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Boulevard de la Madeleine, Paris | Tourist Information


Boulevard de la Madeleine
Paris, France


Ce site est desservi par les stations de métro Opéra et Madeleine.Le boulevard de la Madeleine est un des grands boulevards de Paris, et fait partie de la chaîne constituée d'ouest en est par les boulevards de la Madeleine, des Capucines, des Italiens et Montmartre.Origine du nomLe boulevard doit son nom à l'église de la Madeleine toute proche.Bâtiments remarquables, et lieux de mémoire ' : Ici se trouvait dans les années 1920, la Galerie Adolphe Le Goupy. ' : à l'entresol de l'immeuble, mourut Alphonsine Plessis (dite Marie Duplessis) rendue célèbre par Alexandre Dumas fils, sous le nom de La Dame aux camélias et par Giuseppe Verdi dans son opéra la Traviata. ' : Hôtel de la Compagnie des messageries maritimes. D'inspiration classique, élevé par l‘architecte J. de Saint-Maurice et les ingénieurs constructeurs Lugagne et de Bouillanne en 1916, l'ancien siège de la Compagnie des Messageries Maritimes est un grand immeuble, entre le boulevard et la rue de Sèze, les rues Vignon (22 fenêtres en façade) et Godot-de-Mauroy. Ses murs conservent des sculptures et bas relief maritimes. Le transfert du siège des Messageries Maritimes du Boulevard de la Madeleine à Paris à la Tour Winterthur à La Défense a eu lieu en 1975. ' : Emplacement de la Galerie Bernheim-Jeune à partir de 1906 à 1925

Community and Government Near Boulevard de la Madeleine

French Press Institute
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
83 bis rue Notre Dame des Champs
Paris, 75006

The French Press Institute is a public institution of research and higher education, which has served as the department for communication and journalism studies at Panthéon-Assas University since 1970. Founded in 1937, the French Press Institute is the oldest and one of the finest French schools in the field of journalism.HistoryThe establishment of the instituteFounded in 1937 in the University of Paris, the Institut des Sciences de la Presse (Press Sciences Institute) became the Institut français de presse in 1951. The French Press Institute is the first organization to have been dedicated to media studies.After the war, owing to international partnerships, the French Press Institute became a leading international institute regarding media evolution studies. Its first director, Fernand Terrou, took part in the redaction of the declaration of Press rights of San Francisco in 1948 and formed a bond with the Institute for Communication Research of Stanford University. In 1957, with UNESCO, the French Press Institute supported the establishment of the International Association for Studies and Research on Information and Communication (IAMCR). After the division of the University of Paris in thirteen autonomous universities in 1970, the French Press Institute joined Panthéon-Assas University.The directors of the institute 1951 - 1976: Fernand Terrou 1976 - 1986: Francis Balle 1986 - 1994: Pierre Albert 1994 - 1999: Rémy Rieffel 1999 - 2004: Nadine Toussaint-Desmoulins 2004 - 2009: Josiane Jouët 2009 - present: Nathalie Sonnac

Rue Monsieur-le-Prince
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
22 , rue Monsieur Le Prince
Paris, 75006

Rue Monsieur-le-Prince is a street of Paris, located in the 6th arrondissement.

15 Rue De L'ecole de Medecine 75006
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
15 Rue de L'école de Médecine
Paris, 75006

Catherine Labouré
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
basilique médaille miraculeuse
Paris,

Saint Catherine Labouré, D.C.. (May 2, 1806 - December 31, 1876) (born Zoé Labouré) was a member of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul and a Marian visionary who relayed the request from the Blessed Virgin Mary to create the Miraculous Medal worn by millions of Christians, both Roman Catholic and Protestant.LifeShe was born in the Burgundy region of France to Pierre Labouré, a farmer, and Louise Madeleine Gontard, the ninth of 11 living children. Catherine's mother died on October 9, 1815, when Catherine was just nine years old. It is said that after her mother's funeral, Catherine picked up a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary and kissed it saying, "Now you will be my mother." Her father's sister offered to care for his two youngest children, Catherine and Tonine. After he agreed, the sisters moved to their aunt's house at Saint-Rémy, a village nine kilometers from their home.She was extremely devout, of a somewhat romantic nature, given to visions and intuitive insights. As a young woman, she became a member of the nursing order founded by Saint Vincent de Paul. She chose the Daughters of Charity after a dream about St. Vincent De Paul.VisionsVincent de PaulIn April 1830, the remains of St. Vincent de Paul were translated to the Vincentian church in Paris. The solemnities included a novena. On three successive evenings, upon returning from the church to the Rue du Bac, Catherine reportedly experienced in the convent chapel, a vision of what she took to be the heart of St. Vincent above a shrine containing a relic of bone from his right arm. Each time the heart appeared a different color, white, red, and crimson. She interpreted this to mean that the Vincentian communities would prosper, and that there would be a change of government. The convent chaplain advised her to forget the matter.

