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Smithfield, London, London | Tourist Information


smithfieldmarket.com

31-32 Watling St
London, United Kingdom EC1A 2

020 7248 3151

Smithfield is a locality in the ward of Farringdon Without situated at the City of London's northwest in central London, England. The principal street of the area is West Smithfield.A number of valued City institutions are located in the area, such as St Bartholomew's Hospital, the Charterhouse, and Livery Halls notably those of the Butchers' and Haberdashers' Companies, but Smithfield is best known for its ancient meat market, dating from the 10th century, which is now London's only remaining wholesale market in continuous operation since medieval times. The area also contains London's oldest surviving church, St Bartholomew-the-Great, founded in 1123 AD.Smithfield has borne witness to many bloody executions of heretics and political rebels over the centuries, including major historical figures such as Scottish patriot Sir William Wallace and Wat Tyler, leader of the Peasants' Revolt, among many other religious reformers and dissenters.

City Near Smithfield, London

Londres - Inglaterra - Europa
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Cidade De Londres
London,

Hoxton
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Hoxton street
London, E2 8

Hoxton is a district in the East End of London, England, immediately north of the financial district of the City of London. Hoxton forms the western part of Shoreditch, being part of the ancient parish and subsequent Metropolitan Borough of Shoreditch prior to its incorporation into the London Borough of Hackney. The area of Hoxton is bordered by Regent's Canal on the north side, Wharf Road and City Road to the west, Old Street to the south, and Kingsland Road to the east.Hoxton is also a ward, electing three councillors to Hackney London Borough Council. It forms part of the Hackney South and Shoreditch constituency.Historical HoxtonOrigins"Hogesdon" is first recorded in the Domesday Book, meaning an Anglo-Saxon farm (or "fortified enclosure") belonging to Hoch, or Hocq. Little is recorded of the origins of the settlement, though there was Roman activity around Ermine Street, which ran to the east of the area from the 1st century. In medieval times, Hoxton formed a rural part of Shoreditch parish. It achieved independent ecclesiastical status in 1826 with the founding of its own parish church dedicated to St John the Baptist, though civil jurisdiction was still invested in the Shoreditch vestry. The Worshipful Company of Haberdashers remains Patron of the advowson of the parish of St John's.

Bankside
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
100 Southwark Street, SE1
London, SE1 9

+(44)020 7928 7521

Bankside is a district of London, England, and part of the London Borough of Southwark. Bankside is located on the southern bank of the River Thames, 1.5mi east of Charing Cross, running from a little west of Blackfriars Bridge to just a short distance before London Bridge at St Mary Overie Dock to the east which marks its distinct status from that of 'the Borough' district of Southwark. It is part of a business improvement district known as Better Bankside.

Blackfriars, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
179 Queen Victoria Street
London, EC4V 4DY

Blackfriars is an area of central London, which lies in the south-west corner of the City of London.The name Blackfriars was first used in 1317 (as Black Freres from the French 'frère' meaning 'brother') and derives from the black cappa worn by the Dominican Friars who moved their priory from Holborn to the area between the River Thames and Ludgate Hill in 1276. Edward I gave permission to rebuild London's city wall, which lay between the river and Ludgate Hill, around their area. The site was used for great occasions of state, including meetings of Parliament and the Privy Council, as well as the location for a divorce hearing in 1529 of Catherine of Aragon and Henry VIII. The priory was eventually closed in 1538 during Henry's Dissolution of the monasteries. Katherine Parr, Henry VIII's sixth and final wife, was born in the area.Some of the buildings were subsequently leased to a group of entrepreneurs who created the Blackfriars Theatre on the site, not far from Shakespeare's Globe Theatre which sat almost directly across on the other side of the river. In 1632, the Society of Apothecaries (a livery company), acquired the monastery's guesthouse and established their base there. The building was destroyed in the Great Fire of London but the Society rebuilt and Apothecaries Hall is still to be found in Blackfriars today.

Clerkenwell
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
14-16 Farringdon Lane
London,

020 7405 3856

Clerkenwell is an area of central London in the London Borough of Islington. It was an ancient parish and from 1900 to 1965 formed part of the Metropolitan Borough of Finsbury. The well after which it was named was rediscovered in 1924. The watchmaking and watch repairing trades were once of great importance.London's Little ItalyIn the 1850s the south-western part of Clerkenwell was known as London's "Little Italy" because around 2,000 Italians had settled in the area. The community had mostly dispersed by the 1960s, but the area remains the 'spiritual home' of London's Italians, and is a focal point for more recent Italian immigrants, largely because of St Peter's Italian Church. There are officially over 200,000 Italians in London, and possibly many more. The Italian Procession of Our Lady of Mount Carmel and Sagra takes place each July in the streets surrounding the church.A small number of Italian businesses remain from the nineteenth century including organ builders Chiappa Ltd, and food outlets such as the delicatessen Terroni. Many other Italian firms survive from the period but have relocated elsewhere.HistoryClerks' WellClerkenwell took its name from the Clerks' Well in Farringdon Lane . In the Middle Ages, the London Parish clerks performed annual mystery plays there, based on biblical themes. Part of the well remains visible, incorporated into a 1980s building called Well Court. It is visible through a window of that building on Farringdon Lane. Access to the well is managed by Islington Local History Centre and visits can be arranged by appointment.

Clink 78
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
78 kings cross road
London, WC1X 9QG

Temple, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
2 Temple Place
London, IG8 7

20-85056687

The Temple is an area of central London, in the vicinity of Temple Church, It is one of the main legal districts of the capital and a notable centre for English law, both historically and in the present day. The Temple area of the City of London consists of the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple, which are two of the four Inns of Court and act as local authorities in place of the City of London Corporation within their areas.The Royal Courts of Justice are just to the north and Temple tube station is located to the west in the City of Westminster. The wider Temple area is roughly bound by the River Thames (the Victoria Embankment) to the south, Surrey Street to the west, Strand and Fleet Street to the north, and Carmelite Street and Whitefriars Street to the east.It contains many barristers' chambers, solicitors' offices, as well as some notable legal institutions such as the Employment Appeal Tribunal. The International Institute for Strategic Studies has its headquarters at Arundel House.

New Cross, London, UK
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
greenwich high road se108jl
London, SE14 6

Capoeira Bem-Vindo Angola
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Garrett Centre
London, E2 6LX

Benefits of Capoeira! The art of Capoeira offers substantial benefits to physical and mental health, strength, flexibility, endurance, self-esteem and discipline. Everyone has the ability to learn Capoeira; however, each person expresses their knowledge of it in a unique manner. The group: Capoeira Bem-Vindo Angola is a group founded in London by Paulinha and students. "Bem-Vindo" means "welcome" in portuguese, the idea is to keep the door open to anyone who wants to learn, share or celebrate the art of capoeira. The capoeira angola community in London is very open and is growing fast, this is an amazing opportunity to develop our capoeira, ourselves and the art itself. Capoeira Bem-Vindo is proud to be part of it and happy to bring simplicity, respect and positive feelings. This philosophy is meaningful to us and will help to develop our work and study of capoeira angola. Vamos vadiar! Capoeira Bem-Vindo é um grupo fundado em Londres por Paulinha e alunos. A idéia é manter a porta aberta para quem quiser aprender, compartilhar ou celebrar a arte da capoeira. A Capoeira Angola comunidade em Londres é muito aberto e está crescendo rapidamente, esta é uma incrível oportunidade de desenvolver a nossa capoeira, nós mesmos e da arte em si. Capoeira Bem-Vindo tem orgulho de ser parte dela e feliz por trazer sentimentos de respeito, simplicidade e positiva. Esta filosofia é importante para nós e vai ajudar a desenvolver o nosso trabalho e estudo da Capoeira Angola. Vamos vadiar! Capoeira Bem- Vindo! Classes: Including music, movements and roda. Everybody are welcome to join us to share the good time together! Tuesdays 6.30pm-8.30pm Praxis community Project, Pott Street E2 0EF just 2min away from Bethnal green Tube St. Saturdays 3.30pm-5.30pm Soho Gym Camden Town Please come 15 minutes before the class for strech and warm up :-)

Copenhagen Street N1
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
barnsbury road
London, N1 0

Island Queen, Islington
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
87 Noel Road
London,

Great Suffolk Street
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Great Suffolk Street
London, SE1 0

207-9288428

St Pancras, London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Euston Rd
London, WC1H 9

+44 345 711 41 41

St Pancras is een wijk in het Londense bestuurlijke gebied Camden, in de regio Groot-Londen.

N1 Centre
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
21 Parkfield St
London, N1 0

20-73592674

Embassy Of The State Of Eritrea
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
96 White Lion St
London,

+44 (0) 20 7713 0096

The Embassy of Eritrea in London is the diplomatic mission of Eritrea in the United Kingdom. It is the eastern-most embassy in the city (ignoring the Mission of Somaliland), being far removed from most other embassies which are predominantly located in Central or West London.

Colebrooke Row, Islington, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Colebrooke Row, Islington, N1
London,

Natixis CIB
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
One Carter Lane
London,

Company of Pikemen & Musketeers HAC
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Armoury House, City Road
London, EC1Y 2BQ

Members are dressed as the Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) would have been in the 1640s. Apart from duties in the City of London,the Company is increasingly in demand for state, military, charity and other events, to add colour and pageantry and to gives displays of 17th century drills and music. In recent years the Pikemen & Musketeers have paraded in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and the United States. Only veteran members of the HAC's Territorial Army / Reserve regiment are eligible for membership.

Company of Pikemen & Musketeers HAC
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Armoury House, City Road
London, EC1Y 2BQ

Members are dressed as the Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) would have been in the 1640s. Apart from duties in the City of London,the Company is increasingly in demand for state, military, charity and other events, to add colour and pageantry and to gives displays of 17th century drills and music. In recent years the Pikemen & Musketeers have paraded in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and the United States. Only veteran members of the HAC's Territorial Army / Reserve regiment are eligible for membership.

Cripplegate
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Giles Terrace
London, EC2Y 8

Cripplegate was a gate in the London Wall and a name for the region of the City of London outside the gate. The area was almost entirely destroyed in the Blitz of World War II and today it is the site of the Barbican Estate and Barbican Centre. The name is preserved in the church of St Giles-without-Cripplegate, in the Cripplegate ward of the City, and in a small road named Cripplegate Street which lies slightly to the north of the site of the Wall between Viscount Street and Bridgewater Street.The ward of Cripplegate straddles the (now former) line of the Wall and the old gate and is often (even today) divided into "Within" and "Without" parts, with a beadle and a deputy (alderman) appointed for each part. Since the 1994 (City) and 2003 (ward) boundary changes, most of the ward is Without, with the ward of Bassishaw having expanded considerably into the Within area.HistoryIn 1555, John Gresham endowed the new Gresham's School in Norfolk with three tenements in the parish of St. Giles Without Cripplegate, including 'The White Hind' and 'The Peacock'.During the Second World War the Cripplegate area, a center of the rag trade, was virtually destroyed and by 1951 the resident population of the City stood at only 5,324, of whom 48 lived in Cripplegate. Discussions began in 1952 about the future of the area, and the decision to build new residential properties was taken by the Court of Common Council on 19 September 1957. The area was reopened as the Barbican Estate in 1969. Cripplegate is today the most populous of the four residential wards of the City, with a population of 2,782 (2011).

Best Doctors United Kingdom
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
68 King William Street
London, EC4N 7DZ

Founded in 1989 by a group of professors from Harvard Medical School, Best Doctors provides patients and their treating doctors with access to the world’s leading medical minds, thanks to our unique database of over 53,000 of the world’s leading specialists in more than 430 sub-specialities, all chosen by fellow doctors as the specialists that they themselves would consult with their own health problems. A valuable health complement for company benefits plans, insurance policies and affinity programmes, Best Doctors removes the burden of uncertainty and ensures that people receive the best medical advice that the world has to offer.

