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Wellington Arch, London | Tourist Information


english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/wellington-arch

Constitution Hill
London, United Kingdom W1J 7JZ

0207 9302726

Set in the heart of Royal London at Hyde Park Corner, Wellington Arch is a landmark for Londoners and visitors alike and a great addition to a memorable day out in London. The balconies also offer unique views across London and of the Household Cavalry, passing beneath on their way to and from the Changing of the Guard at Horse Guards Parade every morning. It was originally commissioned as a grand outer entrance to Buckingham Palace and moved to its present site in 1882.

Historical Place Near Wellington Arch

Trafalgar Square
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 5

20-79301565

Trafalgar Square is a public square in the City of Westminster, Central London, built around the area formerly known as Charing Cross. Its name commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, a British naval victory in the Napoleonic Wars with France and Spain that took place on 21 October 1805 off the coast of Cape Trafalgar, Spain.The site of Trafalgar Square had been a significant landmark since the 13th century and originally contained the King's Mews. After George IV moved the mews to Buckingham Palace, the area was redeveloped by John Nash but progress was slow after his death and the square did not open until 1844. The 169ft Nelson's Column at its centre is guarded by four lion statues. A number of commemorative statues and sculptures occupy the square but the Fourth Plinth, left empty since 1840, has been host to contemporary art since 1999.The square has been used for community gatherings and political demonstrations including Bloody Sunday, the first Aldermaston March, anti-war protests, and campaigns against climate change. A Christmas tree has been donated to the square by Norway since 1947 and is erected for twelve days before and after Christmas Day. The square is a centre of annual celebrations on New Year's Eve. It was well known for its feral pigeons until their removal in the early 21st century.

Westminster Abbey
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, United Kingdom SW1P 3PA

020 7222 5152

Piccadilly Circus
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Picadilly Circus
London, United Kingdom W1V 9LB

Piccadilly Circus è una celebre piazza di Londra, nonché luogo di ritrovo, cuore morale della città, situata nella City of Westminster.Costruita nel 1819 per collegare Regent Street con l'omonima Piccadilly (importante strada dello shopping) è diventata col passare degli anni uno dei principali punti di snodo del traffico cittadino. La sua felice posizione, nel cuore del West End londinese, e la vicinanza con importanti luoghi di interesse come i teatri di Shaftesbury Avenue o strade come Coventry Street e The Haymarket ricchissime di negozi e locali alla moda, hanno reso Piccadilly Circus un affollato punto di ritrovo, nonché una vera e propria attrattiva turistica tanto da diventare uno dei simboli stessi di Londra.Famosa per i display luminosi e le insegne a LED posizionate su di un edificio posto al lato settentrionale della stessa e per la celebre Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain che rappresenta «l'Angelo della Carità Cristiana» (ma realizzata da Alfred Gilbert come "Anteros" anche se è nota ai più col nome di "Eros"), la piazza è circondata da imponenti edifici quali il London Pavilion (sede di numerosi negozi e del Trocadero) ed il Criterion Theatre. Inoltre direttamente sotto il perimetro della piazza c'è l'omonima stazione della metropolitana di Londra.le banane sono blu e bo poi il kebab fa schifo

Buckingham Palace London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1AA

020 7930 4832

UK Parliament
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Houses of Parliament, Westminster
London, United Kingdom SW1A 0AA

0800 112 4272

The work of Parliament is carried out by the House of Commons, the House of Lords and Select Committees of both Houses. Find out more about how Parliament works: http://www.parliament.uk/about/how/

Marble Arch
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1H 7

870-2427114

Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch and London landmark. The structure was designed by John Nash in 1827 to be the state entrance to the cour d'honneur of Buckingham Palace; it stood near the site of what is today the three bayed, central projection of the palace containing the well known balcony. In 1851 it was relocated and following the widening of Park Lane in the early 1960s is now sited, isolated and incongruously, on a large traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street, Park Lane, and Edgware Road.Historically, only members of the Royal Family and the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery are permitted to pass through the arch; this happens only in ceremonial processions.The arch gives its name to the vicinity of its site, particularly, the southern portion of Edgware Road and also to the nearby underground station.Design and constructionThe design of the arch is based on that of the Arch of Constantine in Rome and the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel in Paris. The arch is faced with Carrara marble with embellishments of marble extracted near Seravezza. John Flaxman was chosen to make the commemorative sculpture. After his death in 1826 the commission was divided between Sir Richard Westmacott, Edward Hodges Baily and J.C.F. Rossi. In 1829, a bronze equestrian statue of George IV was commissioned from Sir Francis Chantrey, with the intention of placing it on top of the arch.

Horse Guards
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Horse Guards Parade
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

020 7270 5000

Horse Guards is a large Grade I listed building in the Palladian style between Whitehall and Horse Guards Parade in London. The first Horse Guards building was built on the site of the former tiltyard of Westminster Palace in 1664. It was demolished in 1749 and was replaced by the current building which was built between 1750 and 1753 by John Vardy after the death of original architect in 1748 William Kent. Horse Guards Road runs north-south on the western boundary of the parade ground, while Horse Guards Avenue runs east from Whitehall on other side of the building, to Victoria Embankment.The building served as the offices of the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces until 1904 when the post was abolished and replaced by the Chief of the General Staff. The Chief of the General staff moved to the Old War Office Building in 1906 and Horse Guards subsequently became the headquarters of two major Army commands: the London District and the Household Cavalry. The building is the formal entrance to St James's Palace via St. James's Park (though this is now entirely symbolic). Only the monarch is allowed to drive through its central archway, or those given a pass (formerly made of ivory).

