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Madeleine (Paris Métro), Paris | Tourist Information


Place de la Madeleine
Paris, France 75008


Madeleine is a station on lines 8, 12 and 14 of the Paris Métro in central Paris and the 8th arrondissement.The station was opened on 5 November 1910 as part of the original section of the Nord-Sud Company's line A between Porte de Versailles and Notre-Dame-de-Lorette. On 27 March 1931 line A became line 12 of the Métro. The line 8 platforms opened on 13 July 1913 as part of the original section of the line between Beaugrenelle (now Charles Michels on line 10) and Opéra. The line 14 platforms opened on 15 October 1998 as part of the original section of the line between Madeleine and Bibliothèque François Mitterrand. It was the north-western terminus of Line 14 until its extension to Saint-Lazare in 2003.It is named after the nearby Église de la Madeleine, which was dedicated to Sainte Madeleine in the 18th century. A small settlement had grown up in the district by the 6th century around a stronghold of the Bishop of Paris. It was known from an early date as la Ville-l’Évêque ("Town of the Bishop").

Catholic Church Near Madeleine (Paris Métro)

Chapel of Miraculous Medal, Rue de Bac, Paris
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
140 rue de Bac, 7e
Paris,

01 49 54 78 88

Eglise Saint Ignace
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
33 rue de Sèvres, 75006 PARIS
Paris,

Chapelle Notre-Dame De La Médaille Miraculeuse
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
140 Rue du Bac 75007 Paris
Paris, 75007

06616926967

Capela Da Medalha Milagrosa
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
140 Rue du Bac
Paris, 75007

Catherine Labouré
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
basilique médaille miraculeuse
Paris,

Saint Catherine Labouré, D.C.. (May 2, 1806 - December 31, 1876) (born Zoé Labouré) was a member of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul and a Marian visionary who relayed the request from the Blessed Virgin Mary to create the Miraculous Medal worn by millions of Christians, both Roman Catholic and Protestant.LifeShe was born in the Burgundy region of France to Pierre Labouré, a farmer, and Louise Madeleine Gontard, the ninth of 11 living children. Catherine's mother died on October 9, 1815, when Catherine was just nine years old. It is said that after her mother's funeral, Catherine picked up a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary and kissed it saying, "Now you will be my mother." Her father's sister offered to care for his two youngest children, Catherine and Tonine. After he agreed, the sisters moved to their aunt's house at Saint-Rémy, a village nine kilometers from their home.She was extremely devout, of a somewhat romantic nature, given to visions and intuitive insights. As a young woman, she became a member of the nursing order founded by Saint Vincent de Paul. She chose the Daughters of Charity after a dream about St. Vincent De Paul.VisionsVincent de PaulIn April 1830, the remains of St. Vincent de Paul were translated to the Vincentian church in Paris. The solemnities included a novena. On three successive evenings, upon returning from the church to the Rue du Bac, Catherine reportedly experienced in the convent chapel, a vision of what she took to be the heart of St. Vincent above a shrine containing a relic of bone from his right arm. Each time the heart appeared a different color, white, red, and crimson. She interpreted this to mean that the Vincentian communities would prosper, and that there would be a change of government. The convent chaplain advised her to forget the matter.

Eglise de St Sulpice
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Chemin du Crêt
Paris,

Church of Saint-Sulpice, Paris
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Place Saint Sulpice 2 rue Palatine
Paris,

La iglesia de San Sulpicio es una destacada iglesia barroca francesa situada en la plaza de Saint-Sulpice de París, construida en honor a Sulpicio Pío, que alberga en su interior un sistema para la determinación astronómica de los equinoccios diseñado por Henry Sully.La iglesia, orientada en el sentido usual O-E, es una edificación imponente de de largo, de ancho, de altura bajo la bóveda central; es después de Notre Dame, la iglesia más grande de la ciudad.HistoriaErigida sobre los cimientos de un antiguo templo románico del siglo XIII, que sufrió sucesivas ampliaciones hasta 1631. En 1646, el sacerdote parisino Jean-Jacques Olier encargó la construcción de un nuevo edificio, que se alargó durante más de un siglo. El resultado fue un edificio sencillo, de dos plantas, con una fachada oeste formada por dos filas de elegantes columnas. La armonía del conjunto sólo la rompen las torres de los extremos, que no son parejas.Unas enormes ventanas llenan el interior de luz. Las dos conchas que hay junto a la entrada fueron un regalo de la República de Venecia a Francisco I. La base de piedra sobre la que se encuentran fue realizada por Jean-Baptiste Pigalle.