Musée d’histoire de la médecine
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
12 rue de l'École de Médecine
Paris, 75006

The History of Medicine Museum in Paris, is located at the second floor of the Paris Descartes University, 12 rue de l'École de Médecine, in the buildings of the historic Faculty of Medicine, created in 1803 on the site of the old College and Academy of Surgery.The museum's collections, among the oldest in Europe, were started by the Dean Lafaye, a professor at the Faculty of Medicine in the 18th century. The collection was successively enriched with many donations.The core of the museum hosts an exceptional collection of surgical, diagnostic and physiological instrumentation spanning centuries. There are also paintings, engravings, and lithographs. Restored and open to the public, the museum's goal is higher education and research.

Latin St Germain
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
92 boulevard saint germain
Paris, 75005

01 43 54 34 44

Christian Lacroix
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
2-4 Place Saint Sulpice
Paris, 75006

+33 (0)1 42 68 79 00

Région Ile-de-France
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
35, Boulevard des Invalides
Paris, 75007

Missions Étrangères de Paris
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
128 rue du Bac
Paris, 75007

01 44 39 10 40

Ministere De La Sante
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
14 avenue Duquesne
Paris, 75007

Ministere Des Affaires Sociales Et De La Sante
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
14 avenue Duquesne
Paris, 75007

0140566000

St Michel Notre-Dame, Paris
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Quai Saint-Michel
Paris, 75005

Saint-Michel (Paris Métro)
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Boulevard Saint-Michel
Paris, 75005

Saint-Michel is a station on Line 4 of the Paris Métro in the 5th arrondissement. Located in the Quartier Latin, it offers a connection to the St-Michel - Notre-Dame RER station on RER lines B and C. The platform lengths are 110 metres, longer than the 90–105 metre length of most line 4 station platforms.The station was opened on 9 January 1910 as part of the connecting section of the line under the Seine between Châtelet and Raspail. It is named after the Boulevard Saint-MichelNearby attractions Île de la Cité Île Saint-Louis Notre Dame Cathedral

Quai Saint-Michel
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Quai Saint-Michel
Paris,

Eglise Des Invalides
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
129 rue de Grenelle
Paris, 75007

0 810 11 33 99

Café de Flore
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
172, Boulevard Saint-Germain
Paris, 75006

01 45 48 55 26

The Café de Flore is one of the oldest coffeehouses in Paris. Located at the corner of Boulevard Saint-Germain and Rue Saint-Benoît, in Saint-Germain-des-Prés in the 6th arrondissement, it is celebrated for its famous clientele.HistoryThe café was opened in the 1880s, during the French Third Republic. The name is taken from a sculpture of Flora, the goddess of flowers and the season of spring in Roman mythology, located on the opposite side of the boulevard. Authors Joris-Karl Huysmans and Remy de Gourmont were two of the first well-known regulars. In the late 19th century, Charles Maurras wrote his book Au signe de Flore on the café's first floor, where in 1899 the Revue d'Action Française was also founded.Café de Flore became a popular hub of famous writers and philosophers. Georges Bataille, Robert Desnos, Léon-Paul Fargue, Raymond Queneau were all regulars, and so was Pablo Picasso. Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai was known to be a frequent patron of Café de Flore during his years in France in the 1920s. The classic Art Deco interior of all red seating, mahogany and mirrors has changed little since World War II.

Maison de Verre
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
31, rue Saint Guillaume
Paris, 75007

The Maison de Verre was built from 1928 to 1932 in Paris, France. Constructed in the early modern style of architecture, the house's design emphasized three primary traits: honesty of materials, variable transparency of forms, and juxtaposition of "industrial" materials and fixtures with a more traditional style of home décor. The primary materials used were steel, glass, and glass block. Some of the notable "industrial" elements included rubberized floor tiles, bare steel beams, perforated metal sheet, heavy industrial light fixtures, and mechanical fixtures.The design was a collaboration among Pierre Chareau, Bernard Bijvoet and Louis Dalbet . Much of the intricate moving scenery of the house was designed on site as the project developed. The external form is defined by translucent glass block walls, with select areas of clear glazing for transparency. Internally, spatial division is variable by the use of sliding, folding or rotating screens in glass, sheet or perforated metal, or in combination. Other mechanical components included an overhead trolley from the kitchen to dining room, a retracting stair from the private sitting room to Mme Dalsace's bedroom and complex bathroom cupboards and fittings.

Boutique Christian Louboutin Grenelle
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
40 rue de Grenelle
Paris, 75007

Musée de l’Armée
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
75007
Paris, 75007

0 810 11 33 99

Direction Régionale de Police Judiciaire de Paris
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
36, quai des Orfèvres
Paris, 75001

The Direction Régionale de Police Judiciaire de Paris, often called the 36, quai des Orfèvres or simply the 36 by the address of its headquarters, is the division of the Police judiciaire in Paris. Its 2,200 officers investigate about 15,000 crimes and offences a year.The Police judiciaire, abbreviated PJ, is the criminal investigation division of the Police nationale.36, quai des Orfèvres is often erroneously believed to be the address of the Direction Centrale de la Police Judiciaire, the national authority of the criminal police, which is actually located at the 11, rue des Saussaies, in the buildings of the Ministry of the Interior.HistoryThe PJ is the direct successor of the Sûreté, which was founded in 1812 by Eugène François Vidocq as the criminal investigative bureau of the Paris police. The Sûreté served later as an inspiration for Scotland Yard, the FBI and other departments of criminal investigation throughout the world.In its modern form, the Parisian PJ was created by a decree by Celestin Hennion, the then préfet de police and father of the elite mobile police units called Brigades du Tigre. Unique for their time, they were created with the support of Georges Clémenceau, who was nicknamed "le tigre" (the Tiger). It explains why the PJ emblem consists of a stylized tiger's head.

