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Oxford Street, London | Tourist Information


City of Westminster, West End
London, United Kingdom W1K 1NA


Oxford Street is a major road in the City of Westminster in the West End of London. It is Europe's busiest shopping street, with around half a million daily visitors, and as of 2012 had approximately 300 shops. It is designated as part of the A40, a major road between London and Fishguard, though it is not signed as such, and traffic is regularly restricted to buses and taxis.The road was originally a Roman road, part of the Via Trinobantina between Essex and Hampshire via London. It was known as Tyburn Road through the Middle Ages and was once notorious as a street where prisoners from Newgate Prison would be transported towards a public hanging. It became known as Oxford Road and then Oxford Street in the 18th century, and began to change character from a residential street to commercial and retail purposes by the late 19th century, also attracting street traders, confidence tricksters and prostitution. The first department stores in Britain opened on Oxford Street in the early 20th century, including Selfridges, John Lewis and HMV. Unlike nearby shopping streets such as Bond Street, it has retained an element of downmarket street trading alongside more prestigious retail stores. The street suffered heavy bombing during World War II, and several longstanding stores including John Lewis were completely destroyed and rebuilt from scratch.

Clothing Store Near Oxford Street

Carven
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
85 Pelham Street
London,

02072257110

Philip Treacy
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
69 Elizabeth Street
London,

020 7730 3992

Selina Blow
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Ellis Street
London, SW1X 9AL

+44 (0) 20 7730 2077

Tom Ford
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
201-202 Sloane St
London, SW1X 9QX

020 3141 7800

V&A Shop
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Cromwell Road
London, SW7 2RL

020 7942 2696

Giorgio Armani Uk Head Office
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
5 Howick place
London,

Suzanne Neville London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
29 Beauchamp Place
London, SW3 1NJ

020 7823 9107

Anya Hindmarch
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
15-17 Pont Street
London, SW1X 9EH

+44 (0) 20 7838 9177

Suzanne Neville
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
29 Beauchamp Place
London, SW3 1

+44 (0) 20 7823 9107

Bruce Oldfield Couture
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
34 Beauchamp Pl
London, SW3 1NJ

+44 (0) 20 7584 1363

John Boyd Hats
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
16 Beauchamp Place
London, SW3 1NQ

02075897601

John Boyd is one of London’s most respected milliners. His rich and rewarding career is now in its seventh decade, and he is known and respected throughout the trade as an inspirational and highly influential designer and craftsman. A small team of experienced milliners work under John’s guidance, creating bespoke hats on site using traditional techniques and materials. Modern styles that incorporate the glamour and elegance of past eras characterise the John Boyd aesthetic. His designs range from the discreet and delicate to the dramatic and flamboyant. Handmade bows, flowers, feathers and veiling adorn brims both classic and contemporary.

Emporio Armani Caffe
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
191 Brompton Road
London, SW3 1NE

+44 (0) 20 7823 8818

Caroline Castigliano
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Knightsbridge, Oxford Circus, Bath, Guildford, Leeds & Edinburgh
London, SW3 1

Loro Piana
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
47 Sloane Street
London, SW1X 9

+44 (0) 20 7235 3203

Ray Ward
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
12 Cadogan Place
London, SW1X 9PU

+44 (0) 207 8080291

Prada
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
43-45 Sloane Street
London, SW1X 9

+44 (0) 20 7235 0008

Reiss
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
163-169 Brompton Rd
London, SW1X 0

+44 (0) 20 7730 1234

Pinko
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
161 Brompton Road
London, SW3 1EX

+44 (0) 20 7584 6524

Gap
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
145-149 Brompton Road
London, SW3 1QP

+44 (0) 20 7225 1112

Gap
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
145-149 Brompton Rd
London, SW3 1QP

+44 (0) 20 7225 1112

Rigby & Peller
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
2 Hans Rd
London, SW3 1

+44 (0) 20 7589 9293

C S Boutique
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Unwin Road
London, tw7 6hy

07913108578

Yves Saint Laurent
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
171-172 Sloane St
London, SW1X 9QG

+44 (0) 20 7235 6706

Giorgio Armani
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
37 Sloane Street
London, SW1X 9

+44 (0) 20 7235 6232

Landmark Near Oxford Street

Embassy of Japan, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Hell on Earth for Dolphins
London, United Kingdom

The Embassy of Japan in London is the diplomatic mission of Japan in the United Kingdom. It occupies a large Victorian building on Piccadilly opposite Green Park, which is Grade II listed.

