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Guinness Brewery, Dublin | Tourist Information


guinnessstorehouse.com

St James Gate
Dublin, Ireland


St. James's Gate Brewery is a brewery founded in 1759 in Dublin, Ireland, by Arthur Guinness. The company is now a part of Diageo, a company formed from the merger of Guinness and Grand Metropolitan in 1997. The main product of the brewery is Guinness Draught.Originally leased in 1759 to Arthur Guinness at IR£45 (Irish pounds) per year for 9,000 years, St. James's Gate has been the home of Guinness ever since. It became the largest brewery in Ireland in 1838, and the largest in the world by 1886, with an annual output of 1.2 million barrels. Although no longer the largest brewery in the world, it is still the largest brewer of stout in the world. The company has since bought out the originally leased property, and during the 19th and early 20th centuries the brewery owned most of the buildings in the surrounding area, including many streets of housing for brewery employees, and offices associated with the brewery. The brewery also made all of its own power using its own power plant.There is an attached exhibition on the 250-year-old history of Guinness, called the Guinness Storehouse.HistoryArthur Guinness started brewing ales in Leixlip, County Kildare, and then from 1759 at the St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin. On 31 December he signed a 9,000-year lease at £45 per annum for the unused brewery. However, the lease is no longer in effect because the brewery property has been bought out when it expanded beyond the original 4-acre site.

Arts and Entertainment Near Guinness Brewery

Old Jameson Distillery
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street, Smithfield Village, Dublin 7
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

The Old Jameson Distillery is an Irish whiskey tourist attraction located just off Smithfield Square in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening as an attraction in 1997, it receives between 300,000 and 350,000 guests per year. The Old Jameson Distillery is the original site where Jameson Irish Whiskey was distilled until 1971. It is now a visitors centre that provides guided tours, tutored whiskey tastings, bars, a restaurant, and a gift shop.HistoryThe original distillery on this site was called the Bow Street Distillery and was established in 1780. John Jameson took full ownership (he was previously the general manager) and expanded the distillery in 1805. By 1810, the operation was officially renamed to John Jameson & Son’s Bow Street Distillery. The distillery grew to an upwards of 5 acres by 1886.At this time, it was described by many as a "city within a city". The distillery also housed a Smithy, Cooperage, saw mills, engineers, carpenters, painters and coppersmiths’ shops. Water for the distillery came from two deep wells dug underneath the site. Cellars were also dug underneath nearby streets to store maturing whiskey, while four stills and two wash stills, each holding 24,000 gallons, were heated by both fire and steam coils above.Following a difficult period that included American Prohibition, Ireland’s trade war with Great Britain, and the introduction of Scotch blended whiskey, the Jameson distillery fell on hard times and decided to form the Irish Distillers Group with their previous rivals, the Cork Distillery Company and John Power & Son in 1966. Eventually, it became one of the last distilleries in Ireland to close in 1971. The operation was then moved out of Dublin to the New Midleton Distillery.

Guinness Storehouse, St Jame's Gate, Dublin
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St. Jame's Gate
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 408 4800

Guiness Brewery- Dublin, Ireland
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

01 408 4800

St. Patrick's Cathedral
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Saint Patrick's Close, Dublin 8, Irlanda
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

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The Liquor Rooms
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
5 Wellington Quay
Dublin, Ireland D2

00353873393688

Late night bar 7 nights a week. Open from 5pm daily. Food served from 5pm-10pm. For reservations email: [email protected] For lost property email: [email protected]

Guinness Skybar
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James Gate, Dublin 8
Dublin, Ireland DUBLIN 8

+353 (0) 1 4084800

Forbidden Fruit Festival
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Royal Hospital Kilmainham
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

The Cobblestone
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
77 North King Street, Smithfield
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 7

01 872 1799

Live Trad Music in The Cobblestone 7 Nights a Week. Old Timey String Session with Bill Whelan & Friends every Sat from 4.30 - 7.00pm Mary-Beth Taylor runs dance classes throughout the year contact www.irishdancedublin.com www.facebook.com/irishandseannosdance for up to date info. The Balaclavas is a group that meets weekly to learn trad music with a tutor and is open to new members www.facebook.com/balaclavasCobblestone

The Clarence, Dublin
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
6-8 Wellington Quay
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 1 407 0800