Community and Government Near Smithfield, London

The Law Society
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
113 Chancery Lane
London, WC2A 1PL

+44 (0) 20 7242 1222

Barbican Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Silk Street
London, EC2Y 8

020 7638 4141

Malmaison Charterhouse Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
40 Charterhouse Square
London, EC1M 6

200 Aldersgate City Of London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
200 Aldersgate Street
London, EC1A 7

020 3735 7700

Old Bailey Central Criminal Court
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Central Criminal Court, Old Bailey, London, EC4M 7EH
London, EC4M 7EH

020 7248 3277

Barbican Estate
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
3 Lauderdale Pl
London, EC2Y 8

2070-293955

The Barbican Estate is a residential estate built during the 1960s and the 1970s in the City of London, in an area once devastated by World War II bombings and today densely populated by financial institutions. It contains, or is adjacent to, the Barbican Arts Centre, the Museum of London, the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, the Barbican public library, the City of London School for Girls and a YMCA (now closed), forming the Barbican Complex.The Barbican Complex is a prominent example of British brutalist architecture and is Grade II listed as a whole with the exception of the late Milton Court. Milton Court once contained a fire station, medical facilities and some flats and was demolished to allow the construction of a new apartment complex which also contains additional facilities for the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

Etc venues St Paul's
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
200 Aldersgate
London, EC1A 7

020 3735 7700

Golden Lane Estate
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Fann Street
London, EC1Y 0RN

020 7250 1464

The Golden Lane Estate is a 1950s council housing complex in the City of London. It was built on the northern edge of the City, in an area devastated by bombing during World War II.OriginsThe idea to build a residential site to the north of the Cripplegate area, followed devastation of much of the City of London in the Blitz during World War II. Following almost complete destruction in the Blitz, only around 500 residents remained in the City in 1950, a mere 50 of whom lived in Cripplegate. The brief was to provide general needs council housing for the many people who serviced or worked in the City, as part of the comprehensive recovery and re-building strategy of the City of London.As the Estate then fell within the boundary of the Metropolitan Borough of Finsbury, a proportionate number of tenancies were also offered to those on the Finsbury waiting list. A boundary change in 1994 means the estate is today wholly inside the City of London.Compared to other council housing of the era, there was a greater emphasis on the housing needs of single people and couples rather than larger families. Studios and one bedroomed flats comprise the majority (359) of the units (554 in total). The density at 200 person per acre was high, but 60% of the area of the site is open space, a figure made possible by building taller structures than was common in 1951.

Charterhouse Square
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
40 Charterhouse Square
London, EC1M 6

+44 (0)20 7600 3805

Charterhouse Square is a historic square in Smithfield, central London. It lies between Charterhouse Street and Clerkenwell Road, in the extreme south of the London Borough of Islington, just north of the City of London.HistoryIn 1371 a Carthusian monastery was founded by Walter de Manny on what is now the north side of the square. It was established near a 1348 plague pit, which formed the largest mass grave in London during the Black Death, and tens of thousands of bodies were buried there. The name of the monastery, Charterhouse, was derived as an Anglicisation of La Grande Chartreuse, whose order founded the monastery.The Charterhouse was dissolved as a monastery in 1537, and in 1545 was purchased by Sir Edward (later Lord) North (c. 1496-1564) and transformed into a mansion house. Following North's death, the property was bought by Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, who was imprisoned there in 1570 after scheming to marry Mary, Queen of Scots. Later, Thomas Sutton bought the Charterhouse, and on his death in 1611, endowed a hospital (almshouse) and school on the site, which opened in 1614, supporting 80 pensioners (known as 'brothers'). The school for boys coexisted with the home for pensioners until 1872 when Charterhouse School moved to Godalming in Surrey. Following this, the Merchant Taylors' School occupied the buildings until 1933. The square also lends its name to a preparatory school which occupies a building overlooking the square.

125 London Wall
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
125 London Wall
London, EC2V 7

125 London Wall, also known as Alban Gate, is a postmodernist building on London Wall in the City of London. Along with Embankment Place and Vauxhall Cross, it has been described as one of the three projects that established designer Sir Terry Farrell's reputation in the late-1980s to early-1990s. In 2004, writer Deyan Sudjic described it as "postmodernism at its most exuberant", placing it at number 5 in a list of Ten Triumphs of recent UK architecture.HistoryThe district was once the northeast corner of the Roman settlement Londonium. Though one of the oldest settled parts of the city, the area was completely devastated during The Blitz. It was redeveloped in the postwar decades according to modernist planning principles centred on the automobile. London Wall became an "unpleasant 1960s dual carriageway", a "mini-motorway which acted as divisively upon its surroundings as the old wall had". The sites surrounding the roadway were developed under high-rise schemes including the Barbican Estate to the north. The site beside the road upon which Alban Gate was built was originally home to Lee House, a modernist office complex. In 1986, spurred by Margaret Thatcher's "Big Bang" deregulation of financial markets and the need for more large-floorplate modern office space, planning permission was granted for the demolition of Lee House.

The Top Of The Dome- St Pauls Cathedral
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Paul's Churchyard, London
London, EC4M 8AD

St John's Gate, Clerkenwell
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St John's Lane
London, EC1M 4AR

020 7324 4000

St John's Gate is one of the few tangible remains from Clerkenwell's monastic past; it was built in 1504 by Prior Thomas Docwra as the south entrance to the inner precinct of the Priory of the Knights of Saint John - the Knights Hospitallers. The substructure is of brick, the north and south façades of stone. After centuries of decay and much rebuilding, very little of the stone facing is original; heavily restored in the 19th century, the Gate today is in large part a Victorian recreation, the handiwork of a succession of architects — William P. Griffiths, R. Norman Shaw, and J. Oldrid Scott.The building has many historical associations, most notably as the original printing-house for Edward Cave's pioneering monthly, The Gentleman's Magazine, and sometime workplace of Samuel Johnson. From 1701–1709 it was the home of the painter William Hogarth who was just a child at that time. In 1703 his father Richard opened a coffee house there, 'Hogarth's Coffee House', offering Latin lessons together with the coffee.

Nando's @ St Paul's Shopping Centre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
One New Change, St Paul's Unit Su48
London, EC4M 9AD

020 7236 8359

Sir William Wallace Memorial
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
West Smithfield
London, EC1A 9

020 3465 5798

Ludgate Circus
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
12 Ludgate Circus
London, EC4M 7

020 7489 1580

Ludgate Circus is a road junction in the City of London where Farringdon Street and New Bridge Street (together forming part of the A201 road) cross Fleet Street and Ludgate Hill (which rises up to St Paul's Cathedral).Historically the main connection between the City of London and the City of Westminster, Ludgate Circus is situated on the course of the River Fleet, London's largest subterranean river. The circle of Ludgate Circus was constructed between 1864 and 1875 using Haytor granite from Dartmoor in Devon transported via the unique Haytor Granite Tramway.In Charles Dickens' Dictionary of London (1879) the area was described as "Farringdon-circus". In Rumpole of the Bailey season 5, episode 6 Rumpole and the Quality of Life, there is a wide shot of St Bride's Church and Ludgate Circus starting at 19m 37s filmed circa 1988, before the City Thameslink railway station was built.EtymologyThe name Ludgate, according to Stow in his 1598 Survey of London, was derived from the belief that the gate had been created by the pre-Roman British King of London King Lud as did many of his contemporaries believed so that when a new gate was erected a statue on it depicted him along with one of Queen Elizabeth I.

Old St Paul's Cathedral
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Paul's Churchyard
London, SW1W 0

Old St Paul's Cathedral was the medieval cathedral of the City of London that, until 1666, stood on the site of the present St Paul's Cathedral. Built from 1087 to 1314 and dedicated to Saint Paul, the cathedral was the fourth church on the site at Ludgate Hill.Work on the cathedral began during the reign of William the Conqueror after a fire in 1087 that destroyed much of the city. Work took more than 200 years, and construction was delayed by another fire in 1135. The church was consecrated in 1240 and enlarged again in 1256 and the early 14th century. At its completion in the middle of the 14th century, the cathedral was one of the longest churches in the world and had one of the tallest spires and some of the finest stained glass.The presence of the shrine of Saint Erkenwald made the cathedral a pilgrimage site during the Medieval period. In addition to serving as the seat of the Diocese of London, the building developed a reputation as a hub of the City of London, with the nave aisle, "Paul's walk", known as a centre for business and the London grapevine. After the Reformation, the open-air pulpit in the churchyard, St Paul's Cross, became the stage for radical evangelical preaching and Protestant bookselling.

Staple Inn
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
11Staples Yard
London, WC1V 7

Staple Inn is a Tudor building on the south side of High Holborn street in the City of London, London, England. Located near Chancery Lane tube station, it is used as the London venue for meetings of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, and is the last surviving Inn of Chancery. It was designated a grade I listed building in 1974.HistoryIt was originally attached to Gray's Inn, which is one of the four Inns of Court. The Inns of Chancery fell into decay in the 19th century. All of them were dissolved, and most were demolished. Staple Inn is the only one which survives largely intact. It was an extra-parochial area until 1858 and then a civil parish. It became part of the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn in 1900 and was abolished in 1930.On 1 April 1994 boundary changes meant that the Inn was transferred from the London Borough of Camden to the City of London (and the City ward of Farringdon Without).It was the model for the fictitious Inn of Court "Bacon's Inn" in Arthur Moore's 1904 novel 'Archers of the Long Bow'. The ancient switch-tailed double pump referred to was replaced in 1937 by a mock single pump, to mark the site.

L'atelier Des Chefs St Paul's
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
10 Foster Lane
London, EC2V 6HR

0207 796 0110

The Farmiloe Building
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St John Street
London,

020 7269 7935

The Farmiloe Building is a Grade II listed building in Clerkenwell, London, in the London Borough of Islington.HistoryThe Farmiloe Building, of Victorian architecture, was completed by Browne & Robinson in 1868. The architect for the building was Lewis Henry Isaacs. The Farmiloe Building became a Grade II listed building on 20 December 1991. The business George Farmiloe & Sons used the building as its base until 1999. In June 2005, Film London nominated the building as the location of the month. In 2014, plans were announced to transform the building into offices.Use in mediaThe Farmiloe Building is a popular location for filming scenes. Films and television productions that have been shot at the building include: Batman Begins (2005)Eastern Promises (2007)The Dark Knight (2008)Sherlock Holmes (2009)Inception (2010)The Dark Knight Rises (2012)What Remains (2013)

Wood Street Police station
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
37 Wood Street
London,

Cloth Fair
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
39-40 Cloth Fair
London, EC1A 7ET

020 7710 6444

Cloth Fair is a street in the City of London where, in medieval times, merchants gathered to buy and sell material during the Bartholomew Fair. Today, it is a short residential street to the east of Smithfield in the north-western part of the City and is located in the ward of Farringdon Within.The street runs southwest to northeast from Little Britain, the very start of the A1 road, the country's longest named road, parallel to Long Lane to the north and bordered by the Anglican church of St. Bartholomew-the-Great to the south, until it merges with Middle Street some 150 yards later.The street was originally within the precincts of the Priory of St. Bartholomew's, and until 1910 formed a separate liberty, with gates that were shut at night. Such a small area could not meet the demands of installing street lighting and sewers, and rejoined the City. The area has a rich history, a colourful past and proud literary tradition. It contains within its boundaries the oldest residential dwelling in London (numbers 41 and 42), a pair of properties administered by the Landmark Trust, and the former home of English poet John Betjeman, now a restaurant.The nearest London Underground station is Barbican (Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines) and the closest mainline railway station is Farringdon.

Center for Transnational Legal Studies
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Swan House 37-39 High Holborn
London, WC1V 6AA

+44 (0)203 077 5900

The Center for Transnational Legal Studies is a global educational center for the study of transnational law. The Center was founded in London in October 2008 as an initiative by Georgetown University Law Center, providing educational services and student resources. It was constituted as a joint venture between ten leading law schools from around the world, each contributing faculty and students to the center. The Center's founding institutions are Georgetown University Law Center, University of Toronto, King's College London, National University of Singapore, ESADE, Fribourg University, Free University of Berlin, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, University of Torino, Melbourne Law School, and the University of São Paulo. The Center also has several affiliate institutions, including Bucerius Law School.The CTLS facilities are located at Swan House at 37-39 High Holborn Street in London's legal quarter. Students and faculty have access to King's College Law Library and student housing at the Liberty Living Student Housing complex 'Liberty House' on St John Street.The Center's curriculum was developed by an Academic Council of faculty from all of the founding law schools and all courses address topics in transnational or comparative law, legal theory or legal practice. designed for students intent on transnational careers.

