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Apollo Theatre, London | Tourist Information


31 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 7

020 7494 5070

The Apollo Theatre is a Grade II listed West End theatre, on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster, in central London. Designed by the architect Lewin Sharp for owner Henry Lowenfeld, it became the fourth legitimate theatre to be constructed on the street when it opened its doors on 21 February 1901, with the American musical comedy The Belle of Bohemia.HistoryConstructionBecause Henry Lowenfeld had bought land on the newly created Shaftesbury Avenue at the turn of the 20th century – next door to the Lyric Theatre which opened in 1888 – the Apollo is one of the few theatres in London to be freehold.The only complete theatre design of architect Lewin Sharp, the Apollo was specifically designed for musical theatre and named after the Greek god of the arts and leader of the muses. Constructed by builder Walter Wallis of plain London brick in keeping with the neighbouring streets, the front piece is in the Renaissance style with sculpted stone fascia by T. Simpson. The structure encloses a four-level auditorium, with three cantilevered balconies and a first floor central loggia, decorated in the Louis XIV Style by Hubert van Hooydonk. In keeping with then European style, each level has its own foyer and promenade.

Movie Theater Near Apollo Theatre

Share Radio
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
22 Chapter Street
City of Westminster,

FUTJackpot
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
124 Ebury Street
London, SW1W 9QQ

07968798008

The Nth Degree Club
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
40 Elizabeth Street
London, SW1W 9NW

0845 4379 450

Chris Vickers
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
113 Lambeth Road
London, SE1 7LS

00 44 (0) 207 793 1010

Holly Capp
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
113 Lambeth Road
London, SE1 7LS

44 20 7793 5730

The Lindley Hall
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
80 Vincent Square
London, SW1P 2PE

J-d Haynes
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
113 Lambeth Road
London, SE1 7LS

44 20 7793 5730

Jason Jarvis
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
113 Lambeth Road
London, SE1 7LS

44 20 7793 5730

Wicked the Musical
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
17 Wilton Rd
London, SW1V 1LG

020 7492 9930

Victoria Apollo Theatre Wicked
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Wicked
London,

Wicked
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
17 Wilton Road
London, SW1V 1LG

020 7492 9930

Pacha Disco, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Vauxhall Bridge Road
London, SW1V 1

Konnect London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Terminus Place
London, SW1V 1JR

0845 371 4489

Konnect London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Terminus Place, SW1V 1JR
London,

The Qube Project
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
191 Victoria Street
London, SW1E 5NE

0203 752 0468

Curzon Victoria
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
58 Victoria Street
London, SW1E 6QW

0330 500 1331

Curzon Victoria is our newest cinema in Central London - come and immerse yourself in a unique mix of film, cultural events and Q&As. Get the conversation flowing with carefully selected wines, local beers and spirits in our beautiful lounge bars. We’re also equipped with five state-of-the-art screens with Sony 4K projection and 3D.

MediCinema
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Conybeare House, Guy's Hospital
London, EC4A 4HT

0207 188 3697

“They say laughter is the best medicine, but I think MediCinema is the best medicine.” Katie Gallacher, Paediatric Nurse at the Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle MediCinema is an independently funded, registered charity that has formed a unique partnership with the health sector and film industry. We are dedicated to bringing the power, escapism and the magic of cinema and film to patients, their families and carers in UK hospitals and places of care. We build, manage and operate state-of-the-art cinemas, bringing the latest movie blockbusters completely free of charge to those receiving and supporting treatment. Our screens are built to accommodate patients in wheelchairs, beds, on drips or monitors. MediCinema operates at Guy’s and St. Thomas' Hospitals in London, The Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow, the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle, the Serennu Children’s Centre in Newport, and at Headley Court, the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre for injured service personnel in Epsom, Surrey. This year we will open a new MediCinema at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital in London. For as little as £10 you can fund a patient to attend a screening at a MediCinema. Please support us today by texting FILM11 followed by the amount you want to donate to 70070. For more ways to get involved, visit us at www.medicinema.org.uk or find us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/medicinema

