EuroZoid
Discover The Most Popular Places In Europe

Highbury Fields, London | Tourist Information


Highbury Hill
London, United Kingdom N5 1AR


Highbury Fields is an open space in Highbury, in the London Borough of Islington. At 11.75 hectares (29 acres), it is the largest open space in the borough.It extends north from Highbury Corner almost as far as Highbury Barn. Besides parkland, Highbury Fields contains recreational facilities including tennis courts and Highbury Pool, which reopened after refurbishment in January 2007.Georgian and Victorian terracesThe elegant houses surrounding the Fields are good examples of Georgian and Victorian town houses and are highly desirable residences. These terraces lie on three roads: Highbury Place, Highbury Crescent, and Highbury Terrace.John Dawes bought much of the demesne and began the residential development of Highbury. He granted leases in 1774-9 for 39 houses on Highbury Place. These were designed and built by John Spiller, a speculative builder of Southwark. The terrace was completed in 1777. Famous residents include: 1. Walter Sickert, the Impressionist painter, lived here and ran a rather unsuccessful school for artists at from 1927-31. 22. This became the home of Charles, the character played by Hugh Grant in Four weddings and a funeral. 25. John Wesley stayed here. 25. Joseph Chamberlain lived here from 1845-54. 39. John Spiller moved in when the terrace was completed in 1777. ??. Abraham Newland, chief cashier of the Bank of England, never slept out of it for 25 years. His house on Highbury Place was for daytime use only. The next major development around what was to become Highbury Fields was the construction of Highbury Terrace. The central part of the terrace dates to 1789. By 1794 nos. 1-16 had been built.

Landmark Near Highbury Fields

King's Cross Thameslink railway station
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
Kings Cross ThamesLink Railway Station,
London, N1 9HJ

+44 (0) 845 748 4950

King's Cross Thameslink station is a closed railway station in central London, England, which served the Thameslink route. It was replaced by new Thameslink platforms at St Pancras in December 2007. The last operator of the station was First Capital Connect. The site is on Pentonville Road, about 160yd from King's Cross station.The station occupied part of the original site of the Metropolitan Railway's 1863 King's Cross station. Its original street buildings were a little further west than the later station frontage and, though in poor repair, may still be seen. The Thameslink platforms on the City Widened Lines were separated only by a newer wall from the site of the Underground platforms, which may still be seen on the west side from Underground trains travelling between King's Cross St. Pancras and Farringdon stations.The two platforms at King's Cross Thameslink were lettered rather than numbered, to avoid confusion with the platforms at nearby King's Cross among staff who worked at both stations, which may have been regarded as part of the same station complex. A similar situation exists at Waterloo East station, an annexe of London Waterloo, and the use of platform letters has been continued on the new Thameslink platforms at St Pancras.

The Wenlock Arms
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
26 Wenlock Road
London, N1 7

20-76083406

The Wenlock Arms is a public house in London, which reopened on Friday 14 January 1994. The pub is located halfway between Old Street and Angel, just off the City Road and the City Road Basin and Wenlock Basin on the Regent's Canal. The pub has won awards for the quality and range of its cask ales.HistoryThe Wenlock Arms first opened for business in 1836 and was operated by the nearby Wenlock Brewery as a "brewery tap".John Lane (1808–1873) owned and ran the Wenlock Brewery from 1840 until his death, initially as "Lane & Bowden" (the 1842 Post Office Directory mentions “LANE & BOWDEN, Ale Brewers, 9 Wenlock Road”). John's brother-in-law, John Mitchell (1813–1868), was brewery foreman in 1851 (mentioned in the census). Various other members of the Mitchell family worked at the brewery from time to time. These included John Mitchell's older brother Thomas (mentioned in the census as being foreman at the brewery in 1871), another John Mitchell (a cousin; c. 1820–1849), as well as at least three of John Lane's brothers. Yet another John Mitchell, John Hoffe Mitchell, was joint executor of John Lane's will.In 1873, ownership passed to John Lane's youngest son, Robert George. Robert, after brewing in Alton, Hampshire, and marrying Parisienne Louise Marie Julienne Isabel Jean dit Saussay in 1876, died of pneumonia in 1880, aged only 31. After this the brewery became the property of one Richard Alfred Glover, before being taken over by Glover Bell & Co in 1887.