Paternoster Row
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
87 Kingsland Rd
London, EC4M 7

Paternoster Row was a street in the City of London that is supposed to have received its name from the fact that, when the monks and clergy of St Paul's Cathedral would go in procession chanting the great litany, they would recite the Lord's Prayer (Pater Noster being its opening line in Latin) in the litany along this part of the route. The prayers said at these processions may have also given the names to nearby Ave Maria Lane and Amen Corner. An alternative etymology is the early traders who sold a type of prayer bead known as a "pater noster".The area was a centre of the London publishing trade, with booksellers operating from the street. In 1819 Paternoster Row was described as "almost synonymous" with the book trade.Trübner & Co. was one of the publishing companies on Paternoster Row. The street was devastated by aerial bombardment during the Blitz of World War II, suffering particularly heavy damage in the night raid of 29–30 December 1940, later characterised as the Second Great Fire of London, during which an estimated 5 million books were lost in the fires caused by tens of thousands of incendiary bombs.The street was replaced with Paternoster Square, the modern home of the London Stock Exchange, although a City of London Corporation road sign remains in the square near where Paternoster Row once stood.

Castle Baynard
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
135 Queen Victoria St
London, EC4V 4AA

Castle Baynard is one of the 25 Wards of the City of London, the historic and financial centre of London.FeaturesThe Ward covers an irregular shaped area, sometimes likened to a tuning fork, bounded on the east by the Wards of Queenhithe and Bread Street; the River Thames to the south; the Ward of Farringdon Without to the north and west; and the Ward of Farringdon Within to the north.Major landmarks within the Ward include Blackfriars Bridge (the full span of which falls within the City and this Ward), naval establishment HMS President, and St Paul's Cathedral. In addition the area includes the churches of St Bride's, which Poet Laureate Sir John Betjeman described as "magnificent, even by the exalted standards of Sir Christopher Wren", and St. Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe. In former times the Ward also included the Church of St Mary Magdalen Old Fish Street which burned down in 1886 and was not rebuilt and its own charitable foundation, Castle Baynard Ward School. The Mermaid Theatre, on the site of Curriers' Alley and Puddle Dock, nowadays lie within the Ward's catchment area. The north-bank entrance of Blackfriars station, the only London station to span the Thames, also lies within Castle Baynard.

Total Telecom
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
43 Hatton Garden
London, EC1N 8

44 20 7092 1000

Total Telecom meets the information and research needs of the Global Communications industry, from breaking news to expert analysis. It is the leading communications link between end users and the vendors, carriers and resellers of telecommunications technology and services. Total Telecom Online provides breaking news, archives, research reports and more. The site keeps more than 100,000 monthly unique users worldwide up to date and in touch with the latest reports and events from the global communications industry.

St Audoen within Newgate
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
114 Newgate St
London, EC1A 7AE

020 7606 3955

St Audoen within Newgate was a mediaeval church in the City of London situated on the corner of Newgate Street and Eldeness Lane . It was first mentioned as Parochia sancti Audoeni in around 1220.In 1546, Henry VIII gave the church, along with St Nicholas Shambles and the dissolved Christ Church priory to the City corporation. A new parish was created for Christ Church, out of those of St Audoen and St Nicholas, and part of that of St Sepulchre. St Audoen's was demolished in around 1583.

愛漂亮新聞
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
P.O. Box 13583
London, EH49 9AP

0203 334 3265

只要是愛美的女人,都想知道的第一手變美資訊!

CRY - CHILD RIGHTS AND YOU - UK CHAPTER
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
C/O - Penningtons Manches LLP 125 Wood Street, London
London, EC2V 7AN

Historical Place Near Smithfield, London

Sadler's Wells
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Rosebery Ave
London, EC1R 4

20-77136000

Did you know that Sadler's Wells takes its name from the underground spring found by Dick Sadler in 1683? He opened a music and variety house, inviting people to taste the waters. There has been a theatre on this site ever since. And we're still pumping the water!

Guildhall, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Guildhall, Gresham Street
London, EC2V 7AE

02073323700

Guildhall is a Grade I-listed building in the City of London, England. It is situated off Gresham and Basinghall streets, in the wards of Bassishaw and Cheap. The building has been used as a town hall for several hundred years, and is still the ceremonial and administrative centre of the City of London and its Corporation. (It should not be confused with London's City Hall, the administrative centre for Greater London.) The term "Guildhall" refers both to the whole building and to its main room, which is a medieval great hall. The building is traditionally referred to as Guildhall, never "the" Guildhall. The nearest London Underground stations are Bank, St Paul's and Moorgate.HistoryRoman, Saxon and MedievalThe great hall is believed to be on a site of an earlier Guildhall . Possible evidence for this derivation may be in a reference to John Parker, the sergeant of "Camera Guyhalde", London, in 1396.

Royal Courts of Justice
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2R 1

020 79476000

The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a court building in London which houses both the High Court and Court of Appeal of England and Wales. Designed by George Edmund Street, who died before it was completed, it is a large grey stone edifice in the Victorian Gothic style built in the 1870s and opened by Queen Victoria in 1882. It is one of the largest courts in Europe. It is located on the Strand within the City of Westminster, near the border with the City of London (Temple Bar). It is surrounded by the four Inns of Court, King's College London and the London School of Economics. The nearest London Underground stations are Chancery Lane and Temple.The courts within the building are open to the public, although there may be some restrictions depending upon the nature of the cases being heard. Those in court who do not have legal representation may receive some assistance within the building. There is a citizens' advice bureau based within the Main Hall which provides free, confidential and impartial advice by appointment to anyone who is a litigant in person in the courts. There is also a Personal Support Unit where litigants in person can receive emotional support and practical information about court proceedings.

The Royal Courts of Justice
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2A 2LL

020 79476000

Middle Temple
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Middle Temple Lane
London, EC4Y 7

02074274800

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, commonly known simply as Middle Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court exclusively entitled to call their members to the English Bar as barristers, the others being the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn. It is located in the wider Temple area of London, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.HistoryIn the 13th century, the Inns of Court originated as hostels and schools for student lawyers. The Middle Temple is the western part of "The Temple", the headquarters of the Knights Templar until they were dissolved in 1312. The Temple Church still stands as a "peculiar" (extra-diocesan) church of the Inner and Middle Temples.The Inns stopped being responsible for legal education in 1852, although they continue to provide training in areas such as advocacy and ethics for students, pupil barristers and newly qualified barristers. Most of the Inn is occupied by barristers' offices, known as chambers. One of the Middle Temple's main functions now is to provide education and support for new members to the profession. This is done through advocacy training, the provision of scholarships (over £1 million in 2011), subsidised accommodation both in the Temple and in Clapham, and by providing events where junior members may meet senior colleagues for help and advice.

Saddlers Wells Theathre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Rosebery Avenue
London, EC1R 4TN

020 7863 8000

One Great George Street
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1 Great George Street
London, SW1P 3AA

+44 (0)20 7665 2323

One Great George Street is a four-domed grade II listed Edwardian building used as a conference and wedding venue just off Parliament Square in Westminster, London, England. The building is also the global headquarters of the Institution of Civil Engineers ; it was originally a venue for ICE members to relax, meet and have conferences, and became available for public events in 1989. It is near the Houses of Parliament, Westminster Abbey, and St James's Park.Building and historyFrom 1839 until 1913, ICE occupied numbers 24–26 Great George Street. In the mid-1880s the government proposed re-development of the area around Great George Street to provide more office space for government departments. This meant the demolition of ICE's first location and led ICE to move its headquarters across the road to numbers 1-7.One Great George Street was built for the ICE between 1910 and 1913 and was the result of an architectural competition won by James Miller, RSA (1860–1947). His winning design was priced at £77,126, with the other architects involved in the design competition including Brigg, Wolstenholme & Thornely, John Belcher, William Emerson, Charles Edward Barry and Thomas Collcutt. The contractor who built the building was Mowlem.

HMS President
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, EC4Y 0HJ

HMS Saxifrage was launched in 1918 as a Flower-class anti-submarine Q-ship. She was renamed HMS President in 1922 and moored permanently on the Thames as a Royal Navy Reserve drill ship. In 1982 she was sold to private owners, and having changed hands twice, now serves as a venue for conferences and functions, and serves as the offices for a number of media companies. Technically, she is now called HMS President (1918) to distinguish her from HMS President, the Royal Naval Reserve base in St Katharine Docks. She is one of the last three surviving Royal Navy warships of the First World War. She is also the sole representative of the first type of purpose built anti-submarine vessels, and is the ancestor of WW2 convoy escort sloops, which evolved into modern anti-submarine frigates.Design and constructionThe original Flower-class sloops (the Acacia, Azalea and Arabis classes) were all built in 1915 as fleet minesweeping vessels, with triple hulls at the bow to give extra protection against loss from mine damage. When submarine attacks on British merchant ships became a serious menace after 1916, the existing Flowers were transferred to convoy escort duty, and fitted with depth charges as well as 4.7-inch naval guns.

Honourable Society of Inner Temple
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Arbitration Rooms, 36-37 Essex St
London, WC2R 3AT

020 7413 0375

Ironmonger Row Baths
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1-11 Ironmonger Row
London, EC1V 3

020 7253 4011

Ironmonger Row Baths were built as a public wash house and later upgraded to a Turkish Bath. They are located at Ironmonger Row, in the St Luke's district, near Old Street, Islington, London.DescriptionThe baths include a steam room, a Victorian-style Turkish bath comprising a series of three hot rooms of varying temperature, marble slabs for massage and body scrubbing and an icy plunge pool. In addition there are two relaxation areas. The swimming pool is slightly over 30 metres long. There is a small sauna next to the pool, as well as a well equipped modern gym located within the building. There is also a communal laundry facility (launderette) in the building.The whole building was undergoing extensive renovations starting May 2010. All areas of the building and all facilities are being improved, with the gym relocated to a much larger space within the building, and a more friendly swimming pool and children's shallow pool created. The Turkish Baths have also been renovated. The works finished December 2012HistoryThe baths were designed by architects AWS & KMB Cross, and built in 1931. They are now managed by GLL. From just after the Second World War until the new complex at Crystal Palace was built in the late 60s, the baths were the home of the world-famous Highgate Diving Club, who held their club night there every Friday and also met during the public sessions on Saturday mornings. The Olympic diver, Brian Phelps (Bronze medal - Highboard diving in 1960 Olympics) trained there regularly with his coach, Wally Orner, as did many of the club's international and Olympic divers, such as John Chandler, John Cooze, John Miles, Billy Wood, and Alun Roberts. It was listed grade II in November 2006 and is located within St. Luke’s Conservation Area.

Sir John Soane's Museum
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
13 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, WC2A 3BP

Sir John Soane's Museum was formerly the home of the neo-classical architect John Soane. It holds many drawings and models of Soane's projects and the collections of paintings, drawings and antiquities that he assembled.The museum is located in Holborn, London, adjacent to Lincoln's Inn Fields. It is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.HistoryHousesSoane demolished and rebuilt three houses in succession on the north side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. He began with No. 12 (between 1792 and 1794), externally a plain brick house. After becoming Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy in 1806, Soane purchased No. 13, the house next door, today the Museum, and rebuilt it in two phases in 1808–09 and 1812.In 1808–09 he constructed his drawing office and "museum" on the site of the former stable block at the back, using primarily top lighting. In 1812 he rebuilt the front part of the site, adding a projecting Portland Stone facade to the basement, ground and first floor levels and the centre bay of the second floor. Originally this formed three open loggias, but Soane glazed the arches during his lifetime. Once he had moved into No. 13, Soane rented out his former home at No. 12 (on his death it was left to the nation along with No. 13, the intention being that the rental income would fund the running of the Museum).

Unilever House
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
100 Victoria Embankment, Blackfriars
London, EC4Y 0DY

020 7822 5252

Unilever House is a Grade II listed office building in the Neoclassical Art Deco style, located on New Bridge Street, Victoria Embankment in Blackfriars, London. The building has a tall, curving frontage which overlooks Blackfriars Bridge on the north bank of the River Thames.The site of Unilever House was previously occupied by Bridewell Palace, a residence of Henry VIII, which later became a poorhouse and prison. These buildings were destroyed in 1864 making way for De Keyser's Royal Hotel. In 1920, Lord Leverhulme leased the site to build the London headquarters of his soap manufacturing company Lever Brothers, which became Unilever in 1930. Construction did not commence until 1929.ConstructionThe building design and construction is thought to be a collaboration between James Lomax-Simpson, a member of the Unilever Board, and John James Burnet and Thomas S. Tait, partners in the firm of Sir John Burnet and Partners. However, there is some uncertainty over the credit for the design; a note by Simpson claims exclusive credit, suggesting that Burnet and Tait only approved the final design. Burnet and Tait exhibited the design as a joint work with Simpson at the Royal Academy, and the drawings held at the City of London Record Office are signed by Burnet and Tait alone.