Hôtel de Galliffet
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Rue de Grenelle 73
Paris, 75007

L’Hôtel de Galliffet est un hôtel particulier situé à Paris dans le 7e arrondissement, aux 73 rue de Grenelle et 50 rue de Varenne. Il est actuellement le siège de l'Institut culturel italien de Paris et de la délégation italienne auprès de l'OCDE.HistoireL'hôtel a été construit entre 1776 et 1792 par Étienne-François Le Grand et le sculpteur Jean-Baptiste Boiston pour le marquis Simon-Alexandre de Galliffet, président au Parlement de Provence, à l'emplacement de l'hôtel du président Talon, qui datait de 1680.Saisi comme bien d'émigré en 1792, il est affecté en 1794 au ministère des Relations extérieures dont Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord sera l'hôte le plus illustre.En 1821, les héritiers du marquis de Galliffet parvinrent à rentrer en possession de l'hôtel qui est divisé en appartements et en partie loué, notamment à l'infant d'Espagne don Francisco de Paule en 1838 et au nonce du Pape en 1850.

36, quai des Orfèvres
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
36, quai des Orfèvres
Paris, 75001

Le 36, quai des Orfèvres est le bâtiment où se trouvent le siège, l'état-major et les services communs de la Direction régionale de la police judiciaire de la Préfecture de police de Paris. Attenant au Palais de justice de la capitale, il est situé au numéro 36 du quai des Orfèvres, sur l'île de la Cité, face à la rive gauche, dans le 1er arrondissement de Paris.HistoriqueLe bâtiment a été construit entre 1875 et 1880, sur les plans des architectes Émile Jacques Gilbert et son gendre Arthur-Stanislas Diet, à l'emplacement de l'ancien hôtel du premier président de la cour d'appel de Paris, qui fut détruit par l'incendie volontaire survenu lors de la Commune le, et qui détruisit également une bonne part du Palais de justice mitoyen. La préfecture de police de Paris a donc dû quitter son ancien emplacement, et fut installée dans de nouveaux locaux, par Jules Ferry, dans une partie des bâtiments du palais de Justice qui venait d'être reconstruit au 36, quai des Orfèvres.

Lapérouse
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
51 Quai des Grands Augustins
Paris, 75006

+33 0143266804

Lapérouse is a restaurant located at 51 Quai des Grands Augustins in 6th arrondissement of Paris, France. Established in 1766, the restaurant was awarded the prestigious 3 Michelin stars between 1933 and 1968, although it was briefly 2 stars from 1949 to 1951.

Rue de Nesle
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
22 rue Dauphine
Paris, 75006

01 46 34 85 19

Rue de Nesle is a street in Saint-Germain-des-Prés in the 6e arrondissement of Paris, France.HistoryThe street was opened in 1607. It was formerly called Rue d'Anjou Dauphine. Its current name comes from the fact that the street is located at the former location of the Hôtel de Nesle.FeaturesIt is home to the Museum of Letters and Manuscripts and it crosses with Rue Dauphine. It is in short distance from the Seine and the Louvre Museum.

Istituto Italiano Di Cultura - Paris
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
73, rue de Grenelle - 75007 Paris
Paris, 75007

Ministere de L Agriculture
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
72, rue de Varenne
Paris, 75007

Rue Visconti
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
17-19 rue Visconti
Paris, 75006

0771017588

La rue Visconti est une rue située dans le quartier Saint-Germain-des-Prés du 6 arrondissement de Paris.HistoireElle a été ouverte en 1540 sous le nom des Marais-Saint-Germain à travers le petit Pré-aux-Clercs et fut pendant le le refuge des protestants, dont Bernard Palissy. Ils y étaient si nombreux qu'elle fut surnommée la petite Genève, expression reprise par Agrippa d'Aubigné. Le refuge était assez sûr pour que les habitants de la rue soient épargnés lors du massacre de la Saint-Barthélemy. Elle a été renommée le 24 août 1864 en l'honneur de Louis Visconti, architecte de l'Empereur Napoléon III et auteur du tombeau de.Les maisons sont en majorité du, beaucoup d'entre elles ont conservé de beaux portails sculptés et de belles cours. Un des immeubles les plus remarquables aujourd'hui est l'hôtel de Ranes construit en 1660, au 21.DescriptionElle relie la rue Bonaparte à la rue de Seine, avec la rue des Beaux-Arts au Nord et la rue Jacob au Sud. C'est la plus longue des rues étroites de Paris.