Church of Saint-Sulpice, Paris
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Place St. Sulpice
Paris, 75006

Saint-Sulpice is a Roman Catholic church in Paris, France, on the east side of the Place Saint-Sulpice within the rue Bonaparte, in the Luxembourg Quarter of the 6th arrondissement. At 113 metres long, 58 metres in width and 34 metres tall, it is only slightly smaller than Notre-Dame and thus the second largest church in the city. It is dedicated to Sulpitius the Pious. Construction of the present building, the second church on the site, began in 1646. During the 18th century, an elaborate gnomon, the Gnomon of Saint-Sulpice, was constructed in the church.HistoryThe present church is the second building on the site, erected over a Romanesque church originally constructed during the 13th century. Additions were made over the centuries, up to 1631. The new building was founded in 1646 by parish priest Jean-Jacques Olier (1608–1657) who had established the Society of Saint-Sulpice, a clerical congregation, and a seminary attached to the church. Anne of Austria laid the first stone.Construction began in 1646 to designs which had been created in 1636 by Christophe Gamard, but the Fronde interfered, and only the Lady Chapel had been built by 1660, when Daniel Gittard provided a new general design for most of the church. Gittard completed the sanctuary, ambulatory, apsidal chapels, transept, and north portal (1670–1678), after which construction was halted for lack of funds.

Marche de Noel Saint-Germain des Pres
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
blvd St Germain
Paris,

Église de Saint-Germain-des-Prés
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
3 place Saint-Germain-des-Prés
Paris, 75006

01 55 42 81 10

Chapel of Saint-Louis-des-Invalides
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
6 Boulevard des Invalides
Paris, 75007

Cathédrale Saint-Louis des Invalides
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Place Vauban
Paris, 75007

06 85 26 03 61

Eglise Saint Thomas d'Aquin
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
2 rue Saint Thomas d'Aquin
Paris, 75007

Église Saint-Louis des Invalides
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
129 Rue de Grenelle, 75007 Paris, France
Paris, 75007

Sainte-Clotilde, Paris
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
23 bis Rue las Cases
Paris, 75007

The Basilica of Saint Clotilde is a basilica church in Paris, located on the Rue Las Cases, in the area of Saint-Germain-des-Prés. It is best known for its imposing twin spires.HistoryConstruction of the church was first mooted by the Paris City Council on 16 February 1827. It was designed by architect F. C. Gau of Cologne in a neo-Gothic style. Work began in 1846, but Gau died in 1853, and the job was continued by Théodore Ballu who completed the church in 1857. It was opened on 30 November 1857 by Cardinal Morlot. The church was declared a minor basilica by Pope Leo XIII in 1896.The Pipe OrganSt. Clotilde is famous for the Aristide Cavaillé-Coll organ (1859, enlarged 1933 and electrified 1962) played by César Franck and the succession of famous composers who have been Organiste titulaire: César Franck 1859-1890 Gabriel Pierné 1890-1898 Charles Tournemire 1898-1939 Joseph-Ermend Bonnal 1942-1944 Jean Langlais 1945-1988 Pierre Cogen and Jacques Taddei 1987-1993 Jacques Taddei 1993-2012 Olivier Penin 2012-

Sainte-Clotilde, Paris
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
23 bis Rue las Cases
Paris, 75007

+44 1 44 18 62 60

La basilique Sainte-Clotilde-et-Sainte-Valère est une basilique de l'Église catholique romaine située 23 bis, rue Las Cases dans le de Paris, l'une des cinq basiliques mineures de Paris, élevée au rang de basilique mineure par le pape Léon XIII en 1897.HistoireElle a été construite entre 1846 et 1857 par François-Christian Gau, puis par Théodore Ballu, l'architecte de la Trinité, après la mort du premier en 1853. L'église est dédiée à sainte Clotilde ainsi qu'à sainte Valérie (vierge et martyre de Limoges).En 1897, à l'occasion du quatorzième centenaire du baptême de Clovis (dont la deuxième femme fut sainte Clotilde), l'église a été élevée à la dignité de « basilique mineure » par le pape Léon XIII.