Temple, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
2 Temple Place
London, IG8 7

20-85056687

The Temple is an area of central London, in the vicinity of Temple Church, It is one of the main legal districts of the capital and a notable centre for English law, both historically and in the present day. The Temple area of the City of London consists of the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple, which are two of the four Inns of Court and act as local authorities in place of the City of London Corporation within their areas.The Royal Courts of Justice are just to the north and Temple tube station is located to the west in the City of Westminster. The wider Temple area is roughly bound by the River Thames (the Victoria Embankment) to the south, Surrey Street to the west, Strand and Fleet Street to the north, and Carmelite Street and Whitefriars Street to the east.It contains many barristers' chambers, solicitors' offices, as well as some notable legal institutions such as the Employment Appeal Tribunal. The International Institute for Strategic Studies has its headquarters at Arundel House.

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Middle Temple Lane
London, EC4Y 9BT

020 7427 4800

A modern institution with a long and distinguished history, Middle Temple is a place of many parts. First and foremost, Middle Temple is one of the four Inns of Court which have the exclusive right to Call students to the Bar. The education and training of advocates lie at the heart of the Inn, but we are also a professional society for our membership worldwide; and we maintain a heritage estate in central London housing chambers from which barristers practise. Several important activities support Middle Temple’s core functions. In addition to teaching, training and the management of the Inn’s property portfolio, these include the provision of around £1 million per year in support of our students and other junior members; the running of a modern Law library and an historic archive; the oversight (with Inner Temple) of the historic Temple Church; and the management of a commercial events business. All of these activities represent the 21st century Middle Temple, but training and education will always be at its core. Our core purposes The Inn’s estate on the banks of the Thames was provided by Letters Patent to ‘The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple’ in 1608 on condition that it would always be used for the joint objectives of educating and accommodating those practising or training in the Law. Over four hundred years later, Middle Temple’s core purposes are still based on these founding principles: • The education and training of students and barristers; and the promotion of diversity and access to the Bar by the provision of financial support to students and all other means. • The maintenance of the Inn’s estate and its historic heritage; and the provision of professional accommodation for barristers and other services and facilities in support of the Inn’s core purposes. • The achievement of the highest standards of advocacy in support of the judiciary and the rule of law; the promotion of the ethos of the Bar; and the maintenance of the highest professional standards in the public interest. Who we are Middle Temple’s membership comprises students, barristers and senior members of the Bar and Judiciary. Members of the Inn’s Governing Body (Parliament) are known as Masters of the Bench. The Chairman is the Treasurer, who is elected each year for a 12-month period of office. The Chief Executive, who is a full-time permanent member of the Inn’s staff, is the Under Treasurer. A staff of 90 permanent employees assist the Under Treasurer with the day-to-day management and operation of the Inn, along with part-time staff who support our corporate events.

Old Bailey Central Criminal Court
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Central Criminal Court, Old Bailey, London, EC4M 7EH
London, EC4M 7EH

020 7248 3277

Barbican Estate
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
3 Lauderdale Pl
London, EC2Y 8

2070-293955

The Barbican Estate is a residential estate built during the 1960s and the 1970s in the City of London, in an area once devastated by World War II bombings and today densely populated by financial institutions. It contains, or is adjacent to, the Barbican Arts Centre, the Museum of London, the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, the Barbican public library, the City of London School for Girls and a YMCA (now closed), forming the Barbican Complex.The Barbican Complex is a prominent example of British brutalist architecture and is Grade II listed as a whole with the exception of the late Milton Court. Milton Court once contained a fire station, medical facilities and some flats and was demolished to allow the construction of a new apartment complex which also contains additional facilities for the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

Golden Lane Estate
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Fann Street
London, EC1Y 0RN

020 7250 1464

The Golden Lane Estate is a 1950s council housing complex in the City of London. It was built on the northern edge of the City, in an area devastated by bombing during World War II.OriginsThe idea to build a residential site to the north of the Cripplegate area, followed devastation of much of the City of London in the Blitz during World War II. Following almost complete destruction in the Blitz, only around 500 residents remained in the City in 1950, a mere 50 of whom lived in Cripplegate. The brief was to provide general needs council housing for the many people who serviced or worked in the City, as part of the comprehensive recovery and re-building strategy of the City of London.As the Estate then fell within the boundary of the Metropolitan Borough of Finsbury, a proportionate number of tenancies were also offered to those on the Finsbury waiting list. A boundary change in 1994 means the estate is today wholly inside the City of London.Compared to other council housing of the era, there was a greater emphasis on the housing needs of single people and couples rather than larger families. Studios and one bedroomed flats comprise the majority (359) of the units (554 in total). The density at 200 person per acre was high, but 60% of the area of the site is open space, a figure made possible by building taller structures than was common in 1951.

Magpie & Stump
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
18 Old Bailey
London, EC4M 7EP

0207 248 5085

Saddlers' Hall
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
40 Gutter Lane
London, EC2V 6BR

0207 726 8661

St Giles-without-Cripplegate
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Fore Street, Barbican, London
London, EC2 8DA

St Giles-without-Cripplegate is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on Fore Street within the modern Barbican complex. When built it stood without (that is, outside) the city wall, near the Cripplegate. The church is dedicated to St Giles, patron saint of beggars and the handicapped. It is one of the few medieval churches left in the City of London, having survived the Great Fire of 1666.HistoryThere had been a Saxon church on the site in the 11th century but by 1090 it had been replaced by a Norman one. In 1394 it was rebuilt in the perpendicular gothic style. The stone tower was added in 1682.The church has been badly damaged by fire on three occasions: In 1545, in 1897 and during an air raid of the Blitz of the Second World War on the night of 24 August 1940. German bombs completely gutted the church but it was restored using the plans of the reconstruction of 1545. A new ring of twelve bells was cast by Mears and Stainbank in 1954, and this was augmented with a sharp second bell cast in 2006 by the Whitechapel Bell Foundry.

Bush House
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
61 Aldwych
London, WC2B 4

Bush House is a Grade II listed building between Aldwych and the Strand in Central London at the southern end of Kingsway.Now part of the Strand Campus of King's College London, Bush House previously served as the headquarters of BBC World Service. The broadcast from Bush House lasted for 70 years, from Winter 1941 to Summer 2012. The final BBC broadcast from Bush House was the 12pm BST English bulletin on 12 July 2012. The BBC World Service is now housed in Broadcasting House in Portland Place. King's College London has taken over the premises since acquiring the lease in 2015.HistorySections of Bush House were completed and opened over a period of 10 years: Centre Block was opened in 1925, North-West Wing in 1928, North-East Wing in 1929, South-East Wing in 1930, and South-West Wing in 1935. The full building complex was completed in 1935.The building was commissioned, designed and originally owned by American individuals and companies. Irving T. Bush gained approval for his plans for the building in 1919, which was planned as a major new trade centre and designed by American architect Harvey Wiley Corbett. The construction was undertaken by John Mowlem & Co. At least one stonemason, Frederick Horton (died 17 Sep 1920, age 50) is known to have died during the construction, but overall the building had a very good safety record.

Londinium
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
8-18 London Bridge St
London, SE1 9SG

Londinium was a settlement established on the current site of the City of London around 43. Its bridge over the River Thames turned the city into a road nexus and major port, serving as a major commercial centre in Roman Britain until its abandonment during the 5th century.Following its foundation in the mid-1st century, early Londinium occupied the relatively small area of 1.4sqkm, roughly equivalent to the size of present-day Hyde Park, with a fortified garrison on one of its hills. In the year 60 or 61, the rebellion of the Iceni under Boudica forced the garrison to abandon the settlement, which was then razed. Following the Iceni's defeat at the Battle of Watling Street, the city was rebuilt as a planned Roman town and recovered within about a decade. During the later decades of the 1st century, Londinium expanded rapidly, becoming Great Britain's largest city. By the turn of the century, Londinium had grown to about 60,000 people, almost certainly replacing Camulodunum (Colchester) as the provincial capital and by the 2nd century, Londinium was at its height. Its forum and basilica were one of the largest structures north of the Alps, when the Emperor Hadrian visited Londinium in 122. Excavations have discovered evidence of a major fire that destroyed most of the city shortly thereafter, but the city was again rebuilt. By the second half of the 2nd century, Londinium appears to have shrunk in both size and population.

Staple Inn
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
11Staples Yard
London, WC1V 7

Staple Inn is a Tudor building on the south side of High Holborn street in the City of London, London, England. Located near Chancery Lane tube station, it is used as the London venue for meetings of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, and is the last surviving Inn of Chancery. It was designated a grade I listed building in 1974.HistoryIt was originally attached to Gray's Inn, which is one of the four Inns of Court. The Inns of Chancery fell into decay in the 19th century. All of them were dissolved, and most were demolished. Staple Inn is the only one which survives largely intact. It was an extra-parochial area until 1858 and then a civil parish. It became part of the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn in 1900 and was abolished in 1930.On 1 April 1994 boundary changes meant that the Inn was transferred from the London Borough of Camden to the City of London (and the City ward of Farringdon Without).It was the model for the fictitious Inn of Court "Bacon's Inn" in Arthur Moore's 1904 novel 'Archers of the Long Bow'. The ancient switch-tailed double pump referred to was replaced in 1937 by a mock single pump, to mark the site.

St Vedast Foster Lane
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
4 Foster Lane
London, EC2V 6

020 760 63998

Saint Vedast Foster Lane or Saint Vedast-alias-Foster, a church in Foster Lane, in the City of London, is dedicated to St. Vedast (Foster is an Anglicisation of the name "Vaast", as the saint is known in continental Europe), a French saint whose cult arrived in England through contacts with Augustinian clergy.

St Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Andrew's Hill & Queen Victoria Street
London, EC4V 5DE

+44 20 7329 3632

St. Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe is a Church of England church located on Queen Victoria Street, London in the City of London, near Blackfriars station.HistoryFirst mentioned around 1170, St. Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe was almost certainly founded considerably earlier. During the 13th century the church was a part of Baynard's Castle, an ancient royal residence. In 1361, Edward III moved his Royal Wardrobe (a storehouse for Royal accoutrements, housing arms and clothing among other personal items of the Crown) from the Tower of London to just north of the church. It was from this association that the church acquired its unique name.The Wardrobe and the church, however, were both lost in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Of the 51 churches designed by Sir Christopher Wren after the Great Fire, St. Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe is among the simplest of his designs; it was rebuilt in 1695.The church was again destroyed during the London blitz by German bombing; only the tower and walls survived. It was rebuilt and rededicated in 1961.AdvowsonThe advowson of St Andrew's was anciently held by the family of FitzWalter to which it probably came from the holding by Robert Fitzwalter (d.1235) of the office of Constable of Baynard's Castle. In 1417 it was held by Thomas de Berkeley, 5th Baron Berkeley (d.1417), as his charter dated 24 June 1417 appointing feoffees to his estate records. Berkeley's Inn, the town house of that family stood nearby, at the south end of Adle Street, against Puddle Wharf, as reported by John Stow in his "Survey of London" (1598)

Cripplegate
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Giles Terrace
London, EC2Y 8

Cripplegate was a gate in the London Wall and a name for the region of the City of London outside the gate. The area was almost entirely destroyed in the Blitz of World War II and today it is the site of the Barbican Estate and Barbican Centre. The name is preserved in the church of St Giles-without-Cripplegate, in the Cripplegate ward of the City, and in a small road named Cripplegate Street which lies slightly to the north of the site of the Wall between Viscount Street and Bridgewater Street.The ward of Cripplegate straddles the (now former) line of the Wall and the old gate and is often (even today) divided into "Within" and "Without" parts, with a beadle and a deputy (alderman) appointed for each part. Since the 1994 (City) and 2003 (ward) boundary changes, most of the ward is Without, with the ward of Bassishaw having expanded considerably into the Within area.HistoryIn 1555, John Gresham endowed the new Gresham's School in Norfolk with three tenements in the parish of St. Giles Without Cripplegate, including 'The White Hind' and 'The Peacock'.During the Second World War the Cripplegate area, a center of the rag trade, was virtually destroyed and by 1951 the resident population of the City stood at only 5,324, of whom 48 lived in Cripplegate. Discussions began in 1952 about the future of the area, and the decision to build new residential properties was taken by the Court of Common Council on 19 September 1957. The area was reopened as the Barbican Estate in 1969. Cripplegate is today the most populous of the four residential wards of the City, with a population of 2,782 (2011).

