EuroZoid
Discover The Most Popular Places In Europe

Smithfield, London, London | Tourist Information


31-32 Watling St
London, United Kingdom EC1A 2

020 7248 3151

Smithfield is a locality in the ward of Farringdon Without situated at the City of London's northwest in central London, England. The principal street of the area is West Smithfield.A number of valued City institutions are located in the area, such as St Bartholomew's Hospital, the Charterhouse, and Livery Halls notably those of the Butchers' and Haberdashers' Companies, but Smithfield is best known for its ancient meat market, dating from the 10th century, which is now London's only remaining wholesale market in continuous operation since medieval times. The area also contains London's oldest surviving church, St Bartholomew-the-Great, founded in 1123 AD.Smithfield has borne witness to many bloody executions of heretics and political rebels over the centuries, including major historical figures such as Scottish patriot Sir William Wallace and Wat Tyler, leader of the Peasants' Revolt, among many other religious reformers and dissenters.

City Near Smithfield, London

Great Suffolk Street
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Great Suffolk Street
London, SE1 0

207-9288428

Bankside
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
100 Southwark Street, SE1
London, SE1 9

+(44)020 7928 7521

Bankside is a district of London, England, and part of the London Borough of Southwark. Bankside is located on the southern bank of the River Thames, 1.5mi east of Charing Cross, running from a little west of Blackfriars Bridge to just a short distance before London Bridge at St Mary Overie Dock to the east which marks its distinct status from that of 'the Borough' district of Southwark. It is part of a business improvement district known as Better Bankside.

Natixis CIB
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
One Carter Lane
London,

Best Doctors United Kingdom
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
68 King William Street
London, EC4N 7DZ

Founded in 1989 by a group of professors from Harvard Medical School, Best Doctors provides patients and their treating doctors with access to the world’s leading medical minds, thanks to our unique database of over 53,000 of the world’s leading specialists in more than 430 sub-specialities, all chosen by fellow doctors as the specialists that they themselves would consult with their own health problems. A valuable health complement for company benefits plans, insurance policies and affinity programmes, Best Doctors removes the burden of uncertainty and ensures that people receive the best medical advice that the world has to offer.

Londres - Inglaterra - Europa
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Cidade De Londres
London,

Temple, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
2 Temple Place
London, IG8 7

20-85056687

The Temple is an area of central London, in the vicinity of Temple Church, It is one of the main legal districts of the capital and a notable centre for English law, both historically and in the present day. The Temple area of the City of London consists of the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple, which are two of the four Inns of Court and act as local authorities in place of the City of London Corporation within their areas.The Royal Courts of Justice are just to the north and Temple tube station is located to the west in the City of Westminster. The wider Temple area is roughly bound by the River Thames (the Victoria Embankment) to the south, Surrey Street to the west, Strand and Fleet Street to the north, and Carmelite Street and Whitefriars Street to the east.It contains many barristers' chambers, solicitors' offices, as well as some notable legal institutions such as the Employment Appeal Tribunal. The International Institute for Strategic Studies has its headquarters at Arundel House.

Blackfriars, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
179 Queen Victoria Street
London, EC4V 4DY

Blackfriars is an area of central London, which lies in the south-west corner of the City of London.The name Blackfriars was first used in 1317 (as Black Freres from the French 'frère' meaning 'brother') and derives from the black cappa worn by the Dominican Friars who moved their priory from Holborn to the area between the River Thames and Ludgate Hill in 1276. Edward I gave permission to rebuild London's city wall, which lay between the river and Ludgate Hill, around their area. The site was used for great occasions of state, including meetings of Parliament and the Privy Council, as well as the location for a divorce hearing in 1529 of Catherine of Aragon and Henry VIII. The priory was eventually closed in 1538 during Henry's Dissolution of the monasteries. Katherine Parr, Henry VIII's sixth and final wife, was born in the area.Some of the buildings were subsequently leased to a group of entrepreneurs who created the Blackfriars Theatre on the site, not far from Shakespeare's Globe Theatre which sat almost directly across on the other side of the river. In 1632, the Society of Apothecaries (a livery company), acquired the monastery's guesthouse and established their base there. The building was destroyed in the Great Fire of London but the Society rebuilt and Apothecaries Hall is still to be found in Blackfriars today.