Methodist Central Hall Westminster
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Storeys Gate
London, United Kingdom SW1H 9NH

0044 20 7654 3809

Shakespeare's Head Pub
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Carnaby St
London, United Kingdom W1F 7

+4420 7734 2911

The Official Facebook Page for The Shakespeares Head, Oxford Circus, London.

Trafalgar Studios
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
14 Whitehall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

Trafalgar Studios, formerly the Whitehall Theatre until 2004, is a West End theatre in Whitehall, near Trafalgar Square, in the City of Westminster, London.Also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation, the building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. Studio 1, the larger of the two spaces with 380 seats, opened on 3 June 2004 with the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Othello. Studio 2, with 100 seats, opened in October 2005 with the play Cyprus.History1930 to 1996The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. It had 634 seats. The theatre opened on 29 September 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre's licensee. In November 1933 Henry Daniell appeared there as Portman in Afterwards. Hackett presented several other plays of his own before leaving in 1934, and the theatre built its reputation for modern comedies throughout the rest of the decade. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the West End. In 1942, The Whitehall Follies, featuring Phyllis Dixey, the first stripper to perform in the theatre district, opened with great fanfare and became an immediate success. Dixey leased the theatre and remained in it for the next five years.

Churchill War Rooms
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Clive Steps, King Charles Street
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2AQ

0207 930 6961

Follow us on Facebook and join our growing community of fans. Discover in-depth information about Churchill War Rooms, special content, and discuss and share with others.

St James's Palace
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

Scotland Yard
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Broadway, Westminster
City of Westminster, United Kingdom SW1H 0AZ

02072301212

Scotland Yard is a metonym for the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Service, the territorial police force responsible for policing most of London.The name derives from the location of the original Metropolitan Police headquarters at 4 Whitehall Place, which had a rear entrance on a street called Great Scotland Yard. The Scotland Yard entrance became the public entrance to the police station, and over time the street and the Metropolitan Police became synonymous. The New York Times wrote in 1964 that just as Wall Street gave its name to New York's financial district, Scotland Yard became the name for police activity in London.The force moved away from Great Scotland Yard in 1890, and the name New Scotland Yard was adopted for the subsequent headquarters. The current New Scotland Yard is located on Broadway in Victoria and has been the Metropolitan Police's headquarters since 1967. In summer 2013, it was announced that the force would move back to the former site of Scotland Yard, the Curtis Green Building, which is located on the Victoria Embankment and the headquarters will be renamed Scotland Yard.

The Banqueting House
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Whitehall House, 41 Whitehall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2ER

+44 (0) 844 482 7777

This revolutionary building, the first in England to be designed in a Palladian style by Inigo Jones, was finished in 1622 for James I. Intended for the splendour and exuberance of court masques, the Banqueting House is probably most famous for one real life drama: the execution of Charles I which took place here in 1649 to the ‘dismal, universal groan’ of the crowd. One of Charles’ last sights was he walked through the Banqueting House to his death was the magnificent ceiling, painted by Peter Paul Rubens in 1630-4.

Downing Street
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
st. Downing
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

020 7270 3000

Downing Street in London, United Kingdom, has for more than three hundred years housed the official residences of two of the most senior British Cabinet ministers: the First Lord of the Treasury, an office now synonymous with that of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom; and the Second Lord of the Treasury, an office held by the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The Prime Minister's official residence is 10 Downing Street; the Chancellor's official residence is next door at Number 11. The government's Chief Whip has an official residence at Number 12, although the current Chief Whip's residence is at Number 9.Downing Street is in Whitehall in central London, a few minutes' walk from the Houses of Parliament and a little further from Buckingham Palace. The street was built in the 1680s by Sir George Downing on the site of a mansion, Hampden House. The houses on the south side of the street were demolished in the 19th century to make way for government offices now occupied by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. "Downing Street" is used as a metonym for the Government of the United Kingdom.

Royal Chelsea Hospital Home Of The Chelsea Pensioners
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Royal Hospital Road. Chelsea SW1
London, United Kingdom SW3 4SR

Inside Buckingham Palace
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace, London SW1A 1AA
London, United Kingdom

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Royal Mews
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace Road
London, United Kingdom SW1W 0SR

020 7766 7302

A Royal Mews is a mews (i.e. combined stables, carriage house and in recent times also the garage) of the British Royal Family. In London the Royal Mews has occupied two main sites, formerly at Charing Cross, and since the 1820s at Buckingham Palace. Many open days are held each year.Charing CrossThe first set of stables to be referred to as a mews was at Charing Cross at the western end of The Strand. The royal hawks were kept at this site from 1377 and the name derives from the fact that they were confined there at moulting (or "mew") time.The building was destroyed by fire in 1534 and rebuilt as a stables, keeping its former name when it acquired this new function. On old maps, such as the "Woodcut" map of London of the early 1560s, the Mews can be seen extending back towards the site of today's Leicester Square.This building was usually known as the King's Mews, but was also sometimes referred to as the Royal Mews, the Royal Stables, or as the Queen's Mews when there was a woman on the throne. It was rebuilt again in 1732 to the designs of William Kent, and in the early 19th century it was open to the public. It was an impressive classical building, and there was an open space in front of it which ranked among the larger ones in central London at a time when the Royal Parks were on the fringes of the city and the gardens of London's squares were open only to the residents of the surrounding houses.

