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Apollo Theatre, London | Tourist Information


nimaxtheatres.com/apollotheatre.asp

31 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 7

020 7494 5070

The Apollo Theatre is a Grade II listed West End theatre, on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster, in central London. Designed by the architect Lewin Sharp for owner Henry Lowenfeld, it became the fourth legitimate theatre to be constructed on the street when it opened its doors on 21 February 1901, with the American musical comedy The Belle of Bohemia.HistoryConstructionBecause Henry Lowenfeld had bought land on the newly created Shaftesbury Avenue at the turn of the 20th century – next door to the Lyric Theatre which opened in 1888 – the Apollo is one of the few theatres in London to be freehold.The only complete theatre design of architect Lewin Sharp, the Apollo was specifically designed for musical theatre and named after the Greek god of the arts and leader of the muses. Constructed by builder Walter Wallis of plain London brick in keeping with the neighbouring streets, the front piece is in the Renaissance style with sculpted stone fascia by T. Simpson. The structure encloses a four-level auditorium, with three cantilevered balconies and a first floor central loggia, decorated in the Louis XIV Style by Hubert van Hooydonk. In keeping with then European style, each level has its own foyer and promenade.

Movie Theater Near Apollo Theatre

Empire Leicester Square
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
The Empire Leicester Square, 5-6 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7NA

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Immersive cinematic experience with IMAX and IMPACT Screens. The Empire Leicester Square 5-6 Leicester Square London WC2H 7NA www.empirecinemas.co.uk

ODEON
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
ODEON Leicester Sq, 24-26 Leicester Sq
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7JY

020 7930 6111

The Prince Charles Cinema
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
7 Leicester Place
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7

0207 494 3654

Vue West End (Leicester Square)
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
3 Cranbourn Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7AL

08712 240 240

Noel Coward Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
85-87 St Martin's Lane
London, United Kingdom WC2N 4AU

+44 (0) 20 7759 8010

Courthouse Hotel London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
19-21 Great Marlborough Street
London, United Kingdom W1F 7HL

+44-(0)20 7297-5555

Picturehouse Central
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7DH

0871 902 5747

Picturehouse Central is situated in the heart of London’s West End, a stone’s throw away from Leicester Square. The entrance is on the corner of Great Windmill Street and Shaftesbury Avenue at the centre of London’s famous theatre district. We programme an eclectic mix of quality mainstream cinema, foreign language, indie, arthouse and a strong focus on documentaries from around the world. We also host regular live director/talent Q&As. More than a cinema, there is bustling cafe on the ground floor open from 9am, a spacious and relaxing bar & restaurant on the first floor and a newly opened private members bar covering two floors and roof terrace with stunning views across Piccadilly. Food And Drink - Ground floor café: 9.00am – 11.30pm weekdays 9.00am – 11.30pm Saturday 9.30am – 11.30pm Sunday Our broad range of alcoholic drinks is available with the purchase of food or to those with a current-day cinema ticket. First floor restaurant and bar: 11.30am – 11.30pm (last orders at 10.30pm) Our fully stocked bar's sumptuous array of wines, beers and cocktails is available to those with a current-day cinema ticket. Menu Bowls - Arrancini balls with fresh herb pesto (v, gf) 6.00 - Roast chicken Caesar 9.50 - Pan-roasted salmon fillet, summer greens, new potatoes, fresh herbs (gf) 12.50 - Egg yolk fettuccine, ratatouille, crispy basil & Old Winchester (v) 9.50 - Moroccan spiced chickpeas, aubergine, Swiss chard, coriander & minted yoghurt (v, gf) 11.00 - Smoky beef chilli, soured cream, avocado, cornbread 12.50 - Five-spice pork belly, udon noodles, beansprouts, radish, fragrant chicken broth (gf) 12.50 Boards - Chicken satay with spiced peanut dipping sauce 6.00 - British chorizo, red onion marmalade & feta pizza 9.00 - Chargrilled courgette, hummus, fresh herb & rose harissa flatbread (ve) 9.00 - Chargrilled tuna with green papaya salad (gf) 12.50 - Flat iron beefburger with smoked streaky bacon, Westcombe Cheddar, onion rings, sweet chilli mayo, gherkin & French fries or fat chips 12.00 - Central hot dog with caramelised onions, mustard & French fries or fat chips 9.50 - Slow cooked spiced lamb shoulder with grilled aubergine, tahini, pomegranate, toasted almonds & Moroccan khobz 11.50 Sharing - British charcuterie, cornichons & artisan bread 14.00 - British cheese with sour gooseberry jam, artisan bread 14.00 - Hummus, olives, aubergine caviar, bread sticks (ve) 12.50 - Sweet potato wedges, guacamole, soured cream & tomato salsa (v) 12.50 Sides - Fat chips & tomato relish 3.50 - French fries 3.50 - Sweet potato fries with sweet chilli mayo 3.95 - Buttered new potatoes 3.50 - Onion rings & garlic mayo 3.50 - Summer leaf salad 3.00 - Green beans with lemon & extra virgin olive oil 3.50 Kids - Mini burger with salad or French fries or fat chips 6.00 - Fettuccine with tomato sauce & cheese (v) 6.00 - Hummus with bread sticks & carrots (ve) 4.50 - Cheese & tomato pizza (v) 6.00 Dessert - Creme brûlée 5.50 - White chocolate & berry cheesecake 5.50 - Chocolate & vanilla pot 5.50 - Sticky toffee pudding, clotted cream 5.50 - Strawberry syllabub 5.50 - British cheese, seasonal chutney & artisan bread 7.50 10% off all food and drink for Picturehouse Members * We only use free range chicken and eggs, our fish is sustainably sourced and we support small artisan suppliers wherever possible. Please ask a member of staff about nuts and other allergens. We prepare all of our food to order, so please allow up to 20 minutes for your food to arrive. * Not in conjunction with any other offer. For more information including on how to become a Picturehouse Central Member follow this link: http://ow.ly/QD3Ja

Odeon Cinema Leister Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
40 Leicester Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7LP

0871 22 44 007

Cats At London Palladium
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Argyll Street, London W1F 7TF
London, United Kingdom

0844 874 0667

Vue Cinema Leicster Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
6 Leicster Place
London, United Kingdom wc2h 7bx

Odeon Panton Street
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
10 Panton St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4DP

0333 006 7777

Urinetown
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7ES

0844 482 9671

Set in a city of the future, a serious drought has inflicted a society. Business tycoon Cladwell B. Cladwell has made his fortune through bribery and the monoplisation of public amenities. All toilets have become the property of his corporation ‘Urine Good Company’. A brutal police force keeps the order, sending offenders to Urinetown. The results are catastrophic, but our hero leads the city in an uprising against this evil privatization. A hilarious tale of greed, corruption, love and revolution set in a time when water is worth its weight in gold, this hilarious satirical comedy finally hits London after its Broadway success. Directed by Jamie Lloyd and designed by Soutra Gilmour, this promises to be THE stand out musical opening in London right now.

Shaftesbury Avenue
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
65 - 73 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 6

020 7031 4300

Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, that runs in a north-easterly direction from Piccadilly Circus to New Oxford Street, crossing Charing Cross Road at Cambridge Circus. From Piccadilly Circus to Cambridge Circus it is in the City of Westminster and from Cambridge Circus to New Oxford Street it is in the London Borough of Camden.Shaftesbury Avenue was built in the late 19th century (1877–86) by the architect George Vulliamy and the engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette to provide a north-south traffic artery through the crowded districts of St. Giles and Soho. It was also part of a slum clearance measure, to push impoverished workers out of the city centre although the street's construction was stalled by legislation requiring rehousing some of these displaced residents, overcrowding persisted. Charles Booth's Poverty Map shows the neighbourhood makeup shortly after Shaftesbury Avenue opened. It is generally considered the heart of London's West End theatre district, with the Lyric, Apollo, Gielgud and Queen's theatres clustered together on the north side of the road between Piccadilly Circus and Charing Cross Road. At the intersection of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road there is also the large Palace Theatre. Finally, the north-eastern end of the road has another large theatre, called the Shaftesbury Theatre.