Basilique Ste Clothilde
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
12 rue Martignac
Paris, 75007

Eglise Saint Pierre Du Gros Caillou
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
92, Rue Saint-Dominique
Paris, 75007

(0033)144420404

Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
2 Place du Louvre
Paris, 75001

01 42 60 13 96

The Church of Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois is situated at 2 Place du Louvre, Paris 75001; the nearest Métro station is Louvre-Rivoli. Alexandre Boëly was organist at this church from 1840 to 1851.HistoryFounded in the 7th century, the church was rebuilt many times over several centuries. It now has construction in Roman, Gothic and Renaissance styles. The most striking exterior feature is the porch, with a rose window and a balustrade above which encircles the whole church, a work of Jean Gaussel (1435–39). Among the treasures preserved inside are a 15th-century wooden statue of Saint Germain, a stone carved statue of Saint-Vincent a stone sculpture of Isabelle of France (saint), a Flemish altarpiece carved out of wood, the famous "churchwarden's pew" where important people sat, made in 1683 by François, Le Mercier from drawings by Charles Le Brun.During the Wars of Religion, its bell called "Marie" sounded on the night of 23 August 1572, marking the beginning of the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre. Thousands of Huguenots, who visited the city for a royal wedding, were killed by the mob of Paris. A splendid stained glass still remains, in spite of plunderings during the French Revolution. The north tower was added in 1860 and stands opposite the Mairie of the 1st Arrondissement (1859).

Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
2 Place du Louvre
Paris, 75001

L'église Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois est une église située dans l'actuel arrondissement de Paris. Elle fut également appelée église Saint-Germain-le-Rond. Depuis l'Ancien Régime, elle est connue comme la « paroisse des artistes ».Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois est nommée en l'honneur de l'évêque Germain d'Auxerre.SituationL'église se trouve sur le côté sud-est de la place du Louvre, face à la colonnade du Louvre, à proximité de la mairie de .Elle est desservie par les stations de métro Louvre - Rivoli et Pont Neuf.HistoireHistoire de l'égliseHaut-Moyen ÂgeL'existence de l'église est attestée au car c'est le lieu de sépulture de Saint Landri, évêque de Paris, mort vers 655 ou 656. L'Abbé Lebeuf croit qu'il en faut attribuer la première origine à une chapelle, la chapelle de Saint-Vincent, qui aurait été construite peu de temps après la mort de Saint Germain, évêque d'Auxerre.

Eglise Saint Roch
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
24 R. Saint-Roch
Paris, 75001

01 42 44 13 20

Place des Victoires
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Place des Victoires
Paris, 75002

01 45 08 83 91

The Place des Victoires is a circular place in Paris, located a short distance northeast from the Palais Royal and straddling the border between the 1st and the 2nd arrondissements. The Place des Victoires is at the confluence of six streets: Rue de la Feuillade, Rue Vide Gousset, Rue d'Aboukir, Rue Étienne Marcel, Rue Croix des Petits Champs, and Rue Catinat.HistoryAt the center of the Place des Victoires is an equestrian monument in honor of King Louis XIV, celebrating the Treaties of Nijmegen concluded in 1678-79. A marshal of France, François de la Feuillade, vicomte d'Aubusson, on his own speculative initiative, demolished the old private mansions on the site. Feuillade's project was soon taken over by the Bâtiments du Roi, a department attached to the king's household, and the royal architect, Jules Hardouin Mansart, was entrusted with redesigning a grander complex of buildings, still in the form of a ring of private houses, to accommodate a majestic statue of the triumphant king.Mansart's conceptionMansart's design, of 1685, articulated the square's unified façades according to a formula utilised in some Parisian hôtels particuliers, (palatial private homes). Mansart chose colossal pilasters linking two floors, standing on a high arcaded base with rustication of the pilasters; the façades were capped with sloping slate "mansard roofs", punctuated by dormer windows. However, because the building work was incomplete at the time of the unveiling of the monument, the envisioned façades were painted on canvas. By 1692, the Place des Victoires was pierced by six streets, and the circular plan functioned as a flexible joint to harmonize their various axes.