Angel, London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
3 Islington High Street
London, EC1Y 1

+(44)20 7837 2218

Angel is an area on the northern fringe of central London. It is located 2mi north-northeast of Charing Cross on the Inner Ring Road at a busy transport intersection. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in London. It is a significant commercial and retail centre, and a business improvement district. Angel straddles the ancient boundary of the parishes of Clerkenwell and Islington that later became the metropolitan boroughs of Finsbury and Islington. It is named from the former Angel Inn which stood on the corner of Islington High Street and Pentonville Road. Since 1965 the whole area has formed part of the London Borough of Islington in Greater London.

Hoxton
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Hoxton street
London, E2 8

Hoxton is a district in the East End of London, England, immediately north of the financial district of the City of London. Hoxton forms the western part of Shoreditch, being part of the ancient parish and subsequent Metropolitan Borough of Shoreditch prior to its incorporation into the London Borough of Hackney. The area of Hoxton is bordered by Regent's Canal on the north side, Wharf Road and City Road to the west, Old Street to the south, and Kingsland Road to the east.Hoxton is also a ward, electing three councillors to Hackney London Borough Council. It forms part of the Hackney South and Shoreditch constituency.Historical HoxtonOrigins"Hogesdon" is first recorded in the Domesday Book, meaning an Anglo-Saxon farm (or "fortified enclosure") belonging to Hoch, or Hocq. Little is recorded of the origins of the settlement, though there was Roman activity around Ermine Street, which ran to the east of the area from the 1st century. In medieval times, Hoxton formed a rural part of Shoreditch parish. It achieved independent ecclesiastical status in 1826 with the founding of its own parish church dedicated to St John the Baptist, though civil jurisdiction was still invested in the Shoreditch vestry. The Worshipful Company of Haberdashers remains Patron of the advowson of the parish of St John's.

Hoxton
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Hoxton street
London, E2 8

Hoxton is a district in the East End of London, England, immediately north of the financial district of the City of London. Hoxton forms the western part of Shoreditch, being part of the ancient parish and subsequent Metropolitan Borough of Shoreditch prior to its incorporation into the London Borough of Hackney. The area of Hoxton is bordered by Regent's Canal on the north side, Wharf Road and City Road to the west, Old Street to the south, and Kingsland Road to the east.Hoxton is also a ward, electing three councillors to Hackney London Borough Council. It forms part of the Hackney South and Shoreditch constituency.Historical HoxtonOrigins"Hogesdon" is first recorded in the Domesday Book, meaning an Anglo-Saxon farm (or "fortified enclosure") belonging to Hoch, or Hocq. Little is recorded of the origins of the settlement, though there was Roman activity around Ermine Street, which ran to the east of the area from the 1st century. In medieval times, Hoxton formed a rural part of Shoreditch parish. It achieved independent ecclesiastical status in 1826 with the founding of its own parish church dedicated to St John the Baptist, though civil jurisdiction was still invested in the Shoreditch vestry. The Worshipful Company of Haberdashers remains Patron of the advowson of the parish of St John's.

