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Royal Courts of Justice, London | Tourist Information


hmcourts-service.gov.uk

Strand
London, United Kingdom WC2R 1

020 79476000

The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a court building in London which houses both the High Court and Court of Appeal of England and Wales. Designed by George Edmund Street, who died before it was completed, it is a large grey stone edifice in the Victorian Gothic style built in the 1870s and opened by Queen Victoria in 1882. It is one of the largest courts in Europe. It is located on the Strand within the City of Westminster, near the border with the City of London (Temple Bar). It is surrounded by the four Inns of Court, King's College London and the London School of Economics. The nearest London Underground stations are Chancery Lane and Temple.The courts within the building are open to the public, although there may be some restrictions depending upon the nature of the cases being heard. Those in court who do not have legal representation may receive some assistance within the building. There is a citizens' advice bureau based within the Main Hall which provides free, confidential and impartial advice by appointment to anyone who is a litigant in person in the courts. There is also a Personal Support Unit where litigants in person can receive emotional support and practical information about court proceedings.

Courthouse Near Royal Courts of Justice

The Royal Courts of Justice
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2A 2LL

020 79476000

Old Bailey
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
The Old Bailey
London, EC4M 7E

+44 (0) 20 7248 3277

Old Bailey
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
15 Old Bailey
London, EC4M 7

20-72483277

The Central Criminal Court of England and Wales, commonly known as the Old Bailey from the street on which it stands, is a court in London and one of a number of buildings housing the Crown Court. Part of the present building stands on the site of the medieval Newgate gaol, on a road named Old Bailey which follows the line of the City of London's fortified wall (or bailey), which runs from Ludgate Hill to the junction of Newgate Street and Holborn Viaduct.The Crown Court sitting at the Central Criminal Court deals with major criminal cases from within Greater London and, in exceptional cases, from other parts of England and Wales. Trials at the Old Bailey, as at other courts, are open to the public; however, they are subject to stringent security procedures.HistoryThe court originated as the sessions house of the Lord Mayor and Sheriffs of the City of London and of Middlesex. The original medieval court was first mentioned in 1585; it was next to the older Newgate gaol, and seems to have grown out of the endowment to improve the gaol and rooms for the Sheriffs, made possible by a gift from Richard Whittington. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and rebuilt in 1674, with the court open to the weather to prevent the spread of disease.

Supreme Court of the United Kingdom
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Parliament Square
London, SW1P 3

020 7960 1500

The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom is the supreme court in all matters under English and Welsh law, Northern Ireland law and Scottish civil law. It is the court of last resort and the highest appellate court in the United Kingdom, although the High Court of Justiciary remains the court of last resort for criminal law in Scotland. The Supreme Court also has jurisdiction to resolve disputes relating to devolution in the United Kingdom and concerning the legal powers of the three devolved governments (in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland) or laws made by the devolved legislatures.The Supreme Court was established by Part 3 of the Constitutional Reform Act 2005 and started work on 1 October 2009. It assumed the judicial functions of the House of Lords, which had been exercised by the Lords of Appeal in Ordinary (commonly called "Law Lords"), the 12 judges appointed as members of the House of Lords to carry out its judicial business. Its jurisdiction over devolution matters had previously been exercised by the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council.

Old Bailey Central Criminal Court
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Central Criminal Court, Old Bailey, London, EC4M 7EH
London, EC4M 7EH

020 7248 3277

The High Court
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Royal Courts of Justice, Strand
London, WC2R 1

Inner London Crown Court
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Sessions House, Newington Causeway
London, SE1 6

20-72343100

The Inner London Sessions House Crown Court, more commonly known as the Inner London Crown Court and distinct from the Inner London Magistrates Court, is a Crown Court building in London, United Kingdom. It is located in the Sessions House on Newington Causeway at the corner of Harper Road in the Newington area of the London Borough of Southwark in south London. There has been a judicial building on the site since 1794. The Sessions House was opened in 1917 and had replaced the Middlesex Sessions House in Clerkenwell Green by 1921. From the creation of the County of London in 1889 until 1913 work had been shared between the Middlesex Sessions House and an earlier building at the Newington site. The building was designated as a Crown Court venue in 1971 and was extended in 1974 to provide ten courts. Newington Gardens are immediately to the south east, formerly the location of Horsemonger Lane Gaol.

Iac Taylor House Tribunals
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
88 Rosebury Avenue
London, EC1R 4

Westminster Coroner's Court
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
65 Horseferry Road
London, SW1P 2ED

20-78024750

HM Coroner Her Majesty’s Coroner for the Inner West London is Dr Paul Knapman D.L . What is the role of the Coroner? The role of the Coroner is to record and investigate all sudden, unexpected and violent deaths and deaths whilst in lawful custody. You must report a sudden, violent or unexpected death to the Coroners Office. What happens when a death is reported to the Coroner? The Coroner may order a post-mortem examination to discover the cause of death. The Coroner may also hold an inquest, which is an investigation into the circumstances leading up to the death. What is the function of an inquest? The function of an inquest is to record: * Who the deceased was * When, where and how he or she came by the medical cause of death A conclusion is reached and the Coroner records the details required for the registration of the death. It is not the function of an inquest to determine any question of civil or criminal liability on the part of a named person. The Coroners HM Coroner: . Dr Paul Knapman Deputy Coroner: Dr Shirley Radcliffe Assistant Deputy Coroners: Dr Anthony Barton Mr Robert Prescott The Rev. Dr William Dolman The Rt.Hon. Lord Justice Scott Baker The Rt.Hon. Lady Justice Heather Hallett . Inner West London Coroner`s district deals with deaths within the City of /Westminster and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea at Westminster Coroner`s Court. Deaths in the London boroughs of Wandsworth and Merton are dealt with at the Battersea Coroner`s office. Telephone office hours (Mon – Fri): 8.30am – 1.00 pm 2.00pm – 3.30pm

City of Westminster Magistrates' Court
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
70 Horseferry Rd
London, SW1P 2AX

020 7805 1106

The City of Westminster Magistrates' Court was a magistrates' court located at 70 Horseferry Road, in the City of Westminster, London. It was originally called Horseferry Road Magistrates' Court, after the road in which it was sited. However, it was renamed in July 2006 following the closure of Bow Street Magistrates' Court. It served as the court where the Chief Magistrate of England and Wales sat, and all extradition and terrorism-related cases passed through the court. The court closed permanently on 22 September 2011, and was replaced on 27 September 2011 with Westminster Magistrates' Court, built on the site of Marylebone Magistrates' Court at 181 Marylebone Road.The court pictured has since been demolished, and replaced with a development of flats.HistoryThe court building, designed by C. A. Legerton and opened in 1974, was functional and "of minimal personality and minimal expression of function and purpose", according to Pevsner. It was opened as one of a series of three larger court houses, with the others at Camberwell Green and Highbury Corner. It had four courtrooms as opened and a further two were later added. The central location and proximity to New Scotland Yard caused the court to be involved in a number of high-profile cases.

Middlesex Guildhall
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Parliament Square, LONDON, SW1P 3BD
London, SW1P 3BD

The Middlesex Guildhall is the home of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom and of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. It stands on the south-west corner of Parliament Square in London.HistoryThe location in Parliament Square was the site of the belfry of Westminster Abbey and it was used as a market from 1750 to 1800. The justices of the City and Liberty of Westminster took it over and an octagonal guildhall with a Doric portico was constructed by Samuel Pepys Cockerell in 1805. In 1889 Westminster became part of the County of London, outside the county of Middlesex. In the division of property between the Middlesex and London county councils, the guildhall at Westminster went to Middlesex in exchange for the Middlesex Sessions House in Clerkenwell. A neo-Tudor guildhall was constructed on the site in 1893 by F. H. Pownall.The current building was built between 1912 and 1913, designed by J. S. Gibson, in what Pevsner called an "art nouveau gothic" style, and decorated with medieval-looking gargoyles and other architectural sculptures by Henry Charles Fehr. The county council and the Middlesex sessions were abolished in 1965 and the Guildhall continued to be used by the Greater London Quarter Sessions. After the abolition of the Quarter Sessions it was used as a Crown Court centre.

Old Bailey
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
15 Old Bailey
London, EC4M 7

20-72483277

La Central Criminal Court, in Inghilterra, conosciuta con il nome di Old Bailey è un edificio al centro di Londra, che assieme ad altri ospita la Corte della Corona, il Tribunale Penale Centrale di Londra, che giudica i principali casi criminali della Grande Londra e, in via eccezionale, di altre parti dell'Inghilterra. Sorge nel luogo nel quale si trovava la Prigione medievale di Newgate, in una strada denominata Old Bailey, che segue il percorso delle mura fortificate della City (dette bailey) e che ha dato il nome alla corte.Si trova tra Holborn Circus e la Cattedrale di Saint Paul.StoriaLa corte originale medioevale era situata presso le mura occidentale della City, ma venne distrutta dal grande incendio di Londra nel 1666. Venne ricostruita nel 1673, in un edificio a tre piani di tipo Open Air, per evitare che uno spazio chiuso aumentasse la propagazione di malattie come il tifo, che era diffuso tra i prigionieri.

Competition Appeal Tribunal
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Victoria House, Bloomsbury Pl
London, WC1A 2

020 7979 7979

Historical Place Near Royal Courts of Justice

Somerset House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2R 1LA

+44 (0)20 7845 4600

A unique part of the London cultural scene with a distinctive public programme including Skate, concerts, an open-air film season, a diverse range of temporary exhibitions focusing on contemporary culture, an extensive learning programme, free guided tours and 55 fountains that dance in the The Edmond J. Safra Fountain Court in summer. Somerset House currently attracts approximately 2.5 million visitors every year.