Cripplegate
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Giles Terrace
London, EC2Y 8

Cripplegate was a gate in the London Wall and a name for the region of the City of London outside the gate. The area was almost entirely destroyed in the Blitz of World War II and today it is the site of the Barbican Estate and Barbican Centre. The name is preserved in the church of St Giles-without-Cripplegate, in the Cripplegate ward of the City, and in a small road named Cripplegate Street which lies slightly to the north of the site of the Wall between Viscount Street and Bridgewater Street.The ward of Cripplegate straddles the (now former) line of the Wall and the old gate and is often (even today) divided into "Within" and "Without" parts, with a beadle and a deputy (alderman) appointed for each part. Since the 1994 (City) and 2003 (ward) boundary changes, most of the ward is Without, with the ward of Bassishaw having expanded considerably into the Within area.HistoryIn 1555, John Gresham endowed the new Gresham's School in Norfolk with three tenements in the parish of St. Giles Without Cripplegate, including 'The White Hind' and 'The Peacock'.During the Second World War the Cripplegate area, a center of the rag trade, was virtually destroyed and by 1951 the resident population of the City stood at only 5,324, of whom 48 lived in Cripplegate. Discussions began in 1952 about the future of the area, and the decision to build new residential properties was taken by the Court of Common Council on 19 September 1957. The area was reopened as the Barbican Estate in 1969. Cripplegate is today the most populous of the four residential wards of the City, with a population of 2,782 (2011).

Company of Pikemen & Musketeers HAC
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Armoury House, City Road
London, EC1Y 2BQ

Members are dressed as the Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) would have been in the 1640s. Apart from duties in the City of London,the Company is increasingly in demand for state, military, charity and other events, to add colour and pageantry and to gives displays of 17th century drills and music. In recent years the Pikemen & Musketeers have paraded in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and the United States. Only veteran members of the HAC's Territorial Army / Reserve regiment are eligible for membership.

Company of Pikemen & Musketeers HAC
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Armoury House, City Road
London, EC1Y 2BQ

Members are dressed as the Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) would have been in the 1640s. Apart from duties in the City of London,the Company is increasingly in demand for state, military, charity and other events, to add colour and pageantry and to gives displays of 17th century drills and music. In recent years the Pikemen & Musketeers have paraded in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and the United States. Only veteran members of the HAC's Territorial Army / Reserve regiment are eligible for membership.

Capoeira Bem-Vindo Angola
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Garrett Centre
London, E2 6LX

Benefits of Capoeira! The art of Capoeira offers substantial benefits to physical and mental health, strength, flexibility, endurance, self-esteem and discipline. Everyone has the ability to learn Capoeira; however, each person expresses their knowledge of it in a unique manner. The group: Capoeira Bem-Vindo Angola is a group founded in London by Paulinha and students. "Bem-Vindo" means "welcome" in portuguese, the idea is to keep the door open to anyone who wants to learn, share or celebrate the art of capoeira. The capoeira angola community in London is very open and is growing fast, this is an amazing opportunity to develop our capoeira, ourselves and the art itself. Capoeira Bem-Vindo is proud to be part of it and happy to bring simplicity, respect and positive feelings. This philosophy is meaningful to us and will help to develop our work and study of capoeira angola. Vamos vadiar! Capoeira Bem-Vindo é um grupo fundado em Londres por Paulinha e alunos. A idéia é manter a porta aberta para quem quiser aprender, compartilhar ou celebrar a arte da capoeira. A Capoeira Angola comunidade em Londres é muito aberto e está crescendo rapidamente, esta é uma incrível oportunidade de desenvolver a nossa capoeira, nós mesmos e da arte em si. Capoeira Bem-Vindo tem orgulho de ser parte dela e feliz por trazer sentimentos de respeito, simplicidade e positiva. Esta filosofia é importante para nós e vai ajudar a desenvolver o nosso trabalho e estudo da Capoeira Angola. Vamos vadiar! Capoeira Bem- Vindo! Classes: Including music, movements and roda. Everybody are welcome to join us to share the good time together! Tuesdays 6.30pm-8.30pm Praxis community Project, Pott Street E2 0EF just 2min away from Bethnal green Tube St. Saturdays 3.30pm-5.30pm Soho Gym Camden Town Please come 15 minutes before the class for strech and warm up :-)

Clerkenwell
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
14-16 Farringdon Lane
London,