Marble Arch
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
63-79 SEYMOUR STREET
London, United Kingdom W2 2HF

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Victoria Memorial, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

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The Victoria Memorial is a monument to Queen Victoria, located at the end of The Mall in London, and designed and executed by the sculptor Sir Thomas Brock. Designed in 1901, it was unveiled on 16 May 1911, though it was not completed until 1924. It was the centrepiece of an ambitious urban planning scheme, which included the creation of the Queen’s Gardens to a design by Sir Aston Webb, and the refacing of Buckingham Palace (which stands behind the memorial) by the same architect.Like the earlier Albert Memorial in Kensington Gardens, commemorating Victoria's consort, the Victoria Memorial has an elaborate scheme of iconographic sculpture. The central pylon of the memorial is of Pentelic marble, and individual statues are in Carrara marble and gilt bronze. The memorial weighs 2,300 tonnes and is 104 ft wide. In 1970 it was listed at Grade I.HistoryProposal and announcementsKing Edward VII suggested that a joint Parliamentary committee should be formed to develop plans for a Memorial to Queen Victoria following her death. The first meeting took place on 19 February 1901 at the Foreign Office, Whitehall. The first secretary of the committee was Arthur Bigge, 1st Baron Stamfordham. Initially these meetings were behind closed doors, and the proceedings were not revealed to the public. However the Lord Mayor of London, Sir Joseph Dimsdale, publicly announced that the committee had decided that the Memorial should be "monumental".

Landmark Near Wellington Arch

Pétrus
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Kinnerton St
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8

020 7592 1609

Pétrus is a restaurant in London, which serves Modern French cuisine. It is located in Kinnerton Street, Belgravia and is part of Gordon Ramsay restaurants owned by celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay's Kavalake Limited. It has held one Michelin star since 2011, and five AA Rosettes. Controversy arose when the star was first awarded. It has received mixed reviews from food critics both while in its current incarnation, and while it was run by head chef Marcus Wareing. It was felt that the dishes were sometimes overcomplicated, and designed primarily to gain Michelin stars. The restaurant was named after the French wine Pétrus.It is now in its third location, and used to be located in St James's Street, London, and The Berkeley hotel, where it was run by head chef Wareing. By the time Pétrus' lease ran out in September 2008, it held two Michelin stars under Wareing. This resulted in a public feud between Wareing and Ramsay as Wareing took over Pétrus' former location in the hotel, opening his restaurant Marcus Wareing at the Berkeley, while Ramsay retained the rights to the Pétrus name.DescriptionThe current Pétrus restaurant is located in 1 Kinnerton Street, Belgravia, London, where it was opened on 29 March 2010 under Head Chef Sean Burbidge. He had worked in other Gordon Ramsay restaurants including Restaurant Gordon Ramsay and Gordon Ramsay au Trianon, but it is his first position as head chef.

Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
The Dorchester Hotel, Park Lane,
London, United Kingdom W1K 1QA

020 7629 8888

Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester is a restaurant located in The Dorchester, a hotel in Park Lane, London. It is one of 27 restaurants operated by French chef Alain Ducasse: the head chef is Jean-Philippe Blondet, who replaced Jocelyn Herland in January 2016. Since 2010, it has been one of four UK-sited restaurants to hold three Michelin stars. It opened in 2007 to mixed opinions, but the reviews have since improved.DescriptionAt the time of opening, Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester was one of 27 restaurants around the world operated by Ducasse. He intended the restaurant to have "the modernity of Beige in Tokyo, the seriousness of La Plaza Athénée in Paris and the flavours of Le Louis XV in Monaco meeting the energy of London."The Head Chef was originally intended to be Nicola Canuti, but Canuti was replaced before opening by Jocelyn Herland, who moved from Ducasse's La Plaza Athénée in Paris. Patrick Jouin designed the interior of the restaurant, in light coffee and cream colours. The tables feature ceramic vegetables as centrepieces, handmade butter dishes in pink marble, and Porthault linen tablecloths.The restaurant features a special table for up to six diners called the "Table Lumière", which is surrounded by a thin white curtain which allows diners at the table to view out into the restaurant but prevents other diners from viewing in, and is lit by 4,500 fibre optic lights. Diners who book this table are allowed to select from a choice of tableware and menus, described by the restaurant as being a bespoke dining experience.

Royal Mews
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace Road
London, United Kingdom SW1W 0SR

020 7766 7302

A Royal Mews is a mews (i.e. combined stables, carriage house and in recent times also the garage) of the British Royal Family. In London the Royal Mews has occupied two main sites, formerly at Charing Cross, and since the 1820s at Buckingham Palace. Many open days are held each year.Charing CrossThe first set of stables to be referred to as a mews was at Charing Cross at the western end of The Strand. The royal hawks were kept at this site from 1377 and the name derives from the fact that they were confined there at moulting (or "mew") time.The building was destroyed by fire in 1534 and rebuilt as a stables, keeping its former name when it acquired this new function. On old maps, such as the "Woodcut" map of London of the early 1560s, the Mews can be seen extending back towards the site of today's Leicester Square.This building was usually known as the King's Mews, but was also sometimes referred to as the Royal Mews, the Royal Stables, or as the Queen's Mews when there was a woman on the throne. It was rebuilt again in 1732 to the designs of William Kent, and in the early 19th century it was open to the public. It was an impressive classical building, and there was an open space in front of it which ranked among the larger ones in central London at a time when the Royal Parks were on the fringes of the city and the gardens of London's squares were open only to the residents of the surrounding houses.

High Commission of Pakistan, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
34-36 Lowndes Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 9JN

+44 (0)20 7664 9200

The High Commission of Pakistan in London is the diplomatic mission of Pakistan in the United Kingdom.In September 2015, DAWN (newspaper) reported Prime Minister of Pakistan Nawaz Sharif constituted a four-member committee to explore the possibility of selling the High Commission building.

