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Grand Trianon, Versailles | Tourist Information


Grand Parc de Versailles
Versailles, France 78000


The Grand Trianon is a château (palace) situated in the northwestern part of the Domain of Versailles. It was built at the request of King Louis XIV of France (r. 1643–1715), as a retreat for himself and his maîtresse en titre of the time, the Marquise de Montespan (1640–1707), and as a place where he and invited guests could take light meals.HistoryTrianon de porcelaineIn 1668, Louis XIV purchased Trianon, a hamlet on the outskirts of Versailles, and commissioned the architect Louis Le Vau to design a porcelain pavilion (Trianon de porcelaine) to be built there.The façade was made of white and blue Delft-style "porcelain" (ceramic) tiles from the French manufactures of Rouen, Lisieux, Nevers and Saint-Cloud. Construction began in 1670 and was finished in 1672.

Arts and Entertainment Near Grand Trianon

Le Potager du Roy
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
10 Rue du Maréchal Joffre
Versailles, 78000

01 39 50 35 34

Le Grand Bal Masqué de Versailles
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Orangerie du Château de Versailles
Versailles, 78000

0130837889

De Berry
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Versailles
Versailles, 78000

0615325626

Versailles Orangerie
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
slim
Versailles, 78000

The Versailles Orangerie (French: L′Orangerie du Château de Versailles) was built by Jules Hardouin-Mansart between 1684 and 1686, replacing Le Vaus design from 1663 - that is to say, before work on the palace had even begun. It is an example of many such prestigious extensions of grand gardens in Europe designed both to shelter tender plants and impress visitors. In the winter, the Versailles Orangerie houses more than a thousand trees in boxes. Most are citrus trees, but there are many tender Mediterranean plants including oleanders, olive, pomegranate, and palm trees. From May to October, they are put outdoors in the Parterre Bas.The allure of citrusThe sweet orange was introduced to Europe by the fifteenth or sixteenth century. At first, they were an expensive food item. Medieval cookbooks tell exactly how many orange slices a visiting dignitary was entitled to. Citrus soon became the fashion of the nobility and rich merchants. By the sixteenth century, sweet oranges had become well-established and had assumed commercial importance in Europe.In France, the first orangerie was built and stocked by Charles VIII of France at the Château of Amboise. There is general agreement that the arrival of the sweet orange in Europe was linked with the activities of the Portuguese during the fifteenth century, and particularly by Vasco de Gama's voyages to the East. Although the Romans had been acquainted with lemons and probably sour oranges as well as citrons, the different types - sour oranges, lemons and sweet oranges - reached Europe centuries apart. By withholding water and nutrients, and by using pruning techniques, French gardeners were able to make citrus trees bloom throughout the year, to the delight of Louis XIV. Citrus motifs formed themes in sculpture, mosaics, embroidery, weaving, paintings, poems, and songs throughout history, and orange blossoms remain prized as floral ornaments at weddings.

Maison Sajou
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
16 bis, rue de la Chancellerie
Versailles, 78000

01 39 50 87 78

Versaille
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Place d'Armes
Versailles, 78390

01 30 83 78 00

Hall Of Mirrors At The Palace Of Versailles
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Place d'Armes
Versailles, 12110

01 30 83 78 00

Royal Opera of Versailles
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Château de Versailles
Versailles, 78000

01 30 83 78 89

The Royal Opera of Versailles is the main theatre and opera house of the Palace of Versailles. Designed by Ange-Jacques Gabriel, it is also known as the Théâtre Gabriel. The interior decoration by Augustin Pajou is constructed almost entirely of wood, painted to resemble marble in a technique known as faux marble. The excellent acoustics of the opera house are at least partly due to its wooden interior.The house is located at the northern extremity of the north wing of the palace. General public access to the theater is gained through the two-story vestibule. Some parts of the Opéra, such as the King's Loge and the King's Boudoir represent some of the earliest expressions of what would become known as Louis XVI style.Lully’s Persée — written in 1682, the year Louis XIV moved into the palace — inaugurated the Opéra on 16 May 1770 in celebration of the marriage of the dauphin — the future Louis XVI — to Marie-Antoinette.The Opéra Royal can serve either as a theater for opera, stage plays, or orchestral events, when it can accommodate an audience of 712, or as a ballroom, when the floor of the orchestra level of the auditorium can be raised to the level of the stage. On these occasions, the Opéra can accommodate 1,200.