White Cube
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
25-26 Mason's Yard
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4LG

+44 (0) 20 7930 5373

Hauser & Wirth
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
23 Savile Row
London, United Kingdom W1J 9EY

+44 (0) 20 7287 2300

Imax Empire Leicester Square
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
5-6 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7NA

08714714714

Odeon West End
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
40 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7

0871 224 4007

The Odeon West End, from 1930 to 1988 known as Leicester Square Theatre, was a cinema on the south side of Leicester Square, London. It contained two screens—screen 1 seats 500 and screen 2 seats 832. It was often used for smaller film premieres, and hosted the annual BFI London Film Festival. The building is opposite the much larger flagship Odeon Leicester Square.Odeon Cinemas sold the building to three Irish investors in 2006, though continued to lease it. In 2012 it was bought by the Radisson Edwardian hotel group and closed as a cinema on 1 January 2015, ahead of planned redevelopment as a luxury hotel.HistoryThe Odeon was built in 1930 as the Leicester Square Theatre, a name it largely remained with until 1988. The theatre was built as a cine-variety venue for Jack Buchanan - a penthouse apartment was housed on the roof for the star - and showcased both film and short variety performances, before going over to film on a more permanent basis. A large single screen was housed in an ornate, three-tiered auditorium.It was sold to J. Arthur Rank in 1937 and became Rank's first cinema, although not named Odeon for many years to come.The cinema was modernised in 1968 into a much blander shell, based around a remodelled stalls and single circle. In 1988 it was changed into a two-screen venue (Screen 1 in the former circle and Screen 2 in the stalls) and renamed Odeon West End.The site was sold by Odeon Cinemas to three Irish investors in February 2006, though continued to operate as part of the Odeon chain. Ownership subsequently passed to the Irish National Asset Management Agency and in 2012 it was sold to the Radisson Edwardian hotel company.

Jermyn Street Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
16B Jermyn Street
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6ST

Box Office: 020 7287 2875

West End theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
West End
London, United Kingdom SW11 3

West End theatre is a common term for mainstream professional theatre staged in the large theatres of "Theatreland" in and near the West End of London. Along with New York City's Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in the English-speaking world. Seeing a West End show is a common tourist activity in London.Total attendances first surpassed 12 million in 2002 and then 13 million in 2007, setting a new record for the West End. In 2013, ticket sales reached a record 14.5 million making West End the largest English speaking audience in the world. Famous screen actors frequently appear on the London stage.HistoryTheatre in London flourished after the English Reformation. The first permanent public playhouse, known simply as The Theatre, was constructed in 1576 in Shoreditch by James Burbage. It was soon joined by The Curtain. Both are known to have been used by William Shakespeare's company. In 1599, the timber from The Theatre was moved to Southwark, where it was used in building the Globe Theatre in a new theatre district formed beyond the controls of the City corporation. These theatres were closed in 1642 due to the Puritans who would later influence the interregnum of 1649.

Royal Academy of Arts Anselm Kiefer
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Burlington House, Piccadilly, London, W1J 0BD
London, United Kingdom

Performance Venue Near Apollo Theatre

Her Majesty's Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
75 Haymarket
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4

0844 412 4653

Her Majesty's Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
75 Haymarket
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4

0844 412 4653

Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
47 Frith Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 4

020 7439 0747

Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club is a prominent jazz club which has operated in London, England since 1959.The club opened on 30 October 1959 in a basement at 39 Gerrard Street in London's Soho district. It was set up and managed by musicians Ronnie Scott and Pete King. In 1965 it moved to a larger venue nearby at 47 Frith Street. The original venue continued in operation as the "Old Place" until the lease ran out in 1967, and was used for performances by the up-and-coming generation of musicians.Zoot Sims was the club's first transatlantic visitor in 1962, and was succeeded by many others (often saxophonists whom Scott and King, tenor saxophonists themselves, admired, such as Johnny Griffin, Lee Konitz, Sonny Rollins and Sonny Stitt) in the years that followed. Many UK jazz musicians were also regularly featured, including Tubby Hayes and Dick Morrissey who would both drop in for jam sessions with the visiting stars. In the mid-1960s, Ernest Ranglin was the house guitarist. The club's house pianist until 1967 was Stan Tracey. For nearly 30 years it was home of a Christmas residency to George Melly and John Chilton's Feetwarmers. In 1978, the club established the label Ronnie Scott's Jazz House, which issued both live performances from the club and new recordings.

Jersey Boys UK
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly Theatre, 16 Denman St
London, United Kingdom W1D 7DY

0844 8717630 Calls cost 7p per minute, plus your phone company's access charge.

WINNER of 57 major awards worldwide, including the Olivier Award for BEST NEW MUSICAL. JERSEY BOYS, the internationally acclaimed hit musical, tells the remarkable rise to stardom of one of the most successful bands in pop music history. Discover how four New Jersey boys from the wrong side of the tracks invented their own unique sound, were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and sold 100 million records worldwide. With spectacular performances of all their hits, JERSEY BOYS is the electrifying true life story of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons; the mob, the heartaches, the triumphs and the music. This sensational production features many of the bands worldwide hits, including: BEGGIN', CAN'T TAKE MY EYES OFF YOU, DECEMBER 1963 (OH WHAT A NIGHT), WALK LIKE A MAN, BYE BYE BABY (BABY GOODBYE), SHERRY, BIG GIRLS DON'T CRY and many more. Jersey Boys is playing 8 times a week at the Piccadilly Theatre in London.

Piccadilly Theatre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly Theatre, 16 Denman Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 7DY

02089692308

This breathtaking musical staging of one of the most popular films of all time promises to be a gripping roller-coaster ride of romance, drama and excitement.

Soho Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
21 Dean Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 3NE

020 7478 0100

'Its cool blue neon lights, front-of-house café and late-night shows may blend it into the Soho landscape, but since taking up residence on Dean Street in 2000 Soho Theatre has made quite a name for itself.' Time Out Bang in the creative heart of London, Soho Theatre is a major new writing theatre and a writers’ development organisation of national significance. With a programme spanning theatre, comedy, cabaret and writers’ events and home to a lively bar, Soho Theatre is one of the most vibrant venues on London’s cultural scene. Soho Theatre owns its own Central London venue housing the intimate 150-seat Soho Theatre, our 90-seat Soho Upstairs and our cabaret space, Soho Downstairs. Under the joint leadership of Soho’s Artistic Director Steve Marmion and Executive Director Mark Godfrey, Soho Theatre now welcomes 167,000 people a year.

Rah Rah Room London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
215-217 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 9HN

+44 (0) 203 588 1100

Rah Rah Room London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
215-217 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 9HN

+44 (0) 203 588 1100

The Comedy Store - London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1A Oxendon Street
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4EE

0844 871 7699

The Comedy Store - London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1A Oxendon Street
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4EE

0844 871 7699

Prince of Wales Theatre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
31 Coventry Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 6AS

0844 482 5115

Pizza Express Jazz Club
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
10 Dean Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 3RW

020 7439 4962

We'll keep you up-to-date with information about the incredible Artists performing at one of London's finest Jazz clubs. www.pizzaexpresslive.co.uk

Thriller Live Musical at Lyric Theatre
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7ES

+44 207 7492 1618

Thriller Live Musical at Lyric Theatre
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7ES

+44 207 7492 1618

The Spice of Life - Soho
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
6 Moor Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 5NA

020 7437 7013

Set in the heart of theatreland within the buzzing bohemian community of Soho. Upstairs is for drinks, eats, and giggles while enjoying Great British classics with daily changing specials and up to four Hertfordshire craft ales, world beers, hand-selected fine wines and credible ethical coffee. Downstairs in the basement is The Backstage Bar, featuring live jazz and musical delights daily. Visit our website for more pub info: http://www.mcmullens.co.uk/spiceoflife Become part of the family: http://www.mcmullens.co.uk/keep-in-touch/spice-of-life

Lyric Theatre - Michael Jackson Thriller
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7ES

Noel Coward Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
85-87 St Martin's Lane
London, United Kingdom WC2N 4AU

+44 (0) 20 7759 8010

Phoenix Artist Club
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Phoenix Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 8BU

020 7836 1077

Winner of 'Best Bar & Club in Covent Garden & The Strand' in Time Out's 'Love London Awards 2015' Winner of 'Best UK Entertainment Club' at The Mirror Club Awards 2015 A private members club in London for people who work in the entertainment and media industries. Free 'Understudy' membership allows entry until 9pm, and for special events such as 'Gotta Sing' musical theatre open mic, and our Sunday night Cabaret with Vanity Von Glow (apply on our website). Full 'Cast' membership available from £200 per year, with discounts for groups including Equity, Spotlight, and Directors Guild. Open from 10.30am daily (12pm Sundays) Brasserie open 5pm-9.30pm Tuesday-Saturday.