Landmark and Historical Place Near Smithfield, London

Oxo Tower Restaurant
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Oxo Tower Wharf, Barge House St 8th Floor
London, SE1 9

+44 (0) 20 7803 3888

Consisting of a Restaurant, Bar and Brasserie, OXO is a place for celebration. At the cutting edge of innovation in food and drink, OXO delivers on service, quality of products and experience every time. With intimate views along the Thames, OXO is the ideal environment for a stylish cocktail, a quick bite to eat or a fine dining experience.

Aldwych Theatre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
49 Aldwych
London, WC2B 4

20-74166000

The Aldwych Theatre is a West End theatre, located in Aldwych in the City of Westminster. It was listed Grade II on 20 July 1971. Its seating capacity is 1,200 on three levels, a fairly large auditorium.HistoryOriginsThe theatre was constructed in the newly built Aldwych as a pair with the Waldorf Theatre, now known as the Novello Theatre. Both buildings were designed in the Edwardian Baroque style by W. G. R. Sprague. The Aldwych Theatre was funded by Seymour Hicks in association with the American impresario Charles Frohman, and built by Walter Wallis of Balham.The theatre opened on 23 December 1905 with a production of Blue Bell, a new version of Hicks's popular pantomime Bluebell in Fairyland. In 1906, Hicks's The Beauty of Bath, followed in 1907 by The Gay Gordons, played at the theatre. In February 1913 the theatre was used by Serge Diaghilev and Vaslav Nijinsky for the first rehearsals of Le Sacre du Printemps before its première in Paris during May. In 1920, Basil Rathbone played Major Wharton in The Unknown.

The Royal Courts of Justice
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2A 2LL

020 79476000

Oxo Tower Wharf
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Barge House Street
London, SE1 9PH

020 7021 1600

The iconic Oxo Tower Wharf is an award-winning, landmark building situated on the riverside walkway of London's fast moving South Bank. With its famous tower, spectacular river views and fascinating mix of design, food, shopping and art, Oxo Tower Wharf is a unique London destination not to be missed! Oxo Tower Wharf is home to some of the UK’s most innovative and internationally renowned contemporary design boutiques and studios, offering the best in contemporary art, jewellery, fashion, lighting and homeware. There are also a number of restaurants, cafes and bars, including the famous OXO Tower Restaurant, Bar & Brasserie, with its free public gallery offering breathtaking views across the river to the City and St Paul's. www.coinstreet.org/shopeatdrink While visiting, don't forget to drop into the Wharf's exhibition venues [email protected] and Bargehouse, offering a changing programme of free exhibitions including art, photography, sculpture and new media. www.coinstreet.org/whatson/exhibitions-and-events Oxo Tower Wharf is owned and managed by Coin Street Community Builders [CSCB], a social enterprise whose work seeks to make the South Bank a better place to live, work and visit. Since 1984 CSCB has transformed a largely derelict riverside site into a thriving mixed-use neighbourhood, providing parks, shopping, restaurants, festivals, galleries, homes and community facilities. http://www.coinstreet.org/developments/oxotowerwharf This Facebook page is managed by CSCB - you can follow all our news at www.facebook.com/CoinStreet! You can also follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/OxoTowerWharf www.twitter.com/CoinStreet #CreativeLondon

Radio Rooftop Bar, London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
336-337 Strand
London, WC2R 1HA

0845 601 8980

Bankside
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
100 Southwark Street, SE1
London, SE1 9

+(44)020 7928 7521

Bankside is a district of London, England, and part of the London Borough of Southwark. Bankside is located on the southern bank of the River Thames, 1.5mi east of Charing Cross, running from a little west of Blackfriars Bridge to just a short distance before London Bridge at St Mary Overie Dock to the east which marks its distinct status from that of 'the Borough' district of Southwark. It is part of a business improvement district known as Better Bankside.

St Peter's Italian Church
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
136 Clerkenwell Road
London, EC1R 5DL

020 7837 1528

St. Peter's Italian Church is a Basilica-style church located in Holborn, London.HistoryIt was built by request of Saint Vincent Pallotti, and it is still under the control of the Pallotine order which he founded. He had assistance from Giuseppe Mazzini, who was in London at the time, for the growing number of Italian immigrants in the mid 19th century and modelled by Irish architect Sir John Miller-Bryson on the Basilica San Crisogono in Rome.It was consecrated on 16 April 1863 as The Church of St. Peter of all Nations. At the time of consecration, it was the only Basilica-style church in the UK. Its organ was built in 1886 by Belgian Anneesen.The frontal section of the church consists of a loggia and portico with twin arches, above which are three alcoves. The central alcove contains a statue of Christ, whilst the sides contain statues of St. Bede and St. George. Between the alcoves are two large mosaics depicting the miracle of the fishes and Jesus giving the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven to St. Peter.Above the façade is a 33-metre-high bell tower, built in 1891 which houses a bell known as "The Steel Monster".In the loggia are two remembrance plaques, one to veterans (mostly Italian Britons) of World War I and the other to 446 Italians who lost their lives on the Arandora Star.

Temple, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
2 Temple Place
London, IG8 7

20-85056687

The Temple is an area of central London, in the vicinity of Temple Church, It is one of the main legal districts of the capital and a notable centre for English law, both historically and in the present day. The Temple area of the City of London consists of the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple, which are two of the four Inns of Court and act as local authorities in place of the City of London Corporation within their areas.The Royal Courts of Justice are just to the north and Temple tube station is located to the west in the City of Westminster. The wider Temple area is roughly bound by the River Thames (the Victoria Embankment) to the south, Surrey Street to the west, Strand and Fleet Street to the north, and Carmelite Street and Whitefriars Street to the east.It contains many barristers' chambers, solicitors' offices, as well as some notable legal institutions such as the Employment Appeal Tribunal. The International Institute for Strategic Studies has its headquarters at Arundel House.

Old Street Roundabout
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Old Street Roundabout
London, EC1Y 1

Old Street Roundabout is a roundabout located on the boundary of the London Borough of Hackney and the London Borough of Islington. It is an interchange system at the junction of Old Street and City Road. It is sometimes known as St. Agnes Well after the shopping centre beneath it, while the area surrounding the roundabout is often colloquially known as Silicon Roundabout, owing to the prominence of British technology companies there.ConnectionsCity Road crosses the roundabout, running south towards the City of London and Moorgate and Liverpool Street stations, and north-west towards Angel, King's Cross, St. Pancras and Euston. The roundabout, the north-western part of City Road, and Great Eastern Street form the boundary of the London congestion charge zone (CCZ).To the west of Old Street are Clerkenwell, Bloomsbury, and (further afield) the West End. To the east are Shoreditch and London's East End.

Barbican Estate
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
3 Lauderdale Pl
London, EC2Y 8

2070-293955

The Barbican Estate is a residential estate built during the 1960s and the 1970s in the City of London, in an area once devastated by World War II bombings and today densely populated by financial institutions. It contains, or is adjacent to, the Barbican Arts Centre, the Museum of London, the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, the Barbican public library, the City of London School for Girls and a YMCA (now closed), forming the Barbican Complex.The Barbican Complex is a prominent example of British brutalist architecture and is Grade II listed as a whole with the exception of the late Milton Court. Milton Court once contained a fire station, medical facilities and some flats and was demolished to allow the construction of a new apartment complex which also contains additional facilities for the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Great Ormond Street
London, WC1N 3

+44 (0) 845 155 5000

The Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine is a specialist alternative medicine hospital located in London, England and a part of University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. It is the largest public sector provider of complementary medicine in Europe.The Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine offers clinical services including complementary cancer treatments, allergy services, acupuncture, homeopathy, rheumatology, weight loss management, sleep management, musculoskeletal medicine and stress management, and has access to conventional medicine. It has an education department which offers full and part-time courses in complementary medicine for registered health professionals. It is also home to a specialist library for complementary and alternative medicine.The hospital is based in the Bloomsbury area of Central London, adjacent to Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Red Lion Square
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Red Lion Square
London, WC1R 4QG

020 7974 1693

Red Lion Square is a small square in Holborn, London. The square was laid out in 1684 by Nicholas Barbon, taking its name from the Red Lion Inn. According to some sources the bodies of three regicides - Oliver Cromwell, John Bradshaw and Henry Ireton - were placed in a pit on the site of the Square.By 1720 it was a fashionable part of London: the eminent judge Bernard Hale was a resident of Red Lion Square. In the 1860s, on the other hand, it had clearly become decidedly unfashionable: the writer Anthony Trollope in his novel Orley Farm (1862) humorously reassures his readers that one of his characters is perfectly respectable, despite living in Red Lion Square.The centre-piece of the garden today is a statue by Ian Walters of Fenner Brockway, which was installed in 1986. There is also a memorial bust of Bertrand Russell. Conway Hall—which is the home of the South Place Ethical Society and the National Secular Society—opens on to the Square. On 15 June 1974 a meeting by the National Front in Conway Hall resulted in a protest by anti-fascist groups. The following disorder and police action left one student - Kevin Gately from the University of Warwick - dead.

The Barbican - The Conservatory
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Silk Street
London, EC2Y 8

St James's Church, Clerkenwell
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Clerkenwell Close
London, EC1R 0

+44 20 7251 1190

St James Church, Clerkenwell, is an Anglican parish church in Clerkenwell, London, England.HistoryNunnery of St Mary: c. 1100–1539The parish of St James, Clerkenwell, has had a long and sometimes lively history. The springs which give Clerkenwell its name are mentioned during the reign of Henry II. The parish clerks of London used to perform their mystery plays, plays based on Biblical themes, in the neighbourhood, sometimes in the presence of royalty. In approximately 1100 a Norman baron named Jordan Briset founded an Augustine nunnery dedicated to St Mary, which became wealthy and influential. It had a place of pilgrimage at Muswell Hill, and the parish kept an outlying tract of territory there until the nineteenth century.Old Church of St James: 1540–1788At the dissolution of the nunnery under Henry VIII its church, which by then seems to have acquired a second dedication to St James, was taken into use by its parishioners who had already been using a part of it for some considerable time. The site of the nunnery was granted to Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, in 1540 but the freehold of the church passed through various hands until it was conveyed in 1656 to trustees on behalf of the parishioners, who at the same time obtained the right to appoint the vicar. Unlike other parishes, they retained it after the Restoration of 1660. Elections of vicars were held, with all the excitement and paraphernalia of parliamentary elections, right down to the early years of this century and a distinctly Low Church tradition was thereby established. This did not prevent a long struggle in the latter years of the eighteenth century with Selina, Countess of Huntingdon. This strong-minded and evangelical lady had taken over a building in the parish called Spa Fields Chapel, and insisted on appointing her own chaplains to preach there. The vicar was furious, and his action against her in the ecclesiastical courts was the cause of her secession from the Church of England.

HMS Wellington
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Temple Stairs Victoria Embankment
London, WC2R 2PN

020 7836 8179

HMS Wellington is a sloop, formerly of the Royal Navy. During the Second World War, she served as a convoy escort ship in the North Atlantic. She is now moored alongside the Victoria Embankment, at Temple Pier, on the River Thames in London, England, as the headquarters ship of the Honourable Company of Master Mariners, where she is known as HQS Wellington. It was always the ambition of the founding members of the company to have a livery hall. Up to the outbreak of war in 1939, various proposals were examined, including the purchase of a sailing ship,.After the Second World War, it became apparent that the possibility of building a hall in the City of London had been rendered very remote. In 1947, the Grimsby-class sloop Wellington was made available by the Admiralty. The company decided to buy her with money subscribed by the members and convert her to a floating livery hall, an appropriate home for a company of seafarers.