Belgrave Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
32 Belgrave Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8QB

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Hilton London Hyde Park Hotel
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
129 Bayswater Road
London, United Kingdom W2 4RJ

The Hilton London Hyde Park is a hotel situated on Bayswater Road, overlooking Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens in central London. It was opened in July 1999.The building was originally the Coburg Court Hotel, first opened in 1907, and it was later renamed the Coburg Hotel in the early 1960s.The Coburg Hotel was used as a filming location in Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy (1972). Richard Blaney and Babs Milligan check into the Coburg as "Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Wilde". Filming took place at the hotel during September 1971. The interiors of the Coburg Hotel were mostly recreated at Pinewood Studios, except for the policemen's point-of-view shot showing the fire escape, which was filmed by assistant director Colin M. Brewer from a fifth-floor room.The current hotel is the first Hilton Hotels & Resorts hotel in London with a state-of-the-art meeting room featuring an interactive projection and speaker system.

Zafferano
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
15-17 Lowndes Street
London, United Kingdom SW1X 9

Zafferano is a restaurant located in London, and was originally run by Giorgio Locatelli on behalf of A-Z Restaurants until 2005. The restaurant was awarded one michelin star in 1999, which it held until this star was stripped from it 2012.HistoryZafferano was opened by chef Giorgio Locatelli in February 1995 in Knightsbridge, London. The restaurant's name comes from the Italian for saffron. The location had previously been a fish restaurant, but under Locatelli the new restaurant served Italian food. The major investor in the restaurant was Claudio Pulze, who owned the restaurant through his company A-Z Restaurants. Locatelli's pay was based on percentage of the overall performance of the restaurant. Chef Angela Hartnett worked at the restaurant as she rotated around the A-Z Restaurants range of establishments.The restaurant was awarded a Michelin star in the list published in 1999. While as chef-proprietor of Zafferanno, Locatelli was named the Outstanding London Chef of 2001 at the London Restaurant Awards, but shortly afterwards left the restaurant following disagreements with new head of A-Z Restaurants, Giuliano Lotto. Andrew Needham took over as head chef, having previously been sous chef to Locatelli.After A-Z Restaurants went into administrations in November 2004, Locatelli stated publicly that he was interested in purchasing Zafferano. The group, including Zafferano, was sold back to Claudio Pulze with new partner John De Stefano. In 2007, Pulze sold his share of the company to De Stefano. The restaurant expanded during the same year, and opened a delicatessen.

High Commission of Malaysia, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
45, BELGRAVE SQUARE,
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8Q

+44 20 7235 8033

The High Commission of Malaysia in London is the diplomatic mission of Malaysia in the United Kingdom. Prior to independence the then-Malaya had a Commission in London; this was upgraded to a full High Commission upon independence in 1957. It was initially located on Trafalgar Square before relocating to Great Portland Street; it then moved to its current location in the mid 1960s.

Buckingham Palace
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace Road
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1AA

One Hyde Park
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
100 Knightsbridge
London, United Kingdom SW1X 7LJ

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One Hyde Park is a major residential and retail complex located in Knightsbridge, London. The development includes three retail units (Rolex, McLaren Automotive and Abu Dhabi Islamic Bank) totalling 385000sqft and 86 residential properties marketed with prices starting at around £20 million.The building is owned by Project Grande (Guernsey) Limited, a joint venture between the Christian Candy-owned CPC Group and Sheikh Hamad bin Jassim bin Jaber Al Thani, former Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Qatar. Graham Stirk led the trem at Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners who designed the building. built by Laing O'Rourke It was financed via a £1.15 billion development loan from Eurohypo AG. Candy & Candy were the development managers and interior designers for the scheme.HistoryPlanning consent for the building was granted in June 2006. Demolition of the previous building on the site took place between July and December 2006. Construction work began in January 2007. The superstructure of the building was completed in March 2009. Fitting-out of the building began in April 2009. In August 2010 a penthouse in the development was rumoured to be sold for £140 million, making it the most expensive residential property in Britain. Also in that month it was announced that McLaren Automotive would be opening a car showroom in the building in early 2011. However, a newspaper report at the time of the development's launch party in January 2011 indicated that according to Land Registry records the sale of only five properties had been completed - the 'recordbreaking' £140 million penthouse being sold to the development's own financial backer Sheik Hamad bin Jassim bin Jaber Al Thani for £40.5 million in August 2010. One to an Indian family in mining and oil and an adjoining penthouse to One Hyde Park developer Christian Candy, who reportedly paid £31 million, "about £100 million less than the asking price".

Apsley House
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner, 149 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

020 7499 5676

Apsley House, also known as Number One, London, is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner, on the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south towards the busy traffic roundabout in the centre of which stands the Wellington Arch. It is a Grade I listed building.It is sometimes referred to as the Wellington Museum. The house is now run by English Heritage and is open to the public as a museum and art gallery, exhibiting 83 paintings from the Spanish royal collection. The 9th Duke of Wellington retains the use of part of the buildings. It is perhaps the only preserved example of an English aristocratic town house from its period. The practice has been to maintain the rooms as far as possible in the original style and decor. It contains the 1st Duke's collection of paintings, porcelain, the silver centrepiece made for the Duke in Portugal, c. 1815, sculpture and furniture. Antonio Canova's heroic marble nude of Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker made 1802–10, holding a gilded Nike in the palm of his right hand, and standing to the raised left hand holding a staff. It was set up for a time in the Louvre and was bought by the Government for Wellington in 1816 (according to Nikolaus Pevsner) and stands in Adam's Stairwell.