020 7405 3856

Clerkenwell is an area of central London in the London Borough of Islington. It was an ancient parish and from 1900 to 1965 formed part of the Metropolitan Borough of Finsbury. The well after which it was named was rediscovered in 1924. The watchmaking and watch repairing trades were once of great importance.London's Little ItalyIn the 1850s the south-western part of Clerkenwell was known as London's "Little Italy" because around 2,000 Italians had settled in the area. The community had mostly dispersed by the 1960s, but the area remains the 'spiritual home' of London's Italians, and is a focal point for more recent Italian immigrants, largely because of St Peter's Italian Church. There are officially over 200,000 Italians in London, and possibly many more. The Italian Procession of Our Lady of Mount Carmel and Sagra takes place each July in the streets surrounding the church.A small number of Italian businesses remain from the nineteenth century including organ builders Chiappa Ltd, and food outlets such as the delicatessen Terroni. Many other Italian firms survive from the period but have relocated elsewhere.HistoryClerks' WellClerkenwell took its name from the Clerks' Well in Farringdon Lane . In the Middle Ages, the London Parish clerks performed annual mystery plays there, based on biblical themes. Part of the well remains visible, incorporated into a 1980s building called Well Court. It is visible through a window of that building on Farringdon Lane. Access to the well is managed by Islington Local History Centre and visits can be arranged by appointment.

St Pancras, London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Euston Rd
London, WC1H 9

+44 345 711 41 41

St Pancras is een wijk in het Londense bestuurlijke gebied Camden, in de regio Groot-Londen.

Clink 78
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
78 kings cross road
London, WC1X 9QG

New Cross, London, UK
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
greenwich high road se108jl
London, SE14 6

Embassy Of The State Of Eritrea
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
96 White Lion St
London,

+44 (0) 20 7713 0096

The Embassy of Eritrea in London is the diplomatic mission of Eritrea in the United Kingdom. It is the eastern-most embassy in the city (ignoring the Mission of Somaliland), being far removed from most other embassies which are predominantly located in Central or West London.

Island Queen, Islington
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
87 Noel Road
London,

Hoxton
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Hoxton street
London, E2 8

Hoxton is a district in the East End of London, England, immediately north of the financial district of the City of London. Hoxton forms the western part of Shoreditch, being part of the ancient parish and subsequent Metropolitan Borough of Shoreditch prior to its incorporation into the London Borough of Hackney. The area of Hoxton is bordered by Regent's Canal on the north side, Wharf Road and City Road to the west, Old Street to the south, and Kingsland Road to the east.Hoxton is also a ward, electing three councillors to Hackney London Borough Council. It forms part of the Hackney South and Shoreditch constituency.Historical HoxtonOrigins"Hogesdon" is first recorded in the Domesday Book, meaning an Anglo-Saxon farm (or "fortified enclosure") belonging to Hoch, or Hocq. Little is recorded of the origins of the settlement, though there was Roman activity around Ermine Street, which ran to the east of the area from the 1st century. In medieval times, Hoxton formed a rural part of Shoreditch parish. It achieved independent ecclesiastical status in 1826 with the founding of its own parish church dedicated to St John the Baptist, though civil jurisdiction was still invested in the Shoreditch vestry. The Worshipful Company of Haberdashers remains Patron of the advowson of the parish of St John's.

N1 Centre
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
21 Parkfield St
London, N1 0

20-73592674

Colebrooke Row, Islington, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Colebrooke Row, Islington, N1
London,

Copenhagen Street N1
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
barnsbury road
London, N1 0

Landmark and Historical Place Near Smithfield, London

HMS Wellington
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Temple Stairs Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom WC2R 2PN

020 7836 8179

HMS Wellington is a sloop, formerly of the Royal Navy. During the Second World War, she served as a convoy escort ship in the North Atlantic. She is now moored alongside the Victoria Embankment, at Temple Pier, on the River Thames in London, England, as the headquarters ship of the Honourable Company of Master Mariners, where she is known as HQS Wellington. It was always the ambition of the founding members of the company to have a livery hall. Up to the outbreak of war in 1939, various proposals were examined, including the purchase of a sailing ship,.After the Second World War, it became apparent that the possibility of building a hall in the City of London had been rendered very remote. In 1947, the Grimsby-class sloop Wellington was made available by the Admiralty. The company decided to buy her with money subscribed by the members and convert her to a floating livery hall, an appropriate home for a company of seafarers.

Temple, London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
2 Temple Place
London, United Kingdom IG8 7

20-85056687

The Temple is an area of central London, in the vicinity of Temple Church, It is one of the main legal districts of the capital and a notable centre for English law, both historically and in the present day. The Temple area of the City of London consists of the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple, which are two of the four Inns of Court and act as local authorities in place of the City of London Corporation within their areas.The Royal Courts of Justice are just to the north and Temple tube station is located to the west in the City of Westminster. The wider Temple area is roughly bound by the River Thames (the Victoria Embankment) to the south, Surrey Street to the west, Strand and Fleet Street to the north, and Carmelite Street and Whitefriars Street to the east.It contains many barristers' chambers, solicitors' offices, as well as some notable legal institutions such as the Employment Appeal Tribunal. The International Institute for Strategic Studies has its headquarters at Arundel House.