The London Dungeon
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
The London Dungeon, County Hall, Westminster Bridge Road
London, SE1 7PB

Situated in County Hall next to the Coca-Cola London Eye, the London Dungeon is a 110 minute journey through London's darkest history. The London Dungeon brings 1000 years of authentic London history to life with a unique mix of talented live actors, stunning special effects, edge of your seat surprises and two exciting thrill rides. Guests embark on a journey through a dramatic London landscape going back ten centuries. They are guided through ghastly plague-ridden streets, witness Guy Fawkes’ dramatic plot to blow up Parliament, travel back to Jack the Ripper’s bleak Whitechapel and walk beneath London’s foreboding medieval gates. Expect to meet Sweeney Todd, the infamous Barber, and his evil sidekick, Mrs Lovett alongside Jack the Ripper with one of his unfortunate victims Mary Jane Kelly. They will be joined by murderous monarch Henry VIII ‘virtually’ played by boisterous British acting giant, Brian Blessed, gunpowder plotter Guy Fawkes and a supporting cast of torturers, plague victims and dark jesters. Guests can also expect close encounters with non-human ‘talent’ including giant cockroaches and the Dungeon’s resident family of scurrying rats! As well as 19 shows, and innumerable unexpected surprises, the attraction will boast two state-of-the art thrill rides with high-tech surprises guaranteed to get adrenaline pumping. A fast flowing boat ride sees guests condemned by Henry VIII – played virtually by boisterous British acting legend Brian Blessed - to a turbulent journey along the dank River Thames towards execution. Whilst on a deadly dark drop ride they will literally be sentenced to ‘take the drop’ as they plunge three stories in the pitch dark. A chilling, screams-guaranteed, Whitechapel labyrinth will baffle guests as they try to escape ‘Jack’ and find their way out of the East End and a strange but fun journey through Balzelgette’s Victorian Sewer system will leave guests in a disorientated spin. At the end of your tour, join us in the Dungeon Tavern, a Victorian pub experience. Your first drink is on us!

Piccadilly Circus - London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Picadilly Circus
London, London W1D 7ET

London Trafalgar Square
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square, Westminster, London
London, WC2N 5DN

Windsor Castle
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Windsor Castle
Windsor, SL4 1NJ

+44 (0)20 7766 7304

Trafalgar Studios
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
14 Whitehall
London, SW1A 2

Trafalgar Studios, formerly the Whitehall Theatre until 2004, is a West End theatre in Whitehall, near Trafalgar Square, in the City of Westminster, London.Also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation, the building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. Studio 1, the larger of the two spaces with 380 seats, opened on 3 June 2004 with the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Othello. Studio 2, with 100 seats, opened in October 2005 with the play Cyprus.History1930 to 1996The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. It had 634 seats. The theatre opened on 29 September 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre's licensee. In November 1933 Henry Daniell appeared there as Portman in Afterwards. Hackett presented several other plays of his own before leaving in 1934, and the theatre built its reputation for modern comedies throughout the rest of the decade. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the West End. In 1942, The Whitehall Follies, featuring Phyllis Dixey, the first stripper to perform in the theatre district, opened with great fanfare and became an immediate success. Dixey leased the theatre and remained in it for the next five years.

The Royal Courts of Justice
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2A 2LL

020 79476000

Middle Temple
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Middle Temple Lane
London, EC4Y 7

02074274800

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, commonly known simply as Middle Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court exclusively entitled to call their members to the English Bar as barristers, the others being the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn. It is located in the wider Temple area of London, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.HistoryIn the 13th century, the Inns of Court originated as hostels and schools for student lawyers. The Middle Temple is the western part of "The Temple", the headquarters of the Knights Templar until they were dissolved in 1312. The Temple Church still stands as a "peculiar" (extra-diocesan) church of the Inner and Middle Temples.The Inns stopped being responsible for legal education in 1852, although they continue to provide training in areas such as advocacy and ethics for students, pupil barristers and newly qualified barristers. Most of the Inn is occupied by barristers' offices, known as chambers. One of the Middle Temple's main functions now is to provide education and support for new members to the profession. This is done through advocacy training, the provision of scholarships (over £1 million in 2011), subsidised accommodation both in the Temple and in Clapham, and by providing events where junior members may meet senior colleagues for help and advice.

Smithfield, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
31-32 Watling St
London, EC1A 2

020 7248 3151

Smithfield is a locality in the ward of Farringdon Without situated at the City of London's northwest in central London, England. The principal street of the area is West Smithfield.A number of valued City institutions are located in the area, such as St Bartholomew's Hospital, the Charterhouse, and Livery Halls notably those of the Butchers' and Haberdashers' Companies, but Smithfield is best known for its ancient meat market, dating from the 10th century, which is now London's only remaining wholesale market in continuous operation since medieval times. The area also contains London's oldest surviving church, St Bartholomew-the-Great, founded in 1123 AD.Smithfield has borne witness to many bloody executions of heretics and political rebels over the centuries, including major historical figures such as Scottish patriot Sir William Wallace and Wat Tyler, leader of the Peasants' Revolt, among many other religious reformers and dissenters.

Coram's Fields
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
93 Guilford Street
London, WC1N 1DN

020 7837 6138

Coram's Fields is a unique seven acre playground and park for children and young people living in or visiting London. It includes a Youth Centre, Children's Centre, Community Nursery, Sports Programme, play areas and animals. Coram's Fields is a registered charity (#302963) established in 1936.

Coram's Fields
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
93 Guildford Street
London, WC1N 1D

Coram's Fields is a large urban open space in the London borough of Camden in central London. It occupies seven acres in Bloomsbury and includes a children's playground, sand pits, a duck pond, a pets corner, café and nursery. Adults (defined as anyone over the age of 16) are only permitted to enter if accompanied by children (under 16).It is situated on the former site of the Foundling Hospital, established by Thomas Coram in what was then named Lamb's Conduit Field in 1739. The Foundling Hospital was relocated outside London in the 1920s, and the site was earmarked for redevelopment. However, campaigning and fundraising by local residents and a donation from the Harmsworth family of newspaper proprietors, led to the creation of the current park that opened in 1936. Coram's Fields is a Grade II listed site and is owned and run by an independent registered charity, officially named Coram's Fields and the Harmsworth Memorial Playground.Coram's Fields also offers three eight-a-side football pitches, two tennis courts, a stickball field and a basketball court.

Cleopatra's Needle
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Thames Embankment
London, WC2N 6

020 7234 5800

One Great George Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Great George Street
London, SW1P 3AA

+44 (0)20 7665 2323

One Great George Street is a four-domed grade II listed Edwardian building used as a conference and wedding venue just off Parliament Square in Westminster, London, England. The building is also the global headquarters of the Institution of Civil Engineers ; it was originally a venue for ICE members to relax, meet and have conferences, and became available for public events in 1989. It is near the Houses of Parliament, Westminster Abbey, and St James's Park.Building and historyFrom 1839 until 1913, ICE occupied numbers 24–26 Great George Street. In the mid-1880s the government proposed re-development of the area around Great George Street to provide more office space for government departments. This meant the demolition of ICE's first location and led ICE to move its headquarters across the road to numbers 1-7.One Great George Street was built for the ICE between 1910 and 1913 and was the result of an architectural competition won by James Miller, RSA (1860–1947). His winning design was priced at £77,126, with the other architects involved in the design competition including Brigg, Wolstenholme & Thornely, John Belcher, William Emerson, Charles Edward Barry and Thomas Collcutt. The contractor who built the building was Mowlem.

HMS President
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, EC4Y 0HJ

HMS Saxifrage was launched in 1918 as a Flower-class anti-submarine Q-ship. She was renamed HMS President in 1922 and moored permanently on the Thames as a Royal Navy Reserve drill ship. In 1982 she was sold to private owners, and having changed hands twice, now serves as a venue for conferences and functions, and serves as the offices for a number of media companies. Technically, she is now called HMS President (1918) to distinguish her from HMS President, the Royal Naval Reserve base in St Katharine Docks. She is one of the last three surviving Royal Navy warships of the First World War. She is also the sole representative of the first type of purpose built anti-submarine vessels, and is the ancestor of WW2 convoy escort sloops, which evolved into modern anti-submarine frigates.Design and constructionThe original Flower-class sloops (the Acacia, Azalea and Arabis classes) were all built in 1915 as fleet minesweeping vessels, with triple hulls at the bow to give extra protection against loss from mine damage. When submarine attacks on British merchant ships became a serious menace after 1916, the existing Flowers were transferred to convoy escort duty, and fitted with depth charges as well as 4.7-inch naval guns.

Honourable Society of Inner Temple
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Arbitration Rooms, 36-37 Essex St
London, WC2R 3AT

020 7413 0375

Sir John Soane's Museum
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
13 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, WC2A 3BP

Sir John Soane's Museum was formerly the home of the neo-classical architect John Soane. It holds many drawings and models of Soane's projects and the collections of paintings, drawings and antiquities that he assembled.The museum is located in Holborn, London, adjacent to Lincoln's Inn Fields. It is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.HistoryHousesSoane demolished and rebuilt three houses in succession on the north side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. He began with No. 12 (between 1792 and 1794), externally a plain brick house. After becoming Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy in 1806, Soane purchased No. 13, the house next door, today the Museum, and rebuilt it in two phases in 1808–09 and 1812.In 1808–09 he constructed his drawing office and "museum" on the site of the former stable block at the back, using primarily top lighting. In 1812 he rebuilt the front part of the site, adding a projecting Portland Stone facade to the basement, ground and first floor levels and the centre bay of the second floor. Originally this formed three open loggias, but Soane glazed the arches during his lifetime. Once he had moved into No. 13, Soane rented out his former home at No. 12 (on his death it was left to the nation along with No. 13, the intention being that the rental income would fund the running of the Museum).