Make Space Studios
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Newnham Terrace
London,

020 7928 5677

St James Theatre, Victoria, London
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
12 Palace Street
London, SW1E 5JA

BIS
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
1 victoria street
London,

Main Theatres, St. Thomas' Hospital -
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Westminster Bridge Road
London, SE1 7EH

Florence Nightingale Museum, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
5 LOLLARDS TOWER, LAMBETH PALACE ROAD
London,

Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace Road
London, SW1A 1AA

+44 (0) 20 7766 7301

Lewis Duerden
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
5-6 Halkin St, London SW1X 7DJ , United Kingdom
London, SW1X 7DJ

+44 20 7333 1086

Big Ben
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Westminster,London SW1A 0AA, United Kingdom
London,

TheWall_SE1
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Arches 228-232 Station Approach Road
London, SE1 8SW

020 8983 5459

Proud to be a part of House of Vans, at The Wall SE1 we aim to provide a space for all to sit, relax, recharge, energise, fraternise and generally enjoy themselves; whether for a quick pit stop or a leisurely morning, The Wall's team will provide. The Wall SE1 was set up in as the food and drink operation within House of Vans London, which opened August 2014. It provides food and drink for skaters, member of the public, for the array of events that take place within the space, and for special guests like the Foo Fighters, to Tony Alva, to Julian Casablancas, to Christian Hosoi. Inspired by the New York brunch scene and London life, we’ve created a menu to showcase American style with British ingredients and flair. We hope to share our love of big flavours, seasonal ingredients, lip-smacking and finger-dripping dishes with you. We plan to do this alongside cookery classes for kids (our very own 'skate 'n bake') and anything we can think of that will engage the members of our HOV community.

Landmark Near Apollo Theatre

Buckingham Palace
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1AA

Buckingham Palace est la résidence officielle de la monarchie britannique à Londres. Le palais est à la fois le lieu où se produisent les événements en relation avec la famille royale, le point de chute de beaucoup de chefs d’État en visite, et une attraction touristique importante. C’est le point de convergence du peuple britannique lors des moments de joie, de crise et de peine. « Buckingham Palace », ou tout simplement « le Palais », désigne la source des déclarations de presse émanant des bureaux royaux. Buckingham Palace a été construit par John Sheffield à l'origine du duc de Buckingham en 1703, c'est le lieu de résidence de la monarchie britannique. Buckingham Palace a été reconstruit au cours des siècles par John Nash pour George IV.Au Moyen Âge, le site du palais de Buckingham formait une partie du manoir d’Ebury. Il y eut plusieurs occupants royaux depuis Édouard le Confesseur, et a été l’objet de nombreuses spéculations à propos de son propriétaire : une faille dans le bail de Charles d’Angleterre permit au terrain de revenir dans le giron royal au. Les précurseurs de Buckingham Palace sont Blake House, Goring House et Arlington House.D’abord connu sous le nom de Buckingham House, le bâtiment formant le cœur du palais d’aujourd’hui était auparavant un grand hôtel particulier construit en 1703 par le duc de Buckingham John Sheffield et acquis par le roi George III en 1762 pour en faire sa résidence privée. Il a été agrandi au cours des 75 années suivantes, principalement par les architectes John Nash et Edward Blore, qui ajoutèrent trois ailes autour d’une cour carrée. Buckingham Palace devint finalement la résidence officielle de la monarchie britannique lors de l’accession au trône de la reine Victoria en 1837. Les derniers ajouts structurels d’importance datent de la fin du et du début du : l’imposante aile est qui fait face au Mall a été ajoutée, et l’ancienne entrée officielle, Marble Arch, a été déplacée près du Speaker’s Corner à Hyde Park, où elle se trouve toujours. La façade côté est a été refaite en 1913 avec des blocs de calcaire de Portland, en arrière plan du Victoria Memorial, créant la « façade publique » de Buckingham, avec le fameux balcon en son centre.