The Lyric Theatre
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
29 Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7ES

+44 (0) 20 7494 5841

Harold Pinter Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
6 Panton St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4

020 7369 1731

The Harold Pinter Theatre, formerly the Comedy Theatre until 2011, is a West End theatre, and opened on Panton Street in the City of Westminster, on 15 October 1881, as the Royal Comedy Theatre. It was designed by Thomas Verity and built in just six months in painted (stucco) stone and brick. By 1884 it was known as just the Comedy Theatre. In the mid-1950s the theatre underwent major reconstruction and re-opened in December 1955; the auditorium remains essentially that of 1881, with three tiers of horseshoe-shaped balconies.HistoryIn 1883, the successful operetta Falka had its London première at the theatre, and in 1885, Erminie did the same. The theatre's reputation grew through the First World War when Charles Blake Cochran and André Charlot presented their famous revue shows. Famous actors who appeared here include Henry Daniell who played John Carlton in Secrets in September 1929.The theatre was notable for the role it played in overturning stage censorship by establishing the New Watergate Club in 1956, under producer Anthony Field. The Theatres Act 1843 was still in force and required scripts to be submitted for approval by the Lord Chamberlain's Office. Formation of the club allowed plays that had been banned due to language or subject matter to be performed under "club" conditions.

Religious Center Near Apollo Theatre

Horse Guards
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Horse Guards Parade
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

020 7270 5000

Horse Guards is a large Grade I listed building in the Palladian style between Whitehall and Horse Guards Parade in London. The first Horse Guards building was built on the site of the former tiltyard of Westminster Palace in 1664. It was demolished in 1749 and was replaced by the current building which was built between 1750 and 1753 by John Vardy after the death of original architect in 1748 William Kent. Horse Guards Road runs north-south on the western boundary of the parade ground, while Horse Guards Avenue runs east from Whitehall on other side of the building, to Victoria Embankment.The building served as the offices of the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces until 1904 when the post was abolished and replaced by the Chief of the General Staff. The Chief of the General staff moved to the Old War Office Building in 1906 and Horse Guards subsequently became the headquarters of two major Army commands: the London District and the Household Cavalry. The building is the formal entrance to St James's Palace via St. James's Park (though this is now entirely symbolic). Only the monarch is allowed to drive through its central archway, or those given a pass (formerly made of ivory).

Sofra
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
1 St Christopher's Place
London, United Kingdom W1U 1

+44 (0) 20 7224 4080

Abercrombie and Fitch
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
40 Savile Row
London, United Kingdom W1S 3ES

+44 844 412 5750

Victoria Memorial, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

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The Victoria Memorial is a monument to Queen Victoria, located at the end of The Mall in London, and designed and executed by the sculptor Sir Thomas Brock. Designed in 1901, it was unveiled on 16 May 1911, though it was not completed until 1924. It was the centrepiece of an ambitious urban planning scheme, which included the creation of the Queen’s Gardens to a design by Sir Aston Webb, and the refacing of Buckingham Palace (which stands behind the memorial) by the same architect.Like the earlier Albert Memorial in Kensington Gardens, commemorating Victoria's consort, the Victoria Memorial has an elaborate scheme of iconographic sculpture. The central pylon of the memorial is of Pentelic marble, and individual statues are in Carrara marble and gilt bronze. The memorial weighs 2,300 tonnes and is 104 ft wide. In 1970 it was listed at Grade I.HistoryProposal and announcementsKing Edward VII suggested that a joint Parliamentary committee should be formed to develop plans for a Memorial to Queen Victoria following her death. The first meeting took place on 19 February 1901 at the Foreign Office, Whitehall. The first secretary of the committee was Arthur Bigge, 1st Baron Stamfordham. Initially these meetings were behind closed doors, and the proceedings were not revealed to the public. However the Lord Mayor of London, Sir Joseph Dimsdale, publicly announced that the committee had decided that the Memorial should be "monumental".

St. James's Square
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
St. James's, London, SW1
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4JU

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St. James's Square is the only square in the exclusive St James's district of the City of Westminster. It has predominantly Georgian and Neo-Georgian architecture and a garden in the centre. For its first two hundred or so years it was one of the three or four most fashionable residential address in London. It is now home to the headquarters of a number of well-known businesses, including BP and Rio Tinto Group; to three private members' clubs, the East India Club, the Canning Club and the Naval and Military Club; to the High Commission of Cyprus; and to the London Library. Also based in the square is the premises of the think tank Chatham House. The square's main feature is an equestrian statue of William III erected in 1808.HistoryIn 1662 Charles II extended a lease over the 45 acres of Pall Mall (St James's) Field held by Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans to 1720 and soon afterwards the earl began to lay out the property for development. The earl petitioned the king that the class of occupants they both hoped to attract to the new district would not take houses without the prospect of eventually acquiring them outright, and in 1665 the king granted the freehold of the site of St. James's Square and some closely adjacent parts of the field to the earl's trustees. The location was convenient for the royal palaces of Whitehall and St James. The houses on the east, north and west sides of the square were soon developed, each of them being constructed separately as was usual at that time.

Shaftesbury Avenue
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
65 - 73 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 6

020 7031 4300

Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, that runs in a north-easterly direction from Piccadilly Circus to New Oxford Street, crossing Charing Cross Road at Cambridge Circus. From Piccadilly Circus to Cambridge Circus it is in the City of Westminster and from Cambridge Circus to New Oxford Street it is in the London Borough of Camden.Shaftesbury Avenue was built in the late 19th century (1877–86) by the architect George Vulliamy and the engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette to provide a north-south traffic artery through the crowded districts of St. Giles and Soho. It was also part of a slum clearance measure, to push impoverished workers out of the city centre although the street's construction was stalled by legislation requiring rehousing some of these displaced residents, overcrowding persisted. Charles Booth's Poverty Map shows the neighbourhood makeup shortly after Shaftesbury Avenue opened. It is generally considered the heart of London's West End theatre district, with the Lyric, Apollo, Gielgud and Queen's theatres clustered together on the north side of the road between Piccadilly Circus and Charing Cross Road. At the intersection of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road there is also the large Palace Theatre. Finally, the north-eastern end of the road has another large theatre, called the Shaftesbury Theatre.

Courtauld Institute of Art
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
WC2R 0RN
London, United Kingdom WC2R 1

The Courtauld Institute of Art, commonly referred to as The Courtauld, is a self-governing college of the University of London specialising in the study of the history of art and conservation. It is among the most prestigious institutions in the world for these disciplines and is widely known for the disproportionate number of directors of major museums drawn from its small body of alumni. The art collection of the Institute is known particularly for its French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings and is housed in the Courtauld Gallery. The Institute and the Gallery are both in Somerset House, in the Strand in London.HistoryThe Institute was founded in 1932 through the philanthropic efforts of the industrialist and art collector Samuel Courtauld, the diplomat and collector Lord Lee of Fareham, and the art historian Sir Robert Witt. Originally the Courtauld Institute was based in Home House, a Robert Adam-designed townhouse in London's Portman Square. The Strand block of Somerset House, designed by William Chambers from 1775–1780, has housed the Courtauld Institute since 1989. The Courtauld celebrated its 75th anniversary during the 2007–08 academic year.

Chatham House
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
10 St James's Square
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4L

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The Royal Institute of International Affairs, commonly known as Chatham House, is a non-profit, non-governmental organisation based in London whose mission is to analyse and promote the understanding of major international issues and current affairs. It is the originator of the Chatham House Rule and takes its name from the building where it is based, a Grade I listed 18th-century house in St. James's Square, designed in part by Henry Flitcroft and occupied by three British prime ministers, including William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham.In the University of Pennsylvania’s 2015 Global Go To Think Tanks Report, Chatham House is ranked the second most influential think tank in the world after the Brookings Institution, and the world's most influential non-U.S. think tank. In 2009, Chatham House was also named the top non-U.S. think tank by Foreign Policy magazine, which listed it as one of the top "scholars" for being among a handful of stars of the think-tank world who are regularly relied upon to set agendas and craft new initiatives.The current chairman of the Council of Chatham House is Stuart Popham and its director is Robin Niblett. The research directors are Rob Bailey, Patricia Lewis, Paola Subacchi and Alex Vines.

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Houses of Parliament, Westminster
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the UK Parliament or British Parliament, is the supreme legislative body in the United Kingdom, British Crown dependencies and British overseas territories. It alone possesses legislative supremacy and thereby ultimate power over all other political bodies in the UK and its territories. Its head is the Sovereign of the United Kingdom (currently Queen Elizabeth II) and its seat is the Palace of Westminster in the City of Westminster, London.The parliament is bicameral, consisting of an upper house (the House of Lords) and a lower house (the House of Commons). The Sovereign forms the third component of the legislature (the Queen-in-Parliament). The House of Lords includes two different types of members: the Lords Spiritual, consisting of the most senior bishops of the Church of England, and the Lords Temporal, consisting mainly of life peers, appointed by the Sovereign on the advice of the Prime Minister, and elected representatives of the hereditary peers. Prior to the opening of the Supreme Court in October 2009, the House of Lords also performed a judicial role through the Law Lords.