Queen Victoria Street, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Queen Victoria Street
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4

Queen Victoria Street, named after the British monarch who reigned from 1837 to 1901, is a street in London which runs east by north from its junction with New Bridge Street and Victoria Embankment in the Castle Baynard ward of the City of London, along a section that divides the wards of Queenhithe and Bread Street, then lastly through the middle of Cordwainer ward, until it reaches Mansion House Street at Bank junction. Beyond Bank junction, the street continues north-east as Threadneedle Street which joins Bishopsgate.The road was commissioned in 1861 to streamline the approach to the central business district, and was provided for through the Metropolitan Improvement Act. Costing over £1,000,000, it remains a flagship street within the City.The nearest London Underground stations are Blackfriars (at its western junction with New Bridge Street), Mansion House (where it crosses Cannon Street), and Bank (near its eastern end).Queen Victoria Street formed part of the marathon course of the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Queen Victoria Street, London
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Queen Victoria Street
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4

维多利亚女王街(Queen Victoria Street)得名于维多利亚女王,是伦敦市的一条街道,东西走向,始于新桥街和维多利亚堤岸,止于市长官邸街(银行交叉口)。该路开辟于1861年,以改善中央银行区的交通,仍然是伦敦市“一平方英里”金融区的一条旗舰街道。最近的地铁站是黑衣修士站、市长官邸站和银行-纪念碑站。

Old St Paul's Cathedral
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
St Paul's Churchyard
London, United Kingdom SW1W 0

Old St Paul's Cathedral was the medieval cathedral of the City of London that, until 1666, stood on the site of the present St Paul's Cathedral. Built from 1087 to 1314 and dedicated to Saint Paul, the cathedral was the fourth church on the site at Ludgate Hill.Work on the cathedral began during the reign of William the Conqueror after a fire in 1087 that destroyed much of the city. Work took more than 200 years, and construction was delayed by another fire in 1135. The church was consecrated in 1240 and enlarged again in 1256 and the early 14th century. At its completion in the middle of the 14th century, the cathedral was one of the longest churches in the world and had one of the tallest spires and some of the finest stained glass.The presence of the shrine of Saint Erkenwald made the cathedral a pilgrimage site during the Medieval period. In addition to serving as the seat of the Diocese of London, the building developed a reputation as a hub of the City of London, with the nave aisle, "Paul's walk", known as a centre for business and the London grapevine. After the Reformation, the open-air pulpit in the churchyard, St Paul's Cross, became the stage for radical evangelical preaching and Protestant bookselling.

Daily Express Building, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
120 Fleet Street
London, United Kingdom EC4A 2BH

The Daily Express Building is a Grade II* listed building located in Fleet Street in the City of London. It was designed in 1932 by Ellis and Clark to serve as the home of the Daily Express newspaper and is one of the most prominent examples of art-deco architecture in London.The exterior features a black façade with rounded corners in vitrolite and clear glass, with chromium strips. The flamboyant lobby, designed by Robert Atkinson, includes plaster reliefs by Eric Aumonier, silver and gilt decorations, a magnificent silvered pendant lamp and an oval staircase. The furniture inside the building was, for the most part, designed by Betty Joel.The Grade II* listing relates not only to the architectural features but also to the massive reinforced concrete stacked portal frame structure designed by Sir Owen Williams.As part of a redevelopment of the surrounding site the building was entirely refurbished in 2000 by John Robertson Architects. The foyer was recreated largely from photographs and the façade completely upgraded. The concrete portal frame structure was preserved.The lobby of this building was open to the public on London Open House day, over the weekend of 19 and 20 September 2009. Members of the public were allowed to view the lobby, which is normally only accessible to employees of the building and invited guests.

St Audoen within Newgate
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
114 Newgate St
London, United Kingdom EC1A 7AE

020 7606 3955

St Audoen within Newgate was a mediaeval church in the City of London situated on the corner of Newgate Street and Eldeness Lane . It was first mentioned as Parochia sancti Audoeni in around 1220.In 1546, Henry VIII gave the church, along with St Nicholas Shambles and the dissolved Christ Church priory to the City corporation. A new parish was created for Christ Church, out of those of St Audoen and St Nicholas, and part of that of St Sepulchre. St Audoen's was demolished in around 1583.