Basilica of Notre-Dame-des-Victoires, Paris
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
6 Rue Notre-Dame Des Victoires
Paris, 75002

Located at 6, rue Notre-Dame-des-Victoires, in the 2nd arrondissement of Paris, Notre-Dame-des-Victoires is one of ten minor basilicas located in the Île-de-France region of France. The closest Metro station is 'Bourse'.HistoryIn 1619 the Discalced Augustinians (colloquially referred to as the "Petits Pères") established their convent, Notre-Dame-des-Victoires, on three hectares of land they had purchased by the bourse (market) of the city, located at the intersection of the Place des Petits-Pères and Rue de la Banque. Notre Dame des Victoires is the former chapel of the Augustinian fathers (Petits-Pères), built in the years 1629-1740.On December 8, 1629 the foundations were blessed by the Archbishop of Paris, Jean-François de Gondi. The next day, King Louis XIII himself laid the cornerstone in the presence of the Court's 'seigneurs' and the city's officials. The construction was funded by King Louis on the condition that it be dedicated to his victory over the Protestants at La Rochelle, which he attributed to the intercession of the Blessed Mother.The first church being too small, reconstruction commenced in 1656 according to the plans of Pierre Le Muet. Libéral Bruant, Robert Boudin, and Gabriel Leduc oversaw this work. The new church, not yet completed, was consecrated in 1666. Work was finalized in 1737 under the supervision of Sylvain Cartaud. He oversaw the expansion of the nave, the construction of the façade as well as the construction of the transept's striking spherical roof.

Paris Place De La Madeleine
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Place De La Madeleine
Paris,

La Madeline Church
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Place de la Madeleine
Paris, 75008

01 44 51 69 00

Chapelle expiatoire
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
29 rue Pasquier, 69008 PARIS
Paris, 75008

(33) 01 44 54 19 33

The Chapelle expiatoire is a chapel located in the 8th arrondissement of Paris, France. This chapel is dedicated to Louis XVI and his wife, Marie Antoinette, although they are formally buried in the Basilica of St Denis.The closest métro station is Saint-Augustin 15px 15pxHistory and constructionThe chapel was designed in 1816 by the French Neo-Classical architect Pierre François Léonard Fontaine, who, with his partner Charles Percier, figured among Napoleon's favourite architects. Fontaine's assistant Louis-Hippolyte Lebas oversaw the construction. The chapel was partly constructed on the grounds of the former Madeleine Cemetery, where King Louis XVI and Queen Marie Antoinette had been buried after they had been guillotined.King Louis XVIII shared the 3 million livres expense of building the Chapelle expiatoire with the Duchess of Angoulême. Construction took ten years, and the chapel was inaugurated in 1826 in the presence of King Charles X. When he blessed the cornerstone of the Chapelle expiatoire, Hyacinthe-Louis de Quelen, Archbishop of Paris, called in vain for an amnesty of the exiled members of the National Convention.

Saint-Augustin, Paris
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
8 Avenue César Caire
Paris, 75008

0299717343

The Église Saint-Augustin de Paris is a Catholic church located at 46 boulevard Malesherbes in the 8th arrondissement of Paris. The church was designed to provide a prominent vista at the end of the boulevard both of which were built during Haussmann's renovation of Paris under the Second French Empire. The closest métro station is Saint-Augustin 15px 15pxHistoryHaussmann's PlanDuring the reign of Napoleon III in the 1850s and 60s Paris experienced a dramatic transformation under the direction of Georges-Eugène Haussmann. Haussmann cut many boulevards through the crowded, medieval city placing prominent public buildings at the boulevard ends to provide impressive vistas. The boulevard Malesherbes was laid out cutting northwest from La Madeleine. Saint-Augustin, close to the spot where Haussmann was born, was built to provide a counterpoint to the famous columns of La Madeleine at the other end of the boulevard. It was also designed to be visible from the Arc de Triomphe down the avenue de Friedland. The chosen site, an odd shaped lot at the intersection of four streets, and the need for a dome of 200ft so as to be visible from the Arc de Triomphe, dictated unusual proportions for the building. The church was designed by Haussmann's fellow Protestant, architect Victor Baltard who also famously designed Les Halles markets. While Baltard's use of iron in Saint-Augustin's structure is praised for its inventiveness, at least one critic has described the church as, "an eyesore: ridiculously sited, without proportion, crushed beneath an outsized dome." The neighborhood around the church is now one of the most expensive in Paris.