Church Of Scientology
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
68 Tottenham Court Road
London, United Kingdom W1T 2EZ

+44 (0) 20 7636 9874

Temple Church And Inner Temple
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Inner Temple, London EC4Y 7DE
London, United Kingdom

St James's Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
11 Hamilton Place
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

20-74951771

St James's Street is the principal street in the district of St James's, central London. It runs from Piccadilly downhill to St James's Palace and Pall Mall. The main gatehouse of the palace is at the southern end of the road, and in the 17th century Clarendon House faced down the street across Piccadilly on the site of most of Albemarle Street.St James's Street was built up without an over-all plan but received a boost with Lord St Albans' planned construction of St. James's Square. Today St James's Street contains several of London's best known gentlemen's clubs, such as Brooks's, the Carlton Club and White's, some exclusive shops and various offices. A series of small side streets on its western side lead to some extremely expensive properties overlooking Green Park, including Spencer House and the Royal Over-Seas League at the end of Park Place.Two 18th-century yards survive behind the noble frontages and giant orders of columns or pilasters of the street. One is Blue Ball Yard, with stables built in 1742. The other is Pickering Place, with four informal Georgian brick houses of 1731. Jermyn Street leads off St James's Street to the east. The nearest tube station is Green Park to the west on Piccadilly.

Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
30 Charles Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

020-79173000

The Embassy of Saudi Arabia in London (officially the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia) (السفارة السعودية الملكية في لندن) is the diplomatic mission of Saudi Arabia in the United Kingdom. Saudi Arabia also maintains a Defence Attaché’s Office at 26 Queen's Gate, South Kensington, a Diplomatic Office of the Cultural Bureau at 630 Chiswick High Road, Gunnersbury, a Medical Section at 60 Queen Anne Street, Marylebone, a Commercial Section at 15/16 Queen Street, Mayfair, an Islamic Affairs Section at 2nd Floor, Park Lorne, 111 Park Road, Lisson Grove and an Information Section at 18 Seymour Street, Marylebone.The embassy is situated in Crewe House, a detached mansion designed and constructed by Edward Sheppard in 1730, set in its own grounds. Built in the Georgian style, it is a Grade II* listed building. The house was considerably altered in the late 18th and early 19th-century. Much of its neo-classical interior dates from the early 19th-century, and some of Shepard's original plasterwork ceilings may survive.

St James's, Spanish Place
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
22 George Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 3

St James's Church, Spanish Place, is a large English Gothic Roman Catholic church in Marylebone, London. Although currently situated in George Street, the church maintains its connection with Spanish Place, the road opposite the current church, because of its historic connection with the Spanish Embassy.SiteThe church is located in George Street, Marylebone, behind the Wallace Collection and close to Marylebone High Street.HistoryIn the reign of Elizabeth I the Bishops of Ely let their palace and chapel in Ely Place to the Spanish Ambassador and, until the reign of Charles I, it was occupied by the High Representative of the Court of Spain. During this period the chapel was freely used by English Roman Catholics and became a sanctuary to some degree for them.After the restoration of Charles II the Spanish Embassy was re-established in London, first on Ormond Street and then at Hertford House, Manchester Square, where the Wallace Collection is now housed. Here, in 1791, shortly after the Roman Catholic Relief Act 1791 repealed some of the laws affecting Catholic worship, a chapel was built on the corner of Spanish Place and Charles Street (now George Street), largely through the efforts of Doctor Thomas Hussey who had been a chaplain at the embassy since his ordination in 1769. Most of the objects of piety in the present church are legacies from this older building. In 1827 the official Spanish connection with the chapel ceased and it was handed over to the London Vicariate.

Queen's Chapel of the Savoy
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Savoy Hill
London, United Kingdom WC2R 0DA

020 7836 7221

The Queen’s Chapel of the Savoy has a long association with the Duchy of Lancaster. The Chapel is the last surviving building of a hospital founded by Henry VII for homeless people in 1512. It stands on the area of London known as the Savoy. The Chapel belongs to Her Majesty The Queen in Her Right as Duke of Lancaster. It is a ‘free’ chapel or ‘peculiar’ not falling within any bishop’s jurisdiction, but remaining firmly within the Church of England. The Chapel remains an important part of the Savoy Estate, the Duchy of Lancaster’s principal London land holding. It continues to provide spiritual service to the community, as it has done for over 500 years. The Queen’s Chapel of the Savoy is also the chapel of the Royal Victorian Order, an Order of Chivalry within the Sovereign’s personal gift. By The Queen’s appointment, the present Chaplain is also Chaplain of the Order. The expenses of the Chapel are borne by The Queen in Right of Her Duchy of Lancaster. Maintenance of this historic building remains the Duchy of Lancaster’s responsibility. Recent work has included the landscaping of the gardens in honour of Her Majesty’s Golden Jubilee, and the restoration of the Chapel ceiling in 1999. Members of the public are most welcome to attend services in The Queen’s Chapel of the Savoy. The Chapel is open Monday to Thursday 9am to 4pm and for Sunday service at 11am. However, it is always closed during August and September and for the first Sunday after Christmas and Easter. The Duchy of Lancaster appoints the Chaplain. For more information e-mail the Steward, Squadron Leader Thomas Leyland RAF rtd ([email protected])

Christ Church Mayfair
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
21B Down Street
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

20-76295885

Училище " Боянь Мага",Лондон/ Bulgarian art school, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Soho Parish School , 23 Great Windmill Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 7LFВ

моб.+447919022006;

Българско Училище и Читалище за Български език , изкуства, занаяти и природа за деца от 0 до 19 години с нови методи на преподаване. Предмети- Български език, История, Литература, Пеене и блок-флейта, Рисуване, Моделиране, Калиграфия Извънкласни дейности Български Народни Танци- Танцов състав ''България" Детска вокална група "Шарени чорапки" Музика: пиано,солфеж, китара, кларинет, блок-флейта Драма и Куклен театър. Всички предмети се преподават на Български Език. Библиотеката разполага с книги за деца и възрастни с вяра,че нашите книги ще се увеличават Класове Група за родител и бебе ''Първи стъпки" 0-3 г Предучилищна група ''Букварче" 4-6 г 1-12 клас КУРСОВЕ: За Бременни майки, Български народни танци, Арт и Музикална терапия, Драма и куклен театър, "Паневритмия"- Танцът на Живота. Училището работи всеки петък от 16-19 и всяка събота от 10.00 до 14.00часа ( без ваканциите). Училище Боян Мага Mayfair Library,25 South Audley street,London, W1K 2PB Информация и записвания: Димитрина Ангелова 07919022006 Роси Китанова -07761719145 Oнлайн записване в сайта на училището http://boyanmaga.org/ Училище Боянъ Мага работи с любезното съдействие и подкрепата на Българското Посолство в Лондон, АБУЧ - Агенцията за Българите в Чужбина и МОМН - Министерство на Образованието Младежта и Науката

BIS
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
1 Victoria Street
London, United Kingdom

Charing Cross Library
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
4-6 Charing Cross Rd
London, United Kingdom WC2N 4

+44 (0) 20 7641 4628

Conway Hall Ethical Society
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
25 Red Lion Square
London, United Kingdom

020 7242 8031

The Conway Hall Ethical Society, formerly the South Place Ethical Society, based in London at Conway Hall, is thought to be the oldest surviving freethought organisation in the world, and is the only remaining ethical society in the United Kingdom. It now advocates secular humanism and is a member of the International Humanist and Ethical Union.HistoryThe Society can trace back its origins to February 14th 1793 in a congregation of nonconformists known as Philadelphians or Universalists. William Johnson Fox became their minister in 1817. In 1824 the congregation built a chapel at South Place, in the district of central London known as Finsbury. The chapel was repaired by John Wallen, of a family of London architects and builders.In 1929 they built new premises, Conway Hall, at 37 (now numbered 25) Red Lion Square, in nearby Bloomsbury, on the site of a tenement, previously a factory belonging to James Perry, a pen and ink maker. Conway Hall is named after an American, Moncure D. Conway, who led the Society from 1864–1885 and 1892–1897, during which time it moved further away from Unitarianism. Conway spent the break in his tenure in the United States, writing a biography of Thomas Paine. In 1888 the name of the Society was changed from South Place Religious Society to South Place Ethical Society (SPES) under Stanton Coit's leadership. In 1950 the SPES joined the Ethical Union. In 1969 another name change was mooted, to The South Place Humanist Society, a discussion that sociologist Colin Campbell suggests symbolized the death of the ethical movement in England.