Queen Victoria Street, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Queen Victoria Street
London, EC4V 4

Queen Victoria Street, named after the British monarch who reigned from 1837 to 1901, is a street in London which runs east by north from its junction with New Bridge Street and Victoria Embankment in the Castle Baynard ward of the City of London, along a section that divides the wards of Queenhithe and Bread Street, then lastly through the middle of Cordwainer ward, until it reaches Mansion House Street at Bank junction. Beyond Bank junction, the street continues north-east as Threadneedle Street which joins Bishopsgate.The road was commissioned in 1861 to streamline the approach to the central business district, and was provided for through the Metropolitan Improvement Act. Costing over £1,000,000, it remains a flagship street within the City.The nearest London Underground stations are Blackfriars (at its western junction with New Bridge Street), Mansion House (where it crosses Cannon Street), and Bank (near its eastern end).Queen Victoria Street formed part of the marathon course of the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

St Stephen's, Walbrook
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
38 Walbrook
London, EC4N 4

20-76269000

St Stephen Walbrook is a church in the City of London, part of the Church of England's Diocese of London. The present domed building was erected to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren following the destruction of its medieval predecessor in the Great Fire of London in 1666. It is located in Walbrook, next to the Mansion House, and near to Bank and Monument Underground stations.Early historyThe original church of St Stephen stood on the west side of the Walbrook, a stream running southwards across the City of London from the City Wall near Moorfields to the Thames.The church was moved to its present site, on the east side of the Walbrook (later concealed in a culvert), in the 15th century. In 1429 Robert Chichely, acting as executor of will of the former Lord Mayor, Sir William Stondon, bought a piece of land on the east side of the Walbrook, and presented it to the parish. Several foundation stones were laid at a ceremony on 11 May 1429, and the church was consecrated ten years later, on 30 April 1439. At 125ft long and 67ft wide, it was considerably larger than the present building.The church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. It contained a memorial to the composer John Dunstaple. The wording of the epitaph had been recorded in the early 17th century, and was reinstated in the church in 1904, some 450 years after his death. The nearby church of St Benet Sherehog, also destroyed in the Great Fire, was not rebuilt; instead its parish was united with that of St Stephen.

Old St Paul's Cathedral
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Paul's Churchyard
London, SW1W 0

Old St Paul's Cathedral was the medieval cathedral of the City of London that, until 1666, stood on the site of the present St Paul's Cathedral. Built from 1087 to 1314 and dedicated to Saint Paul, the cathedral was the fourth church on the site at Ludgate Hill.Work on the cathedral began during the reign of William the Conqueror after a fire in 1087 that destroyed much of the city. Work took more than 200 years, and construction was delayed by another fire in 1135. The church was consecrated in 1240 and enlarged again in 1256 and the early 14th century. At its completion in the middle of the 14th century, the cathedral was one of the longest churches in the world and had one of the tallest spires and some of the finest stained glass.The presence of the shrine of Saint Erkenwald made the cathedral a pilgrimage site during the Medieval period. In addition to serving as the seat of the Diocese of London, the building developed a reputation as a hub of the City of London, with the nave aisle, "Paul's walk", known as a centre for business and the London grapevine. After the Reformation, the open-air pulpit in the churchyard, St Paul's Cross, became the stage for radical evangelical preaching and Protestant bookselling.

Clock Tower, Palace Of Westminster
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Addle Hill
London, EC4V 5

St Margaret Lothbury
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Lothbury
London, EC2R 7HH

020 7726 4878

St Margaret Lothbury is a Church of England parish church in the City of London; it spans the boundary between Coleman Street Ward and Broad Street Ward. Recorded since the 12th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. St Margaret Lothbury still serves as a parish church, as well as being the official church of five Livery Companies, two Ward Clubs and two Professional Institutes. It also has connections with many local finance houses, all of which hold special services each year.HistoryThe earliest mention of St Margaret Lothbury is from 1185. The patronage of the church belonged to the abbess and convent of Barking, Essex until the Dissolution, when it passed to the Crown.It was rebuilt in 1440, mostly at the expense of Robert Large, who was Lord Mayor that year and is remembered as the Master of whom Caxton served his apprenticeship. It suffered as did so many of London's churches in the Great Fire of London of 1666 and was rebuilt by Christopher Wren from 1686 to 1690.In 1781 the parish of the church of St Christopher le Stocks, demolished to make way for an extension for the Bank of England, was united with that of St Margaret Lothbury.

St Bartholomew-the-Less
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital, West Smithfield
London, EC1A 9LA

+44 20 7601 8066

St Bartholomew the Less is an Anglican parish in the City of London and the church of St Bartholomew's Hospital within the ancient hospital precincts.HistoryThe present establishment is the latest in a series of churches and chapels associated with the hospital over the past 800 years. Its earliest predecessor, known as the Chapel of the Holy Cross, was founded nearby in 1123 (at the same time as the priory, now the Priory Church of St Bartholomew the Great) before moving to the present site in 1184. Along with most other religious foundations the hospital was dissolved by Henry VIII. It was then refounded by King Henry VIII, when the chapel became an Anglican parish church serving those living within its precincts. Its suffix, "the less", was given to distinguish it from its larger neighbour, St Bartholomew the Great (the former priory).The church's tower and west façade date from 15th century, with two of its three bells dating from 1380 and 1420. They hang within an original medieval bell frame, believed to be the oldest in the City of London. In 1793 George Dance the Younger, a Royal Academician, created a new octagonal interior within the shell of the medieval chapel, its clerestorey rising above the old walls. The new construction was made entirely of wood and soon became affected by dry-rot. In 1823 it was replaced under the supervision of Thomas Hardwick, who replicated the timber construction in stone with an iron ceiling. He also made alterations to the detailing.

St Mary Abchurch
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Abchurch Lane
London, EC4N 5

20-76260306

St Mary Abchurch is a Church of England church off Cannon Street in the City of London. Dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, it is first mentioned in 1198–1199. The medieval church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666, and replaced by the present building.HistoryMedieval churchThe church dates back to the twelfth century and is dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The additional name "Abchurch" may be a variant of "Upchurch", referring to its position on comparatively high ground.The patronage of the church belonged to the convent of St Mary Overy, Southwark, until around 1455, when it passed to the master and chaplains of the college of Corpus Christi at the church of St Laurence Pountney. After the Reformation, Archbishop Parker persuaded Elizabeth I to grant the church to his college, Corpus Christi, Cambridge, which has appointed the incumbent ever since."Restored and beautified" in 1611 at the cost of the parishioners, St Mary's was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666.RebuildingThe church was rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren in 1681–1686. The parish was united with that of the nearby church of St Laurence Pontney, also destroyed in the Great Fire but not rebuilt.Wartime damage and repairA bomb hit the church in September 1940 during the London Blitz. The greatest damage was to the dome. W. Godfrey Allen repaired the church between 1948–1953.

Daily Express Building, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
120 Fleet Street
London, EC4A 2BH

The Daily Express Building is a Grade II* listed building located in Fleet Street in the City of London. It was designed in 1932 by Ellis and Clark to serve as the home of the Daily Express newspaper and is one of the most prominent examples of art-deco architecture in London.The exterior features a black façade with rounded corners in vitrolite and clear glass, with chromium strips. The flamboyant lobby, designed by Robert Atkinson, includes plaster reliefs by Eric Aumonier, silver and gilt decorations, a magnificent silvered pendant lamp and an oval staircase. The furniture inside the building was, for the most part, designed by Betty Joel.The Grade II* listing relates not only to the architectural features but also to the massive reinforced concrete stacked portal frame structure designed by Sir Owen Williams.As part of a redevelopment of the surrounding site the building was entirely refurbished in 2000 by John Robertson Architects. The foyer was recreated largely from photographs and the façade completely upgraded. The concrete portal frame structure was preserved.The lobby of this building was open to the public on London Open House day, over the weekend of 19 and 20 September 2009. Members of the public were allowed to view the lobby, which is normally only accessible to employees of the building and invited guests.

Time For Tease
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
The Paradise, 19 Kilburn Lane
London, W10 4AE

Afternoon Tease! is the original burlesque afternoon tea party. You sit down to a full spread of afternoon tea and are interrupted in the nicest possible way by stunning burlesque and cabaret performances. Tickets for Afternoon Tease! are £42, this includes full afternoon tea and a table for the afternoon. While we don't impose a dress code for Afternoon Tease! people can and do dress up in their feathers and finery which we think is brilliant! We hold Afternoon Tease! on the first Saturday of the month at The Paradise in London. You can book tickets online at www.timefortease.com

Queen Victoria Street, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Queen Victoria Street
London, EC4V 4

维多利亚女王街(Queen Victoria Street)得名于维多利亚女王,是伦敦市的一条街道,东西走向,始于新桥街和维多利亚堤岸,止于市长官邸街(银行交叉口)。该路开辟于1861年,以改善中央银行区的交通,仍然是伦敦市“一平方英里”金融区的一条旗舰街道。最近的地铁站是黑衣修士站、市长官邸站和银行-纪念碑站。

The Salisbury
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Finsbury Circus
London, Ec2m 5qq

St Audoen within Newgate
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
114 Newgate St
London, EC1A 7AE

020 7606 3955

St Audoen within Newgate was a mediaeval church in the City of London situated on the corner of Newgate Street and Eldeness Lane . It was first mentioned as Parochia sancti Audoeni in around 1220.In 1546, Henry VIII gave the church, along with St Nicholas Shambles and the dissolved Christ Church priory to the City corporation. A new parish was created for Christ Church, out of those of St Audoen and St Nicholas, and part of that of St Sepulchre. St Audoen's was demolished in around 1583.

Market Near Smithfield, London

Borough Market
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
8 Southwark Streethh
London, SE1 1TL

+44 (0) 20 7407 1002

Community Guidelines We love to hear from our friends and visitors and encourage you all to post your photos and experiences about Borough Market. And if you ask us a question, we'll do our very best to answer it! The Page is not the place to advertise your own page or something that's not related to Borough Market. If you do, then we're sorry, but we'll remove your post. Likewise if you post spam or abusive messages, your post will be removed and you may be banned from our Page. If you're unhappy at anytime with the service or experience you have at the Market, you can email us directly at [email protected] You can find out more about our complaints procedure on our website: http://boroughmarket.org.uk/page/complaints-procedure. Thanks for following us on Facebook - we hope you enjoy our updates!

Covent Garden & Picadilly Circus
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Covent Garden
London, WC2H 0

Christmas Market at Tate Modern
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Tate Modern
London, SE1 9TG

0044 208 310 2542

Authentic German Christmas Market - Offering a large variety of gifts, treats, food, wine and cider. Perfect for everyone, young and old. Come and celebrate the festive period with us at our new site, The Tate Modern. How to get to our Christmas Market - By Tube The nearest London Underground stations to Tate Modern are: Southwark (Jubilee Line, 600 metres approx.) Blackfriars (District and Circle Line, 800 metres approx.) has now been reopened St Pauls (Central Line, 1,100 metres approx.) By bus The following buses stop near Tate Modern: Routes 45, 63 and 100 stop on Blackfriars Bridge Road Routes RV1 and 381 stop on Southwark Street Route 344 stops on Southwark Bridge Road By train The nearest mainline train stations to Tate Modern are: Blackfriars (800 metres approx.) London Bridge (1,100 metres approx.) There are no parking facilities so we do recommend to use public transport for your visit. http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern/access-and-facilities/disabled-visitors

Chapel Market
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Angel, Islington
London, N1 0RW

Whether you are looking for good honest fruit and veg at a great price, a designer burger on the go or a browse around the stalls offering healthy snacks, old fashioned sweets and beautiful bouquets, you will find it here. Just two minutes walk from Angel tube station you can grab yourself all the ingredients for a romantic dinner, complete with flowers and even a new dress or just get yourself a selection of fine cheese, a good book, a tea infusion and a cd for an indulgent night alone. Open every day except Monday this vibrant street market is definitely worth a visit.

Punch & Judy Public House, Covent Garden
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
40 The Market, Covent Garden Piazza
London, WC2E 8RF

Camden Passage Antiques Market
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
29 Camden Passage
London, N1 8ED

020 7359 0190

One Aldwich Hotel - Covent Garden
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
1 Aldwych Buildings
London,

+44 (20) 73001000

Borough Market London England
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
8 Southwark Street
London,

Borrough Market
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
8 Southwark Street, London, SE1 1TL
London,

Le Boutique Bazaar
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
McQueen, 55 Tabernacle Street
London, EC2A 4AA

02076134733

A new pop up event from the organisers of Torture Garden and Wasted Chic, Le Boutique Bazaar is a carefully curated collection of clothing and accessory designers bringing a wide selection of erotic / haute fashion / unusual / avant garde goods to glamorous central London venue McQueen for an afternoon of shopping, premium cocktails and excellent music from the TG & Wasted Chic DJs... With many brands offering 'on the day' discounts; this is a perfect opportunity to meet with designers, see the garments in person, and make a purchase or pre-order for Halloween, Christmas, Valentines, New Year or any special night out (or in...). We aim to create a new kind of event, with the focus on bringing you the best of alternative designers all under one roof, a 'one stop shop' to put together original and stylish outfits & costumes with the help of our hand-picked selection of brands.