The Clarence is Dublin’s premier boutique hotel located in the heart of the city, on the banks of the River Liffey just a stone’s throw from the famous Ha’penny Bridge. Our hotel is a proud reflection of 21st century Ireland, simple and elegant, a contemporary aesthetic that embodies the very best of Irish hospitality. The Clarence first opened its doors in 1852. The hotel was refurbished in the 1930’s and hosted an eclectic clientele, from visiting clergymen to bawdy musicians. The tired two-star stopover was bought by Bono and The Edge in 1992 and transformed into a contemporary boutique hotel, the kind of place that they would choose to stay themselves, if visitors to Dublin city. Their new Clarence Hotel opened in June 1996. Our hotel is located within short walking distance of a myriad of Dublin city experiences to suit all tastes: from Michelin star Irish restaurants to cool indie coffee bars; big brand shopping on Grafton Street to cutting edge Irish designwear around Temple Bar, George’s Street and South William Street; theatres such as the world famous Abbey as well as contemporary venues such as the Project Arts Centre and the New Theatre. Catch a huge international band at The Olympia or discover some brand new Irish rock music in The Workman’s Club. Dublin’s biggest nightclubs are just a stroll away, from the opulent and exclusive Madison Nightclub to the fun filled party vibe of Everleigh Gardens. Cultural Dublin awaits guests at The Clarence: Trinity College, The Guinness Storehouse, The James Joyce Centre, Dublinia, The Natural History Museum and so much more. With 50 bedrooms and suites to choose from, as well as our spectacular Penthouse Suites, The Clarence offers luxurious and stylish accommodation in the heart of it all. Within the hotel complex, guests can enjoy a number of dining and bar areas – The Study and The Octagon Bar in the hotel itself, as well as Cleaver East restaurant on the ground floor and The Liquor Rooms underneath the hotel. We also provide 24 hour room service and many added comforts for our guests to enjoy. The Clarence is the perfect location for a stylish, modern city centre wedding or civil ceremony and our dedicated team will provide every assistance in arranging your beautiful day in one of our many spaces. Our front facing function rooms and suites offer privacy and understated elegance overlooking The Liffey. We have all the facilities needed to host your event, from large conferences to intimate meetings. Our events team will assist from start to finish. From fun weekends to romantic getaways, family gatherings to solo business trips, a warm welcome, a luxurious room and superior service awaits you at The Clarence Hotel.

The Meeting House Dublin
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Sycamore street, Meeting House Square, Temple Bar, Dublin 2, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland 2

016703330

THE MEETING HOUSE IS WHERE CREATIVE PEOPLE MEET – FROM MUSICIANS TO DESIGNERS – WHO CREATE THEIR OWN VIBE, FUELLED BY GREAT FOOD, DRINK, MUSIC + ART.

Arthurs
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
28 Thomas Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

014020914

Welcome to Arthur’s, a restaurant pub and venue in the heart of the Liberties, in Dublin city. Arthurs is the nearest pub to The Guinness Storehouse, one of the city’s foremost tourist attractions. Naturally, it has the freshest pint of Guinness in all of Ireland. Arthur’s is a classic Dublin pub, old style, but well appointed. We offer good wholesome food, at reasonable prices, seven days a week. We light a real turf fire every day We offer free Wi-Fi We play an eclectic mix of Irish Music, all day, and have live music sessions on some evenings. We do not have a television, because it could interfere with the relaxed ambiance, the banter and the conversation. Upstairs at Arthurs, we have a room available for private parties, functions, and also as a separate music venue with full PA and house piano Please contact us if you require any further information, or have any special requirements.

The Ink Factory
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
15 Wellington Quay
Dublin, Ireland 2

016708641

We Tattoo, we pierce, we Barber and we make damn fine Coffee to boot! We're open from 11-8 every day of the week and we'd like everyone to come and hang out with us. Everyone's welcome to come in and just chill out with us.

Cobblestone Bar
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
77 Nth King Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 7

(01)8721799

ReINKarnated
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
5 Parliament Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

085 8115 333

We are Reinkarnated.... A crew of talented artists and friendly staff that want to tattoo you, it's as simple as that. Send us a mail if you have any queries or pop into the shop to see us.

Block T
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
BLOCK T, 8 Basin View, Dublin 8
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

0035315351014

BLOCK T operates under an integrated business and management structure which seeks to develop a sustainable, multidisciplinary business model, targeted towards the creative industries in Ireland. Utilising business management tools such as resource control, templated documentation, milestone planning and consistent overview of weekly targets and objectives. BLOCK T aims to transcend the status of being an arts centre, art studios or gallery. Its wider mission is to provide a platform for creative thinking of all avenues. It strives to help independent, self-sufficient and productive individuals to bridge the gap between theory and practice in their their art or discipline, and to give them exposure to a wider audience. Last year BLOCK T were winners of the first Noone Casey / Dublin Contemporary Mentorship award and `Cultural Attraction of the Year`at the Dublin Living Awards and have been featured in the Guardian Newspaper, the Irish Times, ARTE (German television), National Geographic, AnOther magazine and Aljazeera (English), amongst others. For generally enquiries please email [email protected]

Back Loft
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
7-11 St. Augustine Street
Dublin, Ireland

Mish.Mash
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
66 Capel Street
Dublin, Ireland

(01) 556 10 80

Mish.Mash is a unique project that combines the best European coffee-shop traditions, the relaxing atmosphere of tea culture, art gallery, retail and diverse range of workshops, a total ‘mishmash‘. Mish.Mash is meant to be the perfect place for a morning cup of coffee to start the day and set the mood, or for a lunch break, to take one’s mind off the business issues and have a relaxing half-hour respite, as well as, an ideal evening breather after a tough day, in a pleasant and stress-free environment.