Shoreditch Park
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
New North Road
London, N1 5

20-83568428

Shoreditch Park is an open space in Hoxton, in the London Borough of Hackney. It is bounded by Poole Street (to the north), Rushton and Mintern Streets (south) and New North Road (west) and Pitfield Street (east). The park derives its name from the Metropolitan Borough of Shoreditch, the local authority when it was established. The park is 7.7ha in extent.The park was originally created in the 1970s on an area of terraced housing that had been devastated by the Blitz, and then used for temporary housing, known as prefabs. In 2005 and 2006, an extensive excavation was carried out by archaeologists from the Museum of London to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the end of World War II. The excavation examined housing of the time, and investigated the damage caused by aerial bombing and missiles. It was pioneering in involving members of the local community in the project.The park has sports facilities, an adventure playground, children's playground, London's only outdoor beach volleyball court ((Time Team Series 13) Shoreditch park digging for history (MoLAS

Amusement World Fun Fair
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
shoreditch park new north road
London, N1

07970555291

The Screen On The Green
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
83 Upper Street
London, N1 0

20-72263520

The Screen On The Green is a single screen cinema facing Islington Green in the London Borough of Islington, London. The current building was opened in 1913 and it is one of the oldest continuously running cinemas in the UK. It is an example of the many purpose-built cinemas that followed the regulations set by the Cinematograph Act 1909.It is distinctive in the local area due to its façade outlined in red neon, along with a large canopy used for advertising current and upcoming films and events.Since 2008, the cinema has been operated by Everyman Cinemas Group, who have expanded their interests into a unique premium cinemas across London (including the original Everyman Cinema in Hampstead), Surrey and Hampshire.Now retitled as 'Everyman Screen on the Green', the cinema offers a variety of films and special events, including the National Theatre Live, live Q&As, film festivals and seasons. The venue is equipped with Sony Digital 4K projectors and Dolby Digital surround sound.HistoryEarly history and foundation (1910 - 1913)Cinematic entertainment began at number 83 Upper Street, Islington when the Pesaresi brothers ran their original animated picture show in the then vacant shop. After success, and gaining financial assistance from Thomas Harrold who ran the "fancy drapery" store next door at number 82, they bought out Stean's Printers, Fosdykes' Confectionery and Vivian Lester's Sign Writers, numbers 84 to 86 respectively. They demolished the old shops and built a new purpose-built electric theatre designed by architects Boreham & Gladding, which opened in October 1913.

The Screen On The Green
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
83 Upper Street
London, N1 0

20-72263520

The Screen On The Green is a single screen cinema facing Islington Green in the London Borough of Islington, London. The current building was opened in 1913 and it is one of the oldest continuously running cinemas in the UK. It is an example of the many purpose-built cinemas that followed the regulations set by the Cinematograph Act 1909.It is distinctive in the local area due to its façade outlined in red neon, along with a large canopy used for advertising current and upcoming films and events.Since 2008, the cinema has been operated by Everyman Cinemas Group, who have expanded their interests into a unique premium cinemas across London (including the original Everyman Cinema in Hampstead), Surrey and Hampshire.Now retitled as 'Everyman Screen on the Green', the cinema offers a variety of films and special events, including the National Theatre Live, live Q&As, film festivals and seasons. The venue is equipped with Sony Digital 4K projectors and Dolby Digital surround sound.HistoryEarly history and foundation (1910 - 1913)Cinematic entertainment began at number 83 Upper Street, Islington when the Pesaresi brothers ran their original animated picture show in the then vacant shop. After success, and gaining financial assistance from Thomas Harrold who ran the "fancy drapery" store next door at number 82, they bought out Stean's Printers, Fosdykes' Confectionery and Vivian Lester's Sign Writers, numbers 84 to 86 respectively. They demolished the old shops and built a new purpose-built electric theatre designed by architects Boreham & Gladding, which opened in October 1913.

Lonsdale Square
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Lonsdale Square
London, N1 1

Lonsdale Square is a traditional central London square in Barnsbury, Islington, North London, England.The square consists of tall brick town houses with distinctive steep gables, mullioned windows in white, arched front doors, and black railings. There is a garden in the centre of the square for use by residents.The square was built between about 1838 and 1845, and was designed in Gothic Revival style by R. C. Carpenter. The square was built at the same time as the public house at the north end, currently called The Drapers Arms, which is known for gastropub-style food.The leading conductor Simon Rattle has a residence here. It is also favoured by lawyers, with houses costing several million pounds. The author Salman Rushdie had a basement apartment in the square, as reported in his memoir Joseph Anton: A Memoir.There is a residents' association, the Lonsdale Square Society, located at No. 22.The nearest tube stations are Highbury & Islington to the north-east and Angel to the south-east. The postcode is N1.