St Bartholomew-the-Less
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital, West Smithfield
London, United Kingdom EC1A 9LA

+44 20 7601 8066

St Bartholomew the Less is an Anglican parish in the City of London and the church of St Bartholomew's Hospital within the ancient hospital precincts.HistoryThe present establishment is the latest in a series of churches and chapels associated with the hospital over the past 800 years. Its earliest predecessor, known as the Chapel of the Holy Cross, was founded nearby in 1123 (at the same time as the priory, now the Priory Church of St Bartholomew the Great) before moving to the present site in 1184. Along with most other religious foundations the hospital was dissolved by Henry VIII. It was then refounded by King Henry VIII, when the chapel became an Anglican parish church serving those living within its precincts. Its suffix, "the less", was given to distinguish it from its larger neighbour, St Bartholomew the Great (the former priory).The church's tower and west façade date from 15th century, with two of its three bells dating from 1380 and 1420. They hang within an original medieval bell frame, believed to be the oldest in the City of London. In 1793 George Dance the Younger, a Royal Academician, created a new octagonal interior within the shell of the medieval chapel, its clerestorey rising above the old walls. The new construction was made entirely of wood and soon became affected by dry-rot. In 1823 it was replaced under the supervision of Thomas Hardwick, who replicated the timber construction in stone with an iron ceiling. He also made alterations to the detailing.

Time For Tease
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
The Paradise, 19 Kilburn Lane
London, United Kingdom W10 4AE

Afternoon Tease! is the original burlesque afternoon tea party. You sit down to a full spread of afternoon tea and are interrupted in the nicest possible way by stunning burlesque and cabaret performances. Tickets for Afternoon Tease! are £42, this includes full afternoon tea and a table for the afternoon. While we don't impose a dress code for Afternoon Tease! people can and do dress up in their feathers and finery which we think is brilliant! We hold Afternoon Tease! on the first Saturday of the month at The Paradise in London. You can book tickets online at www.timefortease.com

St Peter's Italian Church
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
136 Clerkenwell Road
London, United Kingdom EC1R 5DL

020 7837 1528

St. Peter's Italian Church is a Basilica-style church located in Holborn, London.HistoryIt was built by request of Saint Vincent Pallotti, and it is still under the control of the Pallotine order which he founded. He had assistance from Giuseppe Mazzini, who was in London at the time, for the growing number of Italian immigrants in the mid 19th century and modelled by Irish architect Sir John Miller-Bryson on the Basilica San Crisogono in Rome.It was consecrated on 16 April 1863 as The Church of St. Peter of all Nations. At the time of consecration, it was the only Basilica-style church in the UK. Its organ was built in 1886 by Belgian Anneesen.The frontal section of the church consists of a loggia and portico with twin arches, above which are three alcoves. The central alcove contains a statue of Christ, whilst the sides contain statues of St. Bede and St. George. Between the alcoves are two large mosaics depicting the miracle of the fishes and Jesus giving the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven to St. Peter.Above the façade is a 33-metre-high bell tower, built in 1891 which houses a bell known as "The Steel Monster".In the loggia are two remembrance plaques, one to veterans (mostly Italian Britons) of World War I and the other to 446 Italians who lost their lives on the Arandora Star.

St James's Church, Clerkenwell
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Clerkenwell Close
London, United Kingdom EC1R 0

+44 20 7251 1190

St James Church, Clerkenwell, is an Anglican parish church in Clerkenwell, London, England.HistoryNunnery of St Mary: c. 1100–1539The parish of St James, Clerkenwell, has had a long and sometimes lively history. The springs which give Clerkenwell its name are mentioned during the reign of Henry II. The parish clerks of London used to perform their mystery plays, plays based on Biblical themes, in the neighbourhood, sometimes in the presence of royalty. In approximately 1100 a Norman baron named Jordan Briset founded an Augustine nunnery dedicated to St Mary, which became wealthy and influential. It had a place of pilgrimage at Muswell Hill, and the parish kept an outlying tract of territory there until the nineteenth century.Old Church of St James: 1540–1788At the dissolution of the nunnery under Henry VIII its church, which by then seems to have acquired a second dedication to St James, was taken into use by its parishioners who had already been using a part of it for some considerable time. The site of the nunnery was granted to Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, in 1540 but the freehold of the church passed through various hands until it was conveyed in 1656 to trustees on behalf of the parishioners, who at the same time obtained the right to appoint the vicar. Unlike other parishes, they retained it after the Restoration of 1660. Elections of vicars were held, with all the excitement and paraphernalia of parliamentary elections, right down to the early years of this century and a distinctly Low Church tradition was thereby established. This did not prevent a long struggle in the latter years of the eighteenth century with Selina, Countess of Huntingdon. This strong-minded and evangelical lady had taken over a building in the parish called Spa Fields Chapel, and insisted on appointing her own chaplains to preach there. The vicar was furious, and his action against her in the ecclesiastical courts was the cause of her secession from the Church of England.