St James's Palace
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

+44 20 7930 4832

St James's Palace is the official residence of the sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, although no longer the principal residence of the monarch, it is the ceremonial meeting place of the Accession Council and the London residence of several members of the royal family.Built by Henry VIII on the site of a leper hospital dedicated to Saint James the Less, the palace was secondary in importance to the Palace of Whitehall for most Tudor and Stuart monarchs. The palace increased in importance during the reigns of the early Georgian monarchy, but was displaced by Buckingham Palace in the late-18th and early-19th centuries. After decades of being used increasingly for only formal occasions, the move was formalised by Queen Victoria in 1837. Today the palace houses a number of official offices, societies and collections and all ambassadors and high commissioners to the United Kingdom are still accredited to the Court of St James's.Mainly built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style. A fire in 1809 destroyed parts of the structure, including the monarch's private apartments, which were never replaced. Some 17th-century interiors survive, but most were remodelled in the 19th century.

The Banqueting House
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Whitehall House, 41 Whitehall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2ER

+44 (0) 844 482 7777

This revolutionary building, the first in England to be designed in a Palladian style by Inigo Jones, was finished in 1622 for James I. Intended for the splendour and exuberance of court masques, the Banqueting House is probably most famous for one real life drama: the execution of Charles I which took place here in 1649 to the ‘dismal, universal groan’ of the crowd. One of Charles’ last sights was he walked through the Banqueting House to his death was the magnificent ceiling, painted by Peter Paul Rubens in 1630-4.

Bridgewater House, Westminster
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
14 Cleveland Row
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

Bridgewater House is a townhouse located at 14 Cleveland Row in the St James's area of London, England. It is a Grade I listed building.HistoryThe earliest known house on the site was Berkshire House, built in about 1626-27 for Thomas Howard, second son of the Earl of Suffolk and Master of the Horse to Charles I of England when he was Prince of Wales. Howard was later created Earl of Berkshire.After being occupied by Parliamentarian troops in the English Civil War, used for the Portuguese Embassy, and lived in by Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, the house was lived in by Charles II's mistress Barbara Villiers, who was made Duchess of Cleveland in 1670, following which the house was known as Cleveland House. She refaced the old house and added new wings. After being owned for some years by a speculator, the house was sold in 1700 to John Egerton, 3rd Earl of Bridgewater, after which it passed by inheritance until 1948.Cleveland House was re-designed in the Palazzo style by Sir Charles Barry in 1840. The rebuilding was completed and renamed in 1854 for Lord Ellesmere, heir of the 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. It is built in Bath stone with a slate roof in three storeys with a basement.

Queen's Chapel
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Savoy Hill
London, United Kingdom

+44 20 7836 7221

The Queen's Chapel is a chapel in central London, England, that was designed by Inigo Jones and built between 1623 and 1625 as an external adjunct to St. James's Palace for Roman Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. It is one of the facilities of the British monarch's personal religious establishment, the Chapel Royal, and should not be confused with the 1540 building known as the Chapel Royal within the palace and just across Marlborough road.HistoryIt was built as a Roman Catholic chapel at a time when the construction of Catholic churches was prohibited in England, and was used by Charles I's Catholic queen Henrietta Maria. From the 1690s it was used by Continental Protestant courtiers. It was built as an integral part of St James's Palace, but when the adjacent private apartments burned down in 1809 they were not replaced and in 1856-57 Marlborough Road was built between the palace and the Queen's Chapel. The result is that physically the chapel now appears to be more part of the Marlborough House complex than of St James's Palace. It became a Chapel Royal again in 1938.Having been taken from the Royal Chapel of All Saints in Windsor Great Park, the body of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother lay at the Queen's Chapel for several days during the preparations for her lying-in-state in Westminster Hall before her ceremonial funeral.