Lonsdale Square
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Lonsdale Square
London, N1 1

Lonsdale Square is a traditional central London square in Barnsbury, Islington, North London, England.The square consists of tall brick town houses with distinctive steep gables, mullioned windows in white, arched front doors, and black railings. There is a garden in the centre of the square for use by residents.The square was built between about 1838 and 1845, and was designed in Gothic Revival style by R. C. Carpenter. The square was built at the same time as the public house at the north end, currently called The Drapers Arms, which is known for gastropub-style food.The leading conductor Simon Rattle has a residence here. It is also favoured by lawyers, with houses costing several million pounds. The author Salman Rushdie had a basement apartment in the square, as reported in his memoir Joseph Anton: A Memoir.There is a residents' association, the Lonsdale Square Society, located at No. 22.The nearest tube stations are Highbury & Islington to the north-east and Angel to the south-east. The postcode is N1.

Essex Road railway station
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
181 Essex Rd
London, N1 8

3457-484950

Essex Road railway station is a National Rail station in Canonbury in the London Borough of Islington. It is on the Northern City Line between and and is in Travelcard Zone 2. The station is at the junction of Essex Road, Canonbury Road and New North Road, with the present entrance on Canonbury Road. Operated by Great Northern, it is the only deep level underground station in London served solely by National Rail trains. Between 1933 and 1975 the station was operated as part of the London Underground, as a short branch of the Northern line. Between 1922 and 1948 the station name was Canonbury & Essex Road. The name reverted to the original form in 1948.HistoryThe station was opened on 14 February 1904 by the Great Northern & City Railway (GN&CR) on its underground route between the Great Northern Railway (GNR) station at Finsbury Park and the Metropolitan Railway (MR) and City & South London Railway (C&SLR) station at Moorgate in the City of London.

Union Chapel, Islington
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Compton Terrace
London, N1 2UN

+44 20 7226 1686

Union Chapel is a working church, live entertainment venue and charity drop-in centre for the homeless in Islington, London, England. Built in the late 19th century in the Gothic revival style, the church is Grade I-listed. It is at the top end of Upper Street, near Highbury Fields.The VenueThe church hosts live music and comedy events, and was voted London's Best Live Music Venue by readers of Time Out magazine in 2012.Margins Homelessness ProjectThe Margins Project, based in the Union Chapel, provides a range of support services to people facing homelessness, crisis and isolation. It operates a Sunday drop-in that provides meals, showers and laundry facilities. It also offers help with accessing housing, employment and health services and weekly art classes.Church in the ChapelUnion Chapel is a Congregational church, which describes itself as "liberal, inclusive, non-hierarchical, and non-conformist" and meets every Sunday for worship. The church is also open on Wednesday mornings for private prayer, and a Bible study group meets Wednesday lunchtime.HistoryThe congregation first met in 1799 in a house in Highbury Grove as a union of evangelical Anglicans and non-conformists, and moved to a previous building on the present site in Compton Terrace, just off Upper Street, in 1806. The current building is in the Victorian gothic style of architecture. It was designed by James Cubitt of Loughton, and built between 1874 and 1877, with further additions from 1877 to 1890, while Henry Allon was pastor. The chapel was used for a major scene in the 1982 film, Who Dares Wins. Since 1982, the charity Friends of Union Chapel has helped restore and preserve the church and organise activities. Behind the church is the large Sunday School, built on the Akron Plan.