Theater Near Apollo Theatre

Her Majesty's Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
75 Haymarket
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4

0844 412 4653

Les Miserables - Musical
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Queen's Theatre, 51 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 6BA

0844 482 5160

The Book of Mormon - West End
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Prince of Wales Theatre
London, United Kingdom W1D 6AS

0844 482 5110

Now playing at the Prince of Wales Theatre in London's West End.

Cafe de Paris
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
3 Coventry Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 6BL

0207 734 7700

Jersey Boys UK
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly Theatre, 16 Denman St
London, United Kingdom W1D 7DY

0844 8717630 Calls cost 7p per minute, plus your phone company's access charge.

WINNER of 57 major awards worldwide, including the Olivier Award for BEST NEW MUSICAL. JERSEY BOYS, the internationally acclaimed hit musical, tells the remarkable rise to stardom of one of the most successful bands in pop music history. Discover how four New Jersey boys from the wrong side of the tracks invented their own unique sound, were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and sold 100 million records worldwide. With spectacular performances of all their hits, JERSEY BOYS is the electrifying true life story of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons; the mob, the heartaches, the triumphs and the music. This sensational production features many of the bands worldwide hits, including: BEGGIN', CAN'T TAKE MY EYES OFF YOU, DECEMBER 1963 (OH WHAT A NIGHT), WALK LIKE A MAN, BYE BYE BABY (BABY GOODBYE), SHERRY, BIG GIRLS DON'T CRY and many more. Jersey Boys is playing 8 times a week at the Piccadilly Theatre in London.

Leicester Square Theatre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
6 Leicester Place
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7BX

020 7734 2222

LST is a magnificently restored theatre located in the heart of the West End with two exceptional spaces running a healthy programme of comedy, cabaret, dance, music and theatre. The 400 seat theatre boasts 2 bars perfectly positioned in the auditorium with newly-installed cinema style seating and a second intimate Lounge Theatre with a capacity of up to 70 with its own bar and cabaret-style seating.

Piccadilly Theatre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly Theatre, 16 Denman Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 7DY

02089692308

This breathtaking musical staging of one of the most popular films of all time promises to be a gripping roller-coaster ride of romance, drama and excitement.

Soho Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
21 Dean Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 3NE

020 7478 0100

'Its cool blue neon lights, front-of-house café and late-night shows may blend it into the Soho landscape, but since taking up residence on Dean Street in 2000 Soho Theatre has made quite a name for itself.' Time Out Bang in the creative heart of London, Soho Theatre is a major new writing theatre and a writers’ development organisation of national significance. With a programme spanning theatre, comedy, cabaret and writers’ events and home to a lively bar, Soho Theatre is one of the most vibrant venues on London’s cultural scene. Soho Theatre owns its own Central London venue housing the intimate 150-seat Soho Theatre, our 90-seat Soho Upstairs and our cabaret space, Soho Downstairs. Under the joint leadership of Soho’s Artistic Director Steve Marmion and Executive Director Mark Godfrey, Soho Theatre now welcomes 167,000 people a year.

Book of Mormon - Prince of Wales Theatre London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
31 Coventry Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 6AS

+44 207 7492 1618

Prince of Wales Theatre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
31 Coventry Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 6AS

0844 482 5115

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Gielgud Theatre
London, United Kingdom W1D 6AR

02074523000

Christopher, fifteen years old, stands beside Mrs Shears’ dead dog. It has been speared with a garden fork, it is seven minutes after midnight and Christopher is under suspicion. He records each fact in the book he is writing to solve the mystery of who murdered Wellington. He has an extraordinary brain, exceptional at maths while ill-equipped to interpret everyday life. He has never ventured alone beyond the end of his road, he detests being touched and he distrusts strangers. But his detective work, forbidden by his father, takes him on a frightening journey that upturns his world. ‘This may be the most entertaining family drama since the stage version of War Horse’ – New York Times.

Thriller Live Musical at Lyric Theatre
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7ES

+44 207 7492 1618

Wyndham's Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Charing Cross Road
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2H 0D

0844 482 5120

Wyndham's Theatre is a West End theatre, one of two opened by the actor/manager Charles Wyndham (the other is the Criterion Theatre). Located on Charing Cross Road in the City of Westminster, it was designed c.1898 by W.G.R. Sprague, the architect of six other London theatres between then and 1916. It was designed to seat 759 patrons on three levels although later refurbishment increased this to four. The theatre was Grade II* listed by English Heritage in September 1960.HistoryWyndham had always dreamed of building a theatre of his own and through the admiration of a patron and the financial confidence of friends, he was able to realise his dream when Wyndham's Theatre opened on 16 November 1899, in the presence of the Prince of Wales. The first play performed there was a revival of T. W. Robertson's David Garrick.In 1910, Gerald du Maurier began an association with the theatre which lasted 15 years and to include the stage debut of the screen actress Tallulah Bankhead. Du Maurier's small daughter, Daphne, often watched her father's performance from the wings. Thirty years later she presented her own play, The Years Between, on the same stage.

Queen's Theatre
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
51 Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 6BA

0844 482 5160

The Queen's Theatre is a West End theatre located in Shaftesbury Avenue on the corner of Wardour Street in the City of Westminster. It opened on 8 October 1907 as a twin to the neighbouring Hicks Theatre (now the Gielgud Theatre) which opened ten months earlier. Both theatres were designed by W.G.R. Sprague.HistoryOriginal plans were to name the venue Central Theatre, however after lengthy debate, it was named The Queen's Theatre and a portrait of Queen Alexandra was hung in the foyer.The first production at the Queen's Theatre was a comedy by Madeline Lucette Ryley called The Sugar Bowl. It was poorly received and ran for only 36 performances, however the theatre received glowing reviews.The Stage on 10 October 1907 described the theatre as A two-tier house, the Queen's holds about 1200 persons, representing some £300 in money. The colour scheme of the walls and roof is white and gold, while green is the hue of the carpets, hangings and upholstery, and of the very charming velvet tableau curtain. From a spacious and lofty entrance-hall, with passages leading down into the stalls, one ascends by a handsome marble staircase to the dress circle, which runs out over the pit; and there is a fine and roomy saloon at the top. Mr Vedrenne makes a point that 7/6 will be charged for seats in the first three rows only of the dress circle, while but 5/- will be the price of the remaining eight rows, also unreserved, in which evening dress will be optional. On the second tier of the Queen's, which is in the Old Italian Renaissance style and in the building of which the cantilever principle has been adopted, are the upper circle and the shilling gallery. The auditorium is lighted up agreeably with electric lamps and an electrolier, and ample refreshment room and other accommodation will be found to have been provided

Lyric Theatre - Michael Jackson Thriller
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7ES

Lyric Theatre, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue, London, W1D 7ES
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1D 7

20-74945045

The Lyric Theatre is a West End theatre on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster.Designed by the architect C. J. Phipps, it was built by the producer Henry Leslie with profits from the Alfred Cellier and B. C. Stephenson hit, Dorothy (he made £100,000 from this opera), which he transferred from the Prince of Wales Theatre to open his new venue on 17 December 1888. It was the second theatre to be constructed on this stretch of Shaftesbury Avenue and is now the oldest in the street. The foyer and bars were refurbished in 1932-33, and the facade was restored in 1994. At present it seats 967 on four levels, although it originally was designed with a seating capacity of 1,306. The theatre still uses an electric pump to operate its iron curtain.Early in the theatre's history, it staged mostly comic operas, and later it has been a home to light comedies, musicals and straight dramas.The theatre retains many of its original features (including being built behind an original 1767 house front, at the rear to Great Windmill Street, the former house and museum of Sir William Hunter) and the theatre was Grade II listed by English Heritage in September 1960.

The Lyric Theatre
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
29 Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7ES

+44 (0) 20 7494 5841

Prince of Wales Theatre
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
31 Coventry St
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1D 7

The Prince of Wales Theatre is a West End theatre in Coventry Street, near Leicester Square in London. It was established in 1884 and rebuilt in 1937, and extensively refurbished in 2004 by Sir Cameron Mackintosh, its current owner. The theatre should not be confused with the former Scala Theatre in Charlotte Street, off Tottenham Court Road that was known as the Prince of Wales Royal Theatre or Prince of Wales's Theatre from 1865 until its demolition in 1903.