Hilton London Hyde Park Hotel
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
129 Bayswater Road
London, United Kingdom W2 4RJ

The Hilton London Hyde Park is a hotel situated on Bayswater Road, overlooking Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens in central London. It was opened in July 1999.The building was originally the Coburg Court Hotel, first opened in 1907, and it was later renamed the Coburg Hotel in the early 1960s.The Coburg Hotel was used as a filming location in Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy (1972). Richard Blaney and Babs Milligan check into the Coburg as "Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Wilde". Filming took place at the hotel during September 1971. The interiors of the Coburg Hotel were mostly recreated at Pinewood Studios, except for the policemen's point-of-view shot showing the fire escape, which was filmed by assistant director Colin M. Brewer from a fifth-floor room.The current hotel is the first Hilton Hotels & Resorts hotel in London with a state-of-the-art meeting room featuring an interactive projection and speaker system.

Bavarian Village
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Serpentine Road, Hyde Park
London, United Kingdom W2 2UH

LIKE US http://www.facebook.com/bavarian.village WATCH US http://www.youtube.com/thebavarianvillage

Embassy of Qatar, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
1 South Audley St
London, United Kingdom W1K 1

+442074932200

The Embassy of Qatar at 1 South Audley Street in Mayfair, London is the diplomatic mission of Qatar in the United Kingdom. The embassy is housed in a Grade II listed three storey house designed by the architect Frederick Pepys Cockerell and completed after his death by George Aitchison.The exterior of the house is richly decorated with a terracotta freize depicting putti.Qatar also maintains a Cultural and Military Section at 21 Hertford Street, Mayfair and a Health Section at 30 Collingham Gardens, South Kensington.In 2013 there was a protest outside the embassy against the alleged mistreatment of migrant workers in Qatar.

High Commission of The Bahamas, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
10 Chesterfield Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 5JL

02074084488

The High Commission of The Bahamas in London is the diplomatic mission of The Bahamas in the United Kingdom.

Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
30 Charles Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

+44 (0) 20 7917 3000

The Embassy of Saudi Arabia in London (officially the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia) (السفارة السعودية الملكية في لندن) is the diplomatic mission of Saudi Arabia in the United Kingdom. Saudi Arabia also maintains a Defence Attaché’s Office at 26 Queen's Gate, South Kensington, a Diplomatic Office of the Cultural Bureau at 630 Chiswick High Road, Gunnersbury, a Medical Section at 60 Queen Anne Street, Marylebone, a Commercial Section at 15/16 Queen Street, Mayfair, an Islamic Affairs Section at 2nd Floor, Park Lorne, 111 Park Road, Lisson Grove and an Information Section at 18 Seymour Street, Marylebone.The embassy is situated in Crewe House, a detached mansion designed and constructed by Edward Sheppard in 1730, set in its own grounds. Built in the Georgian style, it is a Grade II* listed building. The house was considerably altered in the late 18th and early 19th-century. Much of its neo-classical interior dates from the early 19th-century, and some of Shepard's original plasterwork ceilings may survive.

Embassy of Myanmar, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
19A Charles St
London, United Kingdom W1J 5DX

+44 (0) 207 499 4340

The Embassy of Myanmar in London, also referred to as the Embassy of Burma, is the diplomatic mission of Myanmar in the United Kingdom.

Embassy of Egypt, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
26 South Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 2XD

20-74993304

The Embassy of Egypt in London is the diplomatic mission of Egypt in the United Kingdom.Egypt also maintains several other buildings in London: a Consulate General at 2 Lowndes Street, Belgravia, a Press & Information Office at 299 Oxford Street, a Cultural Office at 4 Chesterfield Gardens, Mayfair and a Medical Office at 47 Longridge Road, Earl's Court.There have been several protests outside the embassy in recent years: in 2011 during the protests against Hosni Mubarak, in 2013 following the violent clashes in Cairo between supporters and opponents of Mohammed Morsi and also in 2013 there was a protest against the rise of sexual attacks against women in Egypt.