HM Prison Pentonville
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Caledonian Road
London, N7 8

HM Prison Pentonville is a Category B/C men's prison, operated by Her Majesty's Prison Service. Pentonville Prison is not actually within Pentonville itself, but is located further north, on the Caledonian Road in the Barnsbury area of the London Borough of Islington, north London, England.HistoryThe first modern prison in London, Millbank, opened in 1816. It had separate cells for 860 prisoners and proved satisfactory to the authorities who started building prisons to deal with the rapid increase in numbers occasioned by the ending of capital punishment for many crimes and a steady reduction in transportation.Two Acts of Parliament allowed for the building of Pentonville prison, designed by Captain Joshua Jebb, Royal Engineers, for the detention of convicts sentenced to imprisonment or awaiting transportation. Construction started on 10 April 1840 and was completed in 1842. The cost was £84,186 12s 2d.It had a central hall with five radiating wings, all visible to staff at the centre. This design, intended to keep prisoners isolated – the "separate system" first used at Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia – was not, as is often thought, a panopticon. Guards had no view into individual cells from their central position. Pentonville was designed to hold 520 prisoners under the separate system, each having his own cell, 13ft long, 7ft wide and 9ft high with little windows on the outside walls and opening on to narrow landings in the galleries.

Hen and Chickens Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
109 St Paul's Road
London, N1 2

020 7704 2001

The Hen and Chickens Theatre is a fringe venue for theatre and comedy situated above a pub at Highbury in the London Borough of Islington. The theatre management was awarded to actress Felicity Wren in 1999.The Mighty Boosh played here numerous times in their early comedy career

Brahlistan
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
2 Dove Road, The Pinnacle 7
London, N1 3PL

Knipe Towers
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2A Crane Grove
London, N78LE

02077006977

St Mary Magdalene Church, Holloway Road
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
117 Holloway Road
London,

St Mary Magdalene Church is an Anglican church on Holloway Road in north London. It is located in St Mary Magdalene Gardens opposite Islington Central Library. St Mary Magdalene is part of the Parish of St Mary Magdalene and St David. In 2013 its sister church St David's on Westbourne road was reopened and both churches came under the banner of 'Hope Church Islington'. The church now functions as one site of the two site church which shares leadership and a staff team. The early 19th century building accommodates the activities of the church congregation, including church services, a winter night shelter, 'Mini Mags' – a toddlers group, and provides spaces to other users. Baptisms and confirmations, marriages and funerals are regularly held here.CongregationThe church has traditionally belonged in the evangelical stream of the Church of England. More recently it has become more closely associated with a charismatic evangelical approach to worship, informal other than at the 9am service which is robed. There are good ties with other churches in the Deanery, especially St Mark's Tollington and Christ Church Highbury. There is also a strong relationship with Holy Trinity Brompton and related churches. St Mary Magdalene is a certified Fairtrade church. Since November 2013 the congregation has expanded into two sites- St Mary Magdalene's and St David's on Westbourne Road meeting for 4 services on a Sunday.

Piebury Corner The Pie Shop
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
209-211 Holloway Rd, London
London, N7 8DL

020 7700 5441

Piebury Corner is a Pie and a Pint shop selling award winning Pies, Scotch eggs, Craft Beers and Ciders from around the UK. All our pies are handmade and are available cold from the Deli or to eat in/take away with sides. Any pies left over at the end of the day go to 'The Pilion Trust' charity supporting young homeless people in Islington/Camden. DIRECTIONS The shop is 150 yards south of Holloway Road Tube Station (turn right out of the station). The stall (only open on Arsenal match days) is on the corner of Gillespie Road/Avenell Road (left out of Arsenal Tube Station.