Harold Pinter Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
6 Panton St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4

020 7369 1731

The Harold Pinter Theatre, formerly the Comedy Theatre until 2011, is a West End theatre, and opened on Panton Street in the City of Westminster, on 15 October 1881, as the Royal Comedy Theatre. It was designed by Thomas Verity and built in just six months in painted (stucco) stone and brick. By 1884 it was known as just the Comedy Theatre. In the mid-1950s the theatre underwent major reconstruction and re-opened in December 1955; the auditorium remains essentially that of 1881, with three tiers of horseshoe-shaped balconies.HistoryIn 1883, the successful operetta Falka had its London première at the theatre, and in 1885, Erminie did the same. The theatre's reputation grew through the First World War when Charles Blake Cochran and André Charlot presented their famous revue shows. Famous actors who appeared here include Henry Daniell who played John Carlton in Secrets in September 1929.The theatre was notable for the role it played in overturning stage censorship by establishing the New Watergate Club in 1956, under producer Anthony Field. The Theatres Act 1843 was still in force and required scripts to be submitted for approval by the Lord Chamberlain's Office. Formation of the club allowed plays that had been banned due to language or subject matter to be performed under "club" conditions.

The Harold Pinter Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
6 Panton St
City of Westminster, United Kingdom SW1Y 4

0207 321 5300

The Harold Pinter Theatre opened on 15 October 1881 as the Royal Comedy Theatre. The theatre's reputation grew through the First World War when C B Cochran and André Charlot presented their famous review shows. The range of work at The Harold Pinter Theatre has been far reaching, from musical comedies to revival and experimental theatre and includes hugely successful shows such as Savages starring Paul Scofield in 1973 and The Rocky Horror Show making its West End debut in 1979. Alan Bennett has appeared with Patricia Routledge in his Talking Heads and Stockard Channing appeared in Six Degrees of Separation, which won best play at the 1993 Olivier Awards. The Homecoming, No-man's Land, Moonlight, The Hothouse and The Caretaker have all been presented in recent years. Maureen Lipman has also graced The Harold Pinter Theatre stage starring in Alan Plater's highly acclaimed comedy, Peggy For You, but The Harold Pinter Theatre's two biggest successes must be The Caretaker starring Michael Gambon in 2000 and an eight week sell out of Little Malcolm and his Struggle Against the Eunuchs in 1999, starring Ewan McGregor and directed by Denis Lawson, which smashed all box office records. More recently, Francesca Annis and Anthony Andrews have starred in Ibsen's Ghosts and 2004 saw the much lauded revival of RC Sherriff's Journey's End and a successful run of The Old Masters by Simon Gray, starring Edward Fox and Peter Bowles. This production was directed by Harold Pinter. In January 2005, Kim Cattrall starred in Peter Hall's production of Whose Life Is It Anyway? by Brian Clark, followed by Tom Courtenay in Brian Friel's The Home Place and Joseph Fiennes and Francesca Annis starred in Epitaph for George Dillon by John Osborne and Anthony Creighton. The Harold Pinter Theatre has also played host to Steptoe and Son, Michael Frayn's Donkey's Years, the Rocky Horror Show, the hilarious high-flying comedy, Boeing-Boeing and many more. Most recently MOJO, Relative Values and the Importance of Being Ernest. Currently home to the Kinks Musical - Sunny Afternoon.

Landmark Near Apollo Theatre

Lyric Theatre, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue, London, W1D 7ES
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1D 7

20-74945045

The Lyric Theatre is a West End theatre on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster.Designed by the architect C. J. Phipps, it was built by the producer Henry Leslie with profits from the Alfred Cellier and B. C. Stephenson hit, Dorothy (he made £100,000 from this opera), which he transferred from the Prince of Wales Theatre to open his new venue on 17 December 1888. It was the second theatre to be constructed on this stretch of Shaftesbury Avenue and is now the oldest in the street. The foyer and bars were refurbished in 1932-33, and the facade was restored in 1994. At present it seats 967 on four levels, although it originally was designed with a seating capacity of 1,306. The theatre still uses an electric pump to operate its iron curtain.Early in the theatre's history, it staged mostly comic operas, and later it has been a home to light comedies, musicals and straight dramas.The theatre retains many of its original features (including being built behind an original 1767 house front, at the rear to Great Windmill Street, the former house and museum of Sir William Hunter) and the theatre was Grade II listed by English Heritage in September 1960.

Shaftesbury Avenue
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
65 - 73 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 6

020 7031 4300

Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, that runs in a north-easterly direction from Piccadilly Circus to New Oxford Street, crossing Charing Cross Road at Cambridge Circus. From Piccadilly Circus to Cambridge Circus it is in the City of Westminster and from Cambridge Circus to New Oxford Street it is in the London Borough of Camden.Shaftesbury Avenue was built in the late 19th century (1877–86) by the architect George Vulliamy and the engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette to provide a north-south traffic artery through the crowded districts of St. Giles and Soho. It was also part of a slum clearance measure, to push impoverished workers out of the city centre although the street's construction was stalled by legislation requiring rehousing some of these displaced residents, overcrowding persisted. Charles Booth's Poverty Map shows the neighbourhood makeup shortly after Shaftesbury Avenue opened. It is generally considered the heart of London's West End theatre district, with the Lyric, Apollo, Gielgud and Queen's theatres clustered together on the north side of the road between Piccadilly Circus and Charing Cross Road. At the intersection of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road there is also the large Palace Theatre. Finally, the north-eastern end of the road has another large theatre, called the Shaftesbury Theatre.

Piccadilly Circus
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Picadilly Circus
London, United Kingdom W1V 9LB

Piccadilly Circus è una celebre piazza di Londra, nonché luogo di ritrovo, cuore morale della città, situata nella City of Westminster.Costruita nel 1819 per collegare Regent Street con l'omonima Piccadilly (importante strada dello shopping) è diventata col passare degli anni uno dei principali punti di snodo del traffico cittadino. La sua felice posizione, nel cuore del West End londinese, e la vicinanza con importanti luoghi di interesse come i teatri di Shaftesbury Avenue o strade come Coventry Street e The Haymarket ricchissime di negozi e locali alla moda, hanno reso Piccadilly Circus un affollato punto di ritrovo, nonché una vera e propria attrattiva turistica tanto da diventare uno dei simboli stessi di Londra.Famosa per i display luminosi e le insegne a LED posizionate su di un edificio posto al lato settentrionale della stessa e per la celebre Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain che rappresenta «l'Angelo della Carità Cristiana» (ma realizzata da Alfred Gilbert come "Anteros" anche se è nota ai più col nome di "Eros"), la piazza è circondata da imponenti edifici quali il London Pavilion (sede di numerosi negozi e del Trocadero) ed il Criterion Theatre. Inoltre direttamente sotto il perimetro della piazza c'è l'omonima stazione della metropolitana di Londra.le banane sono blu e bo poi il kebab fa schifo

The Comedy Store
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
7 Oxendon St
Hackney, United Kingdom SW1Y 4EE

The Comedy Store is a comedy club located in Soho, London, England, opened in 1979 by Don Ward and Peter Rosengard.It was named after The Comedy Store club in the United States, which Rosengard had visited the previous year. Starting out above a strip club, in 1982 they moved to Leicester Square at a premises they were able to take over formally in 1985.The club was the focus of the "alternative comedy" boom in the early 1980s and helped start the careers of many comedians, including Paul Merton, French & Saunders, Alexei Sayle, Rik Mayall, Adrian Edmondson, Ben Elton, Mark Thomas, Andrew Bailey, Pat Condell and John Sparkes.In October 1985, an improvisational group called The Comedy Store Players was formed, consisting of Mike Myers, Neil Mullarkey, Kit Hollerbach, Dave Cohen and Paul Merton. The group has had several lineup changes over the years, and now features a rotating team of Neil Mullarkey, Paul Merton, Josie Lawrence, Richard Vranch (a comedy improviser who also plays piano), Jim Sweeney, Lee Simpson and Andy Smart, together with frequent guest appearances. Several of The Comedy Store Players appeared on the BBC Radio 4 and Channel 4 comedy game show Whose Line Is It Anyway?.