Park Lane
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Park Lane, South Kensington, London. UK.
London, United Kingdom W1K 7

Park Lane is a major road in the City of Westminster, in Central London. It is part of the London Inner Ring Road and runs from Hyde Park Corner in the south to Marble Arch in the north. It separates Hyde Park to the west from Mayfair to the east. The road has a number of historically important properties and hotels and has been one of the most sought after streets in London, despite being a major traffic thoroughfare.The road was originally a simple country lane on the boundary of Hyde Park, separated by a brick wall. Aristocratic properties appeared during the late 18th century, including Breadalbene House, Somerset House and Londonderry House. The road grew in popularity during the 19th century after improvements to Hyde Park Corner and more affordable views of the park, which attracted the nouveau riche to the street and led to it becoming one of the most fashionable roads to live on in London. Notable residents included the 1st Duke of Westminster's residence at Grosvenor House, the Dukes of Somerset at Somerset House and the British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli at No. 93. Other historic properties include Dorchester House, Brook House and Dudley House. In the 20th century, Park Lane became well known for its luxury hotels, particularly The Dorchester, completed in 1931, which became closely associated with eminent writers and international film stars. Flats and shops began appearing on the road, including penthouse flats. Several buildings suffered damage during World War II, yet the road still attracted significant development, including the Park Lane Hotel and the London Hilton on Park Lane, and several sports car garages. A number of properties on the road today are owned by some of the wealthiest businessmen from the Middle East and Asia. Current residents include business mogul Mohamed Al-Fayed and former council leader Dame Shirley Porter.

Grosvenor Chapel
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
24 South Audley Street, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1K 2

020 7499 1684

Grosvenor Chapel is an Anglican church in what is now the City of Westminster, in England, built in 1730s. It inspired many churches in New England. It is situated on South Audley Street in Mayfair.HistoryThe foundation stone of the Grosvenor Chapel was laid on 7 April 1730 by Sir Richard Grosvenor, 4th Baronet, owner of the surrounding property, who had leased the site for 99 years at a peppercorn rent to a syndicate of four “undertakers” led by Benjamin Timbrell, a prosperous local builder.The new building was completed and ready to use by April 1731.Soon after the original 99-year lease ran out in 1829 the chapel was brought within the parochial system as a chapel of ease to St George's, Hanover Square.The chapel has been the spiritual home to a number of famous people including John Wilkes, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington, and his wife (parents to the Duke of Wellington), Florence Nightingale, U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Bishop Charles Gore.During the Second World War men and women of the American armed forces were welcomed to the chapel for their Sunday services, as recorded on a tablet outside the west wall, and after the war the congregation regularly included such people as the writer Rose Macaulay and Sir John Betjeman, Poet Laureate from 1972 until his death in 1984.

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
114 Mount Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 3

02074937811

The Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, also known as Farm Street Church, is a Roman Catholic parish church run by the Society of Jesus in Mayfair, central London. Its main entrance is in Farm Street, though it can also be accessed from the adjacent Mount Street Gardens. Sir Simon Jenkins, in his book England's Thousand Best Churches, describes the church as "Gothic Revival at its most sumptuous".

Gimpel Fils
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
30 Davies Street
London, United Kingdom

Gimpel Fils is a London art gallery based at 30 Davies Street in Westminster just off Grosvenor Square. The gallery was founded by Charles and Peter Gimpel, sons of the celebrated Parisian art dealer, René Gimpel, author of the Diary of an Art Dealer. Throughout its history it has maintained a commitment to contemporary British and International art.