Notre-Dame-de-Lorette
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Station Notre-Dame-de-Lorette, ligne 12
Paris, 75009

Notre-Dame-de-Lorette is a station on Line 12 of the Paris Métro in the 9th arrondissement.The station opened on 5 November 1910 as part of the original section of the Nord-Sud company's line A between Porte de Versailles and Notre-Dame-de-Lorette. It was the northern terminus of the line until its extension to Pigalle on 8 April 1911. On 27 March 1931 line A became line 12 of the Métro. The station is named after the nearby church Notre-Dame-de-Lorette. The name of the church refers to the Italian city of Loreto and its Chiesa della Casa Santa (Church of the Holy House), a centre of Marianism.The station is located within a short walking distance from Le Peletier station on line 7, but no free transfer is permitted.IncidentsOn 30 August 2000 at 13:21, the head car of an MF 67 overturned in the tunnel on its southbound approach from Saint-Georges. Only the front carriage derailled, however it remained attached to the following carriages. After overturning, the derailled carriage slid on its side for 134 metres before crashing into the bulkhead of the northbound platform at Notre-Dame-de-Lorette. 24 people were injured in the incident.

Notre-Dame-de-Lorette, Paris
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
rue de Châteaudun
Paris,

The Church of Notre-Dame-de-Lorette is a neoclassical church in the 9th arrondissement of Paris.HistoryConstruction of the church began in 1823 under the reign of Louis XVIII and was completed in 1836 under the reign of Louis-Philippe.An earlier chapel of the same name was situated at 54 rue Lamartine but was destroyed during the French Revolution. In 1821, plans were made to rebuild Notre-Dame-de-Lorette, with Louis-Hippolyte Lebas the sole architect. Originally, the church was planned to face northward towards Montmartre, but eventually faced southward towards rue Laffitte.Two notable figures in French culture were baptized at Notre-Dame-de-Lorette. Musician Georges Bizet received his baptism at the church on March 16, 1840, while painter Claude Monet was baptized on May 20, 1841.Building detailsThe early 19th century was characterized with neoclassical building styles, with the church also being designed in this manner. Instead of decorative paintings being placed on the church's walls, murals were painted directly onto them, similarly to the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome. The façade features Charles-François Lebœuf's sculpture Six angels in adoration before the Madonna and Child. Inside are the statues of Charles-René Laitié, Philippe Joseph Henri Lemaire and Denis Foyatier, who represent the three theological virtues of charity, hope and faith, respectively.

Local Business Near Madeleine (Paris Métro)

Siège du Parti Socialiste-Solferino
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
10 Rue de Solférino
Paris, France 75007

01 45 56 77 00

Musée d'Orsay Exposition "Degas et le nu"
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
62 rue de Lille
Paris, France 75007

0140494814

Boury Tallon & Associés
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
43 rue Saint Dominique
Paris, France 75007

Le Royal Orsay
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
75 Rue de Lille
Paris, France 75007

01 45 48 82 88

Latham & Watkins
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
45, rue Saint-Dominique
Paris, France 75007

+33.1.4062.2000

Hôtel de Monaco à Paris
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
57, rue saint dominique
Paris, France 75007

Les Berges
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
La Seine
Paris, France 75007

Pont Royal
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Pont Royal
Paris, France 75007

The Pont Royal is a bridge crossing the river Seine in Paris. It is the third oldest bridge in Paris, after the Pont Neuf and the Pont Marie.LocationThe Pont Royal links the Right Bank by the Pavillon de Flore with the Left Bank of Paris between rue du Bac and the rue de Beaune. The bridge is constructed with five elliptical arches en plein cintre. A hydrographic ladder, indicating floods' highest level in Paris, is visible on the last pier nearest each bank.HistoryIn 1632, the entrepreneur Pierre Pidou directed the construction of a wooden toll-bridge which would be called Pont Sainte-Anne (in deference to Anne of Austria) or Pont Rouge (due to its color). It was designed to replace the Tuileries ferry upon which the rue du Bac (bac meaning ferry in French) owes its name. The ferry had been offering crossings since 1550. Fragile, this bridge of fifteen arches would be repaired for the first time in 1649, completely redone two years later, burnt in 1654, flooded in 1656, completely rebuilt in 1660, propped up in 1673 and finally carried away by a flood in February 1684. Madame de Sévigné reported that this last incident caused the loss of eight of the bridge's arches.