Apsley House
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner, 149 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

020 7499 5676

Apsley House, also known as Number One, London, is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner, on the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south towards the busy traffic roundabout in the centre of which stands the Wellington Arch. It is a Grade I listed building.It is sometimes referred to as the Wellington Museum. The house is now run by English Heritage and is open to the public as a museum and art gallery, exhibiting 83 paintings from the Spanish royal collection. The 9th Duke of Wellington retains the use of part of the buildings. It is perhaps the only preserved example of an English aristocratic town house from its period. The practice has been to maintain the rooms as far as possible in the original style and decor. It contains the 1st Duke's collection of paintings, porcelain, the silver centrepiece made for the Duke in Portugal, c. 1815, sculpture and furniture. Antonio Canova's heroic marble nude of Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker made 1802–10, holding a gilded Nike in the palm of his right hand, and standing to the raised left hand holding a staff. It was set up for a time in the Louvre and was bought by the Government for Wellington in 1816 (according to Nikolaus Pevsner) and stands in Adam's Stairwell.

Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
30 Charles Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

020-79173000

The Embassy of Saudi Arabia in London (officially the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia) (السفارة السعودية الملكية في لندن) is the diplomatic mission of Saudi Arabia in the United Kingdom. Saudi Arabia also maintains a Defence Attaché’s Office at 26 Queen's Gate, South Kensington, a Diplomatic Office of the Cultural Bureau at 630 Chiswick High Road, Gunnersbury, a Medical Section at 60 Queen Anne Street, Marylebone, a Commercial Section at 15/16 Queen Street, Mayfair, an Islamic Affairs Section at 2nd Floor, Park Lorne, 111 Park Road, Lisson Grove and an Information Section at 18 Seymour Street, Marylebone.The embassy is situated in Crewe House, a detached mansion designed and constructed by Edward Sheppard in 1730, set in its own grounds. Built in the Georgian style, it is a Grade II* listed building. The house was considerably altered in the late 18th and early 19th-century. Much of its neo-classical interior dates from the early 19th-century, and some of Shepard's original plasterwork ceilings may survive.

Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
30 Charles Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

020-79173000

The Embassy of Saudi Arabia in London (officially the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia) (السفارة السعودية الملكية في لندن) is the diplomatic mission of Saudi Arabia in the United Kingdom. Saudi Arabia also maintains a Defence Attaché’s Office at 26 Queen's Gate, South Kensington, a Diplomatic Office of the Cultural Bureau at 630 Chiswick High Road, Gunnersbury, a Medical Section at 60 Queen Anne Street, Marylebone, a Commercial Section at 15/16 Queen Street, Mayfair, an Islamic Affairs Section at 2nd Floor, Park Lorne, 111 Park Road, Lisson Grove and an Information Section at 18 Seymour Street, Marylebone.The embassy is situated in Crewe House, a detached mansion designed and constructed by Edward Sheppard in 1730, set in its own grounds. Built in the Georgian style, it is a Grade II* listed building. The house was considerably altered in the late 18th and early 19th-century. Much of its neo-classical interior dates from the early 19th-century, and some of Shepard's original plasterwork ceilings may survive.

Embassy of Myanmar, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
19A Charles St
London, United Kingdom W1J 5DX

+44 (0) 207 499 4340

The Embassy of Myanmar in London, also referred to as the Embassy of Burma, is the diplomatic mission of Myanmar in the United Kingdom.

New Zealand War Memorial, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner
London, United Kingdom W1J 7JZ

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The New Zealand War Memorial in London is a memorial to the war dead of New Zealand in the First and Second World Wars, unveiled in 2006. Officially named "Southern Stand", the memorial was designed by architect John Hardwick-Smith and sculptor Paul Dibble, both from New Zealand.It is located on the Piccadilly side of Hyde Park Corner, northeast of the Wellington Arch, and is diagonally opposite the Australian War Memorial. The traffic island that also houses an Equestrian statue of the Duke of Wellington, the Machine Gun Corps Memorial and the Royal Artillery Memorial.BackgroundThe memorial was established to commemorate "the enduring bond between New Zealand and the United Kingdom", and the lives lost by the two countries during the two World Wars. Dibble said:Thousands of soldiers from New Zealand served with the British Army in South Africa during the Boer War, at Gallipoli and on the Western Front during the First World War, and the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force served in England, the Middle East and Italy in the Second World War. Hundreds of New Zealanders also served in the Royal Flying Corps, Royal Air Force, and Royal Navy, including the battlecruiser HMS New Zealand and the light cruiser HMS Achilles. Prominent wartime commanders with connections to New Zealand included Bernard Freyberg and Keith Park.

Grosvenor Chapel
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
24 South Audley St
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1K 2

020 7499 1684

Grosvenor Chapel is an Anglican church in what is now the City of Westminster, in England, built in 1730s. It inspired many churches in New England. It is situated on South Audley Street in Mayfair.HistoryThe foundation stone of the Grosvenor Chapel was laid on 7 April 1730 by Sir Richard Grosvenor, 4th Baronet, owner of the surrounding property, who had leased the site for 99 years at a peppercorn rent to a syndicate of four “undertakers” led by Benjamin Timbrell, a prosperous local builder.The new building was completed and ready to use by April 1731.Soon after the original 99-year lease ran out in 1829 the chapel was brought within the parochial system as a chapel of ease to St George's, Hanover Square.The chapel has been the spiritual home to a number of famous people including John Wilkes, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington, and his wife (parents to the Duke of Wellington), Florence Nightingale, U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Bishop Charles Gore.During the Second World War men and women of the American armed forces were welcomed to the chapel for their Sunday services, as recorded on a tablet outside the west wall, and after the war the congregation regularly included such people as the writer Rose Macaulay and Sir John Betjeman, Poet Laureate from 1972 until his death in 1984.