Speakers' Corner
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Marble Arch, Hyde Park
London, United Kingdom W1K 1QB

A Speakers' Corner is an area where open-air public speaking, debate and discussion are allowed. The original and most noted is in the northeast corner of Hyde Park in London, UK. Speakers here may talk on any subject, as long as the police consider their speeches lawful, although this right is not restricted to Speakers' Corner only. Contrary to popular belief, there is no immunity from the law, nor are any subjects proscribed, but in practice the police tend to be tolerant and therefore intervene only when they receive a complaint. On some occasions in the past, they have intervened on grounds of profanity. Historically there were a number of other areas designated as Speakers' Corners in other parks in London (e.g., Lincoln's Inn Fields Finsbury Park, Clapham Common, Kennington Park, and Victoria Park). More recently they have been set up in other British cities, and there are also Speakers' Corners in other countries.Hyde ParkThough Hyde Park Speakers' Corner is considered the paved area closest to Marble Arch, legally the public speaking area extends beyond the Reform Tree and covers a large area from Marble Arch to Victoria Gate, then along the Serpentine to Hyde Park Corner and the Broad Walk running from Hyde Park Corner to Marble Arch.Public riots broke out in the park in 1855, in protest over the Sunday Trading Bill, which forbade buying and selling on a Sunday, the only day working people had off. The riots were described by Karl Marx as the beginning of the English revolution.

Savile Club
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
69 Brook St
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

+44 (0)20 7629 5462

The Savile Club is a traditional London gentlemen's club founded in 1868. Though located somewhat out of the way from the main centre of London's gentlemen's clubs, closer to the residences of Mayfair than the clubs of Pall Mall and St James's Street, it still contains prominent names among its members. It was originally formed after a division of opinion within the old Eclectic Club as to whether to accept an offer of rooms by the Medical Club and cease to be simply a "night club" (in its 19th-century sense).Changing premisesInitially calling itself the New Club, it grew rapidly, outgrowing its first floor rooms overlooking Trafalgar Square at 9 Spring Gardens and moving to the second floor. It then moved to 15 Savile Row in 1871, where it changed its name to the Savile Club, before lack of space forced the club to move again in 1882, this time to 107 Piccadilly, a building owned by Lord Rosebery. With its views over Green Park it was described by the members as the "ideal clubhouse". However, after 50 years' residence, demolition of the building next door to create the Park Lane Hotel caused the old clubhouse such structural problems that, in 1927, the club moved to its present home at 69 Brook Street, part of the Grosvenor Estate in Mayfair. This was the former home of "Loulou" Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt, a Liberal cabinet minister who had taken his life on the premises to avert a scandal when his double life as a paedophile and sex offender was in danger of being uncovered. The building, a combination of Nos 69 and 71 Brook Street, owes its extravagant dix-huitième interior to Walter Burns, the brother-in-law of financier J.P. Morgan, who adapted it for his wife Fanny to entertain in suitable style. It thus includes an elegant hall, a grand staircase and a lavish ballroom.

Chiltern Firehouse
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
1 Chiltern Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 7

020 7073 7676

The Chiltern Firehouse is a restaurant and hotel located at 1 Chiltern Street, Marylebone, London, England occupying the Grade II listed building of the former Marylebone Fire Station, also known as Manchester Square Fire Station. It is owned by André Balazs, a hotel chain owner, who also owns the Chateau Marmont Hotel in Los Angeles, California and The Mercer Hotel in New York City. The head chef is Nuno Mendes.Manchester Square Fire StationThe Manchester Square Fire Station was built in 1889, by the London County Council Architect's Department, "in the Vulliamy manner". "Red brick with stone dressings; tiled roof. Free Tudor-Gothic style". It initially served as a fire station, and was one of the first fire stations in London. The original architect was Robert Pearsall. Originally known as Manchester Square Fire Station (Manchester Square is nearby), it was decommissioned in June 2005 by the London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority. For some years subsequently, it had been in occasional use as an exhibition space for local artists, as there was a long and complex planning process to convert it to a luxury hotel and restaurant. David Archer of Archer Humphryes Architects acted as lead architect for the project.

Embassy of Sweden, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
11 Montagu Place
London, United Kingdom W1H 2

+44 20 7917 6400

The Embassy of Sweden in London is the diplomatic mission of Sweden in the United Kingdom. It is located by Montagu Square in Marylebone, just down the road from the embassy of Switzerland, and has housed the Swedish embassy since 1983.The Swedish ambassador's residence is located is a separate building at 27 Portland Place. Sweden also maintains a Trade Council at 259-269 Old Marylebone Road, Marylebone.