Highbury
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
26 Highbury Park
Harlow, N5 1EY

20-72262339

Highbury is a district in the London Borough of Islington.HistoryEarly HighburyThe area now known as Islington was part of the larger manor of Tolentone, which is mentioned in the Domesday Book. Tolentone was owned by Ranulf brother of Ilger and included all the areas north and east of Canonbury and Holloway Road. The manor house was situated by what is now the east side of Hornsey Road near the junction with Seven Sisters Road. After the manor decayed, a new manor house was built in 1271 (see below) to the south-east; to differentiate it from the original manor and because it was on a hill, it was called Highbury, from which the area takes its name.The site for Highbury Manor was possibly used by a Roman garrison as a summer camp. During the construction of a new Highbury House in 1781, tiles were found that could have been Roman or Norman; unfortunately these have been lost.Highbury ManorOwnership of Highbury eventually passed to Alicia de Barrow, who in 1271 gave it to the Priory of St John of Jerusalem, also known as the Knights Hospitallers in England. The wealthy Lord Prior built Highbury manor as a substantial stone country lodging with a grange and barn.In 1381, during the Peasants' Revolt, Jack Straw led a mob of 20,000 rioters who "so offended by the wealth and haughtiness" of the Knights Hospitallers destroyed the manor house. The Lord Prior at the time, Robert Hales, who had taken refuge in the Tower of London, was captured and beheaded on Tower Hill. Jack Straw and some of his followers used the site as a temporary headquarters; consequently the derelict manor became known for the next 500 years as Jack Straw’s Castle. This should not be confused with the better known Jack Straw’s Castle, formerly a pub and now residential flats at Whitestone Ponds, Hampstead, which was named after the semi-legendary leader of the revolt.

Highbury
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
26 Highbury Park
Harlow, N5 1EY

20-72262339

Highbury is a district in the London Borough of Islington.HistoryEarly HighburyThe area now known as Islington was part of the larger manor of Tolentone, which is mentioned in the Domesday Book. Tolentone was owned by Ranulf brother of Ilger and included all the areas north and east of Canonbury and Holloway Road. The manor house was situated by what is now the east side of Hornsey Road near the junction with Seven Sisters Road. After the manor decayed, a new manor house was built in 1271 (see below) to the south-east; to differentiate it from the original manor and because it was on a hill, it was called Highbury, from which the area takes its name.The site for Highbury Manor was possibly used by a Roman garrison as a summer camp. During the construction of a new Highbury House in 1781, tiles were found that could have been Roman or Norman; unfortunately these have been lost.Highbury ManorOwnership of Highbury eventually passed to Alicia de Barrow, who in 1271 gave it to the Priory of St John of Jerusalem, also known as the Knights Hospitallers in England. The wealthy Lord Prior built Highbury manor as a substantial stone country lodging with a grange and barn.In 1381, during the Peasants' Revolt, Jack Straw led a mob of 20,000 rioters who "so offended by the wealth and haughtiness" of the Knights Hospitallers destroyed the manor house. The Lord Prior at the time, Robert Hales, who had taken refuge in the Tower of London, was captured and beheaded on Tower Hill. Jack Straw and some of his followers used the site as a temporary headquarters; consequently the derelict manor became known for the next 500 years as Jack Straw’s Castle. This should not be confused with the better known Jack Straw’s Castle, formerly a pub and now residential flats at Whitestone Ponds, Hampstead, which was named after the semi-legendary leader of the revolt.

Drayton Park railway station
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Drayton Park, Highbury
London, N5 1

0845 026 4700

Drayton Park railway station is a National Rail station in Highbury, in the London Borough of Islington. It is on the Northern City Line between Highbury & Islington and Finsbury Park stations; it is in Travelcard Zone 2.The station is operated by Great Northern. It is just off the Holloway Road near its southern end, close to the Liverpool Road junction. It stands in the shadow of Arsenal football club's Emirates Stadium, but is shut prior to weekend matches and after all matches due to safety concerns with handling fans on the station's narrow island platform.HistoryDrayton Park was opened by the Great Northern & City Railway (GN&CR) on 14 February 1904. The GN&CR was constructed to provide a route for Great Northern Railway (GNR) trains between the GNR station at Finsbury Park and the Metropolitan Railway (MR) and City & South London Railway (C&SLR) station at Moorgate in the City of London. With the exception of Drayton Park station and the former depot which are in a deep cutting, the railway was constructed in deep tube tunnel. The tunnels were constructed with a larger diameter than the other deep-tube railways to accommodate GNR main-line trains, but a dispute between the two companies prevented the GN&CR connecting its tunnels to the GNR platforms at Finsbury Park. The GN&CR tunnels instead terminated beneath the main-line station without a running connection to the surface, rolling stock accessing the line via a yard connection at Finsbury Park.