Temple Bar TradFest
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
2-5 Wellington Quay
Dublin, Ireland Temple Bar

017030700

TradFest Temple Bar has gained a reputation as the one of the biggest and best traditional Irish music and culture festivals in Ireland. It is now a firm fixture on the National and International festival calendar attracting national and international visitors. The festival takes place over 5 days and 5 nights with over 200 events. The festival has been recognised for its contribution to Irish traditional music and culture with several awards including Best Traditional Music Festival in the Festival Awards. Numerous iconic venues are used to host concerts featuring talented and beloved musicians from Ireland (and further afield) such as The Dubliners, Martin Hayes, Donovan, Paul Brady, Paddy Casey, John Sheahan, Mick Flanney, Matt Molloy, Arty McGlynn, John Carty, Mundy, Clannad, Moya Brennan, Sharon Shannon, Maura O’Connell, Altan and many more. The venues include St. Patrick’s Cathedral, St Werburgh’s Church, St Michan’s Church, Dublin’s City Hall, House of Lords, Dublin Castle, The New Theatre and the Button Factory. For more information visit us on: www.templebartrad.com

Sonic Recording Studios
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
The Yard, 16 Stoneybatter
Dublin, Ireland d 7

5448043 or 087 7787270

Sonic Recording Studios has been an iconic part of the music business in Ireland since 1988. Over the years hundreds of performers have recorded with us and many well established artists and groups of today started their careers with recordings made in our Studio. Sonic Studios have opened a new large premises in Stoneybatter Dublin. We are about a ten minute walk from O'Connell street, the area has great restaurants, bars and hotels and is well serviced by bus and Luas services. The new premises is in a quiet secure courtyard with off street parking for our clients and boasts two recording studios both equipped with Protools HD and Logic Pro.

Coke Lane
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
1, Coke Lane Street
Dublin, Ireland

08722293434

A casa mais "fervida" de Dublin! Este é um espaço na qual divulgaremos todas as nossas programações. Inclusive as fotos das festas. FIQUEM ATENTOS E NÃO PERCAM O PRÓXIMO FERVO! contatos/reservas de convites: [email protected]

Brewery Near Guinness Brewery

Old Jameson Distillery
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street, Smithfield Village, Dublin 7
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

The Old Jameson Distillery is an Irish whiskey tourist attraction located just off Smithfield Square in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening as an attraction in 1997, it receives between 300,000 and 350,000 guests per year. The Old Jameson Distillery is the original site where Jameson Irish Whiskey was distilled until 1971. It is now a visitors centre that provides guided tours, tutored whiskey tastings, bars, a restaurant, and a gift shop.HistoryThe original distillery on this site was called the Bow Street Distillery and was established in 1780. John Jameson took full ownership (he was previously the general manager) and expanded the distillery in 1805. By 1810, the operation was officially renamed to John Jameson & Son’s Bow Street Distillery. The distillery grew to an upwards of 5 acres by 1886.At this time, it was described by many as a "city within a city". The distillery also housed a Smithy, Cooperage, saw mills, engineers, carpenters, painters and coppersmiths’ shops. Water for the distillery came from two deep wells dug underneath the site. Cellars were also dug underneath nearby streets to store maturing whiskey, while four stills and two wash stills, each holding 24,000 gallons, were heated by both fire and steam coils above.Following a difficult period that included American Prohibition, Ireland’s trade war with Great Britain, and the introduction of Scotch blended whiskey, the Jameson distillery fell on hard times and decided to form the Irish Distillers Group with their previous rivals, the Cork Distillery Company and John Power & Son in 1966. Eventually, it became one of the last distilleries in Ireland to close in 1971. The operation was then moved out of Dublin to the New Midleton Distillery.

Guinness Storehouse, St Jame's Gate, Dublin
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St. Jame's Gate
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 408 4800

Guinness Storehouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

Guinness Storehouse is a Guinness-themed tourist attraction at St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening in 2000, it has received over four million visitors.The Storehouse covers seven floors surrounding a glass atrium shaped in the form of a pint of Guinness. The ground floor introduces the beer's four ingredients (water, barley, hops and yeast), and the brewery's founder, Arthur Guinness. Other floors feature the history of Guinness advertising and include an interactive exhibit on responsible drinking. The seventh floor houses the Gravity Bar with views of Dublin and where visitors may drink a pint of Guinness included in the price of admission, which was €18 in March 2015, described as "overpriced" by Condé Nast Traveler. In 2006, a new wing opened incorporating a live installation of the present-day brewing process.HistoryThe building in which the Storehouse is located was constructed in 1902 as a fermentation plant for the St. James's Gate Brewery (where yeast is added to the brew). The building was designed in the style of the Chicago School of Architecture and was the first multi-storey steel-framed building to be constructed in Ireland. The building was used continuously as the fermentation plant of the Brewery until its closure in 1988, when a new fermentation plant was completed near the River Liffey.In 1997, it was decided to convert the building into the Guinness Storehouse, replacing the Guinness Hop Store as the Brewery's visitor centre. The redesign of the building was undertaken by the UK-based design firm Imagination in conjunction with the Dublin-based architects firm RKD, and the Storehouse opened to the public on 2 December 2000. In 2006 a new wing was developed at a cost of €2.5 million, including a live installation demonstrating the modern brewing process.

Porterhouse Central
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
45 - 47 Nassau Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 1 6797539

We sell our own micro-brewed beers on tap and from hand pumped casks. We have over 150 different bottle beers from around the world.

Guiness Brewery- Dublin, Ireland
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

01 408 4800

Guinness Storehouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

+3531 408 4800

The Porterhouse Temple Bar
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Parliament St
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

01 6798847

J.W. Sweetman
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
1-2 Burgh Quay
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

01 670 5777

Selling a fine selection of bottled and draft beer that has been hand picked from our expert brewers, we have a great passion for fine ales, especially when it comes to complementing them with great food. Join our locals hidden amongst our many cosy alcoves and winding mahogany stairs to enjoy the view of Dublin’s River Liffey a stones throw away. Watch some sport beside the fire or socialise on one of our four floors. Since 1808, our commodious tavern has been the venue of choice for raconteurs and ramblers, for imbibers of liquor and the loftiest discourse. Become a part of our illustrious and colourful history, if the door’s off the latch just invite yourself inside. You’re sure to be welcomed in to join us for a beer tasting workshop with one of our brewers, hand picking your draft growler to take home with you. We look forward to seeing you! Slanite!

Porterhouse Brewing Company
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Head Office 47 Nassau Street
Dublin, Ireland D2

01 671 8558

Against The Grain Dublin
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
11 Wexford Street
Dublin, Ireland

(01) 470-5100

The Black Sheep
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
61 Capel Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

018730013

Guiness Storehouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Guinness Storehouse St James Gate, Dublin 8, Co. Dublin, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland

01 453 8364

Porterhouse Brewing Co.
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Parliament Street
Dublin, Ireland

01 679 8847

Guinness Bicentenary Centre - Swimming Pool
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Watling Street
Dublin, Ireland 8

+353-1-6435709

Four Provinces Brewing Co.
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Páirc Ghleann na bhFiach, Camaigh
Baile Átha Cliath, Ireland D6W

Our first beer, the Hurler, comes from a deep love of our most ancient of games. Played from the Glens of Antrim to the green fields of north Kerry, Conemara to the hallowed turf of Donnycarney, to the hurler we salute you!

Food/Beverages Near Guinness Brewery

Sapphires Oriental Restaurant
Distance: 3.1 mi Tourist Information
Lower Main St
Rush, Ireland Co.Dublin

8709242

Opening Hours: Monday-Saturday 5pm-11pm Sunday & Bank Holidays 1.30-11pm

Krüst Bakery
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
6 South Georges Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

+35315517622

Ireland's most innovative bakery #yeswegothecronut

Hillbilly's Fried Chicken Walkinstown
Distance: 2.6 mi Tourist Information
1a Lower Ballymount Road, Walkinstown
Dublin, Ireland 1

015519721

Vision Our Vision at Hillbilly’s is for you to have a completely different experience in fast food. Through constant innovation and development we believe our product offering and environment are and will be unmatched by our competitors. Hillbilly’s Food Standards When you arrive at a Hillbilly’s restaurant we want you to have a unique experience and understand why it is we have such a loyal customer following. In order to ensure that this continues we prepare all of our food to the highest food safety standards required by Irish law. Quality Hillbilly’s Quality policy is implemented both at our Distribution centre in Cork and throughout all of our restaurants in Ireland. This policy allows us to have full traceability from our suppliers to ensure that we deliver the highest quality product every single time. Food Safety It is our obligation and commitment to work to the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points Programme ( HACCP). Every employee is trained on these standards which become part of their day to day duties

Guinness
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St. Jame's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

Teeling Whiskey Company
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
17 Newmarket
Dublin, Ireland

+353-1-5310888

We are an independent Irish whiskey company dedicated to bringing choice and breadth back to the Irish whiskey category through small batch releases of interesting and flavoursome bottlings.

I Love Cooking
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
13 Upper Baggot Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 4

ILoveCooking.ie is home to Ireland’s best collection of tried and tested recipes. We’ve consulted the best chefs, cooks and food writers to give you a food experience that works for you, and your family. It is the place to find the recipes you want to cook tonight, for meal ideas that will satisfy even the fussiest eaters, for time-saving cooking tips, how-to food videos, supermarket deals and the very latest Irish food news. I Love Cooking helps you to cook from scratch with our easy-to-follow recipes and recipe videos with tips from leading chefs and food bloggers, Check out www.ilovecooking.ie for the latest news from the Irish food industry. Our team of food writers, contributors and guest bloggers will keep you up to date on all the latest cooking trends, and help you step by step as you master new recipes and skills you. Do you have a brilliant idea to share, or a way to make our site better? We would love to hear from you! Drop us a line at hi [at] ilovecooking.ie

Text Me A Drink
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Guiness Enterprise Center, Taylor's Lane, Unit 61
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

0851985417

What’s Text Me A Drink ? ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Text Me A Drink is a new service which allows, anyone in the world, to treat their friends (or themselves) to a real drink or a real meal through the Internet, Facebook or mobile application. After your online payment, your guest will receive an SMS containing a unique code. They will be able to redeem their drink/meal that you offer by showing this code in all TMAD pubs partners (Code valid once). Note that you can of course use this service for yourself if you want to get good deals! How it works ? ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Text Me A Drink, it’s as simple as 1-2-3 : 1- SELECT : Select drinks/food from the bars on Text Me A Drink and pay with your Visa or paypal (secure payment system) account. 2- SEND : Send drinks/food to yourself and/or friends. The receiver gets a text with a unique code valid for 30 days. 3- ENJOY! : They show the code at the bar to redeem their free drinks ! They talk about us: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Irish Examiner http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/drink-up-its-on-the-text-165437.html The Irish Times http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2011/1028/1224306623526.html The Sunday Business Post http://www.text-me-a-drink.com/text-me-a-drink-sunday-business-post.htm Stratégies http://www.text-me-a-drink.com/strategies.html Silicon Republic http://www.siliconrepublic.com/start-ups/item/24160-ten-propel-3-start-ups-pres

Broderick's
Distance: 2.8 mi Tourist Information
Unit 9 Beechlawn industrial estate
Dublin, Ireland D12 VY54

0035314604011

Mo Link: http://mobro.co/brodericks Order Online: www.brodericksbrothers.com Follow the lads on Twitter: twitter.com/berniebroderick twitter.com/barrybroderick Blog: http://broderickbrothers.blogspot.com/

Sweet Like a Wish
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
North Circular Road
Dublin, Ireland

0879015615

Koyu Matcha Green Tea
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Newmarket House, Newmarket Square
Dublin, Ireland 8

00353 1 6190295

We are a Tea company based in Dublin, Ireland. We supply organic matcha green tea to Ireland, the UK and Sweden. So far.... Contact us to add your company and country to the list

Guernika
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
39 Abbey Street
Dublin, Ireland D1

018729656

Guernika Restaurant is the ideal place for people who want to try a different food and for the Spanish who miss their mother's cuisine! Special menus, tapas, pintxos, paellas, Spanish omelette... are just some of the surprises that you can find in our restaurant. Traditional and tasteful cuisine which combines the healthy Mediterranean products and the traditional recipes of the Basque Country. Placed in the city center, it is a fab restaurant to enjoy a dinner or lunch.

Bulgarian Food Ireland
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
341 South Circular Road
Dublin, Ireland

0879847857

Bulgarian food and groceries in Ireland. Feel most welcome to browse our online shop and order from our generous variety of traditional Bulgarian meats, confectionery, sweets, spreads and conserves, pickles, cheese and e.t.c. To purchase Bulgarian food online is even easier now even miles away from our country.

Q Cafe Company
Distance: 3.0 mi Tourist Information
5 St Galls Gardens, Milltown
Dublin, Ireland Du

01-207 9044

100% Irish owned, The Q Cafe Company is a privately owned niche catering company specialising in modern, innovative food for catering and executive dining. Our teams of dedicated chefs and managers command extensive experience covering an extreme culinary spectrum.

Roshni Dundrum
Distance: 3.3 mi Tourist Information
4 Olivemount Terrace Dundrum Road
Dundrum, Ireland Dublin 14

012601940/2601608

FitzPatrick and Company
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Terenure Park
Dublin, Ireland 6w

+353 1 490 3361

:: FitzPatrick and Company :: The Company was founded in 1962 by John A FitzPatrick, Dublin. We have well over 60 years experience in the tea industry.

Gold Ribbon Cakes
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
30 Lower Dorset Street
Dublin, Ireland D

{01}704-0033

Orla's Kisses - Bitesize Cupcakes
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Rathfarnham
Dublin, Ireland

085 721 0092

I love cupcakes, but I find it difficult to choose a cupcake in just 1 flavour. Plus, sometimes I find the large ones (delicious) but too filling. So I have created a different way of literally, having your cake and eating it! Each kiss is literally one bite, maybe two. This means that you can have just 1 or 2 relatively guilt free, or you can have several and taste the different flavours. We have 10 signature flavours, but we will be coming up with new ones along the way. We also customize the various colours to different events as required. We comply with food safety regulations and we are registered with the HSE.

Absolutely Organic Ltd
Distance: 2.7 mi Tourist Information
Ballymount Road Lower, Walkinstown, Dublin 12
Dublin, Ireland

00 353 (0)1 460 0467

Hospitality Focus Ireland
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
4th Floor, Dollard House, Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland D 2

01-5491020

Hospitality Focus brings together a group of experienced trade professionals under one umbrella. We provide a cost effective range of services customised specifically to each client’s needs. Finding sources of profit and areas of weakness in a business as complex as hospitality can be difficult. With our detailed understanding of how a business functions in this sector, we can provide you with a thorough review of your operational processes, pinpointing areas in need of attention and highlight untapped potential opportunities. In consultation with you we develop agreed plans, setting out a programme of action to eliminate ineffective practices, reduce costs, improve working procedures and strengthen management controls.

Cool Beans
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Harolds Cross
Dublin, Ireland 6W

WHERE CAN YOU GET COOL BEANS? Check out our brand new website to find your nearest tub of Cool Beans. Waitrose in the UK and Supervalu, Fresh and Mortons in Ireland http://www.coolbeans.ie/stockists/

Historical Place Near Guinness Brewery

Croke Park
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
3 St James Avenue
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 3

+353 1 819 2300

Old Jameson Distillery
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street, Smithfield Village, Dublin 7
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

The Old Jameson Distillery is an Irish whiskey tourist attraction located just off Smithfield Square in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening as an attraction in 1997, it receives between 300,000 and 350,000 guests per year. The Old Jameson Distillery is the original site where Jameson Irish Whiskey was distilled until 1971. It is now a visitors centre that provides guided tours, tutored whiskey tastings, bars, a restaurant, and a gift shop.HistoryThe original distillery on this site was called the Bow Street Distillery and was established in 1780. John Jameson took full ownership (he was previously the general manager) and expanded the distillery in 1805. By 1810, the operation was officially renamed to John Jameson & Son’s Bow Street Distillery. The distillery grew to an upwards of 5 acres by 1886.At this time, it was described by many as a "city within a city". The distillery also housed a Smithy, Cooperage, saw mills, engineers, carpenters, painters and coppersmiths’ shops. Water for the distillery came from two deep wells dug underneath the site. Cellars were also dug underneath nearby streets to store maturing whiskey, while four stills and two wash stills, each holding 24,000 gallons, were heated by both fire and steam coils above.Following a difficult period that included American Prohibition, Ireland’s trade war with Great Britain, and the introduction of Scotch blended whiskey, the Jameson distillery fell on hard times and decided to form the Irish Distillers Group with their previous rivals, the Cork Distillery Company and John Power & Son in 1966. Eventually, it became one of the last distilleries in Ireland to close in 1971. The operation was then moved out of Dublin to the New Midleton Distillery.

Dublin Castle
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

+353 1 645 8813

In continuous occupation since its establishment in 1204 AD, Dublin Castle has played a prominent role in Ireland's history.The State Apartments are among the most prestigious State Rooms in the country and are home to St. Patrick's Hall and the James Connolly Room. They can be visited both as part of a guided tour and as part of a self guided visit. The thirteenth century remains of the Gunpowder Tower and the 19th Century baroque style Chapel Royal can also be visited as part of the Guided Tour.

O'Connell Street
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland

O'Connell Street is Dublin's main thoroughfare. It measures 49 m (54 yds) in width at its southern end, 46 m (50 yds) at the north, and is 500 m (547 yds) in length. During the 17th century it was a narrow street known as Drogheda Street (named after Henry Moore, Earl of Drogheda). It was widened, and renamed 'Sackville Street' (named after Lionel Sackville, 1st Duke of Dorset) in the late 1700s until 1924, when it was renamed in honour of Daniel O'Connell, a nationalist leader of the early 19th century, whose statue stands at the lower end of the street, facing O'Connell Bridge.IntroductionLocated in the heart of Dublin city, O'Connell Street forms part of a grand thoroughfare created in the 18th century that runs through the centre of the capital, O'Connell Bridge, Westmoreland Street, College Green and Dame Street, terminating at City Hall and Dublin Castle. Situated just north of the River Liffey, the street has a fine axial positioning, running close to a north-south orientation. Lined with many handsome buildings, O'Connell Street is the most monumental of Dublin's commercial streets, having been largely rebuilt in the early 20th century following extensive destruction in the struggle for Irish independence and subsequent civil war. It has the air of an imposing 1920s boulevard, with signature stone-faced neoclassical buildings such as Clerys department store complemented by the more subtle grain of elegant bank and retail premises. O'Connell Street Upper by contrast retains something of its original 18th century character, with the western side conforming to original plot widths and some original fabric still intact.

Guinness Storehouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

Guinness Storehouse is a Guinness-themed tourist attraction at St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening in 2000, it has received over four million visitors.The Storehouse covers seven floors surrounding a glass atrium shaped in the form of a pint of Guinness. The ground floor introduces the beer's four ingredients (water, barley, hops and yeast), and the brewery's founder, Arthur Guinness. Other floors feature the history of Guinness advertising and include an interactive exhibit on responsible drinking. The seventh floor houses the Gravity Bar with views of Dublin and where visitors may drink a pint of Guinness included in the price of admission, which was €18 in March 2015, described as "overpriced" by Condé Nast Traveler. In 2006, a new wing opened incorporating a live installation of the present-day brewing process.HistoryThe building in which the Storehouse is located was constructed in 1902 as a fermentation plant for the St. James's Gate Brewery (where yeast is added to the brew). The building was designed in the style of the Chicago School of Architecture and was the first multi-storey steel-framed building to be constructed in Ireland. The building was used continuously as the fermentation plant of the Brewery until its closure in 1988, when a new fermentation plant was completed near the River Liffey.In 1997, it was decided to convert the building into the Guinness Storehouse, replacing the Guinness Hop Store as the Brewery's visitor centre. The redesign of the building was undertaken by the UK-based design firm Imagination in conjunction with the Dublin-based architects firm RKD, and the Storehouse opened to the public on 2 December 2000. In 2006 a new wing was developed at a cost of €2.5 million, including a live installation demonstrating the modern brewing process.

Dublin City Center
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Dublin City Centre
Dublin, Ireland Dub

Mix Like a pro is a professional DJ course running in Dublin City Centre.

Kilmainham Gaol
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Inchicore Road, Kilmainham
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

+353 1 453 5984

Kilmainham Gaol is a former prison in Kilmainham, Dublin, Ireland. It is now a museum run by the Office of Public Works, an agency of the Government of Ireland. Many Irish revolutionaries, including the leaders of the 1916 Easter Rising, were imprisoned and executed in the prison by the British.HistoryWhen it was first built in 1796, Kilmainham Gaol was called the "New Gaol" to distinguish it from the old prison it was intended to replace - a noisome dungeon, just a few hundred metres from the present site. It was officially called the County of Dublin Gaol, and was originally run by the Grand Jury for County Dublin.Originally, public hangings took place at the front of the prison. However, from the 1820s onward very few hangings, public or private, took place at Kilmainham. A small hanging cell was built in the prison in 1891. It is located on the first floor, between the west wing and the east wing.There was no segregation of prisoners; men, women and children were incarcerated up to 5 in each cell, with only a single candle for light and heat. Most of their time was spent in the cold and the dark, and each candle had to last for two weeks. Its cells were roughly 28 square metres in area.Children were sometimes arrested for petty theft, the youngest said to be a seven-year-old child, while many of the adult prisoners were transported to Australia.At Kilmainham the poor conditions in which women prisoners were kept provided the spur for the next stage of development. Remarkably, for an age that prided itself on a protective attitude for the "weaker sex", the conditions for women prisoners were persistently worse than for men. As early as his 1809 report the Inspector had observed that male prisoners were supplied with iron bedsteads while females 'lay on straw on the flags in the cells and common halls.' Half a century later there was little improvement. The women's section, located in the west wing, remained overcrowded.

National Botanic Gardens of Ireland
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
National Botanic Gardens, 300 Botanic Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 9

353 1 804 0300

Guided tours of the Gardens all year round- Sundays at 12.00pm & 2.30pm, admission free. Monday-Saturday 11.30am & 3.00pm, €5 pp. Pre-booked tours by arrangement. Ireland's premier garden is a green oasis situated in the leafy suburb of Glasnevin, not far from Dublin city centre. It is just under 50 acres in size and home to over 17,000 different plant species. Famous for its Victorian glasshouses: the Curvilinear Range, designed by Richard Turner, and the Great Palm House, Ireland's only tropical rainforest. Outdoor features include the rose and rock gardens, double herbaceous borders, the pond and river walks, the organic fruit and vegetable garden and wild Ireland, the native conservation area.

Spire of Dublin
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

The Spire of Dublin, alternatively titled the Monument of Light, is a large, stainless steel, pin-like monument 121.2m in height, located on the site of the former Nelson's Pillar on O'Connell Street in Dublin, Ireland.DescriptionThe spire was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects, who sought an "Elegant and dynamic simplicity bridging art and technology". The contract was awarded to SIAC-Radley JV and it was manufactured by Radley Engineering of Dungarvan, County Waterford, and erected by SIAC Construction Ltd & GDW Engineering Ltd. The first section was installed on 18 December 2002. Five additional 20m sections were added with the last one installed on 21 January 2003. The spire is an elongated cone of diameter 3m at the base, narrowing to 15cm at the top. Construction of the world's tallest sculpture was delayed because of difficulty in obtaining planning permission and environmental regulations. It is constructed from eight hollow tubes of stainless steel and features a tuned mass damper, designed by engineers Arup, to counteract sway. The steel underwent shot peening to alter the quality of light reflected from it.The pattern around the base of the Spire is based on a core sample of earth and rock formation taken from the ground where the spire stands. The pattern was applied by bead blasting the steel through rubber stencil masks whose patterns were created by water jet cutting based on core sample drawings supplied by the contractor.

National Botanic Gardens
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Glasnevin
Glasnevin, Ireland Dublin 9

353 1 804 0300

Mansion House, Dublin
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
2, Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

The Mansion House on Dawson Street, Dublin, has been the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin since 1715.FeaturesThe Mansion House's most famous features include the "Round Room", where the First Dáil assembled on 21 January 1919 to proclaim the Irish Declaration of Independence. On 21 January 1969 a special fiftieth anniversary joint session of Dáil Éireann and Seanad Éireann assembled there and was addressed by the then President of Ireland, Éamon de Valera.Externally, the distinctive metal portico over the main door was erected for the visit of Queen Victoria in 1900.Visitors and occupantsIts most famous occupants included Lord Mayors: Daniel O'Connell, nineteenth century nationalist leader Alfie Byrne (1930s), longest serving Lord Mayor in the 800-year history of the office Jim Mitchell (1976–77), the youngest Lord Mayor of Dublin, aged 29, in the history of the office Famous visitors to the mayoral residence include: Prince Rainier III and Princess Grace of Monaco Pope John Paul II Queen Victoria Mother Teresa Nelson Mandela

GPO,O'Connell Street, Dublin
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
O’Connell St Lower
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

01 705 7000

Áras an Uachtaráin
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
Phoenix Park
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 617 1000

Fáilte chuig leathnach Facebook Áras an Uachtaráin. Welcome to the Facebook page for Áras an Uachtaráin. For updates on the work of President Michael D. Higgins, please follow www.facebook.com/PresidentIRL We would like this page to be enjoyable for all. Please note that any offensive or inappropriate comments will be deleted and the user may be blocked. Policy: http://www.president.ie/en/about/social

Grafton Street - Dublin, Ireland.
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland

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City Hall, Dublin
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D

The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.OverviewLocated at the top of Parliament Street on the city's southern side, it stands next to Dublin Castle, the centre of the British government in Ireland until 1922. The street had been built in 1753, providing a continuation of Capel Street on the north bank of the Liffey, across the newly widened Essex Bridge, and so the exchange ended (and still ends) a long streetscape.The external structure is primarily made out of white Portland stone from a quarry in Dorset. The large size and fine fittings of the Royal exchange, with carved capitals by Simon Vierpyl, and plasterwork by the leading stuccodore Charles Thorpe, reflect the standing and prestige of Dublin in the 18th Century. The neo-classical building contains a central entrance hall or Rotunda, with a large dome supported by twelve columns which are surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants strolled and discussed business meetings.The function of the building was to provide a meeting place for Dublin's businessmen, where they could buy and sell goods and trade bills of exchange. It was also close to the then Customs House that stood on the site of today's Clarence Hotel, making it convenient for overseas merchants. The cost of building the exchange was met by the Parliament of Ireland, and this is reflected by the initials "SPQH", standing for "Senatus PopulusQue Hibernicus", meaning "The senate and people of Ireland" (an Irish version of SPQR).

Ha'penny Bridge
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Wellington Quay/Bachelors Walk
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

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Irish National War Memorial Park
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
islandbridge
Dublin, Ireland

Grafton Street
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Kilmainham Jail Museum
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Kilmainham Jail 8
Dublin, Ireland D8

+353 1 453 5984

City Hall
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

(01)2222204

Landmark Near Guinness Brewery

Guinness Storehouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

Guinness Storehouse is a Guinness-themed tourist attraction at St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening in 2000, it has received over four million visitors.The Storehouse covers seven floors surrounding a glass atrium shaped in the form of a pint of Guinness. The ground floor introduces the beer's four ingredients (water, barley, hops and yeast), and the brewery's founder, Arthur Guinness. Other floors feature the history of Guinness advertising and include an interactive exhibit on responsible drinking. The seventh floor houses the Gravity Bar with views of Dublin and where visitors may drink a pint of Guinness included in the price of admission, which was €18 in March 2015, described as "overpriced" by Condé Nast Traveler. In 2006, a new wing opened incorporating a live installation of the present-day brewing process.HistoryThe building in which the Storehouse is located was constructed in 1902 as a fermentation plant for the St. James's Gate Brewery (where yeast is added to the brew). The building was designed in the style of the Chicago School of Architecture and was the first multi-storey steel-framed building to be constructed in Ireland. The building was used continuously as the fermentation plant of the Brewery until its closure in 1988, when a new fermentation plant was completed near the River Liffey.In 1997, it was decided to convert the building into the Guinness Storehouse, replacing the Guinness Hop Store as the Brewery's visitor centre. The redesign of the building was undertaken by the UK-based design firm Imagination in conjunction with the Dublin-based architects firm RKD, and the Storehouse opened to the public on 2 December 2000. In 2006 a new wing was developed at a cost of €2.5 million, including a live installation demonstrating the modern brewing process.

Vicar Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Vicar St.
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

Vicar Street is a concert, performing arts centre and events venue in Dublin, Ireland. Located on Thomas Street, Dublin 8, Vicar Street has capacity for 1,050 people for seated performances and 1,500 people for standing gigs. The venue is owned by Harry Crosbie and operated by Peter Aiken. Since opening in 1