Embassy of Poland, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
15 Devonshire St
London, United Kingdom W1G 7AP

020 7580 5481

The Embassy of Poland in London (Ambasada Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej w Londynie) is the diplomatic mission of Poland in the United Kingdom. It is located on Portland Place next to the High Commission of Kenya building. It forms part of a group of Grade II* listed buildings in Portland Place.History Involving the Embassy of Poland in London, Main Chancery BuildingShortly after regaining independence in 1918, there seemed to be a general feeling of ambivalence towards Britain demonstrated by most Polish statesmen, as if they were neglecting British relations, who played a major role in helping to re-establish the post-World War I - Second Polish Republic. However, with newly-restored independence, the country's government instead concentrated on shoring up good relations with traditional ally France, and immediate neighbour Germany.As a result of this focus, it was not until 1929 that the first Polish legation was sent to establish a permanent embassy in London. The establishment of this Polish embassy building in London would go on to play one of the most important roles of Poland's history.By the late 1930s when world war was once again becoming inevitable, the government of the Second Polish Republic requested the necessary military aid from the British government; as Poland was still rebuilding civilian infrastructure from the aftermath of World War I. The government also signed a three-way mutual defence pact with the United Kingdom and France with the original intent being to make sure an independent and sovereign, democratic Poland would never again have to stand alone against a German invasion. Thus, much of the bureaucracy surrounding these pre-war pacts found itself centred in the halls and corridors of number 47, Portland Place.

Marylebone Gardens
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
35 Marylebone High Street
London, United Kingdom w1u 4qa

Marylebone or Marybone Gardens was a London pleasure garden sited in the grounds of the old manor house of Marylebone and frequented from the mid-17th century, when Marylebone was a village separated from London by fields and market gardens, to the third quarter of the 18th century.Early historyIt was situated in the area which is now between Marylebone Road, Marylebone High Street, Weymouth Street, and Harley Street; its site was developed as Beaumont Street and part of Devonshire Street.Originally consisting of two bowling greens adjoining the Rose of Normandy tavern on the east side of Marylebone High Street, its size was increased to about eight acres by acquisition of land from Marylebone Manor House, which had been converted into a hunting lodge by Henry VIII and was later used as a boarding school, eventually being demolished in 1791. The Marylebone Gardens, surrounded by a high brick wall and set about with fruit trees, had a carriage entrance in the High Street of Marylebone village and another entrance from the fields at the back. Its center was an open oval bowling green encompassed by a wide gravelled walk and many smaller walks and greens surrounded by clipped quickset hedges, "kept in good order, and indented like town walls."

Madame Tussauds London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

0871 894 3000

221B Baker Street
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
221B Baker Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 2ND

02072243688

221B Baker Street is the London address of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, created by author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In the United Kingdom, postal addresses with a number followed by a letter may indicate a separate address within a larger, often residential building. Baker Street in Holmes' time was a high-class residential district, and Holmes' apartment was probably part of a Georgian terrace.At the time the Holmes stories were published, addresses in Baker Street did not go as high as 221. Baker Street was later extended, and in 1932 the Abbey National Building Society moved into premises at 219–229 Baker Street. For many years, Abbey National employed a full-time secretary to answer mail addressed to Sherlock Holmes. In 1990, a blue plaque signifying 221B Baker Street was installed at the Sherlock Holmes Museum, situated elsewhere on the same block, and there followed a 15-year dispute between Abbey National and the Holmes Museum for the right to receive mail addressed to 221B Baker Street. Since the closure of Abbey House in 2005, ownership of the address by the Holmes Museum has not been challenged, despite its location between 237 and 241 Baker Street.Conan Doyle's intentionsWe met next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B, Baker Street, of which he had spoken at our meeting. They consisted of a couple of comfortable bed-rooms and a single large airy sitting-room, cheerfully furnished, and illuminated by two broad windows.(Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet, 1887)