Drayton Park
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
66 Drayton Park
London, N5 1

3457-484950

Drayton Park est une rue de Londres située dans le borough londonien d'Islington, quartier de Highbury. Son code postal est N5. On y trouve le siège de l'Arsenal Football Club situé au numéro 75 ainsi que son stade de l'Emirates Stadium.Ce site est desservi par la gare de Drayton Park.Voir aussiLien externeDescription sur londontown.com

Drayton Park
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
66 Drayton Park
London, N5 1

3457-484950

Drayton Park est une rue de Londres située dans le borough londonien d'Islington, quartier de Highbury. Son code postal est N5. On y trouve le siège de l'Arsenal Football Club situé au numéro 75 ainsi que son stade de l'Emirates Stadium.Ce site est desservi par la gare de Drayton Park.Voir aussiLien externeDescription sur londontown.com

Drayton Park
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
184 Drayton Park
London, N5 1LU

Highbury Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Avenell Road
London, N51

Highbury Square is an apartment complex in Highbury, London. It was originally Arsenal Stadium: the home stadium of Arsenal F.C. until 2006 when they moved out and into the newly built Emirates Stadium nearby.HistoryThe building was originally constructed in 1913 and designed by Archibald Leitch as Arsenal Stadium in the Art Deco style. It remained the home of Arsenal for 93 years until 2006, when they moved into the new Emirates Stadium.The complex cost Arsenal £130 million to build. In 2009, Arsenal sold 150 apartments in Highbury Square to London & Stamford Property at a 20 per cent discount to market value because several buyers failed to complete apartment purchases. Arsenal cleared their debt on Highbury Square by 2010.RedevelopmentThe North Bank and Clock End were demolished while the older Grade II listed buildings of the East and West Stands remained as part of the development. The pitch was redeveloped into gardens. Several parts of Arsenal Stadium were retained including the marble halls, the bust of Herbert Chapman and the players' tunnel. It was opened officially in 2009, by Arsenal manager Arsène Wenger.DetailsHighbury Square has 650 flats. Former Arsenal player Robert Pirès owns one of the flats. Although it houses private residences, Highbury Square was due to have a public footpath through it. Drainage issues in 2010 prevented this footpath from being opened, which led to it being called a "gated community" by local councillors.

Highbury Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Avenell Road
London, N51

Highbury Square is an apartment complex in Highbury, London. It was originally Arsenal Stadium: the home stadium of Arsenal F.C. until 2006 when they moved out and into the newly built Emirates Stadium nearby.HistoryThe building was originally constructed in 1913 and designed by Archibald Leitch as Arsenal Stadium in the Art Deco style. It remained the home of Arsenal for 93 years until 2006, when they moved into the new Emirates Stadium.The complex cost Arsenal £130 million to build. In 2009, Arsenal sold 150 apartments in Highbury Square to London & Stamford Property at a 20 per cent discount to market value because several buyers failed to complete apartment purchases. Arsenal cleared their debt on Highbury Square by 2010.RedevelopmentThe North Bank and Clock End were demolished while the older Grade II listed buildings of the East and West Stands remained as part of the development. The pitch was redeveloped into gardens. Several parts of Arsenal Stadium were retained including the marble halls, the bust of Herbert Chapman and the players' tunnel. It was opened officially in 2009, by Arsenal manager Arsène Wenger.DetailsHighbury Square has 650 flats. Former Arsenal player Robert Pirès owns one of the flats. Although it houses private residences, Highbury Square was due to have a public footpath through it. Drainage issues in 2010 prevented this footpath from being opened, which led to it being called a "gated community" by local councillors.