Unilever House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
100 Victoria Embankment, Blackfriars
London, EC4Y 0DY

020 7822 5252

Unilever House is a Grade II listed office building in the Neoclassical Art Deco style, located on New Bridge Street, Victoria Embankment in Blackfriars, London. The building has a tall, curving frontage which overlooks Blackfriars Bridge on the north bank of the River Thames.The site of Unilever House was previously occupied by Bridewell Palace, a residence of Henry VIII, which later became a poorhouse and prison. These buildings were destroyed in 1864 making way for De Keyser's Royal Hotel. In 1920, Lord Leverhulme leased the site to build the London headquarters of his soap manufacturing company Lever Brothers, which became Unilever in 1930. Construction did not commence until 1929.ConstructionThe building design and construction is thought to be a collaboration between James Lomax-Simpson, a member of the Unilever Board, and John James Burnet and Thomas S. Tait, partners in the firm of Sir John Burnet and Partners. However, there is some uncertainty over the credit for the design; a note by Simpson claims exclusive credit, suggesting that Burnet and Tait only approved the final design. Burnet and Tait exhibited the design as a joint work with Simpson at the Royal Academy, and the drawings held at the City of London Record Office are signed by Burnet and Tait alone.

Temple, London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
2 Temple Place
London, IG8 7

20-85056687

The Temple is an area of central London, in the vicinity of Temple Church, It is one of the main legal districts of the capital and a notable centre for English law, both historically and in the present day. The Temple area of the City of London consists of the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple, which are two of the four Inns of Court and act as local authorities in place of the City of London Corporation within their areas.The Royal Courts of Justice are just to the north and Temple tube station is located to the west in the City of Westminster. The wider Temple area is roughly bound by the River Thames (the Victoria Embankment) to the south, Surrey Street to the west, Strand and Fleet Street to the north, and Carmelite Street and Whitefriars Street to the east.It contains many barristers' chambers, solicitors' offices, as well as some notable legal institutions such as the Employment Appeal Tribunal. The International Institute for Strategic Studies has its headquarters at Arundel House.

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Middle Temple Lane
London, EC4Y 9BT

020 7427 4800

A modern institution with a long and distinguished history, Middle Temple is a place of many parts. First and foremost, Middle Temple is one of the four Inns of Court which have the exclusive right to Call students to the Bar. The education and training of advocates lie at the heart of the Inn, but we are also a professional society for our membership worldwide; and we maintain a heritage estate in central London housing chambers from which barristers practise. Several important activities support Middle Temple’s core functions. In addition to teaching, training and the management of the Inn’s property portfolio, these include the provision of around £1 million per year in support of our students and other junior members; the running of a modern Law library and an historic archive; the oversight (with Inner Temple) of the historic Temple Church; and the management of a commercial events business. All of these activities represent the 21st century Middle Temple, but training and education will always be at its core. Our core purposes The Inn’s estate on the banks of the Thames was provided by Letters Patent to ‘The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple’ in 1608 on condition that it would always be used for the joint objectives of educating and accommodating those practising or training in the Law. Over four hundred years later, Middle Temple’s core purposes are still based on these founding principles: • The education and training of students and barristers; and the promotion of diversity and access to the Bar by the provision of financial support to students and all other means. • The maintenance of the Inn’s estate and its historic heritage; and the provision of professional accommodation for barristers and other services and facilities in support of the Inn’s core purposes. • The achievement of the highest standards of advocacy in support of the judiciary and the rule of law; the promotion of the ethos of the Bar; and the maintenance of the highest professional standards in the public interest. Who we are Middle Temple’s membership comprises students, barristers and senior members of the Bar and Judiciary. Members of the Inn’s Governing Body (Parliament) are known as Masters of the Bench. The Chairman is the Treasurer, who is elected each year for a 12-month period of office. The Chief Executive, who is a full-time permanent member of the Inn’s staff, is the Under Treasurer. A staff of 90 permanent employees assist the Under Treasurer with the day-to-day management and operation of the Inn, along with part-time staff who support our corporate events.

Old Bailey Central Criminal Court
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Central Criminal Court, Old Bailey, London, EC4M 7EH
London, EC4M 7EH

020 7248 3277

Summer Set House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2R 1LA

+442078454600

Magpie & Stump
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
18 Old Bailey
London, EC4M 7EP

0207 248 5085

Saddlers' Hall
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
40 Gutter Lane
London, EC2V 6BR

0207 726 8661

The British Museum Friends
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Great Russell Street
London, WC1B 3DG

0207 323 8195

Bush House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
61 Aldwych
London, WC2B 4

Bush House is a Grade II listed building between Aldwych and the Strand in Central London at the southern end of Kingsway.Now part of the Strand Campus of King's College London, Bush House previously served as the headquarters of BBC World Service. The broadcast from Bush House lasted for 70 years, from Winter 1941 to Summer 2012. The final BBC broadcast from Bush House was the 12pm BST English bulletin on 12 July 2012. The BBC World Service is now housed in Broadcasting House in Portland Place. King's College London has taken over the premises since acquiring the lease in 2015.HistorySections of Bush House were completed and opened over a period of 10 years: Centre Block was opened in 1925, North-West Wing in 1928, North-East Wing in 1929, South-East Wing in 1930, and South-West Wing in 1935. The full building complex was completed in 1935.The building was commissioned, designed and originally owned by American individuals and companies. Irving T. Bush gained approval for his plans for the building in 1919, which was planned as a major new trade centre and designed by American architect Harvey Wiley Corbett. The construction was undertaken by John Mowlem & Co. At least one stonemason, Frederick Horton (died 17 Sep 1920, age 50) is known to have died during the construction, but overall the building had a very good safety record.

Mecklenburg Square
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
WC1N 2AN
London,

Staple Inn
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
11Staples Yard
London, WC1V 7

Staple Inn is a Tudor building on the south side of High Holborn street in the City of London, London, England. Located near Chancery Lane tube station, it is used as the London venue for meetings of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, and is the last surviving Inn of Chancery. It was designated a grade I listed building in 1974.HistoryIt was originally attached to Gray's Inn, which is one of the four Inns of Court. The Inns of Chancery fell into decay in the 19th century. All of them were dissolved, and most were demolished. Staple Inn is the only one which survives largely intact. It was an extra-parochial area until 1858 and then a civil parish. It became part of the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn in 1900 and was abolished in 1930.On 1 April 1994 boundary changes meant that the Inn was transferred from the London Borough of Camden to the City of London (and the City ward of Farringdon Without).It was the model for the fictitious Inn of Court "Bacon's Inn" in Arthur Moore's 1904 novel 'Archers of the Long Bow'. The ancient switch-tailed double pump referred to was replaced in 1937 by a mock single pump, to mark the site.

St Vedast Foster Lane
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
4 Foster Lane
London, EC2V 6

020 760 63998

Saint Vedast Foster Lane or Saint Vedast-alias-Foster, a church in Foster Lane, in the City of London, is dedicated to St. Vedast (Foster is an Anglicisation of the name "Vaast", as the saint is known in continental Europe), a French saint whose cult arrived in England through contacts with Augustinian clergy.

St Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
St Andrew's Hill & Queen Victoria Street
London, EC4V 5DE

+44 20 7329 3632

St. Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe is a Church of England church located on Queen Victoria Street, London in the City of London, near Blackfriars station.HistoryFirst mentioned around 1170, St. Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe was almost certainly founded considerably earlier. During the 13th century the church was a part of Baynard's Castle, an ancient royal residence. In 1361, Edward III moved his Royal Wardrobe (a storehouse for Royal accoutrements, housing arms and clothing among other personal items of the Crown) from the Tower of London to just north of the church. It was from this association that the church acquired its unique name.The Wardrobe and the church, however, were both lost in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Of the 51 churches designed by Sir Christopher Wren after the Great Fire, St. Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe is among the simplest of his designs; it was rebuilt in 1695.The church was again destroyed during the London blitz by German bombing; only the tower and walls survived. It was rebuilt and rededicated in 1961.AdvowsonThe advowson of St Andrew's was anciently held by the family of FitzWalter to which it probably came from the holding by Robert Fitzwalter (d.1235) of the office of Constable of Baynard's Castle. In 1417 it was held by Thomas de Berkeley, 5th Baron Berkeley (d.1417), as his charter dated 24 June 1417 appointing feoffees to his estate records. Berkeley's Inn, the town house of that family stood nearby, at the south end of Adle Street, against Puddle Wharf, as reported by John Stow in his "Survey of London" (1598)

Landmark Near Royal Courts of Justice

The Waldorf Hilton London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Aldwych
London, WC2B 4DD

02078362400

The Waldorf Hilton, an iconic hotel, is located in London’s West End in the Theatreland district. Take a 5-minute drive to the exclusive boutiques of Covent Garden and find plenty to explore. Situated 2 miles from London’s financial center, this central London hotel is ideal for a corporate visit – host a meeting in one of the seven WiFi-enabled function rooms, or keep in touch via the 24-hour business center. Get some rest in a stylish, contemporary guest room. Each spacious room features a plasma TV, WiFi and Edwardian marble washstand. Upgrade to a Suite for separate living and dining areas. After a day of exploring, surf the net with high-speed internet access or curl up in front of a movie on the flat-screen TV. Stay active by swimming some laps of the indoor pool. Make the most of this West End hotel’s commitment to culinary excellence; enjoy a delicious meal in the Homage Grand Salon restaurant or take traditional afternoon tea in the Homage Private Lounge. Head to the popular Good Godfrey's Bar for lunch and afternoon tea during the day, or a sophisticated cocktail as evening approaches.With a 24-hour Concierge desk to help you plan your stay, you can really make the most out of your time in London.

