswater Road Conservation Area established by the City of Westminster to preserve the amenities of this historic area.Within ten minutes walk is London Paddington station The nearest London Underground stations are Marble Arch Lancaster Gate on the Central line and the edgware road station.

St George's Fields, Westminster
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
1 St. Georges Fields
London, W2 2

St George's Fields are a former burial ground of St George's, Hanover Square, lying between Connaught Street and Bayswater Road de-consecrated and sold off by the Church Commissioners in the 1970s to be built upon by The Utopian Housing Association, a housing trust.The architects, Design 5, used a ziggurat style of building (similar to the Brunswick by Patrick Hodgkinson), retaining much of the open space whilst creating 300 dwellings. Parts of the double walls surrounding the burial ground - reputedly designed to frustrate grave robbers - have been preserved along with a number of tombstones.The burial ground was also used for years as an archery ground, hence the nearby Archery Close and one of the new buildings being called Archery Steps.The estate is now in private ownership although the grounds of St George's Fields are opened to the public once a year under the London Garden Square Scheme when one of London's oldest plane trees, with a girth of over 18ft, may be seen set amongst the other trees.Although the buildings on the estate are not listed they have been included within the Bayswater Road Conservation Area established by the City of Westminster to preserve the amenities of this historic area.Within ten minutes walk is London Paddington station The nearest London Underground stations are Marble Arch Lancaster Gate on the Central line and the edgware road station.

Oxford Street
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
City of Westminster, West End
London, W1K 1NA

Oxford Street is a major road in the City of Westminster in the West End of London. It is Europe's busiest shopping street, with around half a million daily visitors, and as of 2012 had approximately 300 shops. It is designated as part of the A40, a major road between London and Fishguard, though it is not signed as such, and traffic is regularly restricted to buses and taxis.The road was originally a Roman road, part of the Via Trinobantina between Essex and Hampshire via London. It was known as Tyburn Road through the Middle Ages and was once notorious as a street where prisoners from Newgate Prison would be transported towards a public hanging. It became known as Oxford Road and then Oxford Street in the 18th century, and began to change character from a residential street to commercial and retail purposes by the late 19th century, also attracting street traders, confidence tricksters and prostitution. The first department stores in Britain opened on Oxford Street in the early 20th century, including Selfridges, John Lewis and HMV. Unlike nearby shopping streets such as Bond Street, it has retained an element of downmarket street trading alongside more prestigious retail stores. The street suffered heavy bombing during World War II, and several longstanding stores including John Lewis were completely destroyed and rebuilt from scratch.

Phoenix Hotel
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
1-8 Kensington Gardens Square
London, W2 4BH

+442072292494

Phoenix is a 125 bedroom 3 star central London hotel, located 5 minutes walk from Hyde Park. Bayswater and Queensway underground stations are both within a few minutes walking distance. The hotel is centrally situated for both the business executive and the holiday-maker, with the West End and its shops and theaters within easy reach. Free Wi-Fi and continental buffet breakfast is always included when making a reservation with Phoenix Hotel. Full English breakfast is available made to order, at an additional charge of £7.50 per person. Check-in time is from 1 pm onward. There is a complimentary luggage storage facility at the hotel. The reception desk is open 24 hours.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, W1A 1AB

Selfridges is a Grade II listed retail premises on Oxford Street in London. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York City. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

Selfridges, Oxford Street
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, W1A 1AB

Selfridges is a Grade II listed retail premises on Oxford Street in London. It was designed by Daniel Burnham for Harry Gordon Selfridge, and opened in 1909. Still the headquarters of Selfridge & Co. department stores, with 540000sqft of selling space, the store is the second largest retail premises in the UK, half as big as the biggest department store in Europe, Harrods. It was named the world's best department store in 2010, and again in 2012.BackgroundIn 1906, Harry Gordon Selfridge travelled to England on holiday with his wife, Rose. Unimpressed with the quality of existing British retailers, he noticed that the large stores in London had not adopted the latest selling ideas that were being used in the United States.Selfridge decided to invest £400,000 in building his own department store in what was then the unfashionable western end of Oxford Street, by slowly buying up a series of Georgian architecture buildings which were on the desired block defined by the surrounding four streets: Somerset, Wigmore, Orchard and Duke.Design and constructionThe building was designed by American architect Daniel Burnham, who was respected for his department store designs. He created Marshall Field's, Chicago, Filene's in Boston, Wanamaker's in Philadelphia, and Gimbels and Wanamaker's in New York City. The building was an early example in the UK of the use of a steel frame, five stories high with three basement levels and a roof terrace, originally laid out to accommodate 100 departments.