Leicester Square
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Leicester Square
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2H 7DE

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Leicester Square) is a pedestrianised square in the West End of London, England. It was laid out in 1670 and is named after the contemporary Leicester House, itself named after Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester.The square was originally a gentrified residential area, with tenants including Frederick, Prince of Wales and artists William Hogarth and Joshua Reynolds. It became more down-market in the late 18th century as Leicester House was demolished and retail developments took place, becoming a centre for entertainment. Several major theatres were established in the 19th century, which were converted to cinemas towards the middle of the next. Leicester Square holds a number of nationally important cinemas such as the Odeon Leicester Square, Empire, Leicester Square and the now closed Odeon West End, which are frequently used for film premières, The nearby Prince Charles Cinema is popular for showing cult films and marathon film runs. The square remains a popular tourist attraction, including hosting events for the Chinese New Year.The square has always had a park in its centre, which was originally Lammas land. The park's fortunes have varied over the centuries, reaching near dilapidation in the mid-19th century after changing ownership several times. It was restored under the direction of St Martin in the Fields parish of their right to use the previously common land. The parishioners appealed to King Charles I, and he appointed three members of the privy council to arbitrate. Lord Leicester was ordered to keep part of his land (thereafter known as Leicester Fields and later as Leicester Square)(1713–1788

Harold Pinter Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
6 Panton St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4

020 7369 1731

The Harold Pinter Theatre, formerly the Comedy Theatre until 2011, is a West End theatre, and opened on Panton Street in the City of Westminster, on 15 October 1881, as the Royal Comedy Theatre. It was designed by Thomas Verity and built in just six months in painted (stucco) stone and brick. By 1884 it was known as just the Comedy Theatre. In the mid-1950s the theatre underwent major reconstruction and re-opened in December 1955; the auditorium remains essentially that of 1881, with three tiers of horseshoe-shaped balconies.HistoryIn 1883, the successful operetta Falka had its London première at the theatre, and in 1885, Erminie did the same. The theatre's reputation grew through the First World War when Charles Blake Cochran and André Charlot presented their famous revue shows. Famous actors who appeared here include Henry Daniell who played John Carlton in Secrets in September 1929.The theatre was notable for the role it played in overturning stage censorship by establishing the New Watergate Club in 1956, under producer Anthony Field. The Theatres Act 1843 was still in force and required scripts to be submitted for approval by the Lord Chamberlain's Office. Formation of the club allowed plays that had been banned due to language or subject matter to be performed under "club" conditions.

Odeon West End
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
40 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7

0871 224 4007

The Odeon West End, from 1930 to 1988 known as Leicester Square Theatre, was a cinema on the south side of Leicester Square, London. It contained two screens—screen 1 seats 500 and screen 2 seats 832. It was often used for smaller film premieres, and hosted the annual BFI London Film Festival. The building is opposite the much larger flagship Odeon Leicester Square.Odeon Cinemas sold the building to three Irish investors in 2006, though continued to lease it. In 2012 it was bought by the Radisson Edwardian hotel group and closed as a cinema on 1 January 2015, ahead of planned redevelopment as a luxury hotel.HistoryThe Odeon was built in 1930 as the Leicester Square Theatre, a name it largely remained with until 1988. The theatre was built as a cine-variety venue for Jack Buchanan - a penthouse apartment was housed on the roof for the star - and showcased both film and short variety performances, before going over to film on a more permanent basis. A large single screen was housed in an ornate, three-tiered auditorium.It was sold to J. Arthur Rank in 1937 and became Rank's first cinema, although not named Odeon for many years to come.The cinema was modernised in 1968 into a much blander shell, based around a remodelled stalls and single circle. In 1988 it was changed into a two-screen venue (Screen 1 in the former circle and Screen 2 in the stalls) and renamed Odeon West End.The site was sold by Odeon Cinemas to three Irish investors in February 2006, though continued to operate as part of the Odeon chain. Ownership subsequently passed to the Irish National Asset Management Agency and in 2012 it was sold to the Radisson Edwardian hotel company.

Wyndham's Theatre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Charing Cross Road
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2H 0D

0844 482 5120

Wyndham's Theatre is a West End theatre, one of two opened by the actor/manager Charles Wyndham (the other is the Criterion Theatre). Located on Charing Cross Road in the City of Westminster, it was designed c.1898 by W.G.R. Sprague, the architect of six other London theatres between then and 1916. It was designed to seat 759 patrons on three levels although later refurbishment increased this to four. The theatre was Grade II* listed by English Heritage in September 1960.HistoryWyndham had always dreamed of building a theatre of his own and through the admiration of a patron and the financial confidence of friends, he was able to realise his dream when Wyndham's Theatre opened on 16 November 1899, in the presence of the Prince of Wales. The first play performed there was a revival of T. W. Robertson's David Garrick.In 1910, Gerald du Maurier began an association with the theatre which lasted 15 years and to include the stage debut of the screen actress Tallulah Bankhead. Du Maurier's small daughter, Daphne, often watched her father's performance from the wings. Thirty years later she presented her own play, The Years Between, on the same stage.

St James's Church, Piccadilly
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
197 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0

020 7734 4511

St James's Church, Piccadilly, also known as St James's Church, Westminster, and St James-in-the-Fields, is an Anglican church on Piccadilly in the centre of London, United Kingdom. The church was designed and built by Sir Christopher Wren.The church is built of red brick with Portland stone dressings. Its interior has galleries on three sides supported by square pillars, and the nave has a barrel vault supported by Corinthian columns. The carved marble font and limewood reredos are both notable examples of the work of Grinling Gibbons.HistoryIn 1662, Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans, was granted land for residential development on what was then the outskirts of London. He set aside land for the building of a parish church and churchyard on the south side of what is now Piccadilly. Christopher Wren was appointed the architect in 1672 and the church was consecrated on 13 July 1684 by Henry Compton, the Bishop of London. In 1685 the parish of St James was created for the church.

Noël Coward Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
85-87 St Martin's Lane
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7

020 7369 1730

The Noël Coward Theatre, formerly known as the Albery Theatre, is a West End theatre on St. Martin's Lane in the City of Westminster, London. It opened on 12 March 1903 as the New Theatre and was built by Sir Charles Wyndham behind Wyndham's Theatre which was completed in 1899. The building was designed by architect W. G. R. Sprague with an exterior in the classical style and an interior in the Rococo style.In 1973 it was renamed the Albery Theatre in tribute to Sir Bronson Albery who had presided as its manager for many years. Since September 2005, the theatre has been owned by Delfont-Mackintosh Ltd. It underwent major refurbishment in 2006, and was renamed the Noël Coward Theatre when it re-opened for the London premiere of Avenue Q on 1 June 2006. Noël Coward, one of Britain's greatest playwrights and actors, appeared in his own play, I'll Leave It To You, at the then New Theatre in 1920, the first West End production of one of his plays.The theatre seats 872 patrons on four levels. The building is now a Grade II Listed structure.Some productionsAfter opening in 1903 with a production of Rosemary starring Charles Wyndham and his wife, Mary Moore, the Noël Coward Theatre has hosted a number productions. I'll Leave it to You, in 1920, was Coward's first play. George Bernard Shaw's St. Joan with an acclaimed performance by actress Sybil Thorndike ran in 1924.

Duke of York's Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
St Martin's Lane
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2N 4

844-8717627

The Duke of York's Theatre is a West End Theatre in St Martin's Lane, in the City of Westminster, London. It was built for Frank Wyatt and his wife, Violet Melnotte, who retained ownership of the theatre until her death in 1935. It opened on 10 September 1892 as the Trafalgar Square Theatre, with Wedding Eve. The theatre, designed by architect Walter Emden became known as the Trafalgar Theatre in 1894 and the following year became the Duke of York's to honour the future King George V.One of the earliest musical comedies, Go-Bang, was a success at the theatre in 1894. In 1900, Jerome K. Jerome's Miss Hobbs was staged as well as David Belasco's Madame Butterfly, which was seen by Puccini, who later turned it into the famous opera. This was also the theatre where J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up debuted on 27 December 1904. Many famous British actors have appeared here, including Basil Rathbone, who played Alfred de Musset in Madame Sand in June 1920, returning in November 1932 as the Unknown Gentleman in Tonight or Never.

Albany (London)
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Albany Courtyard, Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0DS

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The Albany, or simply Albany, is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, London.BuildingThe Albany was built in 1770–74 by Sir William Chambers for the newly created 1st Viscount Melbourne as Melbourne House. It is a three-storey mansion, seven bays (windows) wide, with a pair of service wings flanking a front courtyard. In 1791, Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany abandoned Dover House, Whitehall (now a government office), and took up residence. In 1802 the Duke in turn gave up the house and it was converted by Henry Holland into 69 bachelor apartments (known as "sets"). This was achieved by subdividing the main block and its two service wings, and by adding two new parallel long buildings covering most of the garden, running as far as a new rear gate building on Burlington Gardens. Holland's new buildings of 1802-3 flank a covered walkway supported on thin iron columns and with an upswept roof. The blocks are white painted render in a simpler Regency style than Chambers' work. Most sets are accessed off common staircases without doors, like Oxbridge colleges and the Inns of Court.HistorySince its conversion, the Albany has been a prestigious set of bachelor apartments in London. The residents have included such famous names as the poet Lord Byron and the future Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone, and numerous members of the aristocracy.