Odeon Holloway
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
419-427 Holloway Road
London, N7 6

0871 224 4007

Studio Four
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
231 Stoke Newington Church Street
London, N169HP

02078129188

Landmark Near Highbury Fields

Union Chapel, Islington
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Compton Terrace
London, United Kingdom N1 2UN

+44 20 7226 1686

Union Chapel is a working church, live entertainment venue and charity drop-in centre for the homeless in Islington, London, England. Built in the late 19th century in the Gothic revival style, the church is Grade I-listed. It is at the top end of Upper Street, near Highbury Fields.The VenueThe church hosts live music and comedy events, and was voted London's Best Live Music Venue by readers of Time Out magazine in 2012.Margins Homelessness ProjectThe Margins Project, based in the Union Chapel, provides a range of support services to people facing homelessness, crisis and isolation. It operates a Sunday drop-in that provides meals, showers and laundry facilities. It also offers help with accessing housing, employment and health services and weekly art classes.Church in the ChapelUnion Chapel is a Congregational church, which describes itself as "liberal, inclusive, non-hierarchical, and non-conformist" and meets every Sunday for worship. The church is also open on Wednesday mornings for private prayer, and a Bible study group meets Wednesday lunchtime.HistoryThe congregation first met in 1799 in a house in Highbury Grove as a union of evangelical Anglicans and non-conformists, and moved to a previous building on the present site in Compton Terrace, just off Upper Street, in 1806. The current building is in the Victorian gothic style of architecture. It was designed by James Cubitt of Loughton, and built between 1874 and 1877, with further additions from 1877 to 1890, while Henry Allon was pastor. The chapel was used for a major scene in the 1982 film, Who Dares Wins. Since 1982, the charity Friends of Union Chapel has helped restore and preserve the church and organise activities. Behind the church is the large Sunday School, built on the Akron Plan.

Knipe Towers
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2A Crane Grove
London, United Kingdom N78LE

02077006977

Drayton Park
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
66 Drayton Park
London, United Kingdom N5 1

3457-484950

Drayton Park est une rue de Londres située dans le borough londonien d'Islington, quartier de Highbury. Son code postal est N5. On y trouve le siège de l'Arsenal Football Club situé au numéro 75 ainsi que son stade de l'Emirates Stadium.Ce site est desservi par la gare de Drayton Park.Voir aussiLien externeDescription sur londontown.com

Highbury Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Avenell Road
London, United Kingdom N51

Highbury Square is an apartment complex in Highbury, London. It was originally Arsenal Stadium: the home stadium of Arsenal F.C. until 2006 when they moved out and into the newly built Emirates Stadium nearby.HistoryThe building was originally constructed in 1913 and designed by Archibald Leitch as Arsenal Stadium in the Art Deco style. It remained the home of Arsenal for 93 years until 2006, when they moved into the new Emirates Stadium.The complex cost Arsenal £130 million to build. In 2009, Arsenal sold 150 apartments in Highbury Square to London & Stamford Property at a 20 per cent discount to market value because several buyers failed to complete apartment purchases. Arsenal cleared their debt on Highbury Square by 2010.RedevelopmentThe North Bank and Clock End were demolished while the older Grade II listed buildings of the East and West Stands remained as part of the development. The pitch was redeveloped into gardens. Several parts of Arsenal Stadium were retained including the marble halls, the bust of Herbert Chapman and the players' tunnel. It was opened officially in 2009, by Arsenal manager Arsène Wenger.DetailsHighbury Square has 650 flats. Former Arsenal player Robert Pirès owns one of the flats. Although it houses private residences, Highbury Square was due to have a public footpath through it. Drainage issues in 2010 prevented this footpath from being opened, which led to it being called a "gated community" by local councillors.