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Piccadilly Circus, London | Tourist Information



Picadilly Circus
London, United Kingdom W1V 9LB


Piccadilly Circus è una celebre piazza di Londra, nonché luogo di ritrovo, cuore morale della città, situata nella City of Westminster.Costruita nel 1819 per collegare Regent Street con l'omonima Piccadilly (importante strada dello shopping) è diventata col passare degli anni uno dei principali punti di snodo del traffico cittadino. La sua felice posizione, nel cuore del West End londinese, e la vicinanza con importanti luoghi di interesse come i teatri di Shaftesbury Avenue o strade come Coventry Street e The Haymarket ricchissime di negozi e locali alla moda, hanno reso Piccadilly Circus un affollato punto di ritrovo, nonché una vera e propria attrattiva turistica tanto da diventare uno dei simboli stessi di Londra.Famosa per i display luminosi e le insegne a LED posizionate su di un edificio posto al lato settentrionale della stessa e per la celebre Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain che rappresenta «l'Angelo della Carità Cristiana» (ma realizzata da Alfred Gilbert come "Anteros" anche se è nota ai più col nome di "Eros"), la piazza è circondata da imponenti edifici quali il London Pavilion (sede di numerosi negozi e del Trocadero) ed il Criterion Theatre. Inoltre direttamente sotto il perimetro della piazza c'è l'omonima stazione della metropolitana di Londra.le banane sono blu e bo poi il kebab fa schifo

Arts and Entertainment Near Piccadilly Circus

Leicester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Leicester Square
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2H 7DE

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Leicester Square) is a pedestrianised square in the West End of London, England. It was laid out in 1670 and is named after the contemporary Leicester House, itself named after Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester.The square was originally a gentrified residential area, with tenants including Frederick, Prince of Wales and artists William Hogarth and Joshua Reynolds. It became more down-market in the late 18th century as Leicester House was demolished and retail developments took place, becoming a centre for entertainment. Several major theatres were established in the 19th century, which were converted to cinemas towards the middle of the next. Leicester Square holds a number of nationally important cinemas such as the Odeon Leicester Square, Empire, Leicester Square and the now closed Odeon West End, which are frequently used for film premières, The nearby Prince Charles Cinema is popular for showing cult films and marathon film runs. The square remains a popular tourist attraction, including hosting events for the Chinese New Year.The square has always had a park in its centre, which was originally Lammas land. The park's fortunes have varied over the centuries, reaching near dilapidation in the mid-19th century after changing ownership several times. It was restored under the direction of St Martin in the Fields parish of their right to use the previously common land. The parishioners appealed to King Charles I, and he appointed three members of the privy council to arbitrate. Lord Leicester was ordered to keep part of his land (thereafter known as Leicester Fields and later as Leicester Square)(1713–1788

Rainforest Cafe, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
20-24 Shaftesbury Avenve
London, United Kingdom W1D 7EU

020 7434 3111

Cafe de Paris
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
3 Coventry Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 6BL

0207 734 7700

Freedom Bar Soho
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
66 Wardour Street
London, United Kingdom W1F 0TA

020 7734 0071

The Box, Soho
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
11-12 Walkers Court, Brewer Street, Soho
London, United Kingdom W1F 0ED

0207 434 4374

Infamous NYC club The Box comes to London's Soho and hosts risqué cabaret and burlesque shows.

Benihana
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
37 Sackville Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 3EH

+44 (0) 20 7494 2525

Rocky “Hiroaki” Aoki opened the first Benihana restaurant in 1964 in New York City. He is the pioneer of “Teppan-yaki” dining, chefs combining dazzling performance and cooking freshest ingredients in front of diners.

The Cuckoo Club
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Swallow Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 4AB

+44 20 7287 4300

The Cuckoo Club has been at the forefront of London's West End nightlife scene since it opened in 2005. The club's ability to evolve, adapt and re-invent itself has been instrumental in its success and sustained position as one of London's most in demand destination venues. Since a redesign in late 2011, The Cuckoo Club has focused on dividing its two floors into mutually exclusive areas - each with an Unique personality, music policy & identity. The ground floor focuses on comfort clubbing with a varied music policy and a devoted following whilst downstairs bridges the market between London's East & West, with a forward thinking music policy that focuses on deep House, introducing some of the most successful underground DJ's into the West End clubbing space. Featuring a state of the art sound system from Funktion 1 on both floors, and full staging capacity for live performance on the ground floor, The Cuckoo Club is an optimum musical performance space.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Gielgud Theatre
London, United Kingdom W1D 6AR

02074523000

Christopher, fifteen years old, stands beside Mrs Shears’ dead dog. It has been speared with a garden fork, it is seven minutes after midnight and Christopher is under suspicion. He records each fact in the book he is writing to solve the mystery of who murdered Wellington. He has an extraordinary brain, exceptional at maths while ill-equipped to interpret everyday life. He has never ventured alone beyond the end of his road, he detests being touched and he distrusts strangers. But his detective work, forbidden by his father, takes him on a frightening journey that upturns his world. ‘This may be the most entertaining family drama since the stage version of War Horse’ – New York Times.

Century
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
61 - 63 Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 6LG

+44 (0)207 534 3080

Soho's Best Kept Secret - Private Members Club. Opening its doors in 2001, The Century Club encompasses the perfect place to work, rest and play in the heart of Soho. Discreetly hidden behind our modest front door on Shaftsbury Avenue, and aptly named ‘Century’ after our one hundred steps, you will find four floors of exclusive member’s facilities, including our pièce de résistance – Soho’s largest rooftop terrace, with views taking in the heart of the West End.

Bar Rumba
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
36 Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7EP

020 7287 6933

Here you’ll experience Piccadilly’s secret, situated in a downstairs venue on Shaftesbury avenue. Be part of a diverse and electrifying night club experience with an atmosphere unlike any other!! MUSIC POLICY: "If you can't sing it, we won't play it" ADVICE: Come as a mixed group - G.O.T G'List!!

Tramp
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
40 Jermyn Street
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6DN

020 7734 0565

BAFTA 195 Piccadilly
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
195 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 9LN

+44 (0)20 7292 5860

Situated in the heart of London’s West End, 195 Piccadilly, the BAFTA Members’ Club in London offers five elegant rooms perfect for corporate events, private dining and weddings. Located in a historic building facing onto Piccadilly, 195 presents the finest contemporary cuisine combined with outstanding service.

Tramp (nightclub)
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
40 Jermyn St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6

0207 734 0565

Tramp is a private, members-only nightclub located on Jermyn Street in central London, England. Founded in 1969 by Johnny Gold with business partner Oscar Lerman, and Bill Ofner (Luishek) Tramp is considered to be one of the most exclusive member's clubs in the world and is a regular haunt for celebrities. It was sold by founder Gold in 2003.ReputationOver its 40-year history Tramp has been frequented by many celebrities, socialites, aristocrats and royalty.Peter Sellers, Joan Collins, Liza Minnelli and Ringo Starr have all had their wedding receptions at the glitzy club. Infamous stories that took place under the Tramp chandeliers include a young Shirley MacLaine falling asleep on top of a table overnight, The Who's Keith Moon dancing naked on the dance floor, and comedian Mel Brooks getting on all fours and running around under the tables barking like a dog.Tramp's Gold, a book about the club written by Gold himself and with a foreword from Michael Caine, was published in 2001.

Storm Nightclub London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
28A Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7

0207 839 2633

We are Londons Best Urban music venue. Playing the best in Bashment, Dancehall, Hip Hop, R'n'B, Uk funky and Old School garage. We Play the music you want to hear, not what some head office monkey thinks you want (like every other venue around Central London) No other venue offer the selection of amazing music coupled with the fantastic, recession busting drinks prices all under one roof. If Urban music is your thing, don't bother going anywhere else. That way you wont be dissapointed!

The Club at Cafe Royal
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
68 Regent Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 4DY

4402074063370

Residing within the iconic Café Royal, originally established in 1865 and now a luxury hotel, The Club at Café Royal has been conceived to ensure that the iconic Regent Street venue once again becomes a crucible for free-thinkers, captains of industry, the creative and the notorious. Celebrating a long legacy of famed patrons, The Club welcomes the return of today’s leaders and stars from the worlds of fashion and design, business and politics, entertainment and media, arts and culture, gastronomy and sport, aristocracy and royalty Occupying the first floor of the stunning Grade II listed building, The Club is designed to be a comfortable and creative space where members are encouraged to pursue their creative vocations, to work, socialise, network and relax. A curated programme of events ranges from intimate parties with some of the world’s top DJs to pioneering talks and seminars around the creative and business industries. The Club at Café Royal is open from from 7am until late, for breakfast, lunch, dinner and drinks.

Shaftesbury Avenue
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
65 - 73 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 6

020 7031 4300

Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, that runs in a north-easterly direction from Piccadilly Circus to New Oxford Street, crossing Charing Cross Road at Cambridge Circus. From Piccadilly Circus to Cambridge Circus it is in the City of Westminster and from Cambridge Circus to New Oxford Street it is in the London Borough of Camden.Shaftesbury Avenue was built in the late 19th century (1877–86) by the architect George Vulliamy and the engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette to provide a north-south traffic artery through the crowded districts of St. Giles and Soho. It was also part of a slum clearance measure, to push impoverished workers out of the city centre although the street's construction was stalled by legislation requiring rehousing some of these displaced residents, overcrowding persisted. Charles Booth's Poverty Map shows the neighbourhood makeup shortly after Shaftesbury Avenue opened. It is generally considered the heart of London's West End theatre district, with the Lyric, Apollo, Gielgud and Queen's theatres clustered together on the north side of the road between Piccadilly Circus and Charing Cross Road. At the intersection of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road there is also the large Palace Theatre. Finally, the north-eastern end of the road has another large theatre, called the Shaftesbury Theatre.

Leicester Square Gardens
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
50 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7LU

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Capital Radio
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
30 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 0

20-77666000

Marian Goodman Gallery
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Lower John Street
London, United Kingdom W1F 9DY

02070990088

All Bar One Leicester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
48 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7LU

Historical Place Near Piccadilly Circus

Big Ben
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
The Clock Tower, Houses of Parliament, Palace of Westminister, London
Westminster, United Kingdom SW1A 0AA

Big Ben is the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London, and often extended to refer to the clock and the clock tower.

Trafalgar Square
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 5

20-79301565

Trafalgar Square is a public square in the City of Westminster, Central London, built around the area formerly known as Charing Cross. Its name commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, a British naval victory in the Napoleonic Wars with France and Spain that took place on 21 October 1805 off the coast of Cape Trafalgar, Spain.The site of Trafalgar Square had been a significant landmark since the 13th century and originally contained the King's Mews. After George IV moved the mews to Buckingham Palace, the area was redeveloped by John Nash but progress was slow after his death and the square did not open until 1844. The 169ft Nelson's Column at its centre is guarded by four lion statues. A number of commemorative statues and sculptures occupy the square but the Fourth Plinth, left empty since 1840, has been host to contemporary art since 1999.The square has been used for community gatherings and political demonstrations including Bloody Sunday, the first Aldermaston March, anti-war protests, and campaigns against climate change. A Christmas tree has been donated to the square by Norway since 1947 and is erected for twelve days before and after Christmas Day. The square is a centre of annual celebrations on New Year's Eve. It was well known for its feral pigeons until their removal in the early 21st century.

Westminster Abbey
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, United Kingdom SW1P 3PA

020 7222 5152

Big Ben
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Westminster
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

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Big Ben is the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London, and often extended to refer to the clock and the clock tower. The tower is officially known as Elizabeth Tower, renamed to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II in 2012; previously it was known simply as the Clock Tower. The tower holds the second largest four-faced chiming clock in the world (after Minneapolis City Hall). The tower was completed in 1859 and had its 150th anniversary on 31 May 2009, during which celebratory events took place. The tower has become one of the most prominent symbols of the United Kingdom and is often in the establishing shot of films set in London.TowerThe Elizabeth Tower, more popularly known as Big Ben, was raised as a part of Charles Barry's design for a new palace, after the old Palace of Westminster was largely destroyed by fire on the night of 16 October 1834. The new parliament was built in a neo-gothic style. Although Barry was the chief architect of the palace, he turned to Augustus Pugin for the design of the clock tower, which resembles earlier Pugin designs, including one for Scarisbrick Hall. The design for the tower was Pugin's last design before his final descent into madness and death, and Pugin himself wrote, at the time of Barry's last visit to him to collect the drawings: "I never worked so hard in my life for Mr Barry for tomorrow I render all the designs for finishing his bell tower & it is beautiful." The tower is designed in Pugin's celebrated Gothic Revival style, and is 315ft high.

Somerset House
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, United Kingdom WC2R 1LA

+44 (0)20 7845 4600

A unique part of the London cultural scene with a distinctive public programme including Skate, concerts, an open-air film season, a diverse range of temporary exhibitions focusing on contemporary culture, an extensive learning programme, free guided tours and 55 fountains that dance in the The Edmond J. Safra Fountain Court in summer. Somerset House currently attracts approximately 2.5 million visitors every year.

Buckingham Palace London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1AA

020 7930 4832

UK Parliament
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Houses of Parliament, Westminster
London, United Kingdom SW1A 0AA

0800 112 4272

The work of Parliament is carried out by the House of Commons, the House of Lords and Select Committees of both Houses. Find out more about how Parliament works: http://www.parliament.uk/about/how/

Palace of Westminster
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Westminster
City of Westminster, United Kingdom SW1A 2

02072225152

The Palace of Westminster is the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Commonly known as the Houses of Parliament after its occupants, it is also known as the 'heart of British politics'. The Palace lies on the northern bank of the River Thames in the City of Westminster, in central London. Its name, which derives from the neighbouring Westminster Abbey, may refer to either of two structures: the Old Palace, a medieval building complex that was destroyed by fire in 1834, and its replacement, the New Palace that stands today. For ceremonial purposes, the palace retains its original style and status as a royal residence and is the property of the Crown.The first royal palace was built on the site in the eleventh century, and Westminster was the primary residence of the Kings of England until a fire destroyed much of the complex in 1512. After that, it served as the home of the Parliament of England, which had been meeting there since the thirteenth century, and also as the seat of the Royal Courts of Justice, based in and around Westminster Hall. In 1834, an even greater fire ravaged the heavily rebuilt Houses of Parliament, and the only medieval structures of significance to survive were Westminster Hall, the Cloisters of St Stephen's, the Chapel of St Mary Undercroft, and the Jewel Tower.

Horse Guards
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Horse Guards Parade
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

020 7270 5000

Horse Guards is a large Grade I listed building in the Palladian style between Whitehall and Horse Guards Parade in London. The first Horse Guards building was built on the site of the former tiltyard of Westminster Palace in 1664. It was demolished in 1749 and was replaced by the current building which was built between 1750 and 1753 by John Vardy after the death of original architect in 1748 William Kent. Horse Guards Road runs north-south on the western boundary of the parade ground, while Horse Guards Avenue runs east from Whitehall on other side of the building, to Victoria Embankment.The building served as the offices of the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces until 1904 when the post was abolished and replaced by the Chief of the General Staff. The Chief of the General staff moved to the Old War Office Building in 1906 and Horse Guards subsequently became the headquarters of two major Army commands: the London District and the Household Cavalry. The building is the formal entrance to St James's Palace via St. James's Park (though this is now entirely symbolic). Only the monarch is allowed to drive through its central archway, or those given a pass (formerly made of ivory).

Methodist Central Hall Westminster
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Storeys Gate
London, United Kingdom SW1H 9NH

0044 20 7654 3809

Wellington Arch
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Constitution Hill
London, United Kingdom W1J 7JZ

0207 9302726

Set in the heart of Royal London at Hyde Park Corner, Wellington Arch is a landmark for Londoners and visitors alike and a great addition to a memorable day out in London. The balconies also offer unique views across London and of the Household Cavalry, passing beneath on their way to and from the Changing of the Guard at Horse Guards Parade every morning. It was originally commissioned as a grand outer entrance to Buckingham Palace and moved to its present site in 1882.