Landmark and Historical Place Near Boulevard de la Madeleine

Rue de Solférino
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
rue de solferino
Paris, France 75007

La rue de Solférino est une rue du 7 arrondissement de Paris. Longue de et large de, la rue de Solférino relie le quai Anatole-France au boulevard Saint-Germain.HistoireL'artère fut créée sous le Second Empire par décret du 28 juillet 1866. Elle doit son nom à la bataille de Solférino, une victoire remportée par Napoléon III en Lombardie (décret du 10 août 1868). Elle conduisait à l'origine au pont de Solférino (1859-1961). Aujourd'hui, la partie comprise entre le boulevard Saint-Germain et la rue Saint-Dominique a été dénommée place Jacques Bainville en 1961.Depuis 1999, la passerelle Solférino (renommée passerelle Léopold-Sédar-Senghor en 2006) relie, par dessus la Seine, le quai des Tuileries à la rue de Solférino, à l'emplacement de l'ancien pont de Solférino.

Pont Royal
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Pont Royal 75007 Paris
Paris, France 75007

+33-1-42 84 70 00

Pont Royal – most w Paryżu łączący oba brzegi Sekwany, pomiędzy pawilonem de Flore i ulicą du Bac.Pierwszy drewniany most na tym miejscu powstał w 1632 na zamówienie finansisty Barbiera według projektu Pierre’a Pidou. Nazwano go Pont Rouge, od koloru farby, lub Św. Anny, na cześć królowej Anny Austriaczki. Ten piętnastołukowy most okazał się wyjątkowo nietrwały w codziennej eksploatacji i w 1649 musiał zostać wyremontowany, a dwa lata później rozebrany i postawiony na nowo. W 1654 ten odbudowany most padł ofiarą pożaru, a pod kolejnej odbudowie w 1656 został zniesiony przez wezbranie rzeki. Kolejną zrekonstruowaną przeprawę spotkał w 1684 ten sam los, kiedy rzeka zniszczyła osiem łuków mostu.Rok później drewniany most został zastąpiony konstrukcją z kamienia, sfinansowaną przez Ludwika XIV, który zamówił projekt u Jacques’a Gabriela, Jules’a Mansarta i François Romaina. Powstały most był nie tylko przeprawą, ale i miejscem wielu miejskich zabaw i festynów. w 1792 Konwent Narodowy w ramach wielkiej akcji zmiany kojarzących się z monarchią nazw zmienił nazwę mostu na „Pont National”, a następnie Pont des Tuileries. Oryginalną nazwę przywróciła Restauracja Burbonów.W 1850 most został uznany za solidny na tyle, by w odróżnieniu od kilku innych zabytkowych przepraw przez rzekę nie zostać zburzonym, lecz jedynie wzmocnionym. Od 1939 posiada status szczególnie cennego zabytku jako jeden z trzech paryskich mostów .

Louvre Palace
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Musée du Louvre
Paris, France 75058

(0)1 40 20 53 17

Le palais du Louvre est un ancien palais royal situé à Paris sur la rive droite de la Seine, entre le jardin des Tuileries et l'église Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois. S'étendant sur une surface bâtie de plus de, le palais du Louvre est le plus grand palais européen, et le second plus grand bâtiment du continent après le palais du Parlement roumain. Il abrite aujourd'hui le musée du Louvre.La construction du Louvre est indissociable de l'histoire de Paris. Elle s'étend sur plus de, bien que le plan général du palais ait été imaginé dès la Renaissance. Charles V y établit sa résidence, donnant au palais un statut qu'il a conservé jusqu'au règne de Louis XIV.Avec 8,9 millions de visiteurs annuels en 2011, c'est le site culturel le plus visité en France devant la tour Eiffel, la cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris étant en tête des monuments à l'accès libre avec de visiteurs estimés.Origine du nomLa première forteresse du Louvre, sous Philippe Auguste, a été bâtie sur un lieu-dit nommé en bas-latin Lupara, terme désignant une louverie, lieu abritant les équipages employés à chasser le loup (en latin lupus signifie « loup »). Étymologie pouvant se rapprocher d'ailleurs de celle du village de Louvres dans le Val-d'Oise.

Louvre Pyramid
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
The Louvre
Paris, France 75001

+33 (0)1 40 20 53 17

La Pirámide del Museo del Louvre es una obra situada en el patio del Museo del Louvre, en París, que da acceso al edificio. Fue diseñada por el arquitecto Ieoh Ming Pei. De estilo internacional, esta pirámide de vidrio y aluminio fue inaugurada en el año 1989 por el entonces presidente francés, François Mitterrand.DescripciónTiene una altura de 20,1 m. y un total de 673 paneles de vidrio laminado transparente divididos en 603 rombos y 70 triángulos, aunque algunas fuentes señalan que existen 666 rombos debido a una intención de darle un sentido esotérico a la construcción. El peso total de la estructura es de 180 toneladas. La inclinación de sus paredes, al igual que ocurre con las pirámides egipcias, es de 51 grados.Su centro de gravedad coincide con el de los tres pabellones del museo, Richelieu al norte, Denon al sur y Sully al este. Siendo esta la principal y más grande de las pirámides de cristal del museo, que incluye, a nivel subterráneo, otra pirámide pero invertida. Antes de construirse la pirámide, la entrada al Louvre tenía unas largas colas. Con su construcción, además de solucionarse el problema, se aumenta el espacio de exposición del museo.ControversiaDesde su construcción, la pirámide ha estado sujeta a polémicas, debido al contraste de estilos entre la modernidad del vidrio y el clasicismo del museo, si bien ha servido de inspiración para las ampliaciones de muchos otros museos. Ha sido descrita por algunos detractores como parte del "complejo de faraón" de Mitterrand. Otros alaban la yuxtaposición del contraste entre estilos arquitectónicos como una exitosa combinación entre lo antiguo y lo nuevo, lo clásico y lo ultramoderno.