Parc de Versailles
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
78000 Versailles, France
Versailles, 78000

Le parc de Versailles, également appelé parc du château de Versailles, est un parc qui s'étend sur sur le territoire de la commune de Versailles, dans les Yvelines en France. Le parc représente en superficie environ un dixième de l'ancien domaine royal, réserve de chasse des rois, appelé le « Grand Parc », dont l'emprise a été sensiblement réduite à la Révolution, et qui est gérée par l'établissement public du château et du domaine de Versailles.Dans ce parc entièrement clos, se trouvent plusieurs monuments, tels : le château de Versailles, le Petit Trianon et le Grand Trianon, le Hameau de la Reine, ainsi que les jardins à la française du château de Versailles créés par André Le Nôtre. Le parc regroupe également les jardins des Trianons, dont le jardin de style anglo-chinois de Marie-Antoinette, le potager du roi et deux grandes pièces d'eau : le Grand Canal et la pièce d'eau des Suisses.Le reste du parc est occupé par des parcelles forestières ou agricoles, parcourues par de grandes allées rectilignes. C'est dans ce parc que prend naissance le ru de Gally qui draine le Grand Canal et s'écoule vers l'Ouest. Le parc est limité à l'Est par les parties urbanisées de Versailles et du Chesnay, au Nord par l'arboretum de Chèvreloup situé dans la commune de Rocquencourt et à l'Ouest par la plaine de Versailles qui est un site classé. Au Sud, adossées au bois de Satory, qui appartient à la forêt domaniale de Versailles, se trouvent diverses implantations, dont le centre de recherche de l'INRA, qui occupe les terrains de l'ancienne ferme de la Ménagerie, la résidence de la Lanterne et le camp militaire des Matelots.

Grand Canal Chateau De Versailles
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Parc de Château de Versailles
Versailles, 78000

Temple de l'Amour
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Chateau Versaille
Versailles, 78000

The temple de l'Amour is a garden folly of the Château de Versailles, and more specifically, in the Petit Trianon part of it.

La Tangente
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
32 rue de l'Ermitage
Versailles, 78000

0139555796

Hameau de la Reine
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Parc du château de Versailles
Versailles, 78000

0785004651

The Hameau de la Reine is a rustic retreat in the park of the Château de Versailles built for Marie Antoinette in 1783 near the Petit Trianon in the Yvelines, France. It served as a private meeting place for the Queen and her closest friends, a place of leisure. Designed by the Queen's favoured architect, Richard Mique and with the help of the painter Hubert Robert, it contained a meadowland with lakes and streams, a classical Temple of Love on an island with fragrant shrubs and flowers, an octagonal belvedere, with a neighbouring grotto and cascade. There are also various buildings in a rustic or vernacular style, inspired by Norman or Flemish design, situated around an irregular pond fed by a stream that turned the mill wheel. The building scheme included a farmhouse,, a dairy, a dovecote, a boudoir, a barn that was burned down during the French Revolution, a mill and a tower in the form of a lighthouse. Each building is decorated with a garden, an orchard or a flower garden. The largest and most famous of these houses is the "Queen's House" that is connected to the Billiard house by a wooden gallery, at the center of the village. A working farm was close to the idyllic, fantasy-like setting of the Queen’s Hamlet.The hameau is the best-known of a series of rustic garden constructions built at the time, notably the Prince of Condé's Hameau de Chantilly which was the inspiration for the Versailles hameau. Such model farms operating under principles espoused by the Physiocrats, were fashionable among the French aristocracy at the time. One primary purpose of the hameau was to add to the ambiance of the Petit Trianon, giving the illusion that it was deep in the countryside rather than within the confines of Versailles. The rooms at the hameau allowed for more intimacy than the grand salons at Versailles or at the Petit Trianon.