Islington Farmers' Market
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Chapel Market (Penton Street End)
London, N1 9PZ

020 7833 0338

Now at the Penton Street end of Chapel Market, the Islington Farmers' Market is London's best established Farmers' Market, running since 1999. Many of the farmers and producers have been selling since the start, and it is a market built on strong relationships between farmers and the local people

Real Paella
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Chapel Market on Angel, Islington
London, N1 9EZ

07454158674

We offer a exquisite selection of Spanish products. Our menu offers you: Traditional Spanish Paella

Camden Marketing
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
^?-:-(:-o::-o$&::-oarc&7&75
London, SE1 7

Export To China Today
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
#27, Old Gloucester Street
London, WC1N 3AX

0044-7788916506 (UK Office) 0086-15067917879 (Suzhou Office) 0086-18503007466 (Shenzhen Office) 0049-1722557153 (Germany Office)

If you have never paid your attention to the massive and rapidly growing Chinese market, then probably you should do so now. Otherwise you will regret that you lost a golden opportunity of entering the huge Chinese market with the right partner at the best time. Fueled by the rapid growth of the middle classes with ever increasing disposable income - nowadays have come unprecedented opportunities for export to China. The concept that "China’s massive industrial capacity is feeding the world" is evolving to "the world is feeding China’s under developed market". Being based in China, supported by an extensive and robust network throughout Euroasia - Trade XL Limited is ideally positioned to take your brand or commodities into the eagerly awaiting market place in China. Our aim is to make your brand and commodities prevail in the Chinese market with 1.5 billion potential costumers by sorting out "Complex business culture", "Huge language barriers", "Significant time difference", "Anti-monopoly legislation used against foreign firm" and etc by our robust team and network in China. China represents 10% of the world's consumption and in many sectors is growing at 70% every year. So why should you wait? Let's Export To China Today!

Tourist Attraction Near Smithfield, London

Somerset House
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2R 1LA

+44 (0)20 7845 4600

A unique part of the London cultural scene with a distinctive public programme including Skate, concerts, an open-air film season, a diverse range of temporary exhibitions focusing on contemporary culture, an extensive learning programme, free guided tours and 55 fountains that dance in the The Edmond J. Safra Fountain Court in summer. Somerset House currently attracts approximately 2.5 million visitors every year.

Royal Opera House
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street
London, WC2E 9DD

+44 (0) 20 7240 1200

The Royal Opera, under the direction of Antonio Pappano, is one of the world’s leading opera companies. Based in the iconic Covent Garden theatre, it is renowned for its outstanding performances of both traditional opera as well as commissioning new works by today’s leading opera composers such as Harrison Birtwistle, Mark-Anthony Turnage and Thomas Ades. Some of the most famous singers of all time have performed with the Company including Plácido Domingo, Angela Gheorghiu, Anna Netrebko, Renée Fleming, Bryn Terfel, Jonas Kaufman, Rolando Villazón, Juan Diego Flórez, as well as the late Luciano Pavarotti and Joan Sutherland. The Royal Ballet, led by Director Kevin O’Hare, is Britain’s largest ballet company. The Company has a wide-ranging repertory showcasing the great classical ballets, heritage works from Founder Choreographer Frederick Ashton and Principal Choreographer Kenneth MacMillan, as well as new works by the foremost choreographers of today. Access is a key issue for the Company and its work is seen not just at the Royal Opera House but via televised and cinematic performances, outdoor Big Screen performances, international touring and through the work of the Company’s Education Department.

Shakespeare's Globe
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
21 New Globe Walk
London, SE1 9DT

020 7401 9919 (Box Office)

Please note: This page is monitored Monday - Friday 10am-6pm. If you have an urgent enquiry outside of these hours please call our General Information line on +44 (0)20 7902 1400. Thanks for dropping by our Facebook page. We love to hear from our friends and visitors and we encourage you to engage with information we post about the Globe. Tell us what you thought of our shows, or what you have discovered about Shakespeare. If you ask us a questions we will try our best to answer it. Our page is not the place to advertise your own productions or comments and events that are not related to Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre. Likewise if you post spam or abusive messages, your post will be removed. If you're unhappy at anytime with the service or experience you have at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre you can email us directly at [email protected] Shakespeare's Globe

London Bridge
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (A3)
London, EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

The Punch and Judy - real page covent garden
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
40 The Market Covent Garden Piazza
London, WC2E 8RF

0207 379 0923

The Punch & Judy is a traditional British pub in Covent Garden Piazza serving great cask ales and freshly cooked traditional pub food

Covent Garden & Picadilly Circus
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Covent Garden
London, WC2H 0

Royal Courts of Justice
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2R 1

020 79476000

The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a court building in London which houses both the High Court and Court of Appeal of England and Wales. Designed by George Edmund Street, who died before it was completed, it is a large grey stone edifice in the Victorian Gothic style built in the 1870s and opened by Queen Victoria in 1882. It is one of the largest courts in Europe. It is located on the Strand within the City of Westminster, near the border with the City of London (Temple Bar). It is surrounded by the four Inns of Court, King's College London and the London School of Economics. The nearest London Underground stations are Chancery Lane and Temple.The courts within the building are open to the public, although there may be some restrictions depending upon the nature of the cases being heard. Those in court who do not have legal representation may receive some assistance within the building. There is a citizens' advice bureau based within the Main Hall which provides free, confidential and impartial advice by appointment to anyone who is a litigant in person in the courts. There is also a Personal Support Unit where litigants in person can receive emotional support and practical information about court proceedings.

Millenium Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Bankside
London, EC4V 3QH

The Courtauld Gallery
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
150 Strand
London, WC2R 0RN

+44 (0)20 7848 2526

Discover our world-famous collection of paintings, drawings and decorative arts. Ranging from the Middle Ages to the 20th century the collection is displayed in the elegant surroundings of Somerset House. The Courtauld is best known for its outstanding Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, including celebrated works by Monet, Renoir, Degas and Gauguin as well as a major group of paintings by Cézanne. Visitors can enjoy iconic masteries such as Manet's 'A Bar at the Folies-Bergère' and Van Gogh's 'Self-Portrait with Badaged Ear.'

Hunterian Museum, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Royal College of Surgeons, 35- 43 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, WC2A 3PE

020 78696560

John Hunter's collection was purchased by the government in 1799, and given to the Company (later The Royal College) of Surgeons. The collection formed the basis for a museum constructed as part of the new Royal College of Surgeons of London's building on the south side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. _____________ Hire the Hunterian: In the evening this fantastic space can be hired for your private event. Ideal for drinks receptions, pre-dinner drinks and canapés, or an intimate networking event; the Hunterian Museum will be a once-in-a-lifetime experience for your guests. For further information, please call the events team on 020 7869 6702 and quote FB13 for 15% off your first event.

Bankside
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
100 Southwark Street, SE1
London, SE1 9

+(44)020 7928 7521

Bankside is a district of London, England, and part of the London Borough of Southwark. Bankside is located on the southern bank of the River Thames, 1.5mi east of Charing Cross, running from a little west of Blackfriars Bridge to just a short distance before London Bridge at St Mary Overie Dock to the east which marks its distinct status from that of 'the Borough' district of Southwark. It is part of a business improvement district known as Better Bankside.

Barbican Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Silk Street
London, EC2Y 8

020 7638 4141

HMS President
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, EC4Y 0HJ

HMS Saxifrage was launched in 1918 as a Flower-class anti-submarine Q-ship. She was renamed HMS President in 1922 and moored permanently on the Thames as a Royal Navy Reserve drill ship. In 1982 she was sold to private owners, and having changed hands twice, now serves as a venue for conferences and functions, and serves as the offices for a number of media companies. Technically, she is now called HMS President (1918) to distinguish her from HMS President, the Royal Naval Reserve base in St Katharine Docks. She is one of the last three surviving Royal Navy warships of the First World War. She is also the sole representative of the first type of purpose built anti-submarine vessels, and is the ancestor of WW2 convoy escort sloops, which evolved into modern anti-submarine frigates.Design and constructionThe original Flower-class sloops (the Acacia, Azalea and Arabis classes) were all built in 1915 as fleet minesweeping vessels, with triple hulls at the bow to give extra protection against loss from mine damage. When submarine attacks on British merchant ships became a serious menace after 1916, the existing Flowers were transferred to convoy escort duty, and fitted with depth charges as well as 4.7-inch naval guns.

The London Stone
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
111 Cannon Street
London, EC4N 5AD

020 7626 8246

London Stone
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon Street
London, EC4N 5

02076268246

London Stone is a historic landmark traditionally housed at 111 Cannon Street in the City of London. It is an irregular block of oolitic limestone measuring 53 × 43 × 30 cm (21 × 17 × 12"), the remnant of a once much larger object that had stood for many centuries on the south side of the street. Currently the stone is housed at the Museum of London pending reconstruction of the 111 Cannon Street building.The name "London Stone" was first recorded around the year 1100. The date and original purpose of the Stone are unknown, although it is possibly of Roman origin, and there has been interest and speculation about it since at least the 16th century. There are modern claims that it was formerly an object of veneration, or has some occult significance. These assertions however, are completely unsubstantiated.DescriptionThe present London Stone is only the upper portion of a once much larger object, as described below under History. The surviving portion is a block of oolitic limestone approximately 53 cm wide, 43 cm high, and 30 cm front to back (21 × 17 × 12 inches). A study in the 1960s indicated that the stone is Clipsham Limestone, a good-quality stone from Rutland transported to London for building purposes in both the Roman and medieval periods. More recently Kevin Hayward has suggested that it may be Bath stone, the stone most used for monuments and sculpture in early Roman London and in Saxon times.

Westminster Embankment
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London,

The Barbican - The Conservatory
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Silk Street
London, EC2Y 8

Summer Set House
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2R 1LA

+442078454600

HMS Wellington
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Temple Stairs Victoria Embankment
London, WC2R 2PN

020 7836 8179

HMS Wellington is a sloop, formerly of the Royal Navy. During the Second World War, she served as a convoy escort ship in the North Atlantic. She is now moored alongside the Victoria Embankment, at Temple Pier, on the River Thames in London, England, as the headquarters ship of the Honourable Company of Master Mariners, where she is known as HQS Wellington. It was always the ambition of the founding members of the company to have a livery hall. Up to the outbreak of war in 1939, various proposals were examined, including the purchase of a sailing ship,.After the Second World War, it became apparent that the possibility of building a hall in the City of London had been rendered very remote. In 1947, the Grimsby-class sloop Wellington was made available by the Admiralty. The company decided to buy her with money subscribed by the members and convert her to a floating livery hall, an appropriate home for a company of seafarers.

The Top Of The Dome- St Pauls Cathedral
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Paul's Churchyard, London
London, EC4M 8AD

Big Ben clock
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
New Charles Street
London, EC1V 7

07452959304

Guildhall Art Gallery
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Guildhall 5, Aldermanbury
London, EC2P 2EJ

020 7332 3700

The Guildhall Art Gallery houses the art collection of the City of London, England. It occupies a building that was completed in 1999 to replace an earlier building destroyed in The Blitz in 1941. It is a stone building in a semi-gothic style intended to be sympathetic to the historic Guildhall, which is adjacent and to which it is connected internally.HistoryThe gallery was originally built in 1885 to house art collections from the City of London Corporation and the present collection consists of about 4,000 works, of which around 250 are on display at any one time. Many of the paintings are of London themes. There is also a significant collection of Victorian era art, including Pre-Raphaelites, which features paintings by artists such as John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Abraham Solomon, Edward John Poynter and Edwin Landseer, and a view of Salisbury Cathedral by John Constable. The centrepiece of the largest gallery is John Singleton Copley's huge painting The Defeat of the Floating Batteries at Gibraltar.