Playhouse Theatre
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Northumberland Ave
London, United Kingdom WC2N 5

870-0606631

The Playhouse Theatre is a West End theatre in the City of Westminster, located in Northumberland Avenue, near Trafalgar Square. The Theatre was built by F. H. Fowler and Hill with a seating capacity of 1,200. It was rebuilt in 1907 and still retains its original substage machinery. Its current seating capacity is 786.HistoryEarly yearsBuilt by Sefton Henry Parry as the Royal Avenue Theatre, it opened on 11 March 1882 with 1200 seats. The first production at the theatre was Jacques Offenbach's Madame Favart. In its early seasons, the theatre hosted comic operas, burlesques and farces for several years. For much of this time, the low comedian Arthur Roberts, a popular star of the music halls, starred at the theatre. By the 1890s, the theatre was presenting drama, and in 1894 Annie Horniman, the tea heiress, anonymously sponsored the actress Florence Farr in a season of plays at the theatre. Farr's first production was unsuccessful, and so she prevailed upon her friend, George Bernard Shaw, to hurry and make his West End début at the theatre with Arms and the Man in 1894. It was successful enough to allow him to discontinue music criticism to focus full-time on play writing. The legendary actress Gladys Cooper managed the theatre for some years.

Wimbledon Village
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
60 High Street
London, United Kingdom SW19

Stephanie Anne Louise Bailey
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Strand, Charing Cross, London E1W3ST
London, United Kingdom E1W3ST

+44 20 7839 7282

The Cockney Sparrow
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Westminster Pier
London, United Kingdom

0800 007 5196

Stepping Stones
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Creighton Avenue, East Finchley
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2

07836 284538

Fun interactive play session accompanied by guitar and violin. Songs, rhymes parachute games, puppets, storytime, bubbles. Suitable for 0-4 years. Tuesdays 10am at East Finchley Baptist Church. Drop-in. Cost £5 (£2.50 siblings).

High Commission of South Africa, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 5DP

+44 (0) 20 7451 7299

The High Commission of South Africa in London is the diplomatic mission from South Africa to the United Kingdom. It is located at South Africa House, a building on Trafalgar Square, London. As well as containing the offices of the High Commissioner, the building also hosts the South African consulate. It has been a Grade II* Listed Building since 1982.HistorySouth Africa House was built by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts in the 1930s on the site of what had been Morley's Hotel until it was demolished in 1936. The building was designed by Sir Herbert Baker, with architectural sculpture by Coert Steynberg and Sir Charles Wheeler, and opened in 1933. The building was acquired by the government of South Africa as its main diplomatic presence in the UK. During World War II, Prime Minister Jan Smuts lived there while conducting South Africa's war plans.In 1961, South Africa became a republic, and withdrew from the Commonwealth due to its policy of racial segregation. Accordingly, the building became an Embassy, rather than a High Commission. During the 1980s, the building, which was one of the only South African diplomatic missions in a public area, was targeted by protesters from around the world. During the 1990 Poll Tax Riots, the building was set alight by rioters, although not seriously damaged.

St James's Church, Piccadilly
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
197 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0

020 7734 4511

St James's Church, Piccadilly, also known as St James's Church, Westminster, and St James-in-the-Fields, is an Anglican church on Piccadilly in the centre of London, United Kingdom. The church was designed and built by Sir Christopher Wren.The church is built of red brick with Portland stone dressings. Its interior has galleries on three sides supported by square pillars, and the nave has a barrel vault supported by Corinthian columns. The carved marble font and limewood reredos are both notable examples of the work of Grinling Gibbons.HistoryIn 1662, Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans, was granted land for residential development on what was then the outskirts of London. He set aside land for the building of a parish church and churchyard on the south side of what is now Piccadilly. Christopher Wren was appointed the architect in 1672 and the church was consecrated on 13 July 1684 by Henry Compton, the Bishop of London. In 1685 the parish of St James was created for the church.