Odeon Cinema
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
151 Queensway
London, W2 6LS

+44 (0) 871 224 4007

Paddington
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
26 Spring St
London, W2 3

Paddington is an area within the City of Westminster, in central London. Formerly a metropolitan borough, it was integrated with Westminster and Greater London in 1965. Three important landmarks of the district are Paddington station, designed by the celebrated engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel and opened in 1847; St Mary's Hospital; and Paddington Green Police Station (the most important high-security police station in the United Kingdom).A major project called Paddington Waterside aims to regenerate former railway and canal land between 1998 and 2018, and the area is seeing many new developments.HistoryThe earliest extant references to Padington, historically a part of Middlesex, appear in documentation of purported 10th-century land grants to the monks of Westminster by Edgar the Peaceful as confirmed by Archbishop Dunstan. However, the documents' provenance is much later and likely to have been forged after the 1066 Norman conquest. There is no mention of the place (or Westbourne or Knightsbridge) in the Domesday Book of 1086. It has been reasonably speculated that a Saxon settlement was located around the intersection of the northern and western Roman roads, corresponding with the Edgware Road (Watling Street) and the Harrow and Uxbridge Roads. A more reliable 12th-century document cited by the cleric Isaac Maddox (1697–1759) establishes that part of the land was held by brothers "Richard and William de Padinton".

Paddington
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
26 Spring St
London, W2 3

Paddington is an area within the City of Westminster, in central London. Formerly a metropolitan borough, it was integrated with Westminster and Greater London in 1965. Three important landmarks of the district are Paddington station, designed by the celebrated engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel and opened in 1847; St Mary's Hospital; and Paddington Green Police Station (the most important high-security police station in the United Kingdom).A major project called Paddington Waterside aims to regenerate former railway and canal land between 1998 and 2018, and the area is seeing many new developments.HistoryThe earliest extant references to Padington, historically a part of Middlesex, appear in documentation of purported 10th-century land grants to the monks of Westminster by Edgar the Peaceful as confirmed by Archbishop Dunstan. However, the documents' provenance is much later and likely to have been forged after the 1066 Norman conquest. There is no mention of the place (or Westbourne or Knightsbridge) in the Domesday Book of 1086. It has been reasonably speculated that a Saxon settlement was located around the intersection of the northern and western Roman roads, corresponding with the Edgware Road (Watling Street) and the Harrow and Uxbridge Roads. A more reliable 12th-century document cited by the cleric Isaac Maddox (1697–1759) establishes that part of the land was held by brothers "Richard and William de Padinton".

St Mary's Hospital, London
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Praed St,London W2 1NY
London, W2 1

20-78866666

St Mary's Hospital is a hospital in Paddington, in the City of Westminster, London, founded in 1845. Since the UK's first academic health science centre was created in 2008, it has been operated by Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, which also operates Charing Cross Hospital, Hammersmith Hospital, Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital, and Western Eye Hospital.Until 1988 the hospital ran St Mary's Hospital Medical School, part of the federal University of London. In 1988 it merged with Imperial College London, and then with Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School in 1997 to form Imperial College School of Medicine. In 2007 Imperial College became an independent institution when it withdrew from the University of London.

St James's, Spanish Place
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
22 George Street
London, W1U 3

020 7935 0943

St James's Church, Spanish Place, is a large English Gothic Roman Catholic church in Marylebone, London. Although currently situated in George Street, the church maintains its connection with Spanish Place, the road opposite the current church, because of its historic connection with the Spanish Embassy.SiteThe church is located in George Street, Marylebone, behind the Wallace Collection and close to Marylebone High Street.HistoryIn the reign of Elizabeth I the Bishops of Ely let their palace and chapel in Ely Place to the Spanish Ambassador and, until the reign of Charles I, it was occupied by the High Representative of the Court of Spain. During this period the chapel was freely used by English Roman Catholics and became a sanctuary to some degree for them.After the restoration of Charles II the Spanish Embassy was re-established in London, first on Ormond Street and then at Hertford House, Manchester Square, where the Wallace Collection is now housed. Here, in 1791, shortly after the Roman Catholic Relief Act 1791 repealed some of the laws affecting Catholic worship, a chapel was built on the corner of Spanish Place and Charles Street (now George Street), largely through the efforts of Doctor Thomas Hussey who had been a chaplain at the embassy since his ordination in 1769. Most of the objects of piety in the present church are legacies from this older building. In 1827 the official Spanish connection with the chapel ceased and it was handed over to the London Vicariate.

34 Montagu Square, Marylebone
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
34 Montagu Square
London, W1H 2

34 Montagu Square is the address of a London ground floor and basement flat once leased by Beatles member Ringo Starr during the mid-1960s. Its location is 1.3 miles (2.09 km) from the Abbey Road Studios, where The Beatles recorded. Many well-known people have lived at the address, including a British Member of Parliament, Richard-Hanbury Gurney, and the daughter of the Marquess of Sligo, Lady Emily Charlotte Browne. The square was named after Elizabeth Montagu, who was highly regarded by London society in the late 18th century.Paul McCartney recorded demo songs there, such as "I'm Looking Through You", and worked on various compositions, including "Eleanor Rigby". With the help of Ian Sommerville he converted the flat to a studio for Apple Corps' avant-garde Zapple label, recording William S. Burroughs for spoken-word Zapple albums. Jimi Hendrix and his manager, Chas Chandler, later lived there with their girlfriends. Whilst living there, Hendrix composed "The Wind Cries Mary".For three months, John Lennon and Yoko Ono rented the flat, taking a photograph that would become the cover of their Two Virgins album. After the police raided the flat looking for drugs, the landlord of the property sought an injunction against Starr to prevent it from being used for anything untoward or illegal. Starr sold the lease in February 1969. In 2010, Ono unveiled a blue marker plaque at the site, making it an English Heritage "building of historical interest".