Kings Road, Chelsea
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
69 brothel mansions kings rs
London,

London Stone
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon Street
London, EC4N 5AD

John Wesley Chapel
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
49 City Road
London, EC1Y 1

020 7253 2262

Prince Henry's Room
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
17 Fleet St
London, EC4Y 1AA

020 7353 1190

Prince Henry's Room is situated on the first floor at the front of No.17 Fleet Street, London. The house is one of the few surviving buildings in the City of London dating from before the Great Fire of London in 1666. It is a Grade II* Listed Building.HistoryThe site was once owned by the Templars, but after the dissolution of the Order of St John, the building was rebuilt in 1610 and became a tavern called Prince's Arms. This coincided with the investiture of Prince Henry, son of James I, as Prince of Wales. During the 17th century, the house was known as the Fountain Inn and was visited by Samuel Pepys on 14 October 1661. He wrote "In the afternoon Captain Ferrers and I walked abroad to several places; among others, to Mr.Pim's my Lord's tailors and there he went out with us to the Fountain tavern and did give us store of wine." On 28 November 1661, Pepys wrote "to the Fountain tavern and there stayed till 12 at night, drinking and singing, Mr.Symons and one Mr.Agar singing very well. Then Mr.Gauden, being almost drunk, had the wit to be gone; and so I took leave too" During the early 19th century a famous exhibition "Mrs Salmon's Waxworks" was held in the front part of the house, whilst the Tavern continued in the rear. The house became the property of the London County Council in 1908 with the aid of a contribution from the City Corporation. It later passed to the City of London Corporation, which administers the property now.

The Bing Bings
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
City of London
London,

+447402659032

The Bing Bings deals in both the entertainment and tourism sector, resided in the hearts of London. We thrive to be your eyes and ears for the good things in life. Life in the city... from best night out in the center of one of Europe’s premier locations, to the best shows on Broadway, to the beautiful attractions the city has to offer. We are located in the heart of one of London's party hotspots, Piccadilly Circus! For the perfect night out amongst the celebs and stars, for tables/guestlists and for further event information contact us via: Follow us on: Twitter: @wwbblondon Instagram: wwbblondon Telephone: +447402659032

Clink & Bankside Company
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
1 Clink Street
London, SE1 9

20-74036515

Landmark and Historical Place Near Smithfield, London

St Bartholomew-the-Less
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital, West Smithfield
London, United Kingdom EC1A 9LA

+44 20 7601 8066

St Bartholomew the Less is an Anglican parish in the City of London and the church of St Bartholomew's Hospital within the ancient hospital precincts.HistoryThe present establishment is the latest in a series of churches and chapels associated with the hospital over the past 800 years. Its earliest predecessor, known as the Chapel of the Holy Cross, was founded nearby in 1123 (at the same time as the priory, now the Priory Church of St Bartholomew the Great) before moving to the present site in 1184. Along with most other religious foundations the hospital was dissolved by Henry VIII. It was then refounded by King Henry VIII, when the chapel became an Anglican parish church serving those living within its precincts. Its suffix, "the less", was given to distinguish it from its larger neighbour, St Bartholomew the Great (the former priory).The church's tower and west façade date from 15th century, with two of its three bells dating from 1380 and 1420. They hang within an original medieval bell frame, believed to be the oldest in the City of London. In 1793 George Dance the Younger, a Royal Academician, created a new octagonal interior within the shell of the medieval chapel, its clerestorey rising above the old walls. The new construction was made entirely of wood and soon became affected by dry-rot. In 1823 it was replaced under the supervision of Thomas Hardwick, who replicated the timber construction in stone with an iron ceiling. He also made alterations to the detailing.

Time For Tease
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
The Paradise, 19 Kilburn Lane
London, United Kingdom W10 4AE

Afternoon Tease! is the original burlesque afternoon tea party. You sit down to a full spread of afternoon tea and are interrupted in the nicest possible way by stunning burlesque and cabaret performances. Tickets for Afternoon Tease! are £42, this includes full afternoon tea and a table for the afternoon. While we don't impose a dress code for Afternoon Tease! people can and do dress up in their feathers and finery which we think is brilliant! We hold Afternoon Tease! on the first Saturday of the month at The Paradise in London. You can book tickets online at www.timefortease.com

St Audoen within Newgate
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
114 Newgate St
London, United Kingdom EC1A 7AE

020 7606 3955

St Audoen within Newgate was a mediaeval church in the City of London situated on the corner of Newgate Street and Eldeness Lane . It was first mentioned as Parochia sancti Audoeni in around 1220.In 1546, Henry VIII gave the church, along with St Nicholas Shambles and the dissolved Christ Church priory to the City corporation. A new parish was created for Christ Church, out of those of St Audoen and St Nicholas, and part of that of St Sepulchre. St Audoen's was demolished in around 1583.

Daily Express Building, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
120 Fleet Street
London, United Kingdom EC4A 2BH

The Daily Express Building is a Grade II* listed building located in Fleet Street in the City of London. It was designed in 1932 by Ellis and Clark to serve as the home of the Daily Express newspaper and is one of the most prominent examples of art-deco architecture in London.The exterior features a black façade with rounded corners in vitrolite and clear glass, with chromium strips. The flamboyant lobby, designed by Robert Atkinson, includes plaster reliefs by Eric Aumonier, silver and gilt decorations, a magnificent silvered pendant lamp and an oval staircase. The furniture inside the building was, for the most part, designed by Betty Joel.The Grade II* listing relates not only to the architectural features but also to the massive reinforced concrete stacked portal frame structure designed by Sir Owen Williams.As part of a redevelopment of the surrounding site the building was entirely refurbished in 2000 by John Robertson Architects. The foyer was recreated largely from photographs and the façade completely upgraded. The concrete portal frame structure was preserved.The lobby of this building was open to the public on London Open House day, over the weekend of 19 and 20 September 2009. Members of the public were allowed to view the lobby, which is normally only accessible to employees of the building and invited guests.

St Peter's Italian Church
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
136 Clerkenwell Road
London, United Kingdom EC1R 5DL

020 7837 1528

St. Peter's Italian Church is a Basilica-style church located in Holborn, London.HistoryIt was built by request of Saint Vincent Pallotti, and it is still under the control of the Pallotine order which he founded. He had assistance from Giuseppe Mazzini, who was in London at the time, for the growing number of Italian immigrants in the mid 19th century and modelled by Irish architect Sir John Miller-Bryson on the Basilica San Crisogono in Rome.It was consecrated on 16 April 1863 as The Church of St. Peter of all Nations. At the time of consecration, it was the only Basilica-style church in the UK. Its organ was built in 1886 by Belgian Anneesen.The frontal section of the church consists of a loggia and portico with twin arches, above which are three alcoves. The central alcove contains a statue of Christ, whilst the sides contain statues of St. Bede and St. George. Between the alcoves are two large mosaics depicting the miracle of the fishes and Jesus giving the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven to St. Peter.Above the façade is a 33-metre-high bell tower, built in 1891 which houses a bell known as "The Steel Monster".In the loggia are two remembrance plaques, one to veterans (mostly Italian Britons) of World War I and the other to 446 Italians who lost their lives on the Arandora Star.

St James's Church, Clerkenwell
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Clerkenwell Close
London, United Kingdom EC1R 0

+44 20 7251 1190

St James Church, Clerkenwell, is an Anglican parish church in Clerkenwell, London, England.HistoryNunnery of St Mary: c. 1100–1539The parish of St James, Clerkenwell, has had a long and sometimes lively history. The springs which give Clerkenwell its name are mentioned during the reign of Henry II. The parish clerks of London used to perform their mystery plays, plays based on Biblical themes, in the neighbourhood, sometimes in the presence of royalty. In approximately 1100 a Norman baron named Jordan Briset founded an Augustine nunnery dedicated to St Mary, which became wealthy and influential. It had a place of pilgrimage at Muswell Hill, and the parish kept an outlying tract of territory there until the nineteenth century.Old Church of St James: 1540–1788At the dissolution of the nunnery under Henry VIII its church, which by then seems to have acquired a second dedication to St James, was taken into use by its parishioners who had already been using a part of it for some considerable time. The site of the nunnery was granted to Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, in 1540 but the freehold of the church passed through various hands until it was conveyed in 1656 to trustees on behalf of the parishioners, who at the same time obtained the right to appoint the vicar. Unlike other parishes, they retained it after the Restoration of 1660. Elections of vicars were held, with all the excitement and paraphernalia of parliamentary elections, right down to the early years of this century and a distinctly Low Church tradition was thereby established. This did not prevent a long struggle in the latter years of the eighteenth century with Selina, Countess of Huntingdon. This strong-minded and evangelical lady had taken over a building in the parish called Spa Fields Chapel, and insisted on appointing her own chaplains to preach there. The vicar was furious, and his action against her in the ecclesiastical courts was the cause of her secession from the Church of England.

Old St Paul's Cathedral
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Paul's Churchyard
London, United Kingdom SW1W 0

Old St Paul's Cathedral was the medieval cathedral of the City of London that, until 1666, stood on the site of the present St Paul's Cathedral. Built from 1087 to 1314 and dedicated to Saint Paul, the cathedral was the fourth church on the site at Ludgate Hill.Work on the cathedral began during the reign of William the Conqueror after a fire in 1087 that destroyed much of the city. Work took more than 200 years, and construction was delayed by another fire in 1135. The church was consecrated in 1240 and enlarged again in 1256 and the early 14th century. At its completion in the middle of the 14th century, the cathedral was one of the longest churches in the world and had one of the tallest spires and some of the finest stained glass.The presence of the shrine of Saint Erkenwald made the cathedral a pilgrimage site during the Medieval period. In addition to serving as the seat of the Diocese of London, the building developed a reputation as a hub of the City of London, with the nave aisle, "Paul's walk", known as a centre for business and the London grapevine. After the Reformation, the open-air pulpit in the churchyard, St Paul's Cross, became the stage for radical evangelical preaching and Protestant bookselling.

Queen Victoria Street, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Queen Victoria Street
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4

Queen Victoria Street, named after the British monarch who reigned from 1837 to 1901, is a street in London which runs east by north from its junction with New Bridge Street and Victoria Embankment in the Castle Baynard ward of the City of London, along a section that divides the wards of Queenhithe and Bread Street, then lastly through the middle of Cordwainer ward, until it reaches Mansion House Street at Bank junction. Beyond Bank junction, the street continues north-east as Threadneedle Street which joins Bishopsgate.The road was commissioned in 1861 to streamline the approach to the central business district, and was provided for through the Metropolitan Improvement Act. Costing over £1,000,000, it remains a flagship street within the City.The nearest London Underground stations are Blackfriars (at its western junction with New Bridge Street), Mansion House (where it crosses Cannon Street), and Bank (near its eastern end).Queen Victoria Street formed part of the marathon course of the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Queen Victoria Street, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Queen Victoria Street
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4

维多利亚女王街(Queen Victoria Street)得名于维多利亚女王,是伦敦市的一条街道,东西走向,始于新桥街和维多利亚堤岸,止于市长官邸街(银行交叉口)。该路开辟于1861年,以改善中央银行区的交通,仍然是伦敦市“一平方英里”金融区的一条旗舰街道。最近的地铁站是黑衣修士站、市长官邸站和银行-纪念碑站。

Temple, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
2 Temple Place
London, United Kingdom IG8 7

20-85056687

The Temple is an area of central London, in the vicinity of Temple Church, It is one of the main legal districts of the capital and a notable centre for English law, both historically and in the present day. The Temple area of the City of London consists of the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple, which are two of the four Inns of Court and act as local authorities in place of the City of London Corporation within their areas.The Royal Courts of Justice are just to the north and Temple tube station is located to the west in the City of Westminster. The wider Temple area is roughly bound by the River Thames (the Victoria Embankment) to the south, Surrey Street to the west, Strand and Fleet Street to the north, and Carmelite Street and Whitefriars Street to the east.It contains many barristers' chambers, solicitors' offices, as well as some notable legal institutions such as the Employment Appeal Tribunal. The International Institute for Strategic Studies has its headquarters at Arundel House.

HMS Wellington
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Temple Stairs Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom WC2R 2PN

020 7836 8179

HMS Wellington is a sloop, formerly of the Royal Navy. During the Second World War, she served as a convoy escort ship in the North Atlantic. She is now moored alongside the Victoria Embankment, at Temple Pier, on the River Thames in London, England, as the headquarters ship of the Honourable Company of Master Mariners, where she is known as HQS Wellington. It was always the ambition of the founding members of the company to have a livery hall. Up to the outbreak of war in 1939, various proposals were examined, including the purchase of a sailing ship,.After the Second World War, it became apparent that the possibility of building a hall in the City of London had been rendered very remote. In 1947, the Grimsby-class sloop Wellington was made available by the Admiralty. The company decided to buy her with money subscribed by the members and convert her to a floating livery hall, an appropriate home for a company of seafarers.