BT Tower
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
60 Cleveland Mews
London, United Kingdom W1T 6

020 7432 5050

The BT Tower is a communications tower located in Fitzrovia, London, owned by BT Group. It has been previously known as the GPO Tower, the Post Office Tower and the Telecom Tower. The main structure is 177m high, with a further section of aerial rigging bringing the total height to 191m. It should not be confused with the BT Centre (the global headquarters of BT). Its Post Office code was YTOW.Upon completion it overtook the Millbank Tower to become the tallest building in both London and the United Kingdom, titles it held until 1980, when it in turn was overtaken by the NatWest Tower.History20th centuryThe tower was commissioned by the General Post Office (GPO). Its primary purpose was to support the microwave aerials then used to carry telecommunications traffic from London to the rest of the country, as part of Britain's microwave network.It replaced a much shorter steel lattice tower which had been built on the roof of the neighbouring Museum telephone exchange in the late 1940s to provide a television link between London and Birmingham. The taller structure was required to protect the radio links' "line of sight" against some of the tall buildings in London then in the planning stage. These links were routed via other GPO microwave stations at Harrow Weald, Bagshot, Kelvedon Hatch and Fairseat, and to places like the London Air Traffic Control Centre at West Drayton.

Shakespeare's Head Pub
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Carnaby St
London, United Kingdom W1F 7

+4420 7734 2911

The Official Facebook Page for The Shakespeares Head, Oxford Circus, London.

Trafalgar Studios
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
14 Whitehall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

Trafalgar Studios, formerly the Whitehall Theatre until 2004, is a West End theatre in Whitehall, near Trafalgar Square, in the City of Westminster, London.Also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation, the building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. Studio 1, the larger of the two spaces with 380 seats, opened on 3 June 2004 with the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Othello. Studio 2, with 100 seats, opened in October 2005 with the play Cyprus.History1930 to 1996The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. It had 634 seats. The theatre opened on 29 September 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre's licensee. In November 1933 Henry Daniell appeared there as Portman in Afterwards. Hackett presented several other plays of his own before leaving in 1934, and the theatre built its reputation for modern comedies throughout the rest of the decade. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the West End. In 1942, The Whitehall Follies, featuring Phyllis Dixey, the first stripper to perform in the theatre district, opened with great fanfare and became an immediate success. Dixey leased the theatre and remained in it for the next five years.

Churchill War Rooms
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Clive Steps, King Charles Street
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2AQ

0207 930 6961

Follow us on Facebook and join our growing community of fans. Discover in-depth information about Churchill War Rooms, special content, and discuss and share with others.

St James's Palace
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

Scotland Yard
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
8-10 Broadway, Westminster
City of Westminster, United Kingdom SW1H 0AZ

02072301212

Scotland Yard is a metonym for the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Service, the territorial police force responsible for policing most of London.The name derives from the location of the original Metropolitan Police headquarters at 4 Whitehall Place, which had a rear entrance on a street called Great Scotland Yard. The Scotland Yard entrance became the public entrance to the police station, and over time the street and the Metropolitan Police became synonymous. The New York Times wrote in 1964 that just as Wall Street gave its name to New York's financial district, Scotland Yard became the name for police activity in London.The force moved away from Great Scotland Yard in 1890, and the name New Scotland Yard was adopted for the subsequent headquarters. The current New Scotland Yard is located on Broadway in Victoria and has been the Metropolitan Police's headquarters since 1967. In summer 2013, it was announced that the force would move back to the former site of Scotland Yard, the Curtis Green Building, which is located on the Victoria Embankment and the headquarters will be renamed Scotland Yard.

The Banqueting House
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Whitehall House, 41 Whitehall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2ER

+44 (0) 844 482 7777

This revolutionary building, the first in England to be designed in a Palladian style by Inigo Jones, was finished in 1622 for James I. Intended for the splendour and exuberance of court masques, the Banqueting House is probably most famous for one real life drama: the execution of Charles I which took place here in 1649 to the ‘dismal, universal groan’ of the crowd. One of Charles’ last sights was he walked through the Banqueting House to his death was the magnificent ceiling, painted by Peter Paul Rubens in 1630-4.

Downing Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
st. Downing
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

020 7270 3000

Downing Street in London, United Kingdom, has for more than three hundred years housed the official residences of two of the most senior British Cabinet ministers: the First Lord of the Treasury, an office now synonymous with that of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom; and the Second Lord of the Treasury, an office held by the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The Prime Minister's official residence is 10 Downing Street; the Chancellor's official residence is next door at Number 11. The government's Chief Whip has an official residence at Number 12, although the current Chief Whip's residence is at Number 9.Downing Street is in Whitehall in central London, a few minutes' walk from the Houses of Parliament and a little further from Buckingham Palace. The street was built in the 1680s by Sir George Downing on the site of a mansion, Hampden House. The houses on the south side of the street were demolished in the 19th century to make way for government offices now occupied by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. "Downing Street" is used as a metonym for the Government of the United Kingdom.

Inside Buckingham Palace
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace, London SW1A 1AA
London, United Kingdom

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Landmark Near Piccadilly Circus

Trafalgar Square
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square, Westminster
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2N 5

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Leicester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Leicester Square
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2H 7DE

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Leicester Square) is a pedestrianised square in the West End of London, England. It was laid out in 1670 and is named after the contemporary Leicester House, itself named after Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester.The square was originally a gentrified residential area, with tenants including Frederick, Prince of Wales and artists William Hogarth and Joshua Reynolds. It became more down-market in the late 18th century as Leicester House was demolished and retail developments took place, becoming a centre for entertainment. Several major theatres were established in the 19th century, which were converted to cinemas towards the middle of the next. Leicester Square holds a number of nationally important cinemas such as the Odeon Leicester Square, Empire, Leicester Square and the now closed Odeon West End, which are frequently used for film premières, The nearby Prince Charles Cinema is popular for showing cult films and marathon film runs. The square remains a popular tourist attraction, including hosting events for the Chinese New Year.The square has always had a park in its centre, which was originally Lammas land. The park's fortunes have varied over the centuries, reaching near dilapidation in the mid-19th century after changing ownership several times. It was restored under the direction of St Martin in the Fields parish of their right to use the previously common land. The parishioners appealed to King Charles I, and he appointed three members of the privy council to arbitrate. Lord Leicester was ordered to keep part of his land (thereafter known as Leicester Fields and later as Leicester Square)(1713–1788

Hamleys
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
188-196 Regent Street
London, United Kingdom London W1B 5BT

0871 704 1977

Hamleys is the oldest and largest toy shop in the world and one of the world's best-known retailers of toys. Founded by William Hamley as "Noah's Ark" in High Holborn, London, in 1760, it moved to its current site on Regent Street in 1881. This flagship store is set over seven floors, with more than 50,000 toys on sale. It is considered one of the city's prominent tourist attractions, receiving around five million visitors each year. The chain has ten other outlets in the United Kingdom and nearly 50 franchises worldwide.Hamleys was bought by the Icelandic investment company Baugur Group in 2003 but was taken over by Baugur's main investor, Landsbanki, when the group defaulted. In 2012, the French toy retailer Groupe Ludendo bought the business for £60 million. In 2015 it was reported that Groupe Ludendo was negotiating the sale of Hamleys, possibly to a Hong Kong company owned by a relative of the owner of department store House of Fraser. Subsequently, it was sold to the Chinese footwear company C.banner for an estimated $154 million.HistoryHamleys is the oldest and largest toy shop in the world. It is named after William Hamley, who founded a toy shop called "Noah's Ark" at No. 231 High Holborn, London, in 1760. Ownership of the shop passed through the family, and by the time it was operated by Hamley's grandsons in 1837, the store had become famous, counting royalty and nobility among its customers.

Carnaby London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Carnaby Street
London, United Kingdom W1F 9PS

+44 (0) 20 7333 8118

This style village includes Carnaby Street, Newburgh and Marshall Streets, food quarter Ganton Street, Kingly Street, Foubert’s Place, Beak Street, Broadwick Street, Marlborough and Lowndes Courts and the vibrant open air courtyard, Kingly Court. Carnaby is perfectly located between Oxford Circus and Piccadilly Circus in the centre of London’s West End.

Royal Academy of Arts
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Burlington House, Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0BD

02073008000

Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
47 Frith Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 4

020 7439 0747

Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club is a prominent jazz club which has operated in London, England since 1959.The club opened on 30 October 1959 in a basement at 39 Gerrard Street in London's Soho district. It was set up and managed by musicians Ronnie Scott and Pete King. In 1965 it moved to a larger venue nearby at 47 Frith Street. The original venue continued in operation as the "Old Place" until the lease ran out in 1967, and was used for performances by the up-and-coming generation of musicians.Zoot Sims was the club's first transatlantic visitor in 1962, and was succeeded by many others (often saxophonists whom Scott and King, tenor saxophonists themselves, admired, such as Johnny Griffin, Lee Konitz, Sonny Rollins and Sonny Stitt) in the years that followed. Many UK jazz musicians were also regularly featured, including Tubby Hayes and Dick Morrissey who would both drop in for jam sessions with the visiting stars. In the mid-1960s, Ernest Ranglin was the house guitarist. The club's house pianist until 1967 was Stan Tracey. For nearly 30 years it was home of a Christmas residency to George Melly and John Chilton's Feetwarmers. In 1978, the club established the label Ronnie Scott's Jazz House, which issued both live performances from the club and new recordings.

Nelson's Column
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom London WC2N 5

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Trafalgar Studios
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
14 Whitehall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

Trafalgar Studios, formerly the Whitehall Theatre until 2004, is a West End theatre in Whitehall, near Trafalgar Square, in the City of Westminster, London.Also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation, the building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. Studio 1, the larger of the two spaces with 380 seats, opened on 3 June 2004 with the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Othello. Studio 2, with 100 seats, opened in October 2005 with the play Cyprus.History1930 to 1996The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. It had 634 seats. The theatre opened on 29 September 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre's licensee. In November 1933 Henry Daniell appeared there as Portman in Afterwards. Hackett presented several other plays of his own before leaving in 1934, and the theatre built its reputation for modern comedies throughout the rest of the decade. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the West End. In 1942, The Whitehall Follies, featuring Phyllis Dixey, the first stripper to perform in the theatre district, opened with great fanfare and became an immediate success. Dixey leased the theatre and remained in it for the next five years.

St Martin-in-the-Fields
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 4JH

020 7766 1100

Royal Automobile Club
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
89 Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 5

020 7930 2345

The Royal Automobile Club is a British private club and is not to be confused with RAC, an automotive services company, which it formerly owned.It has two club houses: one in London at 89–91 Pall Mall, and the other in the countryside at Woodcote Park, Surrey, next to the City of London Freemen's School. Like many other gentlemen's clubs in London today, the Royal Automobile Club now permits women to be members.HistoryIt was founded on 10 August 1897 as the Automobile Club of Great Britain . The headquarters was originally in a block of flats at 4 Whitehall Court, moving to 119 Piccadilly in 1902.During 1902 the organisation, together with the recently formed Association of Motor Manufactures and Traders campaigned vigorously for the relaxation of speed limits claiming that the 14 mph speed limit imposed by the Locomotives on Highways Act 1896 was 'absurd' and was seldom observed. The organisations, with support from the Prime Minister Arthur Balfour, had considerable influence over the forthcoming Motor Car Act 1903 which originally proposed to remove all speed limits for cars while introducing the offence of driving recklessly. In the face of considerable opposition a speed limit of 20 mph was retained in addition to the creation of the offence of driving recklessly, dangerously or negligently.

Ambassadors Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
West Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 9ND

The Ambassadors Theatre, is a West End theatre located in West Street, near Cambridge Circus on the Charing Cross Road in the City of Westminster. It is one of the smallest of the West End theatres, seating a maximum of 195 people in the Dress Circle and 251 in the Stalls.HistoryThe theatre was, along with the adjacent St Martin's conceived by their architect, W. G. R. Sprague, as companions, born at the same time in 1913, but the First World War interrupted the construction of the latter for three years. The Ambassadors was built with the intention of being an intimate, smaller theatre and is situated opposite the renowned restaurant The Ivy, favourite haunt of the theatrical elite.The theatre was Grade II listed by English Heritage in March 1973.New Ambassadors eraIn 1996, the venue was bought by its namesake the Ambassador Theatre Group, now the largest operator of theatres in the West End. It was first split into two small spaces, by creating a false floor at circle level, and used by the Royal Court. Then in 1999 the venue was returned to its original design, renamed the New Ambassadors and hosted niche works and plays not normally seen outside of smaller fringe venues. However, within a few years the theatre had largely reverted to playing material seen as more commercially viable for its location in the West End.

St James's Church, Piccadilly
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
197 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0

020 7734 4511

St James's Church, Piccadilly, also known as St James's Church, Westminster, and St James-in-the-Fields, is an Anglican church on Piccadilly in the centre of London, United Kingdom. The church was designed and built by Sir Christopher Wren.The church is built of red brick with Portland stone dressings. Its interior has galleries on three sides supported by square pillars, and the nave has a barrel vault supported by Corinthian columns. The carved marble font and limewood reredos are both notable examples of the work of Grinling Gibbons.HistoryIn 1662, Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans, was granted land for residential development on what was then the outskirts of London. He set aside land for the building of a parish church and churchyard on the south side of what is now Piccadilly. Christopher Wren was appointed the architect in 1672 and the church was consecrated on 13 July 1684 by Henry Compton, the Bishop of London. In 1685 the parish of St James was created for the church.

Tramp (nightclub)
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
40 Jermyn St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6

0207 734 0565

Tramp is a private, members-only nightclub located on Jermyn Street in central London, England. Founded in 1969 by Johnny Gold with business partner Oscar Lerman, and Bill Ofner (Luishek) Tramp is considered to be one of the most exclusive member's clubs in the world and is a regular haunt for celebrities. It was sold by founder Gold in 2003.ReputationOver its 40-year history Tramp has been frequented by many celebrities, socialites, aristocrats and royalty.Peter Sellers, Joan Collins, Liza Minnelli and Ringo Starr have all had their wedding receptions at the glitzy club. Infamous stories that took place under the Tramp chandeliers include a young Shirley MacLaine falling asleep on top of a table overnight, The Who's Keith Moon dancing naked on the dance floor, and comedian Mel Brooks getting on all fours and running around under the tables barking like a dog.Tramp's Gold, a book about the club written by Gold himself and with a foreword from Michael Caine, was published in 2001.

Tramp (nightclub)
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
40 Jermyn St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6

0207 734 0565

Tramp is a private, members-only nightclub located on Jermyn Street in central London, England. Founded in 1969 by Johnny Gold with business partner Oscar Lerman, and Bill Ofner (Luishek) Tramp is considered to be one of the most exclusive member's clubs in the world and is a regular haunt for celebrities. It was sold by founder Gold in 2003.ReputationOver its 40-year history Tramp has been frequented by many celebrities, socialites, aristocrats and royalty.Peter Sellers, Joan Collins, Liza Minnelli and Ringo Starr have all had their wedding receptions at the glitzy club. Infamous stories that took place under the Tramp chandeliers include a young Shirley MacLaine falling asleep on top of a table overnight, The Who's Keith Moon dancing naked on the dance floor, and comedian Mel Brooks getting on all fours and running around under the tables barking like a dog.Tramp's Gold, a book about the club written by Gold himself and with a foreword from Michael Caine, was published in 2001.

Savile Row
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
3 savile row, london
London, United Kingdom W1S 3

020 7734 2436

Savile Row is a street in Mayfair, central London. Known principally for its traditional bespoke tailoring for men, the street has had a varied history that has included accommodating the headquarters of the Royal Geographical Society at 1 Savile Row, where significant British explorations to Africa and the South Pole were planned; and more recently, the Apple office of the Beatles at 3 Savile Row, where the band's final live performance was held on the roof of the building.Originally named Savile Street, it was built between 1731 and 1735 as part of the development of the Burlington Estate. It was designed under the influence of Burlington's interpretation of Palladian architecture, known as "Burlingtonian". Henry Flitcroft, under the supervision of Daniel Garrett, appears to have been the main architect – though 1 and 22–23 Savile Row were designed by William Kent. Initially, the street was occupied mainly by military officers and their wives; later William Pitt the Younger and Irish-born playwright and MP, Richard Brinsley Sheridan were residents.Tailors started doing business in the area in the late 18th century; first in Cork Street, about 1790, then by 1803 in Savile Row itself. In 1846, Henry Poole, later credited as the creator of the dinner jacket or tuxedo, opened an entrance to Savile Row from his tailoring premises in Old Burlington Street. In 1969, Nutters of Savile Row modernised the style and approach of traditional Savile Row tailoring; a modernisation that continued in the 1990s with the "New Bespoke Movement", involving the designers Richard James, Ozwald Boateng, and Timothy Everest. The term "bespoke" as applied to fine tailoring is understood to have originated in Savile Row, and came to mean a suit cut and made by hand.