Louvre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Musée du Louvre, 75058 Paris - France
Paris, France 75001

01 40 20 50 50

The Louvre or the Louvre Museum is the world's largest museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine in the city's 1st arrondissement (district or ward). Nearly 35,000 objects from prehistory to the 21st century are exhibited over an area of 72,735 square metres (782,910 square feet). The Louvre is the world's second most visited museum after the Palace Museum in China, receiving more than 9.26 million visitors in 2014.The museum is housed in the Louvre Palace, originally built as a fortress in the late 12th century under Philip II. Remnants of the fortress are visible in the basement of the museum. Due to the urban expansion of the city, the fortress eventually lost its defensive function and, in 1546, was converted by Francis I into the main residence of the French Kings. The building was extended many times to form the present Louvre Palace. In 1682, Louis XIV chose the Palace of Versailles for his household, leaving the Louvre primarily as a place to display the royal collection, including, from 1692, a collection of ancient Greek and Roman sculpture. In 1692, the building was occupied by the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres and the Académie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture, which in 1699 held the first of a series of salons. The Académie remained at the Louvre for 100 years. During the French Revolution, the National Assembly decreed that the Louvre should be used as a museum to display the nation's masterpieces.

Passerelle Léopold-Sédar-Senghor
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Passerelle Léopold-Sédar-Senghor
Paris, France 75007

Passerelle Léopold Sédar Senghor, – most w Paryżu przeznaczony wyłącznie dla ruchu pieszego, łączący 1 i 7 okręg paryski.Pierwszy most na tym miejscu powstał w 1861. Był to żeliwny most przeznaczony zarówno dla pieszych, jak i dla pojazdów, zbudowany przez inżynierów Gallochera de Lagalisserie oraz Savarina. Jego nazwa upamiętniała zwycięstwo spod Solferino w 1859. Liczne wypadki z udziałem barek poważnie nadwątliły konstrukcję, która w 1961, jako grożąca zawaleniem, została rozebrana i zastąpiona stalowym mostem zarezerwowanym dla pieszych. I ten most przestał spełniać wymogi bezpieczeństwa i został rozebrany w 1992.Obecną 106-metrową przeprawę zbudował w latach 1997-1999 Marc Mimram. Żeliwna konstrukcja została pokryta egzotycznym drewnem sprowadzanym z Brazylii. Most jest łukowy, oparty na masywnych betonowych filarach. W 1999 architekt mostu otrzymał za niego nagrodę Srebrnej Ekierki.Obecną nazwę przeprawa otrzymała w 2006, w setną rocznicę urodzin Léopolda Sédara Senghora.Bibliografia Na oficjalnej stronie Paryżą

Hôtel de Lassay
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
128 Rue de l'Université
Paris, France 75007

O Hôtel de Lassay é um palácio urbano de Paris situado na Rue de l'Université (Rua da Universidade), no 7º arrondissement da capital francesa. Actualmente serve de residência oficial ao presidente da Assembleia Nacional, a qual está instalada no vizinho Palais Bourbon.HistóriaA existência do Hôtel de Lassay deve-se a Armand de Madaillan, Marquês de Lassay (1652-1738), amigo, conselheiro e amante de Louise Françoise de Bourbon, Duquesa de Bourbon (1673-1743). Madaillan encomendou, em 1722, o projecto de um hôtel particulier a um italiano chamado Giardini, o qual morreu no mesmo ano. Giardini foi substituído por Pierre Cailleteau, apelidado de "Lassurance", falecido em 1724, e depois por Jean Aubert e Jacques V Gabriel. Acredita-se, actualmente, que foi Aubert o principal autor do palácio, assim como do adjacente Palais Bourbon e do Hôtel Biron (actual Museu Rodin).A construção desenvolveu-se entre 1726 e 1730. O palácio, situado entre a Rue de l'Université e o Sena, foi executado à italiana, ou seja, com um primeiro andar coberto por um tecto plano.