Albany (London)
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Albany Courtyard, Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0DS

The Albany, or simply Albany, is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, London.BuildingThe Albany was built in 1770–74 by Sir William Chambers for the newly created 1st Viscount Melbourne as Melbourne House. It is a three-storey mansion, seven bays (windows) wide, with a pair of service wings flanking a front courtyard. In 1791, Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany abandoned Dover House, Whitehall (now a government office), and took up residence. In 1802 the Duke in turn gave up the house and it was converted by Henry Holland into 69 bachelor apartments (known as "sets"). This was achieved by subdividing the main block and its two service wings, and by adding two new parallel long buildings covering most of the garden, running as far as a new rear gate building on Burlington Gardens. Holland's new buildings of 1802-3 flank a covered walkway supported on thin iron columns and with an upswept roof. The blocks are white painted render in a simpler Regency style than Chambers' work. Most sets are accessed off common staircases without doors, like Oxbridge colleges and the Inns of Court.HistorySince its conversion, the Albany has been a prestigious set of bachelor apartments in London. The residents have included such famous names as the poet Lord Byron and the future Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone, and numerous members of the aristocracy.

Tyler Gibson
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Strand, Charing Cross, London E1W3ST
London, United Kingdom E1W3ST

Odeon West End
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
40 Leicester Square
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7

0871 224 4007

The Odeon West End, from 1930 to 1988 known as Leicester Square Theatre, was a cinema on the south side of Leicester Square, London. It contained two screens—screen 1 seats 500 and screen 2 seats 832. It was often used for smaller film premieres, and hosted the annual BFI London Film Festival. The building is opposite the much larger flagship Odeon Leicester Square.Odeon Cinemas sold the building to three Irish investors in 2006, though continued to lease it. In 2012 it was bought by the Radisson Edwardian hotel group and closed as a cinema on 1 January 2015, ahead of planned redevelopment as a luxury hotel.HistoryThe Odeon was built in 1930 as the Leicester Square Theatre, a name it largely remained with until 1988. The theatre was built as a cine-variety venue for Jack Buchanan - a penthouse apartment was housed on the roof for the star - and showcased both film and short variety performances, before going over to film on a more permanent basis. A large single screen was housed in an ornate, three-tiered auditorium.It was sold to J. Arthur Rank in 1937 and became Rank's first cinema, although not named Odeon for many years to come.The cinema was modernised in 1968 into a much blander shell, based around a remodelled stalls and single circle. In 1988 it was changed into a two-screen venue (Screen 1 in the former circle and Screen 2 in the stalls) and renamed Odeon West End.The site was sold by Odeon Cinemas to three Irish investors in February 2006, though continued to operate as part of the Odeon chain. Ownership subsequently passed to the Irish National Asset Management Agency and in 2012 it was sold to the Radisson Edwardian hotel company.

The Comedy Store
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
7 Oxendon St
Hackney, United Kingdom SW1Y 4EE

The Comedy Store is a comedy club located in Soho, London, England, opened in 1979 by Don Ward and Peter Rosengard.It was named after The Comedy Store club in the United States, which Rosengard had visited the previous year. Starting out above a strip club, in 1982 they moved to Leicester Square at a premises they were able to take over formally in 1985.The club was the focus of the "alternative comedy" boom in the early 1980s and helped start the careers of many comedians, including Paul Merton, French & Saunders, Alexei Sayle, Rik Mayall, Adrian Edmondson, Ben Elton, Mark Thomas, Andrew Bailey, Pat Condell and John Sparkes.In October 1985, an improvisational group called The Comedy Store Players was formed, consisting of Mike Myers, Neil Mullarkey, Kit Hollerbach, Dave Cohen and Paul Merton. The group has had several lineup changes over the years, and now features a rotating team of Neil Mullarkey, Paul Merton, Josie Lawrence, Richard Vranch (a comedy improviser who also plays piano), Jim Sweeney, Lee Simpson and Andy Smart, together with frequent guest appearances. Several of The Comedy Store Players appeared on the BBC Radio 4 and Channel 4 comedy game show Whose Line Is It Anyway?.