Novello Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
5 Aldwych
London, WC2B 4LD

20-79308800

The Novello Theatre is a West End theatre on Aldwych, in the City of Westminster.HistoryThe theatre was built as one of a pair with the Aldwych Theatre on either side of the The Waldorf Hilton, London, both being designed by W. G. R. Sprague. The theatre was opened by The Shubert Organization as the Waldorf Theatre on 22 May 1905, and was renamed the Strand Theatre, in 1909. It was again renamed as the Whitney Theatre in 1911, before again becoming the Strand Theatre in 1913. In 2005, the theatre was renamed by its owners (Delfont Mackintosh Theatres) the Novello Theatre in honour of Ivor Novello, who lived in a flat above the theatre from 1913 to 1951.The black comedy Arsenic and Old Lace had a run of 1337 performances here in the 1940s, and Sailor Beware! ran for 1231 performances from 1955. Stephen Sondheim's musical A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum opened here in 1963, running for nearly two years. In 1971, the comedy No Sex Please, We're British opened here, remaining for over 10 years of its 16-year run until it transferred to the Garrick Theatre in 1982.

Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
145 Fleet Street
London, EC4A 2

020 7353 6170

Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese is a Grade II listed public house at 145 Fleet Street, on Wine Office Court, City of London, EC4A 2BU.It is on the Campaign for Real Ale's National Inventory of Historic Pub Interiors.AgeYe Olde Cheshire Cheese is one of a number of pubs in London to have been rebuilt shortly after the Great Fire of 1666. There has been a pub at this location since 1538. While there are several older pubs which have survived because they were beyond the reach of the fire, or like The Tipperary on the opposite side of Fleet Street because they were made of stone, this pub continues to attract interest due to the curious lack of natural lighting inside which generates its own gloomy charm.Some of the interior wood panelling is nineteenth century, some older, perhaps original. The vaulted cellars are thought to belong to a 13th-century Carmelite monastery which once occupied the site. The entrance to this pub is situated in a narrow alleyway and is very unassuming, yet once inside visitors will realise that the pub occupies a lot of floor space and has numerous bars and gloomy rooms. In winter, open fireplaces are used to keep the interior warm. In the bar room are posted plaques showing famous people who were regulars.The pub is currently owned and operated by the Samuel Smith Brewery.

Middle Temple
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Middle Temple Lane
London, EC4Y 7

02074274800

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, commonly known simply as Middle Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court exclusively entitled to call their members to the English Bar as barristers, the others being the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn. It is located in the wider Temple area of London, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.HistoryIn the 13th century, the Inns of Court originated as hostels and schools for student lawyers. The Middle Temple is the western part of "The Temple", the headquarters of the Knights Templar until they were dissolved in 1312. The Temple Church still stands as a "peculiar" (extra-diocesan) church of the Inner and Middle Temples.The Inns stopped being responsible for legal education in 1852, although they continue to provide training in areas such as advocacy and ethics for students, pupil barristers and newly qualified barristers. Most of the Inn is occupied by barristers' offices, known as chambers. One of the Middle Temple's main functions now is to provide education and support for new members to the profession. This is done through advocacy training, the provision of scholarships (over £1 million in 2011), subsidised accommodation both in the Temple and in Clapham, and by providing events where junior members may meet senior colleagues for help and advice.

Middle Temple
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Middle Temple Lane
London, EC4Y 7

02074274800

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, commonly known simply as Middle Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court exclusively entitled to call their members to the English Bar as barristers, the others being the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn. It is located in the wider Temple area of London, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.HistoryIn the 13th century, the Inns of Court originated as hostels and schools for student lawyers. The Middle Temple is the western part of "The Temple", the headquarters of the Knights Templar until they were dissolved in 1312. The Temple Church still stands as a "peculiar" (extra-diocesan) church of the Inner and Middle Temples.The Inns stopped being responsible for legal education in 1852, although they continue to provide training in areas such as advocacy and ethics for students, pupil barristers and newly qualified barristers. Most of the Inn is occupied by barristers' offices, known as chambers. One of the Middle Temple's main functions now is to provide education and support for new members to the profession. This is done through advocacy training, the provision of scholarships (over £1 million in 2011), subsidised accommodation both in the Temple and in Clapham, and by providing events where junior members may meet senior colleagues for help and advice.

High Commission of Australia, London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Australia House, Strand, London WC2B 4LA
London, WC2B 4

+44 (0) 20 7379 4334

The High Commission of Australia in London is the diplomatic mission of Australia in the United Kingdom. It is located in Australia House, a Grade II listed building. It is both Australia's first diplomatic mission and the longest continuously occupied diplomatic mission in the United Kingdom.HistoryA major landmark on Strand, London, construction on the building by the Dove Brothers commenced in 1913, but shipping problems caused by World War I delayed completion. It was officially opened by King George V in a ceremony on 3 August 1918 attended by the Australian Prime Minister William Morris Hughes. The cost of the triangular shaped land was £379,756 when purchased by the Commonwealth of Australia in 1912 and building and other associated costs brought total expenditure to about £1 million. The building was designed by Scottish architects, Alexander Marshall Mackenzie and his son, Alexander George Robertson Mackenzie following an architectural competition, the judges of which included Bertram Mackennal, John Longstaff, George Washington Lambert, Fred Leist and Arthur Streeton. The Commonwealth of Australia's chief architect, John Smith Murdoch, travelled to London to work with the Mackenzie firm on the building.

High Commission of Australia, London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Australia House, Strand, London WC2B 4LA
London, WC2B 4

+44 (0) 20 7379 4334

The High Commission of Australia in London is the diplomatic mission of Australia in the United Kingdom. It is located in Australia House, a Grade II listed building. It is both Australia's first diplomatic mission and the longest continuously occupied diplomatic mission in the United Kingdom.HistoryA major landmark on Strand, London, construction on the building by the Dove Brothers commenced in 1913, but shipping problems caused by World War I delayed completion. It was officially opened by King George V in a ceremony on 3 August 1918 attended by the Australian Prime Minister William Morris Hughes. The cost of the triangular shaped land was £379,756 when purchased by the Commonwealth of Australia in 1912 and building and other associated costs brought total expenditure to about £1 million. The building was designed by Scottish architects, Alexander Marshall Mackenzie and his son, Alexander George Robertson Mackenzie following an architectural competition, the judges of which included Bertram Mackennal, John Longstaff, George Washington Lambert, Fred Leist and Arthur Streeton. The Commonwealth of Australia's chief architect, John Smith Murdoch, travelled to London to work with the Mackenzie firm on the building.

Lincoln's Inn
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Newman's Row, London WC2A 3TL
London, WC2A 3TL

The Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn is one of the four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar. It is recognised to be one of the world's most prestigious professional bodies of judges and lawyers. It is the largest Inn and it covers 11acre. The other three are Middle Temple, Inner Temple and Gray's Inn. The Inn is believed to be named after Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln. The Inn is also well known for its large garden and library, which have existed since 1422.Lincoln's Inn is situated in Holborn, in the London Borough of Camden, just on the border with the City of London and the City of Westminster, and across the road from London School of Economics and Political Science, Royal Courts of Justice and King's College London's Maughan Library. The nearest tube station is Holborn tube station or Chancery Lane.

Lincoln's Inn
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Newman's Row, London WC2A 3TL
London, WC2A 3TL

The Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn is one of the four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar. It is recognised to be one of the world's most prestigious professional bodies of judges and lawyers. It is the largest Inn and it covers 11acre. The other three are Middle Temple, Inner Temple and Gray's Inn. The Inn is believed to be named after Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln. The Inn is also well known for its large garden and library, which have existed since 1422.Lincoln's Inn is situated in Holborn, in the London Borough of Camden, just on the border with the City of London and the City of Westminster, and across the road from London School of Economics and Political Science, Royal Courts of Justice and King's College London's Maughan Library. The nearest tube station is Holborn tube station or Chancery Lane.

One Great George Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Great George Street
London, SW1P 3AA

+44 (0)20 7665 2323

One Great George Street is a four-domed grade II listed Edwardian building used as a conference and wedding venue just off Parliament Square in Westminster, London, England. The building is also the global headquarters of the Institution of Civil Engineers ; it was originally a venue for ICE members to relax, meet and have conferences, and became available for public events in 1989. It is near the Houses of Parliament, Westminster Abbey, and St James's Park.Building and historyFrom 1839 until 1913, ICE occupied numbers 24–26 Great George Street. In the mid-1880s the government proposed re-development of the area around Great George Street to provide more office space for government departments. This meant the demolition of ICE's first location and led ICE to move its headquarters across the road to numbers 1-7.One Great George Street was built for the ICE between 1910 and 1913 and was the result of an architectural competition won by James Miller, RSA (1860–1947). His winning design was priced at £77,126, with the other architects involved in the design competition including Brigg, Wolstenholme & Thornely, John Belcher, William Emerson, Charles Edward Barry and Thomas Collcutt. The contractor who built the building was Mowlem.