Grosvenor Chapel
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
24 South Audley St
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1K 2

020 7499 1684

Grosvenor Chapel is an Anglican church in what is now the City of Westminster, in England, built in 1730s. It inspired many churches in New England. It is situated on South Audley Street in Mayfair.HistoryThe foundation stone of the Grosvenor Chapel was laid on 7 April 1730 by Sir Richard Grosvenor, 4th Baronet, owner of the surrounding property, who had leased the site for 99 years at a peppercorn rent to a syndicate of four “undertakers” led by Benjamin Timbrell, a prosperous local builder.The new building was completed and ready to use by April 1731.Soon after the original 99-year lease ran out in 1829 the chapel was brought within the parochial system as a chapel of ease to St George's, Hanover Square.The chapel has been the spiritual home to a number of famous people including John Wilkes, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington, and his wife (parents to the Duke of Wellington), Florence Nightingale, U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Bishop Charles Gore.During the Second World War men and women of the American armed forces were welcomed to the chapel for their Sunday services, as recorded on a tablet outside the west wall, and after the war the congregation regularly included such people as the writer Rose Macaulay and Sir John Betjeman, Poet Laureate from 1972 until his death in 1984.

Embassy of Austria, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
18 Belgrave Mews West
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8HU

The Embassy of Austria in London is the diplomatic mission of Austria in the United Kingdom. Austria also maintain a Commercial Section at 45 Prince’s Gate, South Kensington and a Cultural Section at 28 Rutland Gate, South Kensington.HistoryThe Austrian Habsburg Monarchy had a permanent delegation in London from 1677 onwards, it was upgraded to the embassy of the Austrian Empire in 1860. The residence was in Chandos House in Marylebone, before it moved to Belgravia in 1866, thus making this the only building used by the Austro-Hungarian Foreign Service that is still used today the Austrian government.Following the rupture of diplomatic relations between Austria-Hungary and Britain after the outbreak of the First World War the embassy was looked after first by the government of America and then that of Sweden. Following the end of that conflict the embassy was given to the government of the new state of Austria, though a dispute over ownership of the embassy with Hungary was not resolved until 1934. Following the unification of Austria with Nazi Germany in 1938 the building was used as a German consulate, and was then looked after by the Swiss government following the outbreak of the Second World War. After a brief period of use by the Ministry of Works Austria resumed occupation of the embassy in 1949 where it remains to this day.

Embassy of Turkey, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
43 Belgrave Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8

The Embassy of Turkey in London is the diplomatic mission of Turkey in the United Kingdom. There was formerly an embassy of the Ottoman Empire in London dating from 1793; this was suspended in 1914 following the outbreak of the First World War and replaced by the embassy of the new Republic of Turkey in 1924. From 1901-1954 the embassy was located at 69 Portland Place before moving to its current location; however this building was kept and is currently used as the Ambassador's Residence.The embassy is housed in one of a group of Grade I listed buildings at 38—48 Belgrave Square.Turkey also maintains a Consulate at Rutland Lodge, Rutland Gardens, Knightsbridge.

Landmark Near Wellington Arch

New Zealand War Memorial, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner
London, United Kingdom W1J 7JZ

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The New Zealand War Memorial in London is a memorial to the war dead of New Zealand in the First and Second World Wars, unveiled in 2006. Officially named "Southern Stand", the memorial was designed by architect John Hardwick-Smith and sculptor Paul Dibble, both from New Zealand.It is located on the Piccadilly side of Hyde Park Corner, northeast of the Wellington Arch, and is diagonally opposite the Australian War Memorial. The traffic island that also houses an Equestrian statue of the Duke of Wellington, the Machine Gun Corps Memorial and the Royal Artillery Memorial.BackgroundThe memorial was established to commemorate "the enduring bond between New Zealand and the United Kingdom", and the lives lost by the two countries during the two World Wars. Dibble said:Thousands of soldiers from New Zealand served with the British Army in South Africa during the Boer War, at Gallipoli and on the Western Front during the First World War, and the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force served in England, the Middle East and Italy in the Second World War. Hundreds of New Zealanders also served in the Royal Flying Corps, Royal Air Force, and Royal Navy, including the battlecruiser HMS New Zealand and the light cruiser HMS Achilles. Prominent wartime commanders with connections to New Zealand included Bernard Freyberg and Keith Park.

Embassy of Ireland, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
17 Grosvenor Place
London, United Kingdom SW1X 7

20-72352171

The Embassy of Ireland in London is the diplomatic mission of the Republic of Ireland in the United Kingdom. Ireland also maintains a Passport and Visa Office at 114A Cromwell Road, South Kensington.The London mission is concurrently the non-resident ambassador to the nation(s) of: Barbados.

49 Belgrave Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
49 Belgrave Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8QZ

El Número 49 de Belgrave Square es una casa catalogada de grado II en Belgravia, Londres, Reino Unido. Actualmente aquí funciona la residencia del embajador argentino ante el Reino Unido, desde 2016 Renato Carlos Sersale Di Cerisano. La embajada se ubica en el Número 65 de Brook Street.HistoriaFue terminada en 1851, diseñada por Thomas Cubitt. En 1859, Mayhew & Knight construyeron la entrada y añadieron el vestíbulo octogonal.Era conocido originalmente como el Independent North Mansion.El primer propietario, Sidney Herbert, primer barón Herbert of Lea, la llamó Belgrave Villa. Su hijo, Sidney Herbert, decimocuarto conde de Pembroke nació allí en 1853.Después de Herbert, el duque de Richmond vivió aquí.La casa fue posteriormente adquirida por Alfred Beit, y su hermano Sir Otto Beit la heredó en 1906. Su hijo Sir Alfred Beit, segundo baronet se crió allí y tras la muerte de su padre en 1930 heredó la casa, junto con su gran colección de arte. Se trasladó a Kensington Palace Gardens, y vendió la casa en 1936.El edificio fue adquirido por Argentina en 1936, y desde entonces ha sido utilizado como residencia oficial de su embajador. Se ha abierto al público una semana al año desde 2006, como parte de Open House London.