Pont de la Concorde
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Pont de la Concorde
Paris, France 75007

Pont de la Concorde – most łukowy łączący dwa brzegi Sekwany między bulwarami Tuileries oraz d’Orsay.Budowa mostu w tym miejscu była uwzględniona w planach rozwoju miasta od 1725, tj. od momentu zakończenia prac nad placem Ludwika XV . Jednak dopiero w 1787 Ludwik XVI polecił wykonanie tego mostu, wstępnie nazwanego jego imieniem, Jeanowi Perronetowi i Danielowi Trudaine’owi. Prace trwały, gdy wybuchła rewolucja francuska. Nowe władze Paryża zarządziły zmianę projektowanej nazwy przeprawy na Pont de la Révolution oraz symboliczne wykorzystanie przy jego budowie kamieni z rozbiórki Bastylii.W 1810 Napoleon Bonaparte nakazał redekorację mostu, na którym pojawiło się 8 posągów tych generałów czasów rewolucji i Cesarstwa, którzy zginęli na polu walki. W czasie Restauracji figury te zostały usunięte i zastąpione posągami wielkich ludzi czasów przedrewolucyjnych – czterech słynnych ministrów Colberta, Richelieu, Sugera oraz de Sully’ego, czterech dowódców wojskowych Bayarda, du Guesclina, Wielkiego Kondeusza i de Turenne’a, wreszcie czterech marynarzy: Duguaya-Trouina, Duquesne’a, Suffrena i Tourville’a. Przy budowie tego imponującego kompleksu rzeźb kierowano się jednak bardziej względami ideowymi niż technicznymi; przeciążały one poważnie most i w 1830 musiały zostać przeniesione do Wersalu. Restauracja przywróciła również mostowi imię Ludwika XVI, które ponownie zmieniono po 1830, tym razem na nazwę obecną.

Tuileries Garden
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Jardin du Luxembourg
Paris, France 75001

The Tuileries Garden is a public garden located between the Louvre Museum and the Place de la Concorde in the 1st arrondissement of Paris. Created by Catherine de Medici as the garden of the Tuileries Palace in 1564, it was eventually opened to the public in 1667, and became a public park after the French Revolution. In the 19th and 20th century, it was the place where Parisians celebrated, met, promenaded, and relaxed.Garden of Catherine de MedicisIn July 1559, after the death of her husband, Henry II, Queen Catherine de Medicis decided to move from her residence at the chateau of Tournelles, near the Bastille, to the Louvre Palace, along with her son, the new King, François II. She decided that she would build a new palace there for herself, separate from the Louvre, with a garden modeled after the gardens of her native Florence.At the time there was an empty area bordered by the Seine on the south, the rue Saint-Honoré on the north, the Louvre on the east, and the city walls and deep water-filled moat on the west. Since the 13th century this area was occupied by workshops, called tuileries, making tiles for the roofs of buildings. Some of land had been acquired early in the 16th century by King Francois I. Catherine acquired more land and began to build a new palace and garden on the site.

Place de la Concorde
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
place de la concorde 75008 Paris
Paris, France 75018

The Place de la Concorde is one of the major public squares in Paris, France. Measuring 8.64ha in area, it is the largest square in the French capital. It is located in the city's eighth arrondissement, at the eastern end of the Champs-Élysées.HistoryThe place was designed by Ange-Jacques Gabriel in 1755 as a moat-skirted octagon between the Champs-Élysées to the west and the Tuileries Garden to the east. Decorated with statues and fountains, the area was named Place Louis XV to honor the king at that time. The square showcased an equestrian statue of the king, which had been commissioned in 1748 by the city of Paris, sculpted mostly by Edmé Bouchardon, and completed by Jean-Baptiste Pigalle after the death of Bouchardon.At the north end, two magnificent identical stone buildings were constructed. Separated by the rue Royale, these structures remain among the best examples of Louis Quinze style architecture. Initially, the eastern building served as the French Naval Ministry. Shortly after its construction, the western building became the opulent home of the Duc d'Aumont. It was later purchased by the Comte de Crillon, whose family resided there until 1907. The famous luxury Hôtel de Crillon, which currently occupies the building, took its name from its previous owners.

Discover Walks Paris
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
1 rue Thérèse
Paris, France 75001

(+33) 0 970 449 724

We started Discover Walks to give visitors to Paris something exciting, something special, to remember when they returned home. We want to give visitors a couple of special hours being with a real Parisian walking around Paris. The kind of experience you would have if you had a good friend who was a Paris native. Fun, informative and most of all, personal to you and your guide.

Hôtel de la Marine
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2 rue Royale
Paris, France 75008

The hôtel de la Marine is a building on place de la Concorde in Paris, to the east of Rue Royale. It was built between 1757 and 1774 on what was then known as place Louis XV, with a façade by Ange-Jacques Gabriel, Premier architecte du Roi and designer of the square. The identical building to its west now houses the Hôtel de Crillon.The building works were led by Jacques-Germain Soufflot. Its two pediments contain allegories of Magnificence and Felicity by Guillaume II Coustou and Michel-Ange Slodtz. It originally belonged wholly to the crown, at first being used by the Garde-Meuble, whose galleries were open to the public from 9 am to 1 pm on the first Tuesday of each month between Easter and All Saints' Day. It also housed a chapel, a library, workshops, stables and many apartments, including those of the intendant of the Garde-Meuble – at first Pierre Élisabeth de Fontanieu then Marc-Antoine Thierry de Ville-d'Avray .When the Government was forced to join Louis XVI in quitting Versailles and setting up in the palais des Tuileries, the secrétaire d'État à la Marine, César Henri de la Luzerne, was hosted at the Garde-Meuble by his cousin Thierry de Ville d'Avray. Thus, from 1789, it housed the naval ministry. Led by admiral Decrès, the ministry considerably expanded its offices until it occupied the whole building.

Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8 place de la Concorde
Paris, France 75008

330143124455

The Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile is an association established as the Association Internationale des Automobile Clubs Reconnus on 20 June 1904 to represent the interests of motoring organisations and motor car users. To the general public, the FIA is mostly known as the governing body for many auto racing events. The FIA also promotes road safety around the world.Headquartered at 8 Place de la Concorde, Paris, the FIA consists of 239 national member organisations in 143 countries worldwide. Its current president is Jean Todt.The FIA is generally known by its French name or initials, even in non-French-speaking countries, but is occasionally rendered as 'International Automobile Federation'.Its most prominent role is in the licensing and arbitration of Formula One and World Rally Championship motor racing. The FIA along with the Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme also certify land speed record attempts. The International Olympic Committee provisionally recognized the federation in 2011, and granted full recognition in 2013.HistoryThe Association Internationale des Automobile Clubs Reconnus was founded in Paris on 20 June 1904, as an association of national motor clubs. The association was designed to represent the interests of motor car users, as well as to oversee the burgeoning international motor sport scene. In 1922, the AIACR delegated the organisation of automobile racing to the Commission Sportive Internationale, which would set the regulations for international Grand Prix motor racing. The European Drivers' Championship was introduced in 1931, a title awarded to the driver with the best results in the selected Grands Prix. Upon the resumption of motor racing after the Second World War, the AIACR was renamed the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. The FIA established a number of new racing categories, among them Formulas One and Two, and created the first World Championship, the Formula One World Drivers' Championship, in 1950.

Rue de la Paix, Paris
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
rue de la Paix
Paris, France 75002

The rue de la Paix is a fashionable shopping street in the center of Paris. Located in the 2nd arrondissement of Paris, running north from Place Vendôme and ending at the Opéra Garnier, it is best known for its jewellers, such as the shop opened by Cartier in 1898. Charles Frederick Worth was the first to open a couture house in the rue de la Paix. Many buildings on the street are inspired in design by the hôtels particuliers of Place Vendôme.HistoryThe street was opened in 1806 from Place Vendôme on the orders of Napoleon I, part of the Napoleonic program to open the heart of the Right Bank of Paris, both towards the undeveloped western suburbs and to the north. Creating the new street required the demolition of the ancient Convent of the Capucins. At first named Rue Napoléon, its name was changed in 1814, after the Bourbon Restoration, to celebrate the newly arranged peace.TransportationBased in the center of Paris, the street can be reached by: metro: line 1 18px or buses: 72.Retail outlets associated with Rue da la Paix Louis Aucoc - The Aucoc family firm at 6 Rue de la Paix was established in 1821 Duvelleroy is a fan-maker house established at 15 Rue de la Paix in 1827 by Jean-Pierre Duvelleroy, Cartier - 1898. Charles Frederick Worth was the first to open a couture house at 7 rue de la Paix, and in 1885 created the label of his salon "Worth 7, Rue de la Paix". Boué Soeurs, a fashion house active from the late 1890s to early 1950s

Olympia (Paris)
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
28 boulevard des Capucines
Paris, France 75009

08.92.68.33.68

L’Olympia est une salle de spectacle située 28, boulevard des Capucines, dans le 9e arrondissement de Paris de Paris. C'est le plus ancien music-hall de Paris encore en activité. Elle est propriété du groupe Vivendi depuis 2001.HistoireLes débutsEn 1888, Joseph Oller - le fondateur du Pari Mutuel et du Moulin Rouge - pose ses montagnes russes dans la cour d'un bâtiment donnant sur le 28, boulevard des Capucines. Le préfet de police Henri Lozé, craignant l'incendie des montagnes russes bâties en bois, demande la fermeture de l'attraction. Oller procède donc à la démolition des montagnes russes et fait édifier une salle de spectacle de 2000 places : l'Olympia.L'inauguration a lieu le 12 avril 1893, avec comme toutes premières vedettes La Goulue (danseuse de cancan), Loïe Fuller (danseuse américaine) et Fregoli (transformiste).Les frères Isola dirigent l'établissement de 1898 à 1911. Les attractions foraines (acrobates, contorsionnistes, etc) occupent la scène. De 1911 à 1914, Jacques Charles y monte des revues de music-hall, Mistinguett et Yvonne Printemps s'y produisent. En 1916 Raphaël Beretta et Léon Volterra en prennent la direction. Pendant la Première Guerre mondiale la salle ferme ses portes.