HMS President
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, EC4Y 0HJ

HMS Saxifrage was launched in 1918 as a Flower-class anti-submarine Q-ship. She was renamed HMS President in 1922 and moored permanently on the Thames as a Royal Navy Reserve drill ship. In 1982 she was sold to private owners, and having changed hands twice, now serves as a venue for conferences and functions, and serves as the offices for a number of media companies. Technically, she is now called HMS President (1918) to distinguish her from HMS President, the Royal Naval Reserve base in St Katharine Docks. She is one of the last three surviving Royal Navy warships of the First World War. She is also the sole representative of the first type of purpose built anti-submarine vessels, and is the ancestor of WW2 convoy escort sloops, which evolved into modern anti-submarine frigates.Design and constructionThe original Flower-class sloops (the Acacia, Azalea and Arabis classes) were all built in 1915 as fleet minesweeping vessels, with triple hulls at the bow to give extra protection against loss from mine damage. When submarine attacks on British merchant ships became a serious menace after 1916, the existing Flowers were transferred to convoy escort duty, and fitted with depth charges as well as 4.7-inch naval guns.

Maughan Library
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
100-113 Chancery Lane
London, WC2A 1LR

020 7848 2424

The Maughan Library is the main university research library of King's College London, forming part of the Strand Campus. A 19th-century neo-Gothic building located on Chancery Lane in the City of London, it was formerly the home to the headquarters of the Public Record Office, known as the "strong-box of the Empire", and was acquired by the university in 2001. Following a £35m renovation the Maughan is the largest new university library in the United Kingdom since World War II.Designed by Sir James Pennethorne and constructed in 1851, with further extensions made between 1868 and 1900, it is a Grade II* listed building. Inside the library is a dodecagonal reading room, inspired by that of the British Museum, and a former medieval chapel, now an exhibition space showcasing the special collections of the library. The library was named in honour of Sir Deryck Maughan, an alumnus of the university.HistoryEarly historyThe library building seen today was built in 1851, however, its roots date back to the 13th century.

Temple, London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
2 Temple Place
London, IG8 7

20-85056687

The Temple is an area of central London, in the vicinity of Temple Church, It is one of the main legal districts of the capital and a notable centre for English law, both historically and in the present day. The Temple area of the City of London consists of the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple, which are two of the four Inns of Court and act as local authorities in place of the City of London Corporation within their areas.The Royal Courts of Justice are just to the north and Temple tube station is located to the west in the City of Westminster. The wider Temple area is roughly bound by the River Thames (the Victoria Embankment) to the south, Surrey Street to the west, Strand and Fleet Street to the north, and Carmelite Street and Whitefriars Street to the east.It contains many barristers' chambers, solicitors' offices, as well as some notable legal institutions such as the Employment Appeal Tribunal. The International Institute for Strategic Studies has its headquarters at Arundel House.

St Clement Danes
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
The Strand
London, WC2R 1

020 7242 8282

St Clement Danes is an Anglican church in the City of Westminster, London. It is situated outside the Royal Courts of Justice on the Strand. Although the first church on the site was reputedly founded in the 9th century by the Danes, the current building was completed in 1682 by Sir Christopher Wren. Wren's building was gutted during the Blitz and not restored until 1958, when it was adapted to its current function as the central church of the Royal Air Force.The church is sometimes claimed to be the one featured in the nursery rhyme Oranges and Lemons and the bells do indeed play that tune. However, St Clement Eastcheap, in the City of London, also claims to be the church from the rhyme. St Clement Danes is known as one of the two 'Island Churches', the other being St Mary-le-Strand.

Royal College of Surgeons
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
35-43 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, WC2A 2HD

44 (0) 20 7405 3474

A Royal College of Surgeons or Royal Surgical College is a type of organisation found in many present and former members of the Commonwealth of Nations. These organisations are dedicated to excellence in surgery, and are responsible for training surgeons and setting their examinations. In this context, the term chartered implies the awarding of a Royal charter.HistoryThe origins of the first Royal College of Surgeons go back to the fourteenth century with the foundation of the 'Guild of Surgeons Within the City of London'. There was dispute between the surgeons and barber surgeons until an agreement was signed between them in 1493, giving the fellowship of surgeons the power of incorporation. This was followed in 1505 by the incorporation of the Barber Surgeons of Edinburgh as a Craft Guild of Edinburgh. This body was granted a royal charter in 1506 by King James IV of Scotland. It was followed by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, royally chartered by James VI in 1599, as the Glasgow Faculty.The union in London was formalised further in 1540 by Henry VIII of England between the Worshipful Company of Barbers (incorporated 1462) and the Guild of Surgeons to form the Company of Barber-Surgeons. In 1745 the surgeons broke away from the barbers to form the Company of Surgeons. In 1800 the Company was granted a Royal Charter to become the Royal College of Surgeons in London. A further charter in 1843 granted it the present title of the Royal College of Surgeons of England.

St Mary le Strand
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2R 1

+44 (0) 20 7836 3126

St Mary le Strand is a Church of England church at the eastern end of the Strand in the City of Westminster, London. It lies within the Deanery of Westminster (St Margaret) within the Diocese of London. The church stands on what is now a traffic island to the north of Somerset House, King's College London's Strand campus, and south of Bush House (now also part of King's College London). It is the official church of the Women's Royal Naval Service, and has a book of remembrance for members who have died in service. The nearest tube station is Temple, with the now-closed Aldwych station nearly opposite the church. It is known as one of the two 'Island Churches', the other being St Clement Danes.HistoryThe church is the second to have been called St Mary le Strand, the first having been situated a short distance to the south. The date of its foundation is unclear but it was mentioned in a judgment of 1222, when it was called the Church of the Innocents, or St Mary and the Innocents. It was pulled down in 1549 by Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset to make way for Somerset House. The parishioners were promised a new church, which was never built, forcing them to move to the nearby church of St Clement Danes and afterwards to the Savoy Chapel. The site now occupied by the modern church was formerly occupied by a great maypole which had been the scene of May Day festivities in the 16th and 17th century but was severely decayed by the early 18th century.

Bush House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
61 Aldwych
London, WC2B 4

Bush House is a Grade II listed building between Aldwych and the Strand in Central London at the southern end of Kingsway.Now part of the Strand Campus of King's College London, Bush House previously served as the headquarters of BBC World Service. The broadcast from Bush House lasted for 70 years, from Winter 1941 to Summer 2012. The final BBC broadcast from Bush House was the 12pm BST English bulletin on 12 July 2012. The BBC World Service is now housed in Broadcasting House in Portland Place. King's College London has taken over the premises since acquiring the lease in 2015.HistorySections of Bush House were completed and opened over a period of 10 years: Centre Block was opened in 1925, North-West Wing in 1928, North-East Wing in 1929, South-East Wing in 1930, and South-West Wing in 1935. The full building complex was completed in 1935.The building was commissioned, designed and originally owned by American individuals and companies. Irving T. Bush gained approval for his plans for the building in 1919, which was planned as a major new trade centre and designed by American architect Harvey Wiley Corbett. The construction was undertaken by John Mowlem & Co. At least one stonemason, Frederick Horton (died 17 Sep 1920, age 50) is known to have died during the construction, but overall the building had a very good safety record.

St Dunstan-in-the-West
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
186a Fleet St
London, EC4A 2

020 7405 1929

The Guild Church of St Dunstan-in-the-West is in Fleet Street in the City of London. It is dedicated to a former Bishop of London and Archbishop of Canterbury. The church is of medieval origin, although the present building, with an octagonal nave, was constructed in the 1830s to the designs of John Shaw.HistoryMedieval churchFirst founded between AD 988 and 1070, there is a possibility that a church on this site was one of the Lundenwic strand settlement churches, like St Martin in the Fields, the first St Mary le Strand, St Clement Danes and St Brides, which may pre-date any within the walls of the city. It is not known exactly when the original church was built, but it was possibly erected by Saint Dunstan himself, or priests who knew him well. It was first mentioned in written records in 1185. King Henry III gained possession of it and its endowments from Westminster Abbey by 1237 and then granted these and the advowson to the "House of Converts" i.e. of the converted Jews, which led to its neglect of its parochial responsibilities. The House of Converts was eventually transformed into the Court of the Master of the Rolls.William Tyndale, the celebrated translator of the Bible, was a lecturer at the church and sermons were given by the poet John Donne. Samuel Pepys mentions the church in his diary. The church narrowly escaped the Great Fire of London in 1666. The Dean of Westminster roused 40 scholars from Westminster School in the middle of the night, who formed a fire brigade which extinguished the flames with buckets of water to only three doors away.

Kingsway, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
36-38 Kingsway
London,

Kingsway is a major road in central London, designated as part of the A4200. It runs from High Holborn, at its north end in the London Borough of Camden, and meets Aldwych in the south in the City of Westminster at Bush House. It was built in the 1900s. Together Kingsway and Aldwych form one of the major north-south routes through central London linking the ancient east-west routes of High Holborn and Strand.HistoryThe road was purpose-built as part of a major redevelopment of the area in the 1900s. Its route cleared away the maze of small streets in Holborn such as Little Queen Street and the surrounding slum dwellings. However Holy Trinity Church, which was built in Little Queen Street was spared, whereas the Sardinian Embassy Chapel, an important Roman Catholic church attached to the Embassy of the Kingdom of Sardinia, was demolished to make way for the new street.Plans were published by London County Council in 1898 and the road was formally opened in 1905. It is one of the broadest streets in central London at wide. There were several proposed names for the new street, including King Edward VII Street, Empire Avenue, Imperial Avenue and Connecticut Avenue. The name "Kingsway" was in honour of King Edward VII, who opened the street.