High Commission of Malaysia, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
45, BELGRAVE SQUARE,
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8Q

+44 20 7235 8033

The High Commission of Malaysia in London is the diplomatic mission of Malaysia in the United Kingdom. Prior to independence the then-Malaya had a Commission in London; this was upgraded to a full High Commission upon independence in 1957. It was initially located on Trafalgar Square before relocating to Great Portland Street; it then moved to its current location in the mid 1960s.

Embassy of Luxembourg, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
27 Wilton Crescent
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8SD

+44 20 7235 6963

The Embassy of Luxembourg in London is the diplomatic mission of Luxembourg in the United Kingdom. It was the home of the Luxembourg government-in-exile during the Second World War.

Embassy of Turkey, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
43 Belgrave Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8

The Embassy of Turkey in London is the diplomatic mission of Turkey in the United Kingdom. There was formerly an embassy of the Ottoman Empire in London dating from 1793; this was suspended in 1914 following the outbreak of the First World War and replaced by the embassy of the new Republic of Turkey in 1924. From 1901-1954 the embassy was located at 69 Portland Place before moving to its current location; however this building was kept and is currently used as the Ambassador's Residence.The embassy is housed in one of a group of Grade I listed buildings at 38—48 Belgrave Square.Turkey also maintains a Consulate at Rutland Lodge, Rutland Gardens, Knightsbridge.

Hilton London Hyde Park Hotel
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
129 Bayswater Road
London, United Kingdom W2 4RJ

The Hilton London Hyde Park is a hotel situated on Bayswater Road, overlooking Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens in central London. It was opened in July 1999.The building was originally the Coburg Court Hotel, first opened in 1907, and it was later renamed the Coburg Hotel in the early 1960s.The Coburg Hotel was used as a filming location in Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy (1972). Richard Blaney and Babs Milligan check into the Coburg as "Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Wilde". Filming took place at the hotel during September 1971. The interiors of the Coburg Hotel were mostly recreated at Pinewood Studios, except for the policemen's point-of-view shot showing the fire escape, which was filmed by assistant director Colin M. Brewer from a fifth-floor room.The current hotel is the first Hilton Hotels & Resorts hotel in London with a state-of-the-art meeting room featuring an interactive projection and speaker system.

Embassy of Portugal, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
11 Belgrave Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8

20-72355331

The Embassy of Portugal in London is the diplomatic mission of Portugal in the United Kingdom. The embassy is located on Belgrave Square, Belgravia, in two separate buildings, and there is also a Portuguese consulate in Portland Place, Fitzrovia.HistoryThe Portuguese Embassy had previously been situated at 23-24 Golden Square, Soho, London, W1F 9JP from 1724-1747 and Marquess of Pombal served as Ambassdor from 1738 to 1744.The embassy is now situated in a 1825 stucco terrace designed by George Basevi. The building is part of a single group of Grade I listed buildings at 1—11 Belgrave Square.On 2 February 2002 a ceremony on the corner of the square facing the embassy took place, unveiling a statue of the famous Portuguese British Prince Henry The Navigator, whose mother, Philippa of Lancaster, was from England. The statue is very similar to the Prince Henry the Navigator (statue) in Fall River, Massachusetts, USA.

The London Penthouse
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
69 Knightsbridge
London, United Kingdom SW1X 7RB

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Embassy of Qatar, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 South Audley St
London, United Kingdom W1K 1

+442074932200

The Embassy of Qatar at 1 South Audley Street in Mayfair, London is the diplomatic mission of Qatar in the United Kingdom. The embassy is housed in a Grade II listed three storey house designed by the architect Frederick Pepys Cockerell and completed after his death by George Aitchison.The exterior of the house is richly decorated with a terracotta freize depicting putti.Qatar also maintains a Cultural and Military Section at 21 Hertford Street, Mayfair and a Health Section at 30 Collingham Gardens, South Kensington.In 2013 there was a protest outside the embassy against the alleged mistreatment of migrant workers in Qatar.

Embassy of France, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
58 Knightsbridge
London, United Kingdom SW1X 7JT

The Embassy of France in London is the diplomatic mission of France to the United Kingdom. Located just off Knightsbridge at Albert Gate, one of the entrances to Hyde Park, it is situated immediately opposite the Embassy of Kuwait.This building, along with the rest of Albert Gate and neighbouring buildings, were designed by the British architect Thomas Cubitt; his son, George Cubitt, who was created Baron Ashcombe in 1892, is Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall's great-great-grandfather.At the time of these buildings' construction in the 1840s, they were by far the tallest structures in the neighbourhood.The Republic of France also owns various premises along the Cromwell Road, South Kensington which house its Consular, Cultural, Science & Technology and Visa sections. It is also has a Trade Mission at 28-29 Haymarket and a Paymaster & Financial Comptroller Section at 30 Queen’s Gate Terrace, South Kensington.

Embassy of Austria, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
18 Belgrave Mews West
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8HU

The Embassy of Austria in London is the diplomatic mission of Austria in the United Kingdom. Austria also maintain a Commercial Section at 45 Prince’s Gate, South Kensington and a Cultural Section at 28 Rutland Gate, South Kensington.HistoryThe Austrian Habsburg Monarchy had a permanent delegation in London from 1677 onwards, it was upgraded to the embassy of the Austrian Empire in 1860. The residence was in Chandos House in Marylebone, before it moved to Belgravia in 1866, thus making this the only building used by the Austro-Hungarian Foreign Service that is still used today the Austrian government.Following the rupture of diplomatic relations between Austria-Hungary and Britain after the outbreak of the First World War the embassy was looked after first by the government of America and then that of Sweden. Following the end of that conflict the embassy was given to the government of the new state of Austria, though a dispute over ownership of the embassy with Hungary was not resolved until 1934. Following the unification of Austria with Nazi Germany in 1938 the building was used as a German consulate, and was then looked after by the Swiss government following the outbreak of the Second World War. After a brief period of use by the Ministry of Works Austria resumed occupation of the embassy in 1949 where it remains to this day.