Gare d'Orsay
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
7, quai Anatole-France, 75007 Paris
Paris, France 75007

Gare d'Orsay is a former Paris railway station and hotel, built in 1900 to designs by Victor Laloux, Lucien Magne and Émile Bénard; it served as a terminus for the Chemin de Fer de Paris à Orléans (Paris-Orléans Railway). It was the first electrified urban rail terminal in the world, opened 28 May 1900, in time for the 1900 Exposition Universelle. After closure as a station, it reopened in December 1986 as the Musée d'Orsay, an art museum. The museum is currently served by the RER station of the same name.HistoryThe site was occupied by the Palais d'Orsay, intended for the Council of State. It was begun in 1810 but not completed until 1840, when its ground floor was occupied by the Council. In 1842 the Cour des Comptes was housed in the first floor. After the fall of the French Second Empire in 1870, the Paris Commune briefly took power from March through May 1871. The archives, library and works of art were removed to Palace of Versailles and eventually both the Conseil and the Cour des Comptes were rehoused in the Palais-Royal.

Le Nu Masculin Musée D'orsay
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
1 Rue de la Légion d'Honneur
Paris, France 75007

Museé D'orsay
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
1 rue de la Légion d'Honneur
Paris, France 75007

01 40 49 48 14

Assemblée Nationale
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
7,Rue Andre Antoine
Paris, France 75007

06 16 54 19 99

Assemblée Nationale is a station on Line 12 of the Paris Métro in the 7th arrondissement, named after the nearby French National Assembly.The station opened on 5 November 1910 as part of the original section of the Nord-Sud Company's line A between Porte de Versailles and Notre-Dame-de-Lorette. On 27 March 1931 line A became line 12 of the Métro. It was called Chambre des Députés ("Chamber of Deputies", the former name of the French National Assembly) until 1989.

Musée de la Légion d'honneur
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
2, rue de la Légion d'honneur
Paris, France 75007

The Musée national de la Légion d'Honneur et des Ordres de Chevalerie is a museum of national orders of merit located in the 7th arrondissement in the Palais de la Légion d'Honneur beside the Musée d'Orsay at 2, rue de la Légion-d'Honneur, Paris, France. It is open daily except Monday; admission is free. The nearest métro and RER stations are Musée d'Orsay, Solférino, and Assemblée Nationale.The museum is housed within the Hôtel de Salm, built in 1782 by architect Pierre Rousseau for Frederick III, Prince of Salm-Kyrburg, burned in 1871 during the Paris Commune, and subsequently restored by subscription of medallists. Since 1804 this building has been the Palais de la Légion d'Honneur, and the seat of France's highest honors: the Légion d'honneur, the Médaille militaire, and the Ordre national du Mérite .Today's museum was created in 1925. It displays a history of France's honors, medals, decorations, and knightly orders from Louis XI to the present, including Napoleonic souvenirs and more than 300 portraits. A special section is dedicated to foreign orders. Its library and archives contain more than 3,000 works.

Brasserie Le Bourbon
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1 place du palais bourbon Paris 7
Paris, France 75007

0145515827

Brasserie Le Bourbon, Place De Bourbon
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
place du palais bourbon
Paris, France 75007

Grande Chancellerie de l'Ordre National de la Légion d'Honneur
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
1 rue de Solférino
Paris, France

Hôtel de Beauharnais
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
78 Rue de Lille
Paris, France 75007

Invalides
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Hotel des Invalides
Paris, France 75007

Invalides is a Metro & RER station on lines 8 and 13 of the Paris Métro and on RER line C in the 7th arrondissement, located near and named after les Invalides.The metro station was opened on 13 July 1913 as part of the original section of Line 8 between Beaugrenelle (now Charles Michels on line 10) and Opéra. The line 13 platforms were opened on 20 December 1923 as part of the original section of line 10 between Invalides and Croix Rouge (a station east of Sèvres – Babylone, which was closed during World War II). On 27 July 1937 the section of line 10 between Invalides and Duroc was transferred to become the first section of old line 14, which was connected under the Seine and incorporated into line 13 on 9 November 1976.The Palais Bourbon, seat of the French National Assembly (the lower house of the French Parliament), is nearby.

Invalides
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Paris
Paris, France 75007

Invalides est une station des lignes 8 et 13 du métro de Paris. Elle est située dans le 7e arrondissement de Paris de Paris.

Palais Bourbon (Assemblée Nationale)
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
9 Place du Général Beuret Paris 15e
Paris, France 75007

01 45 51 58 27