Kingsway, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
36-38 Kingsway
London,

Kingsway is a major road in central London, designated as part of the A4200. It runs from High Holborn, at its north end in the London Borough of Camden, and meets Aldwych in the south in the City of Westminster at Bush House. It was built in the 1900s. Together Kingsway and Aldwych form one of the major north-south routes through central London linking the ancient east-west routes of High Holborn and Strand.HistoryThe road was purpose-built as part of a major redevelopment of the area in the 1900s. Its route cleared away the maze of small streets in Holborn such as Little Queen Street and the surrounding slum dwellings. However Holy Trinity Church, which was built in Little Queen Street was spared, whereas the Sardinian Embassy Chapel, an important Roman Catholic church attached to the Embassy of the Kingdom of Sardinia, was demolished to make way for the new street.Plans were published by London County Council in 1898 and the road was formally opened in 1905. It is one of the broadest streets in central London at wide. There were several proposed names for the new street, including King Edward VII Street, Empire Avenue, Imperial Avenue and Connecticut Avenue. The name "Kingsway" was in honour of King Edward VII, who opened the street.

Temple Bar, London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Milford Lane
London, EC4M 7EJ

Temple Bar was the principal ceremonial entrance to the City of London on its western side from the City of Westminster. It is situated on the historic royal ceremonial route from the Tower of London to the Palace of Westminster, the two chief residences of the mediaeval English monarchs, and from the Palace of Westminster to St Paul's Cathedral. The road east of Temple Bar and within the City is Fleet Street, the road to the west, in Westminster, is The Strand. At Temple Bar the Corporation of the City of London formerly erected a barrier to regulate trade into the City. The 19th century Royal Courts of Justice are located next to it on its north side, having been moved from Westminster Hall. To its south is the Temple Church and the Inner Temple and Middle Temple Inns of Court. As the most important entrance to the City of London from Westminster, it was formerly long the custom for the monarch to halt at Temple Bar before entering the City of London, in order for the Lord Mayor to offer up the Corporation's pearl-encrusted Sword of State as a token of loyalty. The term Temple Bar strictly refers to a notional bar or barrier across the route, but is commonly used to refer to the 17th century ornamental Baroque arched gateway designed by Christopher Wren which spanned the road until its removal in 1878. Wren's arch was preserved and was re-erected in 2004 in the City, in Paternoster Square next to St Paul's Cathedral.

The Dickson Poon School of Law
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Somerset House, Strand, WC2R 1LA
London, WC2R 2

03028787141

The Dickson Poon School of Law is the Law school of King's College London, and one of the nine Schools of Study of the university. It is situated on the Strand in the East Wing of Somerset House, close to law firms, the Royal Courts of Justice and the four Inns of Court. The Dickson Poon School of Law is one of the world's premier Law schools and is ranked 17th in the world in the QS University Rankings by Subject 2016. On 18 December 2014, it was announced that The Dickson Poon School of Law was ranked top in the UK for world-leading research in the Research Excellence Framework 2014. The School has the highest GPA of all UK Law schools, with the highest quality submission and the highest proportion of world-leading 4* research.Following a gift of £20 million by Sir Dickson Poon, the School was renamed and the most generous scholarship for Law in the UK and Europe was founded to strengthen its place as a global legal powerhouse. In early 2016, students from The Dickson Poon School of Law beat over 550 Law schools from over 80 countries to win the 57th annual UK championships of the Philip C. Jessup International Moot Court Competition, which is one of the largest moot court competitions in the world.The Dean of the school is David Caron, formerly of the University of California, Berkeley. Caron is the first Dean of the School and his appointment follows the renaming of the school and its new focus on Transnational law. The school is also one of the ten international Law schools that are members of the Center for Transnational Legal Studies . Caron describes the typical graduate of the school as "a transnational, global, lawyer with roots in the historic tradition of the English common law that has influenced, and in turn been influenced by, much of the world, and in the more recent tradition of European Union law. They 'think global' because we teach them with a transnational perspective."

Staple Inn
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
11Staples Yard
London, WC1V 7

Staple Inn is a Tudor building on the south side of High Holborn street in the City of London, London, England. Located near Chancery Lane tube station, it is used as the London venue for meetings of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, and is the last surviving Inn of Chancery. It was designated a grade I listed building in 1974.HistoryIt was originally attached to Gray's Inn, which is one of the four Inns of Court. The Inns of Chancery fell into decay in the 19th century. All of them were dissolved, and most were demolished. Staple Inn is the only one which survives largely intact. It was an extra-parochial area until 1858 and then a civil parish. It became part of the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn in 1900 and was abolished in 1930.On 1 April 1994 boundary changes meant that the Inn was transferred from the London Borough of Camden to the City of London (and the City ward of Farringdon Without).It was the model for the fictitious Inn of Court "Bacon's Inn" in Arthur Moore's 1904 novel 'Archers of the Long Bow'. The ancient switch-tailed double pump referred to was replaced in 1937 by a mock single pump, to mark the site.

Chancery Lane
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
46 Grays Inn Rd
London,

Chancery Lane è una strada della città di Londra che fa da confine tra due borghi londinesi, ossia la Città di Westminster e il London Borough of Camden.EtimologiaIl nome di Chancery Lane si riferisce al palazzo di Chancellor, il quale sorge nei pressi della strada.Cenni storiciChancery Lane è stata costruita dai cavalieri templari qualche tempo prima del 1161 per poter facilmente arrivare alle loro proprietà, ubicate a sud di Fleet Street, nell'odierna Temple. Precedentemente la strada, come già accennato, era conosciuta sotto il nome di Chancelar Lane e, più tardi, Chancellor Lane.Nella strada era localizzata anche una delle quattro antiche Inns of Court, la Sergent's Inn. Inoltre, secondo alcune fonti, a Chancery Lane era situata anche un dormitorio per ebrei convertiti fondato nel 1233 da Enrico III d'Inghilterra. Sempre Enrico III, nello stesso anno, fondò una sinagoga adibita all'uso degli ebrei del dormitorio.EdificiSorgono lungo il tracciato di Chancery Lane: Trasporti30px Metropolitana di LondraVicino Chancery Lane è situata l'omonima stazione della metropolitana di Londra, che per l'appunto si chiama Chancery Lane. Altre stazioni vicine alla strada sono quelle di Temple e Holborn.

Chancery Lane
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
46 Grays Inn Rd
London,

Chancery Lane è una strada della città di Londra che fa da confine tra due borghi londinesi, ossia la Città di Westminster e il London Borough of Camden.EtimologiaIl nome di Chancery Lane si riferisce al palazzo di Chancellor, il quale sorge nei pressi della strada.Cenni storiciChancery Lane è stata costruita dai cavalieri templari qualche tempo prima del 1161 per poter facilmente arrivare alle loro proprietà, ubicate a sud di Fleet Street, nell'odierna Temple. Precedentemente la strada, come già accennato, era conosciuta sotto il nome di Chancelar Lane e, più tardi, Chancellor Lane.Nella strada era localizzata anche una delle quattro antiche Inns of Court, la Sergent's Inn. Inoltre, secondo alcune fonti, a Chancery Lane era situata anche un dormitorio per ebrei convertiti fondato nel 1233 da Enrico III d'Inghilterra. Sempre Enrico III, nello stesso anno, fondò una sinagoga adibita all'uso degli ebrei del dormitorio.EdificiSorgono lungo il tracciato di Chancery Lane: Trasporti30px Metropolitana di LondraVicino Chancery Lane è situata l'omonima stazione della metropolitana di Londra, che per l'appunto si chiama Chancery Lane. Altre stazioni vicine alla strada sono quelle di Temple e Holborn.

Center for Transnational Legal Studies
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Swan House 37-39 High Holborn
London, WC1V 6AA

+44 (0)203 077 5900

The Center for Transnational Legal Studies is a global educational center for the study of transnational law. The Center was founded in London in October 2008 as an initiative by Georgetown University Law Center, providing educational services and student resources. It was constituted as a joint venture between ten leading law schools from around the world, each contributing faculty and students to the center. The Center's founding institutions are Georgetown University Law Center, University of Toronto, King's College London, National University of Singapore, ESADE, Fribourg University, Free University of Berlin, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, University of Torino, Melbourne Law School, and the University of São Paulo. The Center also has several affiliate institutions, including Bucerius Law School.The CTLS facilities are located at Swan House at 37-39 High Holborn Street in London's legal quarter. Students and faculty have access to King's College Law Library and student housing at the Liberty Living Student Housing complex 'Liberty House' on St John Street.The Center's curriculum was developed by an Academic Council of faculty from all of the founding law schools and all courses address topics in transnational or comparative law, legal theory or legal practice. designed for students intent on transnational careers.

Gibraltar House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
150 Strand
London, WC2R 1EL

020 7836 0777

Gibraltar House, es la oficina de representación del Gobierno de Su Majestad de Gibraltar en Londres. Funciona como un consulado informal, centro de información turística sobre el territorio británico de ultramar de Gibraltar y se ocupa de las necesidades de los pacientes enviados por la Autoridad Sanitaria de Gibraltar para recibir tratamiento médico en el Reino Unido.HistoriaLa primera Gibraltar House, una pequeña oficina de turismo, fue inaugurada en Northumberland Avenue, Londres, a principios de los años 1970. La primera directora fue Helen Gordon. Una Oficina de Turismo de Gibraltar se abrió posteriormente en Trafalgar Square, bajo el mando de John Joe Gomez. Poco después, se abrió una oficina mucho más grande en 179 Strand, dirigida por Jose Rosado y más tarde por Richard Garcia. En 1989, Albert Poggio asumió el cargo de director, el cual ocupa hasta la actualidad (fue sustituido brevemente por Peter Canessa entre 2011 y 2012). En 2009, la Casa de Gibraltar se trasladó a su ubicación actual en 150 Strand.