High Commission of The Bahamas, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
10 Chesterfield Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 5JL

02074084488

The High Commission of The Bahamas in London is the diplomatic mission of The Bahamas in the United Kingdom.

Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
30 Charles Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

020-79173000

The Embassy of Saudi Arabia in London (officially the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia) (السفارة السعودية الملكية في لندن) is the diplomatic mission of Saudi Arabia in the United Kingdom. Saudi Arabia also maintains a Defence Attaché’s Office at 26 Queen's Gate, South Kensington, a Diplomatic Office of the Cultural Bureau at 630 Chiswick High Road, Gunnersbury, a Medical Section at 60 Queen Anne Street, Marylebone, a Commercial Section at 15/16 Queen Street, Mayfair, an Islamic Affairs Section at 2nd Floor, Park Lorne, 111 Park Road, Lisson Grove and an Information Section at 18 Seymour Street, Marylebone.The embassy is situated in Crewe House, a detached mansion designed and constructed by Edward Sheppard in 1730, set in its own grounds. Built in the Georgian style, it is a Grade II* listed building. The house was considerably altered in the late 18th and early 19th-century. Much of its neo-classical interior dates from the early 19th-century, and some of Shepard's original plasterwork ceilings may survive.

Embassy of Myanmar, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
19A Charles St
London, United Kingdom W1J 5DX

+44 (0) 207 499 4340

The Embassy of Myanmar in London, also referred to as the Embassy of Burma, is the diplomatic mission of Myanmar in the United Kingdom.

Embassy of Hungary, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
46 Eaton Pl
London, United Kingdom

020 7325 5218

The Embassy of Hungary in London is the diplomatic mission of Hungary in the United Kingdom. Opposite the embassy itself can be found the Hungarian Economic, Investment & Trade Commission and the Hungarian National Tourist Office at 46 Eaton Place. A Hungarian Cultural Centre is also maintained at 10 Maiden Lane in Covent Garden.

Embassy of Egypt, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 Lowndes Street
London, United Kingdom

The Embassy of Egypt in London is the diplomatic mission of Egypt in the United Kingdom.Egypt also maintains several other buildings in London: a Consulate General at 2 Lowndes Street, Belgravia, a Press & Information Office at 299 Oxford Street, a Cultural Office at 4 Chesterfield Gardens, Mayfair and a Medical Office at 47 Longridge Road, Earl's Court.There have been several protests outside the embassy in recent years: in 2011 during the protests against Hosni Mubarak, in 2013 following the violent clashes in Cairo between supporters and opponents of Mohammed Morsi and also in 2013 there was a protest against the rise of sexual attacks against women in Egypt.

High Commission of Lesotho, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
7 Chesham Pl
London, United Kingdom SW1X 8

020 7235 5686

The High Commission of Lesotho in London is the diplomatic mission of Lesotho in the United Kingdom.

High Commission of Pakistan, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
34-36 Lowndes Square
London, United Kingdom SW1X 9JN

+44 (0)20 7664 9200

The High Commission of Pakistan in London is the diplomatic mission of Pakistan in the United Kingdom.In September 2015, DAWN (newspaper) reported Prime Minister of Pakistan Nawaz Sharif constituted a four-member committee to explore the possibility of selling the High Commission building.

Buckingham Palace
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1AA

Buckingham Palace est la résidence officielle de la monarchie britannique à Londres. Le palais est à la fois le lieu où se produisent les événements en relation avec la famille royale, le point de chute de beaucoup de chefs d’État en visite, et une attraction touristique importante. C’est le point de convergence du peuple britannique lors des moments de joie, de crise et de peine. « Buckingham Palace », ou tout simplement « le Palais », désigne la source des déclarations de presse émanant des bureaux royaux. Buckingham Palace a été construit par John Sheffield à l'origine du duc de Buckingham en 1703, c'est le lieu de résidence de la monarchie britannique. Buckingham Palace a été reconstruit au cours des siècles par John Nash pour George IV.Au Moyen Âge, le site du palais de Buckingham formait une partie du manoir d’Ebury. Il y eut plusieurs occupants royaux depuis Édouard le Confesseur, et a été l’objet de nombreuses spéculations à propos de son propriétaire : une faille dans le bail de Charles d’Angleterre permit au terrain de revenir dans le giron royal au. Les précurseurs de Buckingham Palace sont Blake House, Goring House et Arlington House.D’abord connu sous le nom de Buckingham House, le bâtiment formant le cœur du palais d’aujourd’hui était auparavant un grand hôtel particulier construit en 1703 par le duc de Buckingham John Sheffield et acquis par le roi George III en 1762 pour en faire sa résidence privée. Il a été agrandi au cours des 75 années suivantes, principalement par les architectes John Nash et Edward Blore, qui ajoutèrent trois ailes autour d’une cour carrée. Buckingham Palace devint finalement la résidence officielle de la monarchie britannique lors de l’accession au trône de la reine Victoria en 1837. Les derniers ajouts structurels d’importance datent de la fin du et du début du : l’imposante aile est qui fait face au Mall a été ajoutée, et l’ancienne entrée officielle, Marble Arch, a été déplacée près du Speaker’s Corner à Hyde Park, où elle se trouve toujours. La façade côté est a été refaite en 1913 avec des blocs de calcaire de Portland, en arrière plan du Victoria Memorial, créant la « façade publique » de Buckingham, avec le fameux balcon en son centre.