Duke of York's Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
St Martin's Lane
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2N 4

844-8717627

The Duke of York's Theatre is a West End Theatre in St Martin's Lane, in the City of Westminster, London. It was built for Frank Wyatt and his wife, Violet Melnotte, who retained ownership of the theatre until her death in 1935. It opened on 10 September 1892 as the Trafalgar Square Theatre, with Wedding Eve. The theatre, designed by architect Walter Emden became known as the Trafalgar Theatre in 1894 and the following year became the Duke of York's to honour the future King George V.One of the earliest musical comedies, Go-Bang, was a success at the theatre in 1894. In 1900, Jerome K. Jerome's Miss Hobbs was staged as well as David Belasco's Madame Butterfly, which was seen by Puccini, who later turned it into the famous opera. This was also the theatre where J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up debuted on 27 December 1904. Many famous British actors have appeared here, including Basil Rathbone, who played Alfred de Musset in Madame Sand in June 1920, returning in November 1932 as the Unknown Gentleman in Tonight or Never.

Thriller Live Musical at Lyric Theatre
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7ES

+44 207 7492 1618

Gielgud Theatre
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
35-37 Shaftesbury Avenue
London, United Kingdom W1D 7

20-74945065

The Gielgud Theatre is a West End theatre, located on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster, London, at the corner of Rupert Street. The house currently has 986 seats on three levels.The theatre was designed by W.G.R. Sprague and opened on 27 December 1906 as the Hicks Theatre, named after Seymour Hicks, for whom it was built. The first play at the theatre was a hit musical called The Beauty of Bath co-written by Hicks. Another big success was A Waltz Dream in 1908. In 1909, the American impresario Charles Frohman became manager of the theatre and renamed the house the Globe Theatre – a name that it retained for 85 years. Call It a Day opened in 1935 and ran for 509 performances, a long run for the slow inter-war years. There's a Girl in My Soup, opening in 1966, ran for almost three years, a record for the theatre that was not surpassed until Daisy Pulls It Off opened in April 1983 to run for 1,180 performances, the theatre's longest run. In 1987 Peter Shaffer's play Lettice and Lovage opened, starring Maggie Smith, and became a hit.The Globe's theatre cat, named Beerbohm, became famous enough to receive a front page obituary in the theatrical publication, The Stage in 1995. Refurbished in 1987, the theatre has since presented several Alan Ayckbourn premieres, including Man of the Moment (1990), as well as a notable revival of An Ideal Husband in 1992. During reconstruction of Shakespeare's Globe theatre on the South Bank, in 1994 the theatre was renamed the Gielgud Theatre in honour of John Gielgud. Another refurbishment was completed in 2008.

Hamleys
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
188-196 Regent Street
London, United Kingdom London W1B 5BT

0871 704 1977

Hamleys is the oldest and largest toy shop in the world and one of the world's best-known retailers of toys. Founded by William Hamley as "Noah's Ark" in High Holborn, London, in 1760, it moved to its current site on Regent Street in 1881. This flagship store is set over seven floors, with more than 50,000 toys on sale. It is considered one of the city's prominent tourist attractions, receiving around five million visitors each year. The chain has ten other outlets in the United Kingdom and nearly 50 franchises worldwide.Hamleys was bought by the Icelandic investment company Baugur Group in 2003 but was taken over by Baugur's main investor, Landsbanki, when the group defaulted. In 2012, the French toy retailer Groupe Ludendo bought the business for £60 million. In 2015 it was reported that Groupe Ludendo was negotiating the sale of Hamleys, possibly to a Hong Kong company owned by a relative of the owner of department store House of Fraser. Subsequently, it was sold to the Chinese footwear company C.banner for an estimated $154 million.HistoryHamleys is the oldest and largest toy shop in the world. It is named after William Hamley, who founded a toy shop called "Noah's Ark" at No. 231 High Holborn, London, in 1760. Ownership of the shop passed through the family, and by the time it was operated by Hamley's grandsons in 1837, the store had become famous, counting royalty and nobility among its customers.