Gibraltar House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
150 Strand
London, WC2R 1EL

020 7836 0777

Gibraltar House, es la oficina de representación del Gobierno de Su Majestad de Gibraltar en Londres. Funciona como un consulado informal, centro de información turística sobre el territorio británico de ultramar de Gibraltar y se ocupa de las necesidades de los pacientes enviados por la Autoridad Sanitaria de Gibraltar para recibir tratamiento médico en el Reino Unido.HistoriaLa primera Gibraltar House, una pequeña oficina de turismo, fue inaugurada en Northumberland Avenue, Londres, a principios de los años 1970. La primera directora fue Helen Gordon. Una Oficina de Turismo de Gibraltar se abrió posteriormente en Trafalgar Square, bajo el mando de John Joe Gomez. Poco después, se abrió una oficina mucho más grande en 179 Strand, dirigida por Jose Rosado y más tarde por Richard Garcia. En 1989, Albert Poggio asumió el cargo de director, el cual ocupa hasta la actualidad (fue sustituido brevemente por Peter Canessa entre 2011 y 2012). En 2009, la Casa de Gibraltar se trasladó a su ubicación actual en 150 Strand.

Tourist Attraction Near Royal Courts of Justice

Somerset House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2R 1LA

+44 (0)20 7845 4600

A unique part of the London cultural scene with a distinctive public programme including Skate, concerts, an open-air film season, a diverse range of temporary exhibitions focusing on contemporary culture, an extensive learning programme, free guided tours and 55 fountains that dance in the The Edmond J. Safra Fountain Court in summer. Somerset House currently attracts approximately 2.5 million visitors every year.

Royal Opera House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street
London, WC2E 9DD

+44 (0) 20 7240 1200

The Royal Opera, under the direction of Antonio Pappano, is one of the world’s leading opera companies. Based in the iconic Covent Garden theatre, it is renowned for its outstanding performances of both traditional opera as well as commissioning new works by today’s leading opera composers such as Harrison Birtwistle, Mark-Anthony Turnage and Thomas Ades. Some of the most famous singers of all time have performed with the Company including Plácido Domingo, Angela Gheorghiu, Anna Netrebko, Renée Fleming, Bryn Terfel, Jonas Kaufman, Rolando Villazón, Juan Diego Flórez, as well as the late Luciano Pavarotti and Joan Sutherland. The Royal Ballet, led by Director Kevin O’Hare, is Britain’s largest ballet company. The Company has a wide-ranging repertory showcasing the great classical ballets, heritage works from Founder Choreographer Frederick Ashton and Principal Choreographer Kenneth MacMillan, as well as new works by the foremost choreographers of today. Access is a key issue for the Company and its work is seen not just at the Royal Opera House but via televised and cinematic performances, outdoor Big Screen performances, international touring and through the work of the Company’s Education Department.

The Punch and Judy - real page covent garden
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
40 The Market Covent Garden Piazza
London, WC2E 8RF

0207 379 0923

The Punch & Judy is a traditional British pub in Covent Garden Piazza serving great cask ales and freshly cooked traditional pub food

Southbank Centre
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Belvedere Road
London, SE1 8XX

20-74012636

Hello, and welcome to the official Southbank Centre Facebook page. Keep up to date with our latest news, forthcoming events and festivals and please feel free to comment and review as we love to hear what you think. Southbank Centre includes: › Royal Festival Hall › Hayward Gallery › Queen Elizabeth Hall › Purcell Room › Saison Poetry Library

National Portrait Gallery
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
2 St Martin's Place
London, WC2H 0

+44(0)20 7306 0055

Covent Garden & Picadilly Circus
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Covent Garden
London, WC2H 0

Millenium Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Bankside
London, EC4V 3QH

Bateaux London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Embankment Pier, Victoria Embankment
London, WC2N 6NU

0207 695 1800

Bateaux London is the capital's best restaurant cruise. We offer Lunch, Afternoon Tea, Dinner and Sunday Lunch Cruises as well as options for groups, Private Dining and Exclusive Hire of our vessels. www.bateauxlondon.com

Shaftesbury Theatre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
cyberjaya
London, WC2H 8DP

The Shaftesbury Theatre is a West End Theatre, located on Shaftesbury Avenue, in the London Borough of Camden.HistoryThe theatre was designed for the brothers Walter and Frederick Melville by Bertie Crewe and opened on 26 December 1911 with a production of The Three Musketeers, as the New Prince's Theatre, becoming the Prince's Theatre in 1914. It had a capacity of 2,392 and a stage 31' 10" wide by 31' deep.The Prince's was the last theatre to be built in Shaftesbury Avenue, and is located near New Oxford Street, perhaps explaining the many gaps between performances in its early years. It had considerable success with an 18-week season of Gilbert and Sullivan operas, presented by the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, in 1919. These became a regular attraction at the theatre in the 1920s, interspersed with runs of theatre productions transferred from other venues. Basil Rathbone appeared at the Prince's Theatre in May 1933 when he played Julian Beauclerc in a revival of Diplomacy. The Rose of Persia was revived at the theatre in 1935. The D'Oyly Carte returned in 1942.The theatre was sold to EMI in 1962, and became the Shaftesbury Theatre the following year. Broadway productions that transferred to the theatre for long runs in the 1960s included Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1962)and How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1963).

La Soirée
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Leicester Square
London,

Impossible to define and impossible to resist, LA SOIRÉE is an ever-changing collection of some of the most outrageous, hilarious, beautiful and downright bizarre acts you will ever see. With its edgy fusion of cabaret, new burlesque, circus sideshow and contemporary vaudeville, LA SOIRÉE offers audiences the kind of entertainment it has not seen for years.

Hungerford Bridge and Golden Jubilee Bridges
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
River Thames
London, SE1 8

0870 500 0600

The Hungerford Bridge crosses the River Thames in London, and lies between Waterloo Bridge and Westminster Bridge. It is a steel truss railway bridge – sometimes known as the Charing Cross Bridge – flanked by two more recent, cable-stayed, pedestrian bridges that share the railway bridge's foundation piers, and which are named the Golden Jubilee Bridges.The north end of the bridge is Charing Cross railway station, and is near Embankment Pier and the Victoria Embankment. The south end is near Waterloo station, County Hall, the Royal Festival Hall, and the London Eye. Each pedestrian bridge has steps and lift access.

The Courtauld Gallery
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
150 Strand
London, WC2R 0RN

+44 (0)20 7848 2526

Discover our world-famous collection of paintings, drawings and decorative arts. Ranging from the Middle Ages to the 20th century the collection is displayed in the elegant surroundings of Somerset House. The Courtauld is best known for its outstanding Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, including celebrated works by Monet, Renoir, Degas and Gauguin as well as a major group of paintings by Cézanne. Visitors can enjoy iconic masteries such as Manet's 'A Bar at the Folies-Bergère' and Van Gogh's 'Self-Portrait with Badaged Ear.'

Smithfield, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
31-32 Watling St
London, EC1A 2

020 7248 3151

Smithfield is a locality in the ward of Farringdon Without situated at the City of London's northwest in central London, England. The principal street of the area is West Smithfield.A number of valued City institutions are located in the area, such as St Bartholomew's Hospital, the Charterhouse, and Livery Halls notably those of the Butchers' and Haberdashers' Companies, but Smithfield is best known for its ancient meat market, dating from the 10th century, which is now London's only remaining wholesale market in continuous operation since medieval times. The area also contains London's oldest surviving church, St Bartholomew-the-Great, founded in 1123 AD.Smithfield has borne witness to many bloody executions of heretics and political rebels over the centuries, including major historical figures such as Scottish patriot Sir William Wallace and Wat Tyler, leader of the Peasants' Revolt, among many other religious reformers and dissenters.

Hunterian Museum, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Royal College of Surgeons, 35- 43 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, WC2A 3PE

020 78696560

John Hunter's collection was purchased by the government in 1799, and given to the Company (later The Royal College) of Surgeons. The collection formed the basis for a museum constructed as part of the new Royal College of Surgeons of London's building on the south side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. _____________ Hire the Hunterian: In the evening this fantastic space can be hired for your private event. Ideal for drinks receptions, pre-dinner drinks and canapés, or an intimate networking event; the Hunterian Museum will be a once-in-a-lifetime experience for your guests. For further information, please call the events team on 020 7869 6702 and quote FB13 for 15% off your first event.

Cleopatra's Needle
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Thames Embankment
London, WC2N 6

020 7234 5800

Festival of Love Southbank
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Belvedere Road
London, SE1 8XX

Golden Jubilee Bridges
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London,

HMS President
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, EC4Y 0HJ

HMS Saxifrage was launched in 1918 as a Flower-class anti-submarine Q-ship. She was renamed HMS President in 1922 and moored permanently on the Thames as a Royal Navy Reserve drill ship. In 1982 she was sold to private owners, and having changed hands twice, now serves as a venue for conferences and functions, and serves as the offices for a number of media companies. Technically, she is now called HMS President (1918) to distinguish her from HMS President, the Royal Naval Reserve base in St Katharine Docks. She is one of the last three surviving Royal Navy warships of the First World War. She is also the sole representative of the first type of purpose built anti-submarine vessels, and is the ancestor of WW2 convoy escort sloops, which evolved into modern anti-submarine frigates.Design and constructionThe original Flower-class sloops (the Acacia, Azalea and Arabis classes) were all built in 1915 as fleet minesweeping vessels, with triple hulls at the bow to give extra protection against loss from mine damage. When submarine attacks on British merchant ships became a serious menace after 1916, the existing Flowers were transferred to convoy escort duty, and fitted with depth charges as well as 4.7-inch naval guns.