Free Center
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8 rue de la Ville l'Evêque
Paris, France 75008

Envie de vivre une expérience passionnante au sein d’une équipe exceptionnelle : rejoignez les équipes des Free Centers ! Postulez sur free.fr/freecenter/

Palais Garnier
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8 rue Scribe
Paris, France 75001

+33171252423

The Palais Garnier is a 1,979-seat opera house, which was built from 1861 to 1875 for the Paris Opera. It was called the Salle des Capucines, because of its location on the Boulevard des Capucines in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, but soon became known as the Palais Garnier, in recognition of its opulence and its architect, Charles Garnier. The theatre is also often referred to as the Opéra Garnier and historically was known as the Opéra de Paris or simply the Opéra, as it was the primary home of the Paris Opera and its associated Paris Opera Ballet until 1989, when the Opéra Bastille opened at the Place de la Bastille. The Paris Opera now mainly uses the Palais Garnier for ballet.The Palais Garnier has been called "probably the most famous opera house in the world, a symbol of Paris like Notre Dame Cathedral, the Louvre, or the Sacré Coeur Basilica." This is at least partly due to its use as the setting for Gaston Leroux's 1910 novel The Phantom of the Opera and, especially, the novel's subsequent adaptations in films and Andrew Lloyd Webber's popular 1986 musical. Another contributing factor is that among the buildings constructed in Paris during the Second Empire, besides being the most expensive, it has been described as the only one that is "unquestionably a masterpiece of the first rank." This opinion is far from unanimous however: the 20th-century French architect Le Corbusier once described it as "a lying art" and contended that the "Garnier movement is a décor of the grave".

Printemps
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
64 boulevard Haussmann
Paris, France 75009

Printemps is a French department store . The Printemps stores focus on beauty, lifestyle, fashion, accessories, and men's wear.HistoryPrintemps was founded in 1865 by Jules Jaluzot and Jean-Alfred Duclos. The store was designed by noted architects Jules and Paul Sédille and opened at the corner of Le Havre and Boulevard Haussmann, in Paris, France on 3 November 1865. The building was greatly expanded in 1874, and elevators (then a great novelty) from the 1867 Universal Exposition were installed. Rebuilt after a fire in 1881, the store became the first to use electric lighting, in 1888. (Customers could observe the workings of the power plant behind a glass wall.) It was also one of the first department stores with direct subway access, the Metro being connected in 1904.The policies of Printemps revolutionized retail business practices. The store marked items with set prices and eschewed the haggling based on customer appearance that had previously been standard in retail shopping. Like other '' (literally "big store", department store), Printemps used the economies of scale to provide high quality goods at prices that the expanding middle class could afford. They also pioneered the idea of discount sales to clear out dated stocks, and later the use of window models to display the latest fashions. Printemps was noted for its branding innovations as well, handing out bouquets of violets on the first day of each Spring and championing the new Art Nouveau style, with its nature inspired motifs.

Saint-Augustin, Paris
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
8 Avenue César Caire
Paris, France 75008

0299717343

The Église Saint-Augustin de Paris is a Catholic church located at 46 boulevard Malesherbes in the 8th arrondissement of Paris. The church was designed to provide a prominent vista at the end of the boulevard both of which were built during Haussmann's renovation of Paris under the Second French Empire. The closest métro station is Saint-Augustin 15px 15pxHistoryHaussmann's PlanDuring the reign of Napoleon III in the 1850s and 60s Paris experienced a dramatic transformation under the direction of Georges-Eugène Haussmann. Haussmann cut many boulevards through the crowded, medieval city placing prominent public buildings at the boulevard ends to provide impressive vistas. The boulevard Malesherbes was laid out cutting northwest from La Madeleine. Saint-Augustin, close to the spot where Haussmann was born, was built to provide a counterpoint to the famous columns of La Madeleine at the other end of the boulevard. It was also designed to be visible from the Arc de Triomphe down the avenue de Friedland. The chosen site, an odd shaped lot at the intersection of four streets, and the need for a dome of 200ft so as to be visible from the Arc de Triomphe, dictated unusual proportions for the building. The church was designed by Haussmann's fellow Protestant, architect Victor Baltard who also famously designed Les Halles markets. While Baltard's use of iron in Saint-Augustin's structure is praised for its inventiveness, at least one critic has described the church as, "an eyesore: ridiculously sited, without proportion, crushed beneath an outsized dome." The neighborhood around the church is now one of the most expensive in Paris.

Sainte-Trinité, Paris
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
4 Place D'Estienne D'Orves
Paris, France 75009

01 48 74 12 77

The Église de la Sainte-Trinité is a Roman Catholic church located in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, France. The church is a building of the Second Empire period, built between 1861 and 1867 at a cost of almost 5 million francs.La Trinité, as it is known, was designed by Théodore Ballu as part of the beautification and reorganization of Paris under Baron Haussmann. Exterior figures of Faith, Hope, and Charity on the church were sculpted by Eugène-Louis Lequesne. The 93 meter-long church has a bell tower 63 metres high topped by a dome. The choir is ten steps higher than the nave and surrounded by an ambulatory. Also named after it are the rue de La Trinité and the square de La Trinité.The church is accessible by the Métro (the nearby station, Trinité, is named after it) and is known internationally for its former organist, the French composer Olivier Messiaen. It was the location of Hector Berlioz's funeral, on 11 March 1869 and Georges Bizet's funeral in 1875.The church's facade served as the inspiration for the design of the Saint-Jean-Baptiste Church in Quebec City and the Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament in Sacramento, California.