St Martin-in-the-Fields
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 4JH

020 7766 1100

Hamleys
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
188-196 Regent Street
London, United Kingdom London W1B 5BT

0871 704 1977

Hamleys is the oldest and largest toy shop in the world and one of the world's best-known retailers of toys. Founded by William Hamley as "Noah's Ark" in High Holborn, London, in 1760, it moved to its current site on Regent Street in 1881. This flagship store is set over seven floors, with more than 50,000 toys on sale. It is considered one of the city's prominent tourist attractions, receiving around five million visitors each year. The chain has ten other outlets in the United Kingdom and nearly 50 franchises worldwide.Hamleys was bought by the Icelandic investment company Baugur Group in 2003 but was taken over by Baugur's main investor, Landsbanki, when the group defaulted. In 2012, the French toy retailer Groupe Ludendo bought the business for £60 million. In 2015 it was reported that Groupe Ludendo was negotiating the sale of Hamleys, possibly to a Hong Kong company owned by a relative of the owner of department store House of Fraser. Subsequently, it was sold to the Chinese footwear company C.banner for an estimated $154 million.HistoryHamleys is the oldest and largest toy shop in the world. It is named after William Hamley, who founded a toy shop called "Noah's Ark" at No. 231 High Holborn, London, in 1760. Ownership of the shop passed through the family, and by the time it was operated by Hamley's grandsons in 1837, the store had become famous, counting royalty and nobility among its customers.

Denmark Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Denmark St London WC2H St Giles, Holborn, London
London, United Kingdom WC2H 8NJ

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Denmark Street is a street on the edge of London's West End running from Charing Cross Road to St Giles. It is near St Giles in the Fields Church and Tottenham Court Road station. The street was developed in the late 17th century and named after Prince George of Denmark. Since the 1950s it has been associated with British popular music, first via publishers and later by recording studios and music shops. A blue plaque was unveiled in 2014 commemorating the street's importance to the music industry.The street was originally residential, but became used for commercial purposes in the 19th century. At first, metalwork was a popular trade but it became most famous as Britain's "Tin Pan Alley" housing numerous music publishers' offices. This market declined in the 1960s to be replaced by music shops and independent recording studios. The Rolling Stones recorded at Regent Sound Studio at No. 4 and popular musicians often socialised around the Gioconda café at No. 9, including David Bowie and the Small Faces. Elton John and Bernie Taupin wrote songs at offices on the street through the 1960s, while the Sex Pistols lived above No. 6, and recorded their first demos there. The comic book store, Forbidden Planet and the Helter Skelter music bookshop have also been based on the street. In the 2010s, the surrounding area was redeveloped. Parts of Denmark Street are listed to protect them, but other parts, away from the street itself, are planned to be demolished.

The Photographers' Gallery
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Ramillies St
London, United Kingdom W1F 7

+44 (0) 845 262 1618

The Photographers' Gallery was founded in London in 1971, and was the first independent gallery in Britain that was devoted entirely to photography. It also hosts a café and bookshop.Exhibitions in the gallery have included one-person exhibitions of work by André Kertész, Danny Treacy, Taryn Simon, Ori Gersht, Cuny Janssen, Indrė Šerpytytė and David King. The Gallery hosts the annual Deutsche Börse Photography Prize.HistoryThe Photographers' Gallery was the first public gallery in London to exhibit key names in international photography, such as Juergen Teller (fashion), Robert Capa (photojournalism), Sebastiao Salgado (documentary), and Andreas Gursky (contemporary art). Originally based in a converted Lyons tea bar on Great Newport Street near Leicester Square, The Photographers' Gallery moved to a former textile warehouse on Ramillies Street in Soho, in December 2008.Until 2008 there were plans to construct an all-new building. Instead, Irish architects O'Donnell and Tuomey designed an extension to the existing brick and steel warehouse. After closing for redevelopment in autumn 2010, the new building opened in 2012 at a cost of £9.2m. £3.6m of the cost came from Arts Council England, £2.4m from the sale of its previous building and £2.5m from foundations, trusts, corporate sponsors and an auction.

High Commission of South Africa, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 5DP

+44 (0) 20 7451 7299

The High Commission of South Africa in London is the diplomatic mission from South Africa to the United Kingdom. It is located at South Africa House, a building on Trafalgar Square, London. As well as containing the offices of the High Commissioner, the building also hosts the South African consulate. It has been a Grade II* Listed Building since 1982.HistorySouth Africa House was built by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts in the 1930s on the site of what had been Morley's Hotel until it was demolished in 1936. The building was designed by Sir Herbert Baker, with architectural sculpture by Coert Steynberg and Sir Charles Wheeler, and opened in 1933. The building was acquired by the government of South Africa as its main diplomatic presence in the UK. During World War II, Prime Minister Jan Smuts lived there while conducting South Africa's war plans.In 1961, South Africa became a republic, and withdrew from the Commonwealth due to its policy of racial segregation. Accordingly, the building became an Embassy, rather than a High Commission. During the 1980s, the building, which was one of the only South African diplomatic missions in a public area, was targeted by protesters from around the world. During the 1990 Poll Tax Riots, the building was set alight by rioters, although not seriously damaged.

Kiss (UK radio station)
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Mappin House, 4 Winsley St
London, United Kingdom W1W 8HF

020 7975 8100

Kiss is a UK radio station which is broadcasting on FM and National DAB, specialising in pop, hip hop, R&B, urban and electronic dance music. It also broadcasts on DAB Digital Radio around the UK & nationally on Freeview, Sky and Virgin Media. Owned by Hamburg based Bauer Media Group, Kiss forms part of Bauer's National portfolio of radio brands. Kiss spin-off brands include Kisstory and Kiss Fresh.HistoryKiss FM began in October 1985 as a pirate radio station, broadcasting first to South London then across the whole city, on 94FM. The station had gained a large audience by the time it was awarded a legitimate licence in 1990. ″The team which transformed KISS 94 FM to KISS 100FM included Lyn Champion, a BBC Radio 1 producer and UK Dance promo producer, who in the early 1980s had started a weekly column in London's City Limits magazine listing pirate radio shows from the mighty JFM, Invicta and K-Jazz. Lyn was brought in to help write the original proposal in 1989 and was Head of Talks responsible for all spoken word output on the new KISS 100 FM. The British Broadcasting Act of 1990 (the start of Thatcher's de-regulation programme) abolished the ″IBA″ which had enshrined community and spoken word programming within the licence, so KISS 100 FM missed the opportunity to initiate the 20 year wave of documentary series and cultural broadcasting about R&B based music, jazz, reggae, blues, electro and rap which was intended within original legally approved brief ″″. This material had never been broadcast in the UK on radio or TV and this was a key reason the station received an IBA license. A missed opportunity indeed as it became the standard fare of every major broadcaster through the 1990s and noughties. Lyn Champion was the first to leave as a result, followed by such icons as Norman Jay. Lyn lectures extensively about media de-regulation and content.

Wimbledon Village
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
60 High Street
London, United Kingdom SW19

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Central Saint Giles
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
1–13 St Giles High Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 8AG

020 7240 6480

Central Saint Giles is a mixed-use development in central London. Built at a cost of £450 million and completed in May 2010, it was designed by the Italian architect Renzo Piano and is his first work in the UK. The development consists of two buildings of up to 15 storeys in height, arranged around a public courtyard lined with shops and restaurants. It is chiefly notable for its façades, covered with 134,000 glazed tiles in vivid shades of green, orange, lime and yellow. It has attracted a number of high-profile tenants including NBCUniversal, MindShare and Google.Location and backgroundThe development is located in the district of St Giles, a short distance to the east of the east end of Oxford Street. The area was once notorious for being one of the worst slums in London, known as the Rookery – a maze of ramshackle houses, alleys and courtyards inhabited by thousands of destitute people. It was famously depicted by William Hogarth in his 1751 print Gin Lane. Central Saint Giles stands on the site of St Giles Court, an office development originally erected in the 1950s for the Ministry of Supply and latterly used by the Ministry of Defence (MOD). It consisted of a series of linked brick blocks of six to eight storeys high, arranged in an S-shape around two inner courtyards to which there was no public access. The grim appearance of St Giles Court contributed to the area becoming a magnet for prostitutes and the homeless. The building was owned by Legal & General but was occupied by the MOD on a lease that was not due to expire until 2011. However, at the start of the 21st century the MOD began undertaking a process of reducing its London estate and discontinued the use of several buildings in the capital, including St Giles Court. It vacated the building in April 2005.