Southbank Christmas Market
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road
London, SE1 8XX

Westminster Embankment
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London,

Museum of Comedy
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
The Undercroft, St Georges Church, Bloomsbury Way
London, WC1A 2SR

020 7534 1744

Founded by Leicester Square Theatre director Martin Witts, the Museum of Comedy is a brand new, immersive museum and performance venue, featuring iconic props and artefacts from our rich comedic history and housing one of the most comprehensive collections of Comedy memorabilia ever to be amassed in one place. The museum has been lovingly put together by Martin from his collection of over six thousand artefacts and print from some the most iconic comedians and comedy shows both past and present, amassed during his career spanning over three decades in the comedy industry. See comic artefacts from Tommy Cooper’s handmade magic props to Steptoe and Son’s stuffed bear! Plus Leicester Square Theatre favourite Bill Bailey’s iconic 6-neck guitar. Accompanying the collection will be revolving exhibitions, currently Steve Ullathorne’s stylish and contemporary images of current comedy stars The Comic Collection. Museum facilities include The Cooper Room, a state of the art traditional performance space hosting all kinds of comedy performance, from theatre and stand up to silent film. The Museum is also home to The Comedy Academy, an educational facility for comedy writing performance and production. The Museum of Comedy. Shining a light on the stars of British comedy. See What's On: http://bit.ly/25WAU79 @museumofcomedy www.museumofcomedy.com

Summer Set House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2R 1LA

+442078454600

HMS Wellington
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Temple Stairs Victoria Embankment
London, WC2R 2PN

020 7836 8179

HMS Wellington is a sloop, formerly of the Royal Navy. During the Second World War, she served as a convoy escort ship in the North Atlantic. She is now moored alongside the Victoria Embankment, at Temple Pier, on the River Thames in London, England, as the headquarters ship of the Honourable Company of Master Mariners, where she is known as HQS Wellington. It was always the ambition of the founding members of the company to have a livery hall. Up to the outbreak of war in 1939, various proposals were examined, including the purchase of a sailing ship,.After the Second World War, it became apparent that the possibility of building a hall in the City of London had been rendered very remote. In 1947, the Grimsby-class sloop Wellington was made available by the Admiralty. The company decided to buy her with money subscribed by the members and convert her to a floating livery hall, an appropriate home for a company of seafarers.

The Top Of The Dome- St Pauls Cathedral
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
St Paul's Churchyard, London
London, EC4M 8AD

Kings Road, Chelsea
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
69 brothel mansions kings rs
London,

Prince Henry's Room
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
17 Fleet St
London, EC4Y 1AA

020 7353 1190

Prince Henry's Room is situated on the first floor at the front of No.17 Fleet Street, London. The house is one of the few surviving buildings in the City of London dating from before the Great Fire of London in 1666. It is a Grade II* Listed Building.HistoryThe site was once owned by the Templars, but after the dissolution of the Order of St John, the building was rebuilt in 1610 and became a tavern called Prince's Arms. This coincided with the investiture of Prince Henry, son of James I, as Prince of Wales. During the 17th century, the house was known as the Fountain Inn and was visited by Samuel Pepys on 14 October 1661. He wrote "In the afternoon Captain Ferrers and I walked abroad to several places; among others, to Mr.Pim's my Lord's tailors and there he went out with us to the Fountain tavern and did give us store of wine." On 28 November 1661, Pepys wrote "to the Fountain tavern and there stayed till 12 at night, drinking and singing, Mr.Symons and one Mr.Agar singing very well. Then Mr.Gauden, being almost drunk, had the wit to be gone; and so I took leave too" During the early 19th century a famous exhibition "Mrs Salmon's Waxworks" was held in the front part of the house, whilst the Tavern continued in the rear. The house became the property of the London County Council in 1908 with the aid of a contribution from the City Corporation. It later passed to the City of London Corporation, which administers the property now.

Brit Movie Tours
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Brit Movie Tours, Golden Cross House, 8 Duncannon Street,
London, WC2N 4

0844 2471 007

Group Line
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
2nd Floor, 39-41 Charing Cross Road
London, WC2H 0AR

020 7206 1174

Group Line is the leading independent Groups ticketing agency. Our friendly and experienced team are dedicated to helping you organise your theatre trip. • Book Now, Pay Later! • Competitive Group Rates • West End Theatre, Packages & Exhibitions For Groups • Friendly, expert advice, every step of the way

Local Business Near Royal Courts of Justice

The Royal Courts of Justice
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, United Kingdom WC2A 2LL

020 79476000

Twinings, 216 The Strand, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
216 The Strand
London, United Kingdom

+44 20 7353 3511

The High Court
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Royal Courts of Justice, Strand
London, United Kingdom WC2R 1

St Clement Danes
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
The Strand
London, United Kingdom WC2R 1

020 7242 8282

St Clement Danes is an Anglican church in the City of Westminster, London. It is situated outside the Royal Courts of Justice on the Strand. Although the first church on the site was reputedly founded in the 9th century by the Danes, the current building was completed in 1682 by Sir Christopher Wren. Wren's building was gutted during the Blitz and not restored until 1958, when it was adapted to its current function as the central church of the Royal Air Force.The church is sometimes claimed to be the one featured in the nursery rhyme Oranges and Lemons and the bells do indeed play that tune. However, St Clement Eastcheap, in the City of London, also claims to be the church from the rhyme. St Clement Danes is known as one of the two 'Island Churches', the other being St Mary-le-Strand.

St Clement Danes Church of England
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, United Kingdom WC2R 1DH

020 7242 8282

Temple Bar, London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Milford Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4M 7EJ

Temple Bar was the principal ceremonial entrance to the City of London on its western side from the City of Westminster. It is situated on the historic royal ceremonial route from the Tower of London to the Palace of Westminster, the two chief residences of the mediaeval English monarchs, and from the Palace of Westminster to St Paul's Cathedral. The road east of Temple Bar and within the City is Fleet Street, the road to the west, in Westminster, is The Strand. At Temple Bar the Corporation of the City of London formerly erected a barrier to regulate trade into the City. The 19th century Royal Courts of Justice are located next to it on its north side, having been moved from Westminster Hall. To its south is the Temple Church and the Inner Temple and Middle Temple Inns of Court. As the most important entrance to the City of London from Westminster, it was formerly long the custom for the monarch to halt at Temple Bar before entering the City of London, in order for the Lord Mayor to offer up the Corporation's pearl-encrusted Sword of State as a token of loyalty. The term Temple Bar strictly refers to a notional bar or barrier across the route, but is commonly used to refer to the 17th century ornamental Baroque arched gateway designed by Christopher Wren which spanned the road until its removal in 1878. Wren's arch was preserved and was re-erected in 2004 in the City, in Paternoster Square next to St Paul's Cathedral.

Devereux
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Devereux Court
London, United Kingdom WC2R 3JH

020 7353 7534

The Edgar Wallace
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
40 Essex Street
London, United Kingdom WC2R 3

020 7353 3120

St. Ermin's Hotel, London, UK
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
2 Caxton Street
London, United Kingdom SW1H 0QW

Middle Temple
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Middle Temple Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4Y 7

02074274800

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, commonly known simply as Middle Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court exclusively entitled to call their members to the English Bar as barristers, the others being the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn. It is located in the wider Temple area of London, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.HistoryIn the 13th century, the Inns of Court originated as hostels and schools for student lawyers. The Middle Temple is the western part of "The Temple", the headquarters of the Knights Templar until they were dissolved in 1312. The Temple Church still stands as a "peculiar" (extra-diocesan) church of the Inner and Middle Temples.The Inns stopped being responsible for legal education in 1852, although they continue to provide training in areas such as advocacy and ethics for students, pupil barristers and newly qualified barristers. Most of the Inn is occupied by barristers' offices, known as chambers. One of the Middle Temple's main functions now is to provide education and support for new members to the profession. This is done through advocacy training, the provision of scholarships (over £1 million in 2011), subsidised accommodation both in the Temple and in Clapham, and by providing events where junior members may meet senior colleagues for help and advice.

House Removals
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
95 Aldwych
London, United Kingdom WC2B 4JF

020 8746 9692

LSBF new court campus
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
48 Carey Street
London, United Kingdom WC2A 2JE

+44 (0) 20 7823 2303

Cafe Nero
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
181 Strand
London, United Kingdom

Tower 1, Lse
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
8-18 Wild St
London, United Kingdom

Temple Church And Inner Temple
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Inner Temple, London EC4Y 7DE
London, United Kingdom

Cigalon
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
115 Chancery Lane
London, United Kingdom WC2A 1PP

020 7242 8373

Cigalon serves authentic Provencal cuisine inspired by the beautiful flavours of the south of France. Cigalon is based in a magnificient former auction house on London's Chancery Lane, just off from the strand and within walking distance of covent garden and the city.

Cafe Nero @ The Strand
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
181 Strand
London, United Kingdom WC2R 1EA

020 7836 5322

Pret A Manger 28 Fleet Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
23/28 Fleet Street
London, United Kingdom EC4Y 1AA

020 7932 5215

Ye Olde Cock Tavern
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
22 Fleet Street
London, United Kingdom EC4Y 1AA

02073538570

Wilshire Assets
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
5 Chancery Lane
London, United Kingdom WC2A 1LG

02031517208