Piscine Résidentiel Longchamps
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Résidence Longchamp
Le Chesnay, 78150

Printemps Parly 2
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
2 Avenue Charles de Gaulle
Le Chesnay, 78150

01 72 10 07 00

Cinema Parly 2
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Centre commercial Parly 2
Le Chesnay, 78150

01 39 54 57 56

JACP - Jazz au Chesnay parly II
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
7 Avenue Dutarte - Ecole de Musique
Le Chesnay, 78150

06 80 61 79 76

Pratique amateur de musique Jazz. Répétitions Bing-band (lundi), groupe vocal (jeudi) et ateliers d'impro (mardi et mercredi) environ tous les 15 jours. Jams sessions : 1 dimanche par mois et un jeudi par trimestre. 1 stage d'hiver et 1 stage d'été. Plus d'infos sur le site : http://www.jacp-jazzochesnay.eu/spip.php?rubrique16

Théâtre André Malraux
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Rue de l'étang
Rocquencourt, 78150

Local business Near Grand Trianon

Grand Canal Chateau De Versailles
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Parc de Château de Versailles
Versailles, France 78000

La Flotille, Parc du Château de Versailles
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Parc du Chateau de versailles
Versailles, France 78000

01.39.51.41.58

Course Des Princesses
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Château de Versailles
Versailles, France 78000

Domaine De Marie-Antoinette
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Allée des Deux Trianons
Versailles, France 78000

+33 01 30 83 78 00

Petit Trianon
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Coordonnées GPS du château de Versailles : 48°48’17N 2°07’15E
Versailles, France 78000

Petit Trianon, built between 1762 and 1768 during the reign of Louis XV, is a small château located on the grounds of the Palace of Versailles in Versailles, France. The park of the Grand Trianon includes the Petit Trianon.Design and constructionIt was designed by Ange-Jacques Gabriel by the order of Louis XV for his long-term mistress, Madame de Pompadour, and was constructed between 1762 and 1768. Madame de Pompadour died four years before its completion, and the Petit Trianon was subsequently occupied by her successor, Madame du Barry. Upon his accession to the throne in 1774, the 20-year-old Louis XVI gave the château and its surrounding park to his 19-year-old Queen Marie Antoinette for her exclusive use and enjoyment.The château of the Petit Trianon is a celebrated example of the transition from the Rococo style of the earlier part of the 18th century, to the more sober and refined, Neoclassical style of the 1760s and onward. Essentially an exercise on a cube, the Petit Trianon attracts interest by virtue of its four facades, each thoughtfully designed according to that part of the estate it would face. The Corinthian order predominates, with two detached and two semi-detached pillars on the side of the formal French garden, and pilasters facing both the courtyard and the area once occupied by Louis XV's greenhouses. Overlooking the former botanical garden of the king, the remaining facade was left bare. The subtle use of steps compensates for the differences in level of the château's inclined location.

Hameau de la Reine
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Parc du château de Versailles
Versailles, France 78000

0785004651

The Hameau de la Reine is a rustic retreat in the park of the Château de Versailles built for Marie Antoinette in 1783 near the Petit Trianon in the Yvelines, France. It served as a private meeting place for the Queen and her closest friends, a place of leisure. Designed by the Queen's favoured architect, Richard Mique and with the help of the painter Hubert Robert, it contained a meadowland with lakes and streams, a classical Temple of Love on an island with fragrant shrubs and flowers, an octagonal belvedere, with a neighbouring grotto and cascade. There are also various buildings in a rustic or vernacular style, inspired by Norman or Flemish design, situated around an irregular pond fed by a stream that turned the mill wheel. The building scheme included a farmhouse,, a dairy, a dovecote, a boudoir, a barn that was burned down during the French Revolution, a mill and a tower in the form of a lighthouse. Each building is decorated with a garden, an orchard or a flower garden. The largest and most famous of these houses is the "Queen's House" that is connected to the Billiard house by a wooden gallery, at the center of the village. A working farm was close to the idyllic, fantasy-like setting of the Queen’s Hamlet.The hameau is the best-known of a series of rustic garden constructions built at the time, notably the Prince of Condé's Hameau de Chantilly which was the inspiration for the Versailles hameau. Such model farms operating under principles espoused by the Physiocrats, were fashionable among the French aristocracy at the time. One primary purpose of the hameau was to add to the ambiance of the Petit Trianon, giving the illusion that it was deep in the countryside rather than within the confines of Versailles. The rooms at the hameau allowed for more intimacy than the grand salons at Versailles or at the Petit Trianon.