St. James's Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St. James's, London, SW1
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4JU

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St. James's Square is the only square in the exclusive St James's district of the City of Westminster. It has predominantly Georgian and Neo-Georgian architecture and a garden in the centre. For its first two hundred or so years it was one of the three or four most fashionable residential address in London. It is now home to the headquarters of a number of well-known businesses, including BP and Rio Tinto Group; to three private members' clubs, the East India Club, the Canning Club and the Naval and Military Club; to the High Commission of Cyprus; and to the London Library. Also based in the square is the premises of the think tank Chatham House. The square's main feature is an equestrian statue of William III erected in 1808.HistoryIn 1662 Charles II extended a lease over the 45 acres of Pall Mall (St James's) Field held by Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans to 1720 and soon afterwards the earl began to lay out the property for development. The earl petitioned the king that the class of occupants they both hoped to attract to the new district would not take houses without the prospect of eventually acquiring them outright, and in 1665 the king granted the freehold of the site of St. James's Square and some closely adjacent parts of the field to the earl's trustees. The location was convenient for the royal palaces of Whitehall and St James. The houses on the east, north and west sides of the square were soon developed, each of them being constructed separately as was usual at that time.

St. James's Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St. James's, London, SW1
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4JU

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St. James's Square is the only square in the exclusive St James's district of the City of Westminster. It has predominantly Georgian and Neo-Georgian architecture and a garden in the centre. For its first two hundred or so years it was one of the three or four most fashionable residential address in London. It is now home to the headquarters of a number of well-known businesses, including BP and Rio Tinto Group; to three private members' clubs, the East India Club, the Canning Club and the Naval and Military Club; to the High Commission of Cyprus; and to the London Library. Also based in the square is the premises of the think tank Chatham House. The square's main feature is an equestrian statue of William III erected in 1808.HistoryIn 1662 Charles II extended a lease over the 45 acres of Pall Mall (St James's) Field held by Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans to 1720 and soon afterwards the earl began to lay out the property for development. The earl petitioned the king that the class of occupants they both hoped to attract to the new district would not take houses without the prospect of eventually acquiring them outright, and in 1665 the king granted the freehold of the site of St. James's Square and some closely adjacent parts of the field to the earl's trustees. The location was convenient for the royal palaces of Whitehall and St James. The houses on the east, north and west sides of the square were soon developed, each of them being constructed separately as was usual at that time.

Wimbledon Village
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
60 High Street
London, United Kingdom SW19

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Lulworth Cove, Dorset
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
BH20 5RS
London, United Kingdom

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Chatham House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
10 St James's Square
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4L

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The Royal Institute of International Affairs, commonly known as Chatham House, is a non-profit, non-governmental organisation based in London whose mission is to analyse and promote the understanding of major international issues and current affairs. It is the originator of the Chatham House Rule and takes its name from the building where it is based, a Grade I listed 18th-century house in St. James's Square, designed in part by Henry Flitcroft and occupied by three British prime ministers, including William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham.In the University of Pennsylvania’s 2015 Global Go To Think Tanks Report, Chatham House is ranked the second most influential think tank in the world after the Brookings Institution, and the world's most influential non-U.S. think tank. In 2009, Chatham House was also named the top non-U.S. think tank by Foreign Policy magazine, which listed it as one of the top "scholars" for being among a handful of stars of the think-tank world who are regularly relied upon to set agendas and craft new initiatives.The current chairman of the Council of Chatham House is Stuart Popham and its director is Robin Niblett. The research directors are Rob Bailey, Patricia Lewis, Paola Subacchi and Alex Vines.

Landmark Near Piccadilly Circus

Trafalgar Square
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square, Westminster
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2N 5

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Leicester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Leicester Square
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2H 7DE

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Leicester Square) is a pedestrianised square in the West End of London, England. It was laid out in 1670 and is named after the contemporary Leicester House, itself named after Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester.The square was originally a gentrified residential area, with tenants including Frederick, Prince of Wales and artists William Hogarth and Joshua Reynolds. It became more down-market in the late 18th century as Leicester House was demolished and retail developments took place, becoming a centre for entertainment. Several major theatres were established in the 19th century, which were converted to cinemas towards the middle of the next. Leicester Square holds a number of nationally important cinemas such as the Odeon Leicester Square, Empire, Leicester Square and the now closed Odeon West End, which are frequently used for film premières, The nearby Prince Charles Cinema is popular for showing cult films and marathon film runs. The square remains a popular tourist attraction, including hosting events for the Chinese New Year.The square has always had a park in its centre, which was originally Lammas land. The park's fortunes have varied over the centuries, reaching near dilapidation in the mid-19th century after changing ownership several times. It was restored under the direction of St Martin in the Fields parish of their right to use the previously common land. The parishioners appealed to King Charles I, and he appointed three members of the privy council to arbitrate. Lord Leicester was ordered to keep part of his land (thereafter known as Leicester Fields and later as Leicester Square)(1713–1788

Hamleys
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
188-196 Regent Street
London, United Kingdom London W1B 5BT

0871 704 1977

Hamleys is the oldest and largest toy shop in the world and one of the world's best-known retailers of toys. Founded by William Hamley as "Noah's Ark" in High Holborn, London, in 1760, it moved to its current site on Regent Street in 1881. This flagship store is set over seven floors, with more than 50,000 toys on sale. It is considered one of the city's prominent tourist attractions, receiving around five million visitors each year. The chain has ten other outlets in the United Kingdom and nearly 50 franchises worldwide.Hamleys was bought by the Icelandic investment company Baugur Group in 2003 but was taken over by Baugur's main investor, Landsbanki, when the group defaulted. In 2012, the French toy retailer Groupe Ludendo bought the business for £60 million. In 2015 it was reported that Groupe Ludendo was negotiating the sale of Hamleys, possibly to a Hong Kong company owned by a relative of the owner of department store House of Fraser. Subsequently, it was sold to the Chinese footwear company C.banner for an estimated $154 million.HistoryHamleys is the oldest and largest toy shop in the world. It is named after William Hamley, who founded a toy shop called "Noah's Ark" at No. 231 High Holborn, London, in 1760. Ownership of the shop passed through the family, and by the time it was operated by Hamley's grandsons in 1837, the store had become famous, counting royalty and nobility among its customers.

Carnaby London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Carnaby Street
London, United Kingdom W1F 9PS

+44 (0) 20 7333 8118

This style village includes Carnaby Street, Newburgh and Marshall Streets, food quarter Ganton Street, Kingly Street, Foubert’s Place, Beak Street, Broadwick Street, Marlborough and Lowndes Courts and the vibrant open air courtyard, Kingly Court. Carnaby is perfectly located between Oxford Circus and Piccadilly Circus in the centre of London’s West End.

Royal Academy of Arts
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Burlington House, Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0BD

02073008000

Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
47 Frith Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 4

020 7439 0747

Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club is a prominent jazz club which has operated in London, England since 1959.The club opened on 30 October 1959 in a basement at 39 Gerrard Street in London's Soho district. It was set up and managed by musicians Ronnie Scott and Pete King. In 1965 it moved to a larger venue nearby at 47 Frith Street. The original venue continued in operation as the "Old Place" until the lease ran out in 1967, and was used for performances by the up-and-coming generation of musicians.Zoot Sims was the club's first transatlantic visitor in 1962, and was succeeded by many others (often saxophonists whom Scott and King, tenor saxophonists themselves, admired, such as Johnny Griffin, Lee Konitz, Sonny Rollins and Sonny Stitt) in the years that followed. Many UK jazz musicians were also regularly featured, including Tubby Hayes and Dick Morrissey who would both drop in for jam sessions with the visiting stars. In the mid-1960s, Ernest Ranglin was the house guitarist. The club's house pianist until 1967 was Stan Tracey. For nearly 30 years it was home of a Christmas residency to George Melly and John Chilton's Feetwarmers. In 1978, the club established the label Ronnie Scott's Jazz House, which issued both live performances from the club and new recordings.

Nelson's Column
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom London WC2N 5

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Trafalgar Studios
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
14 Whitehall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

Trafalgar Studios, formerly the Whitehall Theatre until 2004, is a West End theatre in Whitehall, near Trafalgar Square, in the City of Westminster, London.Also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation, the building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. Studio 1, the larger of the two spaces with 380 seats, opened on 3 June 2004 with the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Othello. Studio 2, with 100 seats, opened in October 2005 with the play Cyprus.History1930 to 1996The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. It had 634 seats. The theatre opened on 29 September 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre's licensee. In November 1933 Henry Daniell appeared there as Portman in Afterwards. Hackett presented several other plays of his own before leaving in 1934, and the theatre built its reputation for modern comedies throughout the rest of the decade. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the West End. In 1942, The Whitehall Follies, featuring Phyllis Dixey, the first stripper to perform in the theatre district, opened with great fanfare and became an immediate success. Dixey leased the theatre and remained in it for the next five years.

St Martin-in-the-Fields
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 4JH

020 7766 1100

Royal Automobile Club
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
89 Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 5

020 7930 2345

The Royal Automobile Club is a British private club and is not to be confused with RAC, an automotive services company, which it formerly owned.It has two club houses: one in London at 89–91 Pall Mall, and the other in the countryside at Woodcote Park, Surrey, next to the City of London Freemen's School. Like many other gentlemen's clubs in London today, the Royal Automobile Club now permits women to be members.HistoryIt was founded on 10 August 1897 as the Automobile Club of Great Britain . The headquarters was originally in a block of flats at 4 Whitehall Court, moving to 119 Piccadilly in 1902.During 1902 the organisation, together with the recently formed Association of Motor Manufactures and Traders campaigned vigorously for the relaxation of speed limits claiming that the 14 mph speed limit imposed by the Locomotives on Highways Act 1896 was 'absurd' and was seldom observed. The organisations, with support from the Prime Minister Arthur Balfour, had considerable influence over the forthcoming Motor Car Act 1903 which originally proposed to remove all speed limits for cars while introducing the offence of driving recklessly. In the face of considerable opposition a speed limit of 20 mph was retained in addition to the creation of the offence of driving recklessly, dangerously or negligently.

Ambassadors Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
West Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 9ND

The Ambassadors Theatre, is a West End theatre located in West Street, near Cambridge Circus on the Charing Cross Road in the City of Westminster. It is one of the smallest of the West End theatres, seating a maximum of 195 people in the Dress Circle and 251 in the Stalls.HistoryThe theatre was, along with the adjacent St Martin's conceived by their architect, W. G. R. Sprague, as companions, born at the same time in 1913, but the First World War interrupted the construction of the latter for three years. The Ambassadors was built with the intention of being an intimate, smaller theatre and is situated opposite the renowned restaurant The Ivy, favourite haunt of the theatrical elite.The theatre was Grade II listed by English Heritage in March 1973.New Ambassadors eraIn 1996, the venue was bought by its namesake the Ambassador Theatre Group, now the largest operator of theatres in the West End. It was first split into two small spaces, by creating a false floor at circle level, and used by the Royal Court. Then in 1999 the venue was returned to its original design, renamed the New Ambassadors and hosted niche works and plays not normally seen outside of smaller fringe venues. However, within a few years the theatre had largely reverted to playing material seen as more commercially viable for its location in the West End.

St James's Church, Piccadilly
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
197 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0

020 7734 4511

St James's Church, Piccadilly, also known as St James's Church, Westminster, and St James-in-the-Fields, is an Anglican church on Piccadilly in the centre of London, United Kingdom. The church was designed and built by Sir Christopher Wren.The church is built of red brick with Portland stone dressings. Its interior has galleries on three sides supported by square pillars, and the nave has a barrel vault supported by Corinthian columns. The carved marble font and limewood reredos are both notable examples of the work of Grinling Gibbons.HistoryIn 1662, Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans, was granted land for residential development on what was then the outskirts of London. He set aside land for the building of a parish church and churchyard on the south side of what is now Piccadilly. Christopher Wren was appointed the architect in 1672 and the church was consecrated on 13 July 1684 by Henry Compton, the Bishop of London. In 1685 the parish of St James was created for the church.

Tramp (nightclub)
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
40 Jermyn St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6

0207 734 0565

Tramp is a private, members-only nightclub located on Jermyn Street in central London, England. Founded in 1969 by Johnny Gold with business partner Oscar Lerman, and Bill Ofner (Luishek) Tramp is considered to be one of the most exclusive member's clubs in the world and is a regular haunt for celebrities. It was sold by founder Gold in 2003.ReputationOver its 40-year history Tramp has been frequented by many celebrities, socialites, aristocrats and royalty.Peter Sellers, Joan Collins, Liza Minnelli and Ringo Starr have all had their wedding receptions at the glitzy club. Infamous stories that took place under the Tramp chandeliers include a young Shirley MacLaine falling asleep on top of a table overnight, The Who's Keith Moon dancing naked on the dance floor, and comedian Mel Brooks getting on all fours and running around under the tables barking like a dog.Tramp's Gold, a book about the club written by Gold himself and with a foreword from Michael Caine, was published in 2001.

Tramp (nightclub)
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
40 Jermyn St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6

0207 734 0565

Tramp is a private, members-only nightclub located on Jermyn Street in central London, England. Founded in 1969 by Johnny Gold with business partner Oscar Lerman, and Bill Ofner (Luishek) Tramp is considered to be one of the most exclusive member's clubs in the world and is a regular haunt for celebrities. It was sold by founder Gold in 2003.ReputationOver its 40-year history Tramp has been frequented by many celebrities, socialites, aristocrats and royalty.Peter Sellers, Joan Collins, Liza Minnelli and Ringo Starr have all had their wedding receptions at the glitzy club. Infamous stories that took place under the Tramp chandeliers include a young Shirley MacLaine falling asleep on top of a table overnight, The Who's Keith Moon dancing naked on the dance floor, and comedian Mel Brooks getting on all fours and running around under the tables barking like a dog.Tramp's Gold, a book about the club written by Gold himself and with a foreword from Michael Caine, was published in 2001.

Savile Row
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
3 savile row, london
London, United Kingdom W1S 3

020 7734 2436

Savile Row is a street in Mayfair, central London. Known principally for its traditional bespoke tailoring for men, the street has had a varied history that has included accommodating the headquarters of the Royal Geographical Society at 1 Savile Row, where significant British explorations to Africa and the South Pole were planned; and more recently, the Apple office of the Beatles at 3 Savile Row, where the band's final live performance was held on the roof of the building.Originally named Savile Street, it was built between 1731 and 1735 as part of the development of the Burlington Estate. It was designed under the influence of Burlington's interpretation of Palladian architecture, known as "Burlingtonian". Henry Flitcroft, under the supervision of Daniel Garrett, appears to have been the main architect – though 1 and 22–23 Savile Row were designed by William Kent. Initially, the street was occupied mainly by military officers and their wives; later William Pitt the Younger and Irish-born playwright and MP, Richard Brinsley Sheridan were residents.Tailors started doing business in the area in the late 18th century; first in Cork Street, about 1790, then by 1803 in Savile Row itself. In 1846, Henry Poole, later credited as the creator of the dinner jacket or tuxedo, opened an entrance to Savile Row from his tailoring premises in Old Burlington Street. In 1969, Nutters of Savile Row modernised the style and approach of traditional Savile Row tailoring; a modernisation that continued in the 1990s with the "New Bespoke Movement", involving the designers Richard James, Ozwald Boateng, and Timothy Everest. The term "bespoke" as applied to fine tailoring is understood to have originated in Savile Row, and came to mean a suit cut and made by hand.

St. James's Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St. James's, London, SW1
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4JU

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St. James's Square is the only square in the exclusive St James's district of the City of Westminster. It has predominantly Georgian and Neo-Georgian architecture and a garden in the centre. For its first two hundred or so years it was one of the three or four most fashionable residential address in London. It is now home to the headquarters of a number of well-known businesses, including BP and Rio Tinto Group; to three private members' clubs, the East India Club, the Canning Club and the Naval and Military Club; to the High Commission of Cyprus; and to the London Library. Also based in the square is the premises of the think tank Chatham House. The square's main feature is an equestrian statue of William III erected in 1808.HistoryIn 1662 Charles II extended a lease over the 45 acres of Pall Mall (St James's) Field held by Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans to 1720 and soon afterwards the earl began to lay out the property for development. The earl petitioned the king that the class of occupants they both hoped to attract to the new district would not take houses without the prospect of eventually acquiring them outright, and in 1665 the king granted the freehold of the site of St. James's Square and some closely adjacent parts of the field to the earl's trustees. The location was convenient for the royal palaces of Whitehall and St James. The houses on the east, north and west sides of the square were soon developed, each of them being constructed separately as was usual at that time.

St. James's Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St. James's, London, SW1
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4JU

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St. James's Square is the only square in the exclusive St James's district of the City of Westminster. It has predominantly Georgian and Neo-Georgian architecture and a garden in the centre. For its first two hundred or so years it was one of the three or four most fashionable residential address in London. It is now home to the headquarters of a number of well-known businesses, including BP and Rio Tinto Group; to three private members' clubs, the East India Club, the Canning Club and the Naval and Military Club; to the High Commission of Cyprus; and to the London Library. Also based in the square is the premises of the think tank Chatham House. The square's main feature is an equestrian statue of William III erected in 1808.HistoryIn 1662 Charles II extended a lease over the 45 acres of Pall Mall (St James's) Field held by Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans to 1720 and soon afterwards the earl began to lay out the property for development. The earl petitioned the king that the class of occupants they both hoped to attract to the new district would not take houses without the prospect of eventually acquiring them outright, and in 1665 the king granted the freehold of the site of St. James's Square and some closely adjacent parts of the field to the earl's trustees. The location was convenient for the royal palaces of Whitehall and St James. The houses on the east, north and west sides of the square were soon developed, each of them being constructed separately as was usual at that time.

Wimbledon Village
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
60 High Street
London, United Kingdom SW19

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Lulworth Cove, Dorset
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
BH20 5RS
London, United Kingdom

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Chatham House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
10 St James's Square
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4L

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The Royal Institute of International Affairs, commonly known as Chatham House, is a non-profit, non-governmental organisation based in London whose mission is to analyse and promote the understanding of major international issues and current affairs. It is the originator of the Chatham House Rule and takes its name from the building where it is based, a Grade I listed 18th-century house in St. James's Square, designed in part by Henry Flitcroft and occupied by three British prime ministers, including William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham.In the University of Pennsylvania’s 2015 Global Go To Think Tanks Report, Chatham House is ranked the second most influential think tank in the world after the Brookings Institution, and the world's most influential non-U.S. think tank. In 2009, Chatham House was also named the top non-U.S. think tank by Foreign Policy magazine, which listed it as one of the top "scholars" for being among a handful of stars of the think-tank world who are regularly relied upon to set agendas and craft new initiatives.The current chairman of the Council of Chatham House is Stuart Popham and its director is Robin Niblett. The research directors are Rob Bailey, Patricia Lewis, Paola Subacchi and Alex Vines.

Public Places and Attractions Near Piccadilly Circus

Chinatown
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
17 Whitcomb Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7

Southbank Centre
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Belvedere Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 8XX

20-74012636

Hello, and welcome to the official Southbank Centre Facebook page. Keep up to date with our latest news, forthcoming events and festivals and please feel free to comment and review as we love to hear what you think. Southbank Centre includes: › Royal Festival Hall › Hayward Gallery › Queen Elizabeth Hall › Purcell Room › Saison Poetry Library

Ripley's Believe It or Not! London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
The London Pavilion, 1 Piccadilly Circus
London, United Kingdom W1J 0DA

+44(0)20 3238 0022

With more than 700 amazing artefacts, the attraction celebrates the weird, wonderful and bizarre in all its forms. With everything you can imagine (and plenty more you can’t), Ripley’s Believe It or Not! London is a family day out that’s definitely out of the ordinary

Piccadilly Theatre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly Theatre, 16 Denman Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 7DY

02089692308

This breathtaking musical staging of one of the most popular films of all time promises to be a gripping roller-coaster ride of romance, drama and excitement.

Broadcasting House
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
BBC Broadcasting House Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AA

020 7743 8000

Broadcasting House is the headquarters of the BBC, in Portland Place and Langham Place, London. The first radio broadcast was made on 15 March 1932, and the building was officially opened two months later, on 15 May. The main building is in Art Deco style, with a facing of Portland stone over a steel frame. It is a Grade II* listed building and includes the BBC Radio Theatre, where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience, and lobby that was used as a location for filming the 1998 BBC television series In the Red.As part of a major consolidation of the BBC's property portfolio in London, Broadcasting House has been extensively renovated and extended. This involved the demolition of post-war extensions on the eastern side of the building, replaced by a new wing completed in 2005. The wing was named the "John Peel Wing" in 2012, after the disc jockey. BBC London, BBC Arabic Television and BBC Persian Television are housed in the new wing, which also contains the reception area for BBC Radio 1 and BBC Radio 1Xtra (the studios themselves are in the new extension to the main building).The main building was refurbished, and an extension built to the rear. The radio stations BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 4 Extra and the BBC World Service transferred to refurbished studios within the building. The extension links the old building with the John Peel Wing, and includes a new combined newsroom for BBC News, with studios for the BBC News channel, BBC World News and other news programming. The move of news operations from BBC Television Centre completed in March 2013.

Noel Coward Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
85-87 St Martin's Lane
London, United Kingdom WC2N 4AU

+44 (0) 20 7759 8010

Londyn
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
66 LANDSBURY DRIVE HAYES
London, United Kingdom

London is the capital and most populous city of England and the United Kingdom. Standing on the River Thames in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium. London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12sqmi medieval boundaries. Since at least the 19th century, "London" has also referred to the metropolis around this core, historically split between Middlesex, Essex, Surrey, Kent, and Hertfordshire, which today largely makes up Greater London, governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.London is a leading global city, in the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, professional services, research and development, tourism, and transport. It is one of the world's leading financial centres and has the fifth- or sixth-largest metropolitan area GDP in the world. London is a world cultural capital. It is the world's most-visited city as measured by international arrivals and has the world's largest city airport system measured by passenger traffic. London is the world's leading investment destination, hosting more international retailers and ultra high-net-worth individuals than any other city. London's universities form the largest concentration of higher education institutes in Europe, and a 2014 report placed it first in the world university rankings. According to the report London also ranks first in the world in software, multimedia development and design, and shares first position in technology readiness. In 2012, London became the first city to host the modern Summer Olympic Games three times.

Hungerford Bridge and Golden Jubilee Bridges
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
River Thames
London, United Kingdom SE1 8

0870 500 0600

The Hungerford Bridge crosses the River Thames in London, and lies between Waterloo Bridge and Westminster Bridge. It is a steel truss railway bridge – sometimes known as the Charing Cross Bridge – flanked by two more recent, cable-stayed, pedestrian bridges that share the railway bridge's foundation piers, and which are named the Golden Jubilee Bridges.The north end of the bridge is Charing Cross railway station, and is near Embankment Pier and the Victoria Embankment. The south end is near Waterloo station, County Hall, the Royal Festival Hall, and the London Eye. Each pedestrian bridge has steps and lift access.

Tramp
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
40 Jermyn Street
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6DN

020 7734 0565

Cavendish Square Gardens
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Cavendish Square, London
London, United Kingdom W1G 0

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Institute Of Education
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
20 Bedford Way
London, United Kingdom WC1H 0AL

+44 (0) 20 7612 6136

The Harold Pinter Theatre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
6 Panton St
City of Westminster, United Kingdom SW1Y 4

0207 321 5300

The Harold Pinter Theatre opened on 15 October 1881 as the Royal Comedy Theatre. The theatre's reputation grew through the First World War when C B Cochran and André Charlot presented their famous review shows. The range of work at The Harold Pinter Theatre has been far reaching, from musical comedies to revival and experimental theatre and includes hugely successful shows such as Savages starring Paul Scofield in 1973 and The Rocky Horror Show making its West End debut in 1979. Alan Bennett has appeared with Patricia Routledge in his Talking Heads and Stockard Channing appeared in Six Degrees of Separation, which won best play at the 1993 Olivier Awards. The Homecoming, No-man's Land, Moonlight, The Hothouse and The Caretaker have all been presented in recent years. Maureen Lipman has also graced The Harold Pinter Theatre stage starring in Alan Plater's highly acclaimed comedy, Peggy For You, but The Harold Pinter Theatre's two biggest successes must be The Caretaker starring Michael Gambon in 2000 and an eight week sell out of Little Malcolm and his Struggle Against the Eunuchs in 1999, starring Ewan McGregor and directed by Denis Lawson, which smashed all box office records. More recently, Francesca Annis and Anthony Andrews have starred in Ibsen's Ghosts and 2004 saw the much lauded revival of RC Sherriff's Journey's End and a successful run of The Old Masters by Simon Gray, starring Edward Fox and Peter Bowles. This production was directed by Harold Pinter. In January 2005, Kim Cattrall starred in Peter Hall's production of Whose Life Is It Anyway? by Brian Clark, followed by Tom Courtenay in Brian Friel's The Home Place and Joseph Fiennes and Francesca Annis starred in Epitaph for George Dillon by John Osborne and Anthony Creighton. The Harold Pinter Theatre has also played host to Steptoe and Son, Michael Frayn's Donkey's Years, the Rocky Horror Show, the hilarious high-flying comedy, Boeing-Boeing and many more. Most recently MOJO, Relative Values and the Importance of Being Ernest. Currently home to the Kinks Musical - Sunny Afternoon.

Cool Britannia
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
25-27 Buckingham Palace Road
London, United Kingdom SW1W 0PP

0207 839 7200

Tourist Souvenir Store, Fashion, Souvenirs and Collectibles, Information, London Sightseeing Tours and Attraction tickets. Visit: www.coolbritannia.com

BBC Broadcasting House
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Portland Place
London, United Kingdom W1B 3

Sir John Soane's Museum
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
13 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, United Kingdom WC2A 3BP

Sir John Soane's Museum was formerly the home of the neo-classical architect John Soane. It holds many drawings and models of Soane's projects and the collections of paintings, drawings and antiquities that he assembled.The museum is located in Holborn, London, adjacent to Lincoln's Inn Fields. It is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.HistoryHousesSoane demolished and rebuilt three houses in succession on the north side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. He began with No. 12 (between 1792 and 1794), externally a plain brick house. After becoming Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy in 1806, Soane purchased No. 13, the house next door, today the Museum, and rebuilt it in two phases in 1808–09 and 1812.In 1808–09 he constructed his drawing office and "museum" on the site of the former stable block at the back, using primarily top lighting. In 1812 he rebuilt the front part of the site, adding a projecting Portland Stone facade to the basement, ground and first floor levels and the centre bay of the second floor. Originally this formed three open loggias, but Soane glazed the arches during his lifetime. Once he had moved into No. 13, Soane rented out his former home at No. 12 (on his death it was left to the nation along with No. 13, the intention being that the rental income would fund the running of the Museum).

The Savile Club
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
69 Brook Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 4ER

+44 (0)20 7629 5462

Courtauld Institute of Art
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
WC2R 0RN
London, United Kingdom WC2R 1

The Courtauld Institute of Art, commonly referred to as The Courtauld, is a self-governing college of the University of London specialising in the study of the history of art and conservation. It is among the most prestigious institutions in the world for these disciplines and is widely known for the disproportionate number of directors of major museums drawn from its small body of alumni. The art collection of the Institute is known particularly for its French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings and is housed in the Courtauld Gallery. The Institute and the Gallery are both in Somerset House, in the Strand in London.HistoryThe Institute was founded in 1932 through the philanthropic efforts of the industrialist and art collector Samuel Courtauld, the diplomat and collector Lord Lee of Fareham, and the art historian Sir Robert Witt. Originally the Courtauld Institute was based in Home House, a Robert Adam-designed townhouse in London's Portman Square. The Strand block of Somerset House, designed by William Chambers from 1775–1780, has housed the Courtauld Institute since 1989. The Courtauld celebrated its 75th anniversary during the 2007–08 academic year.

Chatham House
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
10 St James's Square
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4L

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The Royal Institute of International Affairs, commonly known as Chatham House, is a non-profit, non-governmental organisation based in London whose mission is to analyse and promote the understanding of major international issues and current affairs. It is the originator of the Chatham House Rule and takes its name from the building where it is based, a Grade I listed 18th-century house in St. James's Square, designed in part by Henry Flitcroft and occupied by three British prime ministers, including William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham.In the University of Pennsylvania’s 2015 Global Go To Think Tanks Report, Chatham House is ranked the second most influential think tank in the world after the Brookings Institution, and the world's most influential non-U.S. think tank. In 2009, Chatham House was also named the top non-U.S. think tank by Foreign Policy magazine, which listed it as one of the top "scholars" for being among a handful of stars of the think-tank world who are regularly relied upon to set agendas and craft new initiatives.The current chairman of the Council of Chatham House is Stuart Popham and its director is Robin Niblett. The research directors are Rob Bailey, Patricia Lewis, Paola Subacchi and Alex Vines.

British Film Institute
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
21 Stephen St
London, United Kingdom W1T 1

020 7255 1444

Sicilian Avenue, London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Sicilian Avenue
London, United Kingdom WC1A 2QD

020 7831 2181

Public Square Near Piccadilly Circus

Leicester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7HL

Trafalgar Square
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 5

20-79301565

Trafalgar Square is a public square in the City of Westminster, Central London, built around the area formerly known as Charing Cross. Its name commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, a British naval victory in the Napoleonic Wars with France and Spain that took place on 21 October 1805 off the coast of Cape Trafalgar, Spain.The site of Trafalgar Square had been a significant landmark since the 13th century and originally contained the King's Mews. After George IV moved the mews to Buckingham Palace, the area was redeveloped by John Nash but progress was slow after his death and the square did not open until 1844. The 169ft Nelson's Column at its centre is guarded by four lion statues. A number of commemorative statues and sculptures occupy the square but the Fourth Plinth, left empty since 1840, has been host to contemporary art since 1999.The square has been used for community gatherings and political demonstrations including Bloody Sunday, the first Aldermaston March, anti-war protests, and campaigns against climate change. A Christmas tree has been donated to the square by Norway since 1947 and is erected for twelve days before and after Christmas Day. The square is a centre of annual celebrations on New Year's Eve. It was well known for its feral pigeons until their removal in the early 21st century.

Trafalgar Square
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square, Westminster
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2N 5

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Leicester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Leicester Square
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2H 7DE

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Leicester Square) is a pedestrianised square in the West End of London, England. It was laid out in 1670 and is named after the contemporary Leicester House, itself named after Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester.The square was originally a gentrified residential area, with tenants including Frederick, Prince of Wales and artists William Hogarth and Joshua Reynolds. It became more down-market in the late 18th century as Leicester House was demolished and retail developments took place, becoming a centre for entertainment. Several major theatres were established in the 19th century, which were converted to cinemas towards the middle of the next. Leicester Square holds a number of nationally important cinemas such as the Odeon Leicester Square, Empire, Leicester Square and the now closed Odeon West End, which are frequently used for film premières, The nearby Prince Charles Cinema is popular for showing cult films and marathon film runs. The square remains a popular tourist attraction, including hosting events for the Chinese New Year.The square has always had a park in its centre, which was originally Lammas land. The park's fortunes have varied over the centuries, reaching near dilapidation in the mid-19th century after changing ownership several times. It was restored under the direction of St Martin in the Fields parish of their right to use the previously common land. The parishioners appealed to King Charles I, and he appointed three members of the privy council to arbitrate. Lord Leicester was ordered to keep part of his land (thereafter known as Leicester Fields and later as Leicester Square)(1713–1788

Oxford Circus
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Circus
London, United Kingdom London W1C 2

Covent Garden & Picadilly Circus
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Covent Garden
London, United Kingdom WC2H 0

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Parliament Square
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
sq. Parliament
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

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Parliament Square is a square at the northwest end of the Palace of Westminster in London. It features a large open green area in the centre with trees to its west and it contains ten statues of statesmen and other notable individuals.As well as being one of London's main tourist attractions, it is also the place where many demonstrations and protests have been held. The square is overlooked by various official buildings: legislature to the east (in the Houses of Parliament), executive offices to the north (on Whitehall), the judiciary to the west (the Supreme Court), and the church to the south (with Westminster Abbey).LocationBuildings looking upon the square include the churches Westminster Abbey and St Margaret's, Westminster, the Middlesex Guildhall which is the seat of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom, Government Offices Great George Street serving HM Treasury and HM Revenue and Customs, and Portcullis House.Roads that branch off the Parliament Square are St. Margaret Street (towards Millbank), Broad Sanctuary (towards Victoria Street), Great George Street (towards Birdcage Walk), Parliament Street (leading into Whitehall), and Bridge Street (leading onto Westminster Bridge).

T.G.I Friday's - Leicester Square, London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
25/29 Coventry Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 7AG

Empire Leicester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
The Empire Leicester Square, 5-6 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7NA

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Immersive cinematic experience with IMAX and IMPACT Screens. The Empire Leicester Square 5-6 Leicester Square London WC2H 7NA www.empirecinemas.co.uk

Trafalgar square, Lord Nelson
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalger Square
London, United Kingdom

Nelson's Column
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom London WC2N 5

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The Moon Under Water - JD Wetherspoons, Leicester Square, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
28 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7LE

020 7839 2837

Vue West End (Leicester Square)
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
3 Cranbourn Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7AL

08712 240 240

Covent Garden Piazza
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Covent Garden
London, United Kingdom WC2E 8

21 Covent Garden
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
21 The Market Place
London, United Kingdom WC2E 8

+44 (0)20 7836 2137

21 Covent Garden Restaurant and Bar spans three floors of Covent Garden’s Market Building. Serving up a modern Italian menu, you can enjoy gourmet pizzas, crispy bruschettas, fresh salads, flavoursome pastas and delicious salumi & formaggi boards. Tables set out on the cobbled Piazza with white parasols and discreet heating mean 21 can offer year-round alfresco dining! Alternatively, book a table in their Restaurant with cosy, candle-lit alcoves perfect for winter nights, intimate dates or large dinner parties. Be sure to head upstairs for The Print Room with rooftop terraces upstairs to enjoy fantastic views of Covent Garden’s Piazza and the iconic market building. The Print Room Happy Hour runs from 5 to 8pm daily with £4.50 feature cocktails, £2.95 Bottles of Birra Moretti, £12 signature cocktail carafes, £12 carafes of Prosecco & £12 bottles of House Wine! The venue is also available for private & semi-private hire.

Jubilee Gardens
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Belvedere Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

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Berkeley Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Berkeley Square, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

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Berkeley Square is a town square in Mayfair in the West End of London, in the City of Westminster. It was originally laid out in the mid 18th century by architect William Kent.The gardens in the centre are open to the public, and their very large London Plane trees are among the oldest in central London, planted in 1789.DescriptionWhilst Berkeley Square was originally a mostly residential area, there now remains only one residential block on the square – number 48. The square is mostly offices, including a number of hedge funds and wealth management businesses.The square features a sculptural fountain by Alexander Munro, a Pre-Raphaelite sculptor, made in 1865.The buildings around the square include several by other notable architects including Robert Adam, who designed Lansdowne House (since 1935 home of the Lansdowne Club) in the southwest corner of the square on Fitzmaurice Place. The daring staircase-hall of No. 44 is sometimes considered William Kent's masterpiece. Gunter's Tea Shop, founded under a different name in 1757, is also located here.

Odeon Cinema Leister Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
40 Leicester Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7LP

0871 22 44 007

Piccadilly
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 8

Piccadilly is a road in the City of Westminster, London to the south of Mayfair, between Hyde Park Corner in the west and Piccadilly Circus in the east. It is part of the A4 road that connects central London to Hammersmith, Earl's Court, Heathrow Airport and the M4 motorway westward. St James's is to the south of the eastern section, while the western section is built up only on the northern side. At just under in length, Piccadilly is one of the widest and straightest streets in central London.Piccadilly has been a main road since at least medieval times, and in the middle ages was known as "the road to Reading" or "the way from Colnbrook". Around 1611 or 1612, a Robert Baker acquired land in the area and prospered by making and selling piccadills. Shortly after purchasing the land, he enclosed it and erected several dwellings, including his home, Pikadilly Hall. What is now Piccadilly was named Portugal Street in 1663 after Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, and grew in importance after the road from Charing Cross to Hyde Park Corner was closed to allow the creation of Green Park in 1668. Some of the most notable stately homes in London were built on the northern side of the street during this period, including Clarendon House and Burlington House in 1664. Berkeley House, constructed around the same time as Clarendon House, was destroyed by a fire in 1733 and rebuilt as Devonshire House in 1737 by William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire. It was later used as the main headquarters for the Whig party. Burlington House has since been home to several noted societies, including the Royal Academy of Arts, the Geological Society of London and the Royal Astronomical Society. Several members of the Rothschild family had mansions at the western end of the street. St James's Church was consecrated in 1684 and the surrounding area became St James Parish.

Chiquitos Mexican Grill & Bar, Leicester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
20/21 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7LE

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Shopping District Near Piccadilly Circus

Camden Market
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
Camden Market, Camden Lock Place
London, United Kingdom NW1 8AF

020 7485 5511

Borough Market
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
8 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1TL

+44 (0) 20 7407 1002

Community Guidelines We love to hear from our friends and visitors and encourage you all to post your photos and experiences about Borough Market. And if you ask us a question, we'll do our very best to answer it! The Page is not the place to advertise your own page or something that's not related to Borough Market. If you do, then we're sorry, but we'll remove your post. Likewise if you post spam or abusive messages, your post will be removed and you may be banned from our Page. If you're unhappy at anytime with the service or experience you have at the Market, you can email us directly at info@boroughmarket.org.uk. You can find out more about our complaints procedure on our website: http://boroughmarket.org.uk/page/complaints-procedure. Thanks for following us on Facebook - we hope you enjoy our updates!

Oxford Street
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street, London
London, United Kingdom W1K 1NA

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Oxford Street is a major road in the City of Westminster in the West End of London. It is Europe's busiest shopping street, with around half a million daily visitors, and as of 2012 had approximately 300 shops. It is designated as part of the A40, a major road between London and Fishguard, though it is not signed as such, and traffic is regularly restricted to buses and taxis.The road was originally a Roman road, part of the Via Trinobantina between Essex and Hampshire via London. It was known as Tyburn Road through the Middle Ages and was once notorious as a street where prisoners from Newgate Prison would be transported towards a public hanging. It became known as Oxford Road and then Oxford Street in the 18th century, and began to change character from a residential street to commercial and retail purposes by the late 19th century, also attracting street traders, confidence tricksters and prostitution. The first department stores in Britain opened on Oxford Street in the early 20th century, including Selfridges, John Lewis and HMV. Unlike nearby shopping streets such as Bond Street, it has retained an element of downmarket street trading alongside more prestigious retail stores. The street suffered heavy bombing during World War II, and several longstanding stores including John Lewis were completely destroyed and rebuilt from scratch.

Covent Garden
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
41 The Market
London, United Kingdom WC2B 5

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Covent Garden is a district in London on the eastern fringes of the West End, between St. Martin's Lane and Drury Lane. It is associated with the former fruit-and-vegetable market in the central square, now a popular shopping and tourist site, and with the Royal Opera House, which is also known as "Covent Garden". The district is divided by the main thoroughfare of Long Acre, north of which is given over to independent shops centred on Neal's Yard and Seven Dials, while the south contains the central square with its street performers and most of the elegant buildings, theatres and entertainment facilities, including the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane and the London Transport Museum.The area was fields, settled in the 7th century when it became the heart of the Anglo-Saxon trading town of Lundenwic, then returned to fields after Lundenwic was abandoned at the end of the 9th century. By 1201 part of it had been walled off by Westminster Abbey for use as arable land and orchards. Referred to as "the garden of the Abbey and Convent", and later "the Covent Garden", it was seized by Henry VIII and granted to the Earls of Bedford in 1552. The 4th Earl commissioned Inigo Jones to build some fine houses to attract wealthy tenants. Jones designed the Italianate arcaded square along with the church of St Paul's. The design of the square was new to London and had a significant influence on modern town planning, acting as the prototype for new estates as London grew.

Chinatown
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
17 Whitcomb Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7

Oxford Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street W1
London, United Kingdom W2 3

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Carnaby London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Carnaby Street
London, United Kingdom W1F 9PS

+44 (0) 20 7333 8118

This style village includes Carnaby Street, Newburgh and Marshall Streets, food quarter Ganton Street, Kingly Street, Foubert’s Place, Beak Street, Broadwick Street, Marlborough and Lowndes Courts and the vibrant open air courtyard, Kingly Court. Carnaby is perfectly located between Oxford Circus and Piccadilly Circus in the centre of London’s West End.

Oxford Street
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street, London
Marylebone, United Kingdom SW12

Oxford Circus
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 3A

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Oxford Circus is the busiest intersection of Oxford Street (A40) and Regent Street in the West End of London. It is served by many bus routes and by Oxford Circus tube station, which is directly beneath the junction itself.At the end of the 2000s, Oxford Circus had the highest pedestrian volumes recorded anywhere in London. At the busiest times, over 40,000 pedestrians per hour pass through the junction including those accessing the London Underground station.HistoryThe Circus was constructed at the beginning of the 19th century, and was designed by John Nash.2009 diagonal crossingIn 2009, Westminster City Council started a £4m pedestrianisation scheme for the area, allowing shoppers to cross the intersection diagonally as well as the traditional 'straight ahead', turning it into a "pedestrian scramble", much like Tokyo's Shibuya crossing. Work started in Summer 2009, and the crossing opened on 2 November of the same year, by which time the cost had risen to £5 million. Although London Mayor Boris Johnson declared it "a triumph for British engineering, Japanese innovation and good old common sense", it was noted that a fairly similar crossing in Balham, South London had previously opened in 2005 at a cost of £98,000, approximately 50 times cheaper. One was also created in Wood Green.

Covent Garden & Picadilly Circus
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Covent Garden
London, United Kingdom WC2H 0

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Hatton Garden
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
44 Hatton Garden
London, United Kingdom EC1N 8ER

020 7404 3812

Hatton Garden is a street and area in the district of Holborn in the London Borough of Camden. It is most noted for being London's jewellery quarter and centre of the UK diamond trade, but the area is also now home to a diverse range of media and creative businesses.The name 'Hatton Garden' is derived from the garden of the London residence of the Bishop of Ely called Ely Place, which was given to Sir Christopher Hatton by Elizabeth I in 1581, during a vacancy of the see.The area surrounding Hatton Garden has been the centre of London's jewellery trade since medieval times. The old City of London had certain streets, or quarters, dedicated to types of business, and the area around Hatton Garden became a centre for jewellers and jewellery.Nearly 300 of the businesses in Hatton Garden are in the jewellery industry and over 55 shops represent the largest cluster of jewellery retailers in the UK. The largest of these companies is De Beers, the international family of companies that dominate the international diamond trade. De Beers has its headquarters in a complex of offices and warehouses just behind the main Hatton Garden shopping street. The area also plays host to a large number of media, publishing and creative businesses, including Blinkbox and Grey Advertising.Hatton Garden has an extensive underground infrastructure of vaults, tunnels, offices and workshops.Hatton Garden was also the home to the invention of the machine gun. Sir Hiram Maxim had a small factory at 57 Hatton Garden and in 1881 invented and started to produce the Maxim Gun, capable of firing 666 rounds a minute.

Sloane Street
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Sloane St
London, United Kingdom SW1X 9LA

From designer handbags, couture fashion and accessories Sloane Street offers an intimate shopping atmosphere in Knightsbridge boutiques committed to world class service.

House of Fraser
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
318 Oxford St 5th Floor
London, United Kingdom W1G 0

870-1607258

Piccadilly
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 8

Piccadilly is a road in the City of Westminster, London to the south of Mayfair, between Hyde Park Corner in the west and Piccadilly Circus in the east. It is part of the A4 road that connects central London to Hammersmith, Earl's Court, Heathrow Airport and the M4 motorway westward. St James's is to the south of the eastern section, while the western section is built up only on the northern side. At just under in length, Piccadilly is one of the widest and straightest streets in central London.Piccadilly has been a main road since at least medieval times, and in the middle ages was known as "the road to Reading" or "the way from Colnbrook". Around 1611 or 1612, a Robert Baker acquired land in the area and prospered by making and selling piccadills. Shortly after purchasing the land, he enclosed it and erected several dwellings, including his home, Pikadilly Hall. What is now Piccadilly was named Portugal Street in 1663 after Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, and grew in importance after the road from Charing Cross to Hyde Park Corner was closed to allow the creation of Green Park in 1668. Some of the most notable stately homes in London were built on the northern side of the street during this period, including Clarendon House and Burlington House in 1664. Berkeley House, constructed around the same time as Clarendon House, was destroyed by a fire in 1733 and rebuilt as Devonshire House in 1737 by William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire. It was later used as the main headquarters for the Whig party. Burlington House has since been home to several noted societies, including the Royal Academy of Arts, the Geological Society of London and the Royal Astronomical Society. Several members of the Rothschild family had mansions at the western end of the street. St James's Church was consecrated in 1684 and the surrounding area became St James Parish.

Chelsea Market
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
125 Sydney Street
London, United Kingdom SW3 6NR

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Denmark Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Denmark St London WC2H St Giles, Holborn, London
London, United Kingdom WC2H 8NJ

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Denmark Street is a street on the edge of London's West End running from Charing Cross Road to St Giles. It is near St Giles in the Fields Church and Tottenham Court Road station. The street was developed in the late 17th century and named after Prince George of Denmark. Since the 1950s it has been associated with British popular music, first via publishers and later by recording studios and music shops. A blue plaque was unveiled in 2014 commemorating the street's importance to the music industry.The street was originally residential, but became used for commercial purposes in the 19th century. At first, metalwork was a popular trade but it became most famous as Britain's "Tin Pan Alley" housing numerous music publishers' offices. This market declined in the 1960s to be replaced by music shops and independent recording studios. The Rolling Stones recorded at Regent Sound Studio at No. 4 and popular musicians often socialised around the Gioconda café at No. 9, including David Bowie and the Small Faces. Elton John and Bernie Taupin wrote songs at offices on the street through the 1960s, while the Sex Pistols lived above No. 6, and recorded their first demos there. The comic book store, Forbidden Planet and the Helter Skelter music bookshop have also been based on the street. In the 2010s, the surrounding area was redeveloped. Parts of Denmark Street are listed to protect them, but other parts, away from the street itself, are planned to be demolished.

Chapel Market
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Angel, Islington
London, United Kingdom N1 0RW

Whether you are looking for good honest fruit and veg at a great price, a designer burger on the go or a browse around the stalls offering healthy snacks, old fashioned sweets and beautiful bouquets, you will find it here. Just two minutes walk from Angel tube station you can grab yourself all the ingredients for a romantic dinner, complete with flowers and even a new dress or just get yourself a selection of fine cheese, a good book, a tea infusion and a cd for an indulgent night alone. Open every day except Monday this vibrant street market is definitely worth a visit.

Camden Town (market)
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
Camden Lock Place, London NW1
London, United Kingdom NW1 8AH

UNAVAILABLE

Gucci
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
34 Old Bond Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 4QL

Savile Row
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
3 savile row, london
London, United Kingdom W1S 3

020 7734 2436

Savile Row is a street in Mayfair, central London. Known principally for its traditional bespoke tailoring for men, the street has had a varied history that has included accommodating the headquarters of the Royal Geographical Society at 1 Savile Row, where significant British explorations to Africa and the South Pole were planned; and more recently, the Apple office of the Beatles at 3 Savile Row, where the band's final live performance was held on the roof of the building.Originally named Savile Street, it was built between 1731 and 1735 as part of the development of the Burlington Estate. It was designed under the influence of Burlington's interpretation of Palladian architecture, known as "Burlingtonian". Henry Flitcroft, under the supervision of Daniel Garrett, appears to have been the main architect – though 1 and 22–23 Savile Row were designed by William Kent. Initially, the street was occupied mainly by military officers and their wives; later William Pitt the Younger and Irish-born playwright and MP, Richard Brinsley Sheridan were residents.Tailors started doing business in the area in the late 18th century; first in Cork Street, about 1790, then by 1803 in Savile Row itself. In 1846, Henry Poole, later credited as the creator of the dinner jacket or tuxedo, opened an entrance to Savile Row from his tailoring premises in Old Burlington Street. In 1969, Nutters of Savile Row modernised the style and approach of traditional Savile Row tailoring; a modernisation that continued in the 1990s with the "New Bespoke Movement", involving the designers Richard James, Ozwald Boateng, and Timothy Everest. The term "bespoke" as applied to fine tailoring is understood to have originated in Savile Row, and came to mean a suit cut and made by hand.

Subway and Light Rail Station Near Piccadilly Circus

Oxford Circus
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 3A

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Oxford Circus is the busiest intersection of Oxford Street (A40) and Regent Street in the West End of London. It is served by many bus routes and by Oxford Circus tube station, which is directly beneath the junction itself.At the end of the 2000s, Oxford Circus had the highest pedestrian volumes recorded anywhere in London. At the busiest times, over 40,000 pedestrians per hour pass through the junction including those accessing the London Underground station.HistoryThe Circus was constructed at the beginning of the 19th century, and was designed by John Nash.2009 diagonal crossingIn 2009, Westminster City Council started a £4m pedestrianisation scheme for the area, allowing shoppers to cross the intersection diagonally as well as the traditional 'straight ahead', turning it into a "pedestrian scramble", much like Tokyo's Shibuya crossing. Work started in Summer 2009, and the crossing opened on 2 November of the same year, by which time the cost had risen to £5 million. Although London Mayor Boris Johnson declared it "a triumph for British engineering, Japanese innovation and good old common sense", it was noted that a fairly similar crossing in Balham, South London had previously opened in 2005 at a cost of £98,000, approximately 50 times cheaper. One was also created in Wood Green.

Regents Park, London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Regent's Park
London, United Kingdom NW1

0207 0788 359

Baker Street
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
113 Baker St
Oxford, United Kingdom W1U 6TD

Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid the street out in the 18th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived at a fictional 221B Baker Street address. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises.Baker Street is a busy thoroughfare, lying in postcode areas NW1/W1 and forming part of the A41 there. It runs south from Regent's Park, the junction with Park Road, parallel to Gloucester Place, meeting Marylebone Road, Portman Square and Wigmore Street. At the junction with Wigmore Street, Baker Street turns into Orchard Street, which ends when it meets with Oxford Street. After Portman Square the road continues as Orchard Street.The street is served by the London Underground by Baker Street tube station, one of the world's oldest surviving underground stations. Next door is Transport for London's lost property office.

London Metropolitan University
Distance: 3.1 mi Tourist Information
166-220 Holloway Rd
London, United Kingdom N7 8DB

020 7423 0000

Marylebone Rail & Tube Station
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Railway Station, Great Central House, Melcombe Place
London, United Kingdom NW1 6JJ

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Piccadilly
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 8

Piccadilly is a road in the City of Westminster, London to the south of Mayfair, between Hyde Park Corner in the west and Piccadilly Circus in the east. It is part of the A4 road that connects central London to Hammersmith, Earl's Court, Heathrow Airport and the M4 motorway westward. St James's is to the south of the eastern section, while the western section is built up only on the northern side. At just under in length, Piccadilly is one of the widest and straightest streets in central London.Piccadilly has been a main road since at least medieval times, and in the middle ages was known as "the road to Reading" or "the way from Colnbrook". Around 1611 or 1612, a Robert Baker acquired land in the area and prospered by making and selling piccadills. Shortly after purchasing the land, he enclosed it and erected several dwellings, including his home, Pikadilly Hall. What is now Piccadilly was named Portugal Street in 1663 after Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, and grew in importance after the road from Charing Cross to Hyde Park Corner was closed to allow the creation of Green Park in 1668. Some of the most notable stately homes in London were built on the northern side of the street during this period, including Clarendon House and Burlington House in 1664. Berkeley House, constructed around the same time as Clarendon House, was destroyed by a fire in 1733 and rebuilt as Devonshire House in 1737 by William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire. It was later used as the main headquarters for the Whig party. Burlington House has since been home to several noted societies, including the Royal Academy of Arts, the Geological Society of London and the Royal Astronomical Society. Several members of the Rothschild family had mansions at the western end of the street. St James's Church was consecrated in 1684 and the surrounding area became St James Parish.

Embankment
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom WC2N 6NS

Blackfriars, London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
179 Queen Victoria Street
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4DY

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Blackfriars is an area of central London, which lies in the south-west corner of the City of London.The name Blackfriars was first used in 1317 (as Black Freres from the French 'frère' meaning 'brother') and derives from the black cappa worn by the Dominican Friars who moved their priory from Holborn to the area between the River Thames and Ludgate Hill in 1276. Edward I gave permission to rebuild London's city wall, which lay between the river and Ludgate Hill, around their area. The site was used for great occasions of state, including meetings of Parliament and the Privy Council, as well as the location for a divorce hearing in 1529 of Catherine of Aragon and Henry VIII. The priory was eventually closed in 1538 during Henry's Dissolution of the monasteries. Katherine Parr, Henry VIII's sixth and final wife, was born in the area.Some of the buildings were subsequently leased to a group of entrepreneurs who created the Blackfriars Theatre on the site, not far from Shakespeare's Globe Theatre which sat almost directly across on the other side of the river. In 1632, the Society of Apothecaries (a livery company), acquired the monastery's guesthouse and established their base there. The building was destroyed in the Great Fire of London but the Society rebuilt and Apothecaries Hall is still to be found in Blackfriars today.

Chelsea Imperial Wharf
Distance: 3.2 mi Tourist Information
Imperial Wharf
London, United Kingdom SW6 2ZH

Holborn tube station
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
88-94 Kingsway
London, United Kingdom WC2B 6

020 7222 1234

Holborn is a London Underground station in Holborn, central London. It is served by the Central and Piccadilly lines. On the Central line the station is between Tottenham Court Road and Chancery Lane stations; on the Piccadilly line it is between Covent Garden and Russell Square. The station is located at the junction of High Holborn and Kingsway and is in Travelcard Zone 1. Close by are the British Museum, Lincoln's Inn Fields, Red Lion Square, Bloomsbury Square and Sir John Soane's Museum.Located at the junction of two earlier tube railway schemes, the station was opened in 1906 by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR). The station entrances and below ground circulation were largely reconstructed for the introduction of escalators and the opening of Central line platforms in 1933, making the station the only interchange between the lines. Before 1994, Holborn was the northern terminus of the short and little-frequented Piccadilly line branch to Aldwych and two platforms originally used for this service are disused. One of the disused platforms has been used for location filming when a London Underground station platform is needed.

Brixton tube station
Distance: 3.4 mi Tourist Information
427 Brixton Rd
London, United Kingdom SW9 8

020 7222 1234

Brixton is a London Underground station on Brixton Road in the Brixton district of the London Borough of Lambeth, south London. The station is the southern terminus of the Victoria line. The station was opened on 23 July 1971 by the London Transport Executive. It has high usage for an inner suburban station with 27.2 million entries and exits during 2013.DesignFrom the ticket hall, three escalators take passengers to and from the platforms. There are also passenger lifts between street level, the ticket hall and the platforms to provide step free access.The station is laid out as a two-track terminus with a scissors crossover north of the station, and the line continues for a short distance south of the station platforms to form a pair of sidings. These are used for the overnight stabling of a pair of trains, which then form the mornings' first two northbound services.Station improvementsAs part of a framework agreement with London Underground, Chetwoods were engaged to carry out an extensive refurbishment of the passenger areas of Brixton Underground Station. This included an overall redesign of the station’s external façade and entrance lobby, together with refurbishment of a number of smaller retail outlets and the ticket office. The scheme developed the Practice’s expertise in the particular technical and design requirements of underground facilities, benefitting the design approach to projects for other clients such as Network Rail. The refurbishment started in 2001, and was completed in 2010. The station was briefly closed for asbestos removal in 2006. The refurbishment works were a long drawn out process. New panels and lighting have been installed in the escalator shaft.

Gloucester Road tube station
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
130 Gloucester Rd
London, United Kingdom SW7 4

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Gloucester Road is a London Underground station in Kensington, west London. It is served by the District, Circle and Piccadilly lines. On the District and Piccadilly lines, the station is between South Kensington and Earl's Court, and on the Circle line, it is between South Kensington and High Street Kensington. It is in London fare zone 1. The station entrance is located close to the junction of Gloucester Road and Cromwell Road. Close by are the Cromwell Hospital and Baden-Powell House.The station is in two parts: sub-surface platforms, opened in 1868 by the Metropolitan Railway as part of the company's extension of the Inner Circle route from Paddington to South Kensington and to Westminster, and deep-level platforms opened in 1906 by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway. A variety of underground and main line services have operated over the sub-surface tracks. The deep-level platforms have remained largely unaltered. A disused sub-surface platform features periodic art installations as part of Transport for London's Art on the Underground scheme.

London Victoria station
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Street,
London, United Kingdom SW1E 5ND

London Victoria station, generally known as Victoria, is a central London railway terminus and London Underground complex named after nearby Victoria Street, the latter being named after Queen Victoria. With over 81 million passenger entries and exits between April 2013 and March 2014, London Victoria is the second-busiest terminus in London (and the UK) after London Waterloo. It is one of 19 stations managed by Network Rail. The area around the station is an important interchange for other forms of transport: a local bus station is in the forecourt, and Victoria Coach Station for long-distance road coaches is nearby. Victoria is in Travelcard Zone 1.Victoria is a London terminus for both Southern and Southeastern. Southern provides the majority of commuter/regional services to South London and Sussex as well as parts of East Surrey via the Brighton Main Line. Southeastern provides services in South East London and along the Chatham Main Line to Kent. It is also the terminus for the Gatwick Express service to Gatwick Airport.

Kennington Station
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
83 Kennington Park Road
London, United Kingdom SE11 4JQ

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

Finchley Road tube station
Distance: 3.2 mi Tourist Information
Finchley Road
London, United Kingdom NW3 5HT

020 7222 1234

Finchley Road is a London Underground station at the corner of Finchley Road and Canfield Gardens in the London Borough of Camden, north London. It is on the Jubilee line, between West Hampstead and Swiss Cottage and on the Metropolitan line between Baker Street and Wembley Park. It is in Travelcard Zone 2.The station is 100 yards south of the O2 Shopping Centre. It serves the Frognal and South Hampstead areas. It is also a five-minute walk from the Finchley Road & Frognal station on the London Overground's North London Line, and this is marked as an official out-of-system interchange.HistoryThe station was opened on 30 June 1879 by the Metropolitan Railway (MR, now the Metropolitan line) on its extension from its now closed station at St. John's Wood (a different station from the current St. John's Wood Jubilee line station). The station was rebuilt in 1914 with entrances incorporated into a new parade of shops.

Holloway Road Station
Distance: 3.1 mi Tourist Information
299 Holloway Road
London, United Kingdom N7 8HS

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

Holloway Road tube station
Distance: 3.1 mi Tourist Information
299 Holloway Rd
London, United Kingdom N7 6

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

Holloway Road is a station on the London Underground. It is on the Piccadilly line between Caledonian Road and Arsenal stations, and in Travelcard Zone 2. The station opened on 15 December 1906.The station was constructed by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway and was built with two lift shafts, but only one was ever used for lifts. The second shaft was the site of an experimental spiral escalator which was built by the American inventor of escalators, Jesse W. Reno. The experiment was not successful and was never used by the public. In the 1990s, remains of the escalator equipment were excavated from the base of the lift shaft and stored at the London Transport Museum Depot in Acton. From the platforms, a second exit no longer in use is visible and leads to the back of the used lift shaft.The station is adjacent to the site of the former Holloway and Caledonian Road railway station.The station is close to the new Emirates Stadium, the new home of Arsenal football club. As part of the planning permission £5m was due to be spent expanding the current station to cope with increased passenger numbers on match days. However subsequent studies showed that to ensure the station could cope with the numbers the lifts would have to be replaced with escalators which would cost £60m. As a result, the redevelopment plans were put on hold and now at match times the station is exit only, and before a match eastbound trains do not call.

Crossrail C435 Farringdon
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
Farringdon Railway Station
London, United Kingdom

Kennington tube station
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
Kennington Tube Station
London, United Kingdom SE11 4

Kennington is a London Underground station on Kennington Park Road in Kennington on both the Charing Cross and Bank branches of the Northern line. It is within the London Borough of Southwark. Its neighbouring stations to the north are Waterloo on the Charing Cross branch and Elephant & Castle on the Bank branch; the next station to the south is Oval. The station is in Travelcard Zone 2.HistoryThe station was opened on 18 December 1890 as part of London's first deep-level tube, the City & South London Railway (C&SLR) (now the Bank branch of the Northern line). The name 'Kennington' was adopted instead of 'Kennington Park Road' although in fact it was in the civil parish of Newington and thence became part of Southwark rather than in the Kennington part of Lambeth. The layout was originally similar to the current arrangement at Borough, with one platform (the northbound) having level access to the lift, and the other (the southbound) being one floor below it.

Green Park Station
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
77 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 9DZ

Tourist Attraction Near Piccadilly Circus

Trafalgar Square
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 5

20-79301565

Trafalgar Square is a public square in the City of Westminster, Central London, built around the area formerly known as Charing Cross. Its name commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, a British naval victory in the Napoleonic Wars with France and Spain that took place on 21 October 1805 off the coast of Cape Trafalgar, Spain.The site of Trafalgar Square had been a significant landmark since the 13th century and originally contained the King's Mews. After George IV moved the mews to Buckingham Palace, the area was redeveloped by John Nash but progress was slow after his death and the square did not open until 1844. The 169ft Nelson's Column at its centre is guarded by four lion statues. A number of commemorative statues and sculptures occupy the square but the Fourth Plinth, left empty since 1840, has been host to contemporary art since 1999.The square has been used for community gatherings and political demonstrations including Bloody Sunday, the first Aldermaston March, anti-war protests, and campaigns against climate change. A Christmas tree has been donated to the square by Norway since 1947 and is erected for twelve days before and after Christmas Day. The square is a centre of annual celebrations on New Year's Eve. It was well known for its feral pigeons until their removal in the early 21st century.

Royal Opera House
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Covent Garden
London, United Kingdom WC2E 9DD

+44 (0) 20 7240 1200

The Royal Opera, under the direction of Antonio Pappano, is one of the world’s leading opera companies. Based in the iconic Covent Garden theatre, it is renowned for its outstanding performances of both traditional opera as well as commissioning new works by today’s leading opera composers such as Harrison Birtwistle, Mark-Anthony Turnage and Thomas Ades. Some of the most famous singers of all time have performed with the Company including Plácido Domingo, Angela Gheorghiu, Anna Netrebko, Renée Fleming, Bryn Terfel, Jonas Kaufman, Rolando Villazón, Juan Diego Flórez, as well as the late Luciano Pavarotti and Joan Sutherland. The Royal Ballet, led by Director Kevin O’Hare, is Britain’s largest ballet company. The Company has a wide-ranging repertory showcasing the great classical ballets, heritage works from Founder Choreographer Frederick Ashton and Principal Choreographer Kenneth MacMillan, as well as new works by the foremost choreographers of today. Access is a key issue for the Company and its work is seen not just at the Royal Opera House but via televised and cinematic performances, outdoor Big Screen performances, international touring and through the work of the Company’s Education Department.

Leicester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Leicester Square
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2H 7DE

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Leicester Square) is a pedestrianised square in the West End of London, England. It was laid out in 1670 and is named after the contemporary Leicester House, itself named after Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester.The square was originally a gentrified residential area, with tenants including Frederick, Prince of Wales and artists William Hogarth and Joshua Reynolds. It became more down-market in the late 18th century as Leicester House was demolished and retail developments took place, becoming a centre for entertainment. Several major theatres were established in the 19th century, which were converted to cinemas towards the middle of the next. Leicester Square holds a number of nationally important cinemas such as the Odeon Leicester Square, Empire, Leicester Square and the now closed Odeon West End, which are frequently used for film premières, The nearby Prince Charles Cinema is popular for showing cult films and marathon film runs. The square remains a popular tourist attraction, including hosting events for the Chinese New Year.The square has always had a park in its centre, which was originally Lammas land. The park's fortunes have varied over the centuries, reaching near dilapidation in the mid-19th century after changing ownership several times. It was restored under the direction of St Martin in the Fields parish of their right to use the previously common land. The parishioners appealed to King Charles I, and he appointed three members of the privy council to arbitrate. Lord Leicester was ordered to keep part of his land (thereafter known as Leicester Fields and later as Leicester Square)(1713–1788

Covent Garden
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
41 The Market
London, United Kingdom WC2B 5

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Covent Garden is a district in London on the eastern fringes of the West End, between St. Martin's Lane and Drury Lane. It is associated with the former fruit-and-vegetable market in the central square, now a popular shopping and tourist site, and with the Royal Opera House, which is also known as "Covent Garden". The district is divided by the main thoroughfare of Long Acre, north of which is given over to independent shops centred on Neal's Yard and Seven Dials, while the south contains the central square with its street performers and most of the elegant buildings, theatres and entertainment facilities, including the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane and the London Transport Museum.The area was fields, settled in the 7th century when it became the heart of the Anglo-Saxon trading town of Lundenwic, then returned to fields after Lundenwic was abandoned at the end of the 9th century. By 1201 part of it had been walled off by Westminster Abbey for use as arable land and orchards. Referred to as "the garden of the Abbey and Convent", and later "the Covent Garden", it was seized by Henry VIII and granted to the Earls of Bedford in 1552. The 4th Earl commissioned Inigo Jones to build some fine houses to attract wealthy tenants. Jones designed the Italianate arcaded square along with the church of St Paul's. The design of the square was new to London and had a significant influence on modern town planning, acting as the prototype for new estates as London grew.

Oxford Circus
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Circus
London, United Kingdom London W1C 2

Chinatown
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
17 Whitcomb Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7

The Punch and Judy - real page covent garden
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
40 The Market Covent Garden Piazza
London, United Kingdom WC2E 8RF

0207 379 0923

The Punch & Judy is a traditional British pub in Covent Garden Piazza serving great cask ales and freshly cooked traditional pub food

National Portrait Gallery
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
St Martin’s Place
London, United Kingdom WC2H 0

+44(0)20 7306 0055

Covent Garden & Picadilly Circus
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Covent Garden
London, United Kingdom WC2H 0

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Ripley's Believe It or Not! London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
The London Pavilion, 1 Piccadilly Circus
London, United Kingdom W1J 0DA

+44(0)20 3238 0022

With more than 700 amazing artefacts, the attraction celebrates the weird, wonderful and bizarre in all its forms. With everything you can imagine (and plenty more you can’t), Ripley’s Believe It or Not! London is a family day out that’s definitely out of the ordinary

Buckingham Palace London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1AA

020 7930 4832

Leicester Square Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
6 Leicester Place
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7BX

020 7734 2222

LST is a magnificently restored theatre located in the heart of the West End with two exceptional spaces running a healthy programme of comedy, cabaret, dance, music and theatre. The 400 seat theatre boasts 2 bars perfectly positioned in the auditorium with newly-installed cinema style seating and a second intimate Lounge Theatre with a capacity of up to 70 with its own bar and cabaret-style seating.

The Moon Under Water - JD Wetherspoons, Leicester Square, London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
28 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7LE

020 7839 2837

Shaftesbury Theatre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom WC2H 8DP

The Shaftesbury Theatre is a West End Theatre, located on Shaftesbury Avenue, in the London Borough of Camden.HistoryThe theatre was designed for the brothers Walter and Frederick Melville by Bertie Crewe and opened on 26 December 1911 with a production of The Three Musketeers, as the New Prince's Theatre, becoming the Prince's Theatre in 1914. It had a capacity of 2,392 and a stage 31' 10" wide by 31' deep.The Prince's was the last theatre to be built in Shaftesbury Avenue, and is located near New Oxford Street, perhaps explaining the many gaps between performances in its early years. It had considerable success with an 18-week season of Gilbert and Sullivan operas, presented by the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, in 1919. These became a regular attraction at the theatre in the 1920s, interspersed with runs of theatre productions transferred from other venues. Basil Rathbone appeared at the Prince's Theatre in May 1933 when he played Julian Beauclerc in a revival of Diplomacy. The Rose of Persia was revived at the theatre in 1935. The D'Oyly Carte returned in 1942.The theatre was sold to EMI in 1962, and became the Shaftesbury Theatre the following year. Broadway productions that transferred to the theatre for long runs in the 1960s included Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1962)and How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1963).

St James's Palace
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

Piccadilly
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 8

Piccadilly is a road in the City of Westminster, London to the south of Mayfair, between Hyde Park Corner in the west and Piccadilly Circus in the east. It is part of the A4 road that connects central London to Hammersmith, Earl's Court, Heathrow Airport and the M4 motorway westward. St James's is to the south of the eastern section, while the western section is built up only on the northern side. At just under in length, Piccadilly is one of the widest and straightest streets in central London.Piccadilly has been a main road since at least medieval times, and in the middle ages was known as "the road to Reading" or "the way from Colnbrook". Around 1611 or 1612, a Robert Baker acquired land in the area and prospered by making and selling piccadills. Shortly after purchasing the land, he enclosed it and erected several dwellings, including his home, Pikadilly Hall. What is now Piccadilly was named Portugal Street in 1663 after Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, and grew in importance after the road from Charing Cross to Hyde Park Corner was closed to allow the creation of Green Park in 1668. Some of the most notable stately homes in London were built on the northern side of the street during this period, including Clarendon House and Burlington House in 1664. Berkeley House, constructed around the same time as Clarendon House, was destroyed by a fire in 1733 and rebuilt as Devonshire House in 1737 by William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire. It was later used as the main headquarters for the Whig party. Burlington House has since been home to several noted societies, including the Royal Academy of Arts, the Geological Society of London and the Royal Astronomical Society. Several members of the Rothschild family had mansions at the western end of the street. St James's Church was consecrated in 1684 and the surrounding area became St James Parish.

The Ghost Bus Tours
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
(Bus stop outside) 8 Northumberland Ave
London, United Kingdom WC2N 5BY

0844 5678 666

The Ghost Bus Tours is a theatrical sightseeing tour onboard a classic 1960s Routemaster bus, showing you the darker side of London, Edinburgh & York, while providing a piece of comedy horror theatre like no other. See the sites of murder, torture and execution, and learn about the ghosts of the UK and the grisly skeletons in the cupboards. The perfect way to experience the London or Edinburgh, our ghostly tours are designed to entertain and educate while providing a spooky theatrical experience you'll never forget!

Burger King Leicester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
63-65 NORTH STREET
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7LE

020 7930 0158

Abbey Road Studios
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
3 Abbey Road
London, United Kingdom NW8 9AY

020 7266 7000

The Original London Sightseeing Tour
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
17-19 Cockspur St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 5BL

+44 (0) 20 8877 1722

With a history dating back to the early 1900s, The Original London Sightseeing Tour is the first sightseeing tour of its kind. It was formally introduced by London Transport as ‘Service J’ for the Festival of Britain in 1951. The thousands of visitors descending on the capital were invited to take the tour “around the town for half a crown!”. At the time it was described as a non-stop circular tour of London operating with double-decker buses from Buckingham Palace Road in Victoria. As part of the tour, visitors were given a free London Transport Guide Book from which they had to identify the major sights of London. It was the first incarnation of the open-top sightseeing tours that are now a familiar sight in cities across the world.

Tours and Sightseeing Near Piccadilly Circus

Nelson's Column
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom London WC2N 5

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City Cruises
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2JH

+44 (0)20 77 400 400

Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/citycruises City Cruises is the No.1 sightseeing tour on the Thames! Our cruises departing every 30 minutes, every day of the week, all year round, City Cruises gives you the freedom to explore the many sights of the River Thames from our fantastic four piers near popular attractions: Westminster, London Eye, Tower of London and Greenwich. We also operate an hourly circular cruise from Tower – perfect for groups! In addition, you can enjoy lunch, afternoon tea, evening and dinner cruises with us. Our fleet of boats are designed to give you the best vantage point of river life. Sit back, relax and enjoy the views either from open air upper deck or comfortable saloon. Tickets can be purchased at any City Cruises pier, online at www.citycruises.com or call +44 (0)20 77 400 400. Please note that the hours listed above are the opening hours of our Sales and Reservations Centre.

China Town London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC1

07823628466

Churchill War Rooms
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Clive Steps, King Charles Street
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2AQ

0207 930 6961

Follow us on Facebook and join our growing community of fans. Discover in-depth information about Churchill War Rooms, special content, and discuss and share with others.

St James's Palace
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

Thames RIB Experience
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Embankment Pier, Victoria Embankment,
London, United Kingdom WC2N 6NU

0203 245 1177

The Ghost Bus Tours
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
(Bus stop outside) 8 Northumberland Ave
London, United Kingdom WC2N 5BY

0844 5678 666

The Ghost Bus Tours is a theatrical sightseeing tour onboard a classic 1960s Routemaster bus, showing you the darker side of London, Edinburgh & York, while providing a piece of comedy horror theatre like no other. See the sites of murder, torture and execution, and learn about the ghosts of the UK and the grisly skeletons in the cupboards. The perfect way to experience the London or Edinburgh, our ghostly tours are designed to entertain and educate while providing a spooky theatrical experience you'll never forget!

Inside Buckingham Palace
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace, London SW1A 1AA
London, United Kingdom

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Victoria Memorial, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

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The Victoria Memorial is a monument to Queen Victoria, located at the end of The Mall in London, and designed and executed by the sculptor Sir Thomas Brock. Designed in 1901, it was unveiled on 16 May 1911, though it was not completed until 1924. It was the centrepiece of an ambitious urban planning scheme, which included the creation of the Queen’s Gardens to a design by Sir Aston Webb, and the refacing of Buckingham Palace (which stands behind the memorial) by the same architect.Like the earlier Albert Memorial in Kensington Gardens, commemorating Victoria's consort, the Victoria Memorial has an elaborate scheme of iconographic sculpture. The central pylon of the memorial is of Pentelic marble, and individual statues are in Carrara marble and gilt bronze. The memorial weighs 2,300 tonnes and is 104 ft wide. In 1970 it was listed at Grade I.HistoryProposal and announcementsKing Edward VII suggested that a joint Parliamentary committee should be formed to develop plans for a Memorial to Queen Victoria following her death. The first meeting took place on 19 February 1901 at the Foreign Office, Whitehall. The first secretary of the committee was Arthur Bigge, 1st Baron Stamfordham. Initially these meetings were behind closed doors, and the proceedings were not revealed to the public. However the Lord Mayor of London, Sir Joseph Dimsdale, publicly announced that the committee had decided that the Memorial should be "monumental".

The Original London Sightseeing Tour
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
17-19 Cockspur St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 5BL

+44 (0) 20 8877 1722

With a history dating back to the early 1900s, The Original London Sightseeing Tour is the first sightseeing tour of its kind. It was formally introduced by London Transport as ‘Service J’ for the Festival of Britain in 1951. The thousands of visitors descending on the capital were invited to take the tour “around the town for half a crown!”. At the time it was described as a non-stop circular tour of London operating with double-decker buses from Buckingham Palace Road in Victoria. As part of the tour, visitors were given a free London Transport Guide Book from which they had to identify the major sights of London. It was the first incarnation of the open-top sightseeing tours that are now a familiar sight in cities across the world.

Westminster Pier River Cruise
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom

Thames River Cruises
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Unit 4A, Tower Workshops, Riley Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 3DG

0207 237 9111

Wesminster Abbey, Big Ben, Houses of Parliament
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
20 Dean's Yard
London, United Kingdom SW1P 3PA

+44(0)20 7222 5152

Battle of Britain Monument, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
City of Westminster, United Kingdom SW1A 2

The Battle of Britain Monument in London is a sculpture on the Victoria Embankment, overlooking the River Thames, which commemorates the British military personnel who took part in the Battle of Britain during the Second World War.It was unveiled on 18 September 2005, the 65th anniversary of the Battle, by Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, in the presence of many of the surviving airmen known collectively as "The Few", following the Royal Air Force Service of Thanksgiving and Rededication on Battle of Britain Sunday. This service is an annual event, the first of which took place in 1943 at St Paul's Cathedral and since has taken place in Westminster Abbey.The monument was conceived by Bill Bond, founder of the Battle of Britain Historical Society, who was later awarded an MBE for his services to heritage. He was solely responsible for negotiating with the City of Westminster to secure the site of the monument, as well as appointing Donald Insall Associates as architects. He also formed the fundraising committee after raising over £250,000 through an appeal. The budget was £1.74 million which was funded in the main by private donations. Bill Bond appointed Lord Tebbit as chairman of the fundraising committee.

Dinner Cruise Westminster Pier
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2JH

West Indies Cricket Tours
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Irving Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7AT

London: +442032395969

West Indies Cricket Tours is brought to you by Australian Cricket's most seasoned supporters 'Waving The Flag' having followed Australian Cricket to all test nations since 1995. Australia's only supporter group to have done so. (Visit: http://facebook.com/wavingtheflag) Island hopping the Caribbean is THE dream. Palmed beaches of turquoise waters, open-air parties, smooth lifestyles, and hyper-activity of life at the game is a cricket traveller's Nirvana & our speciality. Island hop with Australian Cricket's most suntanned supporters across the Wonderful West Indies in Mar-Apr 2012. We have awesome week by week tours of the Caribbean visiting St Vincent, St Lucia, St Martin, Barbados, Trinidad, and Guyana from first ODI ball to the last ball of Test Cricket over 46 glorious 'Sugar Cane' fueled nights! Please visit our tour home page below and book to join our Australia in the West Indies 'Sugar Caned' Tour 2012. 8 nights from just Aud$1290 (land only)

UK Explorers
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7AQ

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Londra - Lavoro ed Internship in Inghilterra
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Mortimer Street
London, United Kingdom W1W8HS

Chillisauce
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
41 Maltby Street
London, United Kingdom SE13PA

+44 (0) 207 299 1831

Chillisauce is the perfect choice for your event, whatever it may be - with a wide variety of specifically dedicated teams catering for the huge spectrum of people we work with. From the perfect Stag or Hen weekend, or an adrenaline-pumping activity weekend with your friends - we pride ourselves on thoughtful, clever and creative events, with unrelenting customer service. And a sense of humour.

Sajid Ahmed
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
38 Riding House Street
London, United Kingdom W1W 7ES

44 203 376 9600

book Cheap flights to Quito from UK with 9flights.co.uk. Search offers for flights to Quito from major UK airports flying with all leading airlines and get the cheapest flight deal.

Landmark Near Piccadilly Circus

Lyric Theatre, London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue, London, W1D 7ES
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1D 7

20-74945045

The Lyric Theatre is a West End theatre on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster.Designed by the architect C. J. Phipps, it was built by the producer Henry Leslie with profits from the Alfred Cellier and B. C. Stephenson hit, Dorothy (he made £100,000 from this opera), which he transferred from the Prince of Wales Theatre to open his new venue on 17 December 1888. It was the second theatre to be constructed on this stretch of Shaftesbury Avenue and is now the oldest in the street. The foyer and bars were refurbished in 1932-33, and the facade was restored in 1994. At present it seats 967 on four levels, although it originally was designed with a seating capacity of 1,306. The theatre still uses an electric pump to operate its iron curtain.Early in the theatre's history, it staged mostly comic operas, and later it has been a home to light comedies, musicals and straight dramas.The theatre retains many of its original features (including being built behind an original 1767 house front, at the rear to Great Windmill Street, the former house and museum of Sir William Hunter) and the theatre was Grade II listed by English Heritage in September 1960.

The Comedy Store
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
7 Oxendon St
Hackney, United Kingdom SW1Y 4EE

The Comedy Store is a comedy club located in Soho, London, England, opened in 1979 by Don Ward and Peter Rosengard.It was named after The Comedy Store club in the United States, which Rosengard had visited the previous year. Starting out above a strip club, in 1982 they moved to Leicester Square at a premises they were able to take over formally in 1985.The club was the focus of the "alternative comedy" boom in the early 1980s and helped start the careers of many comedians, including Paul Merton, French & Saunders, Alexei Sayle, Rik Mayall, Adrian Edmondson, Ben Elton, Mark Thomas, Andrew Bailey, Pat Condell and John Sparkes.In October 1985, an improvisational group called The Comedy Store Players was formed, consisting of Mike Myers, Neil Mullarkey, Kit Hollerbach, Dave Cohen and Paul Merton. The group has had several lineup changes over the years, and now features a rotating team of Neil Mullarkey, Paul Merton, Josie Lawrence, Richard Vranch (a comedy improviser who also plays piano), Jim Sweeney, Lee Simpson and Andy Smart, together with frequent guest appearances. Several of The Comedy Store Players appeared on the BBC Radio 4 and Channel 4 comedy game show Whose Line Is It Anyway?.

Apollo Theatre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
31 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 7

020 7494 5070

The Apollo Theatre is a Grade II listed West End theatre, on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster, in central London. Designed by the architect Lewin Sharp for owner Henry Lowenfeld, it became the fourth legitimate theatre to be constructed on the street when it opened its doors on 21 February 1901, with the American musical comedy The Belle of Bohemia.HistoryConstructionBecause Henry Lowenfeld had bought land on the newly created Shaftesbury Avenue at the turn of the 20th century – next door to the Lyric Theatre which opened in 1888 – the Apollo is one of the few theatres in London to be freehold.The only complete theatre design of architect Lewin Sharp, the Apollo was specifically designed for musical theatre and named after the Greek god of the arts and leader of the muses. Constructed by builder Walter Wallis of plain London brick in keeping with the neighbouring streets, the front piece is in the Renaissance style with sculpted stone fascia by T. Simpson. The structure encloses a four-level auditorium, with three cantilevered balconies and a first floor central loggia, decorated in the Louis XIV Style by Hubert van Hooydonk. In keeping with then European style, each level has its own foyer and promenade.

St James's Church, Piccadilly
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
197 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0

020 7734 4511

St James's Church, Piccadilly, also known as St James's Church, Westminster, and St James-in-the-Fields, is an Anglican church on Piccadilly in the centre of London, United Kingdom. The church was designed and built by Sir Christopher Wren.The church is built of red brick with Portland stone dressings. Its interior has galleries on three sides supported by square pillars, and the nave has a barrel vault supported by Corinthian columns. The carved marble font and limewood reredos are both notable examples of the work of Grinling Gibbons.HistoryIn 1662, Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans, was granted land for residential development on what was then the outskirts of London. He set aside land for the building of a parish church and churchyard on the south side of what is now Piccadilly. Christopher Wren was appointed the architect in 1672 and the church was consecrated on 13 July 1684 by Henry Compton, the Bishop of London. In 1685 the parish of St James was created for the church.

Harold Pinter Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
6 Panton St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4

020 7369 1731

The Harold Pinter Theatre, formerly the Comedy Theatre until 2011, is a West End theatre, and opened on Panton Street in the City of Westminster, on 15 October 1881, as the Royal Comedy Theatre. It was designed by Thomas Verity and built in just six months in painted (stucco) stone and brick. By 1884 it was known as just the Comedy Theatre. In the mid-1950s the theatre underwent major reconstruction and re-opened in December 1955; the auditorium remains essentially that of 1881, with three tiers of horseshoe-shaped balconies.HistoryIn 1883, the successful operetta Falka had its London première at the theatre, and in 1885, Erminie did the same. The theatre's reputation grew through the First World War when Charles Blake Cochran and André Charlot presented their famous revue shows. Famous actors who appeared here include Henry Daniell who played John Carlton in Secrets in September 1929.The theatre was notable for the role it played in overturning stage censorship by establishing the New Watergate Club in 1956, under producer Anthony Field. The Theatres Act 1843 was still in force and required scripts to be submitted for approval by the Lord Chamberlain's Office. Formation of the club allowed plays that had been banned due to language or subject matter to be performed under "club" conditions.

Shaftesbury Avenue
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
65 - 73 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 6

020 7031 4300

Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, that runs in a north-easterly direction from Piccadilly Circus to New Oxford Street, crossing Charing Cross Road at Cambridge Circus. From Piccadilly Circus to Cambridge Circus it is in the City of Westminster and from Cambridge Circus to New Oxford Street it is in the London Borough of Camden.Shaftesbury Avenue was built in the late 19th century (1877–86) by the architect George Vulliamy and the engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette to provide a north-south traffic artery through the crowded districts of St. Giles and Soho. It was also part of a slum clearance measure, to push impoverished workers out of the city centre although the street's construction was stalled by legislation requiring rehousing some of these displaced residents, overcrowding persisted. Charles Booth's Poverty Map shows the neighbourhood makeup shortly after Shaftesbury Avenue opened. It is generally considered the heart of London's West End theatre district, with the Lyric, Apollo, Gielgud and Queen's theatres clustered together on the north side of the road between Piccadilly Circus and Charing Cross Road. At the intersection of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road there is also the large Palace Theatre. Finally, the north-eastern end of the road has another large theatre, called the Shaftesbury Theatre.

Odeon West End
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
40 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7

0871 224 4007

The Odeon West End, from 1930 to 1988 known as Leicester Square Theatre, was a cinema on the south side of Leicester Square, London. It contained two screens—screen 1 seats 500 and screen 2 seats 832. It was often used for smaller film premieres, and hosted the annual BFI London Film Festival. The building is opposite the much larger flagship Odeon Leicester Square.Odeon Cinemas sold the building to three Irish investors in 2006, though continued to lease it. In 2012 it was bought by the Radisson Edwardian hotel group and closed as a cinema on 1 January 2015, ahead of planned redevelopment as a luxury hotel.HistoryThe Odeon was built in 1930 as the Leicester Square Theatre, a name it largely remained with until 1988. The theatre was built as a cine-variety venue for Jack Buchanan - a penthouse apartment was housed on the roof for the star - and showcased both film and short variety performances, before going over to film on a more permanent basis. A large single screen was housed in an ornate, three-tiered auditorium.It was sold to J. Arthur Rank in 1937 and became Rank's first cinema, although not named Odeon for many years to come.The cinema was modernised in 1968 into a much blander shell, based around a remodelled stalls and single circle. In 1988 it was changed into a two-screen venue (Screen 1 in the former circle and Screen 2 in the stalls) and renamed Odeon West End.The site was sold by Odeon Cinemas to three Irish investors in February 2006, though continued to operate as part of the Odeon chain. Ownership subsequently passed to the Irish National Asset Management Agency and in 2012 it was sold to the Radisson Edwardian hotel company.

Leicester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Leicester Square
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2H 7DE

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Leicester Square) is a pedestrianised square in the West End of London, England. It was laid out in 1670 and is named after the contemporary Leicester House, itself named after Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester.The square was originally a gentrified residential area, with tenants including Frederick, Prince of Wales and artists William Hogarth and Joshua Reynolds. It became more down-market in the late 18th century as Leicester House was demolished and retail developments took place, becoming a centre for entertainment. Several major theatres were established in the 19th century, which were converted to cinemas towards the middle of the next. Leicester Square holds a number of nationally important cinemas such as the Odeon Leicester Square, Empire, Leicester Square and the now closed Odeon West End, which are frequently used for film premières, The nearby Prince Charles Cinema is popular for showing cult films and marathon film runs. The square remains a popular tourist attraction, including hosting events for the Chinese New Year.The square has always had a park in its centre, which was originally Lammas land. The park's fortunes have varied over the centuries, reaching near dilapidation in the mid-19th century after changing ownership several times. It was restored under the direction of St Martin in the Fields parish of their right to use the previously common land. The parishioners appealed to King Charles I, and he appointed three members of the privy council to arbitrate. Lord Leicester was ordered to keep part of his land (thereafter known as Leicester Fields and later as Leicester Square)(1713–1788

Albany (London)
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Albany Courtyard, Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0DS

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The Albany, or simply Albany, is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, London.BuildingThe Albany was built in 1770–74 by Sir William Chambers for the newly created 1st Viscount Melbourne as Melbourne House. It is a three-storey mansion, seven bays (windows) wide, with a pair of service wings flanking a front courtyard. In 1791, Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany abandoned Dover House, Whitehall (now a government office), and took up residence. In 1802 the Duke in turn gave up the house and it was converted by Henry Holland into 69 bachelor apartments (known as "sets"). This was achieved by subdividing the main block and its two service wings, and by adding two new parallel long buildings covering most of the garden, running as far as a new rear gate building on Burlington Gardens. Holland's new buildings of 1802-3 flank a covered walkway supported on thin iron columns and with an upswept roof. The blocks are white painted render in a simpler Regency style than Chambers' work. Most sets are accessed off common staircases without doors, like Oxbridge colleges and the Inns of Court.HistorySince its conversion, the Albany has been a prestigious set of bachelor apartments in London. The residents have included such famous names as the poet Lord Byron and the future Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone, and numerous members of the aristocracy.

St Martin-in-the-Fields
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 4JH

020 7766 1100

Wyndham's Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Charing Cross Road
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2H 0D

0844 482 5120

Wyndham's Theatre is a West End theatre, one of two opened by the actor/manager Charles Wyndham (the other is the Criterion Theatre). Located on Charing Cross Road in the City of Westminster, it was designed c.1898 by W.G.R. Sprague, the architect of six other London theatres between then and 1916. It was designed to seat 759 patrons on three levels although later refurbishment increased this to four. The theatre was Grade II* listed by English Heritage in September 1960.HistoryWyndham had always dreamed of building a theatre of his own and through the admiration of a patron and the financial confidence of friends, he was able to realise his dream when Wyndham's Theatre opened on 16 November 1899, in the presence of the Prince of Wales. The first play performed there was a revival of T. W. Robertson's David Garrick.In 1910, Gerald du Maurier began an association with the theatre which lasted 15 years and to include the stage debut of the screen actress Tallulah Bankhead. Du Maurier's small daughter, Daphne, often watched her father's performance from the wings. Thirty years later she presented her own play, The Years Between, on the same stage.

Duke of York's Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
St Martin's Lane
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2N 4

844-8717627

The Duke of York's Theatre is a West End Theatre in St Martin's Lane, in the City of Westminster, London. It was built for Frank Wyatt and his wife, Violet Melnotte, who retained ownership of the theatre until her death in 1935. It opened on 10 September 1892 as the Trafalgar Square Theatre, with Wedding Eve. The theatre, designed by architect Walter Emden became known as the Trafalgar Theatre in 1894 and the following year became the Duke of York's to honour the future King George V.One of the earliest musical comedies, Go-Bang, was a success at the theatre in 1894. In 1900, Jerome K. Jerome's Miss Hobbs was staged as well as David Belasco's Madame Butterfly, which was seen by Puccini, who later turned it into the famous opera. This was also the theatre where J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up debuted on 27 December 1904. Many famous British actors have appeared here, including Basil Rathbone, who played Alfred de Musset in Madame Sand in June 1920, returning in November 1932 as the Unknown Gentleman in Tonight or Never.

Hamleys
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
188-196 Regent Street
London, United Kingdom London W1B 5BT

0871 704 1977

Hamleys is the oldest and largest toy shop in the world and one of the world's best-known retailers of toys. Founded by William Hamley as "Noah's Ark" in High Holborn, London, in 1760, it moved to its current site on Regent Street in 1881. This flagship store is set over seven floors, with more than 50,000 toys on sale. It is considered one of the city's prominent tourist attractions, receiving around five million visitors each year. The chain has ten other outlets in the United Kingdom and nearly 50 franchises worldwide.Hamleys was bought by the Icelandic investment company Baugur Group in 2003 but was taken over by Baugur's main investor, Landsbanki, when the group defaulted. In 2012, the French toy retailer Groupe Ludendo bought the business for £60 million. In 2015 it was reported that Groupe Ludendo was negotiating the sale of Hamleys, possibly to a Hong Kong company owned by a relative of the owner of department store House of Fraser. Subsequently, it was sold to the Chinese footwear company C.banner for an estimated $154 million.HistoryHamleys is the oldest and largest toy shop in the world. It is named after William Hamley, who founded a toy shop called "Noah's Ark" at No. 231 High Holborn, London, in 1760. Ownership of the shop passed through the family, and by the time it was operated by Hamley's grandsons in 1837, the store had become famous, counting royalty and nobility among its customers.

Noël Coward Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
85-87 St Martin's Lane
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7

020 7369 1730

The Noël Coward Theatre, formerly known as the Albery Theatre, is a West End theatre on St. Martin's Lane in the City of Westminster, London. It opened on 12 March 1903 as the New Theatre and was built by Sir Charles Wyndham behind Wyndham's Theatre which was completed in 1899. The building was designed by architect W. G. R. Sprague with an exterior in the classical style and an interior in the Rococo style.In 1973 it was renamed the Albery Theatre in tribute to Sir Bronson Albery who had presided as its manager for many years. Since September 2005, the theatre has been owned by Delfont-Mackintosh Ltd. It underwent major refurbishment in 2006, and was renamed the Noël Coward Theatre when it re-opened for the London premiere of Avenue Q on 1 June 2006. Noël Coward, one of Britain's greatest playwrights and actors, appeared in his own play, I'll Leave It To You, at the then New Theatre in 1920, the first West End production of one of his plays.The theatre seats 872 patrons on four levels. The building is now a Grade II Listed structure.Some productionsAfter opening in 1903 with a production of Rosemary starring Charles Wyndham and his wife, Mary Moore, the Noël Coward Theatre has hosted a number productions. I'll Leave it to You, in 1920, was Coward's first play. George Bernard Shaw's St. Joan with an acclaimed performance by actress Sybil Thorndike ran in 1924.

High Commission of South Africa, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 5DP

+44 (0) 20 7451 7299

The High Commission of South Africa in London is the diplomatic mission from South Africa to the United Kingdom. It is located at South Africa House, a building on Trafalgar Square, London. As well as containing the offices of the High Commissioner, the building also hosts the South African consulate. It has been a Grade II* Listed Building since 1982.HistorySouth Africa House was built by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts in the 1930s on the site of what had been Morley's Hotel until it was demolished in 1936. The building was designed by Sir Herbert Baker, with architectural sculpture by Coert Steynberg and Sir Charles Wheeler, and opened in 1933. The building was acquired by the government of South Africa as its main diplomatic presence in the UK. During World War II, Prime Minister Jan Smuts lived there while conducting South Africa's war plans.In 1961, South Africa became a republic, and withdrew from the Commonwealth due to its policy of racial segregation. Accordingly, the building became an Embassy, rather than a High Commission. During the 1980s, the building, which was one of the only South African diplomatic missions in a public area, was targeted by protesters from around the world. During the 1990 Poll Tax Riots, the building was set alight by rioters, although not seriously damaged.

Marlborough House
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1D

020 7747 6491

Marlborough House is a Grade I listed mansion in the City of Westminster, in The Mall, London, east of St James's Palace. It was built for Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, the favourite and confidante of Queen Anne. For over a century it served as the London residence of the Dukes of Marlborough. It is now the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat.ConstructionThe Duchess wanted her new house to be "strong, plain and convenient and good". The architect Christopher Wren and his son of the same name designed a brick building with rusticated stone quoins (cornerstones) that was completed in 1711.The house was taken up by the Crown in 1817. In the 1820s plans were drawn up to demolish Marlborough House and replace it with a terrace of similar dimensions to the two in neighbouring Carlton House Terrace, and this idea even featured on some contemporary maps, including Christopher and John Greenwood's large-scale London map of 1830, but the proposal was not implemented.

Wimbledon Village
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
60 High Street
London, United Kingdom SW19

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Queen's Chapel
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Savoy Hill
London, United Kingdom

+44 20 7836 7221

The Queen's Chapel is a chapel in central London, England, that was designed by Inigo Jones and built between 1623 and 1625 as an external adjunct to St. James's Palace for Roman Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. It is one of the facilities of the British monarch's personal religious establishment, the Chapel Royal, and should not be confused with the 1540 building known as the Chapel Royal within the palace and just across Marlborough road.HistoryIt was built as a Roman Catholic chapel at a time when the construction of Catholic churches was prohibited in England, and was used by Charles I's Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. From the 1690s it was used by Continental Protestant courtiers. It was built as an integral part of St James's Palace, but when the adjacent private apartments burned down in 1809 they were not replaced and in 1856-57 Marlborough Road was built between the palace and the Queen's Chapel. The result is that physically the chapel now appears to be more part of the Marlborough House complex than of St James's Palace. It became a Chapel Royal again in 1938.Having been taken from the Royal Chapel of All Saints in Windsor Great Park, the body of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother lay at the Queen's Chapel for several days during the preparations for her lying-in-state in Westminster Hall before her ceremonial funeral.

The Photographers' Gallery
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Ramillies St
London, United Kingdom W1F 7

+44 (0) 845 262 1618

The Photographers' Gallery was founded in London in 1971, and was the first independent gallery in Britain that was devoted entirely to photography. It also hosts a café and bookshop.Exhibitions in the gallery have included one-person exhibitions of work by André Kertész, Danny Treacy, Taryn Simon, Ori Gersht, Cuny Janssen, Indrė Šerpytytė and David King. The Gallery hosts the annual Deutsche Börse Photography Prize.HistoryThe Photographers' Gallery was the first public gallery in London to exhibit key names in international photography, such as Juergen Teller (fashion), Robert Capa (photojournalism), Sebastiao Salgado (documentary), and Andreas Gursky (contemporary art). Originally based in a converted Lyons tea bar on Great Newport Street near Leicester Square, The Photographers' Gallery moved to a former textile warehouse on Ramillies Street in Soho, in December 2008.Until 2008 there were plans to construct an all-new building. Instead, Irish architects O'Donnell and Tuomey designed an extension to the existing brick and steel warehouse. After closing for redevelopment in autumn 2010, the new building opened in 2012 at a cost of £9.2m. £3.6m of the cost came from Arts Council England, £2.4m from the sale of its previous building and £2.5m from foundations, trusts, corporate sponsors and an auction.

Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
6 Grafton St
London, United Kingdom W1S 4FE

2074999821

The Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, London is Hong Kong's representation in the United Kingdom. As a Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong does not have an embassy.The office is located at 18 Bedford Square in the City of Westminster in central London; the building also houses the London office of the London Representative Office of the Hong Kong Monetary Authority. It was previously located at 6 Grafton Street..The current Director-General of the office is Priscilla To, who reports to the Special Representative for Hong Kong Economic & Trade Affairs to the European Union, Brussels ETO.The Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office Act 1996 enacted by UK's Parliament conferred a number of personal immunity and tax privileges on HKETO London. When Hong Kong was under British administration, the office was known as the Hong Kong Government Office and was headed by a Commissioner.Apart from the UK, HKETO London is also responsible for maintaining ties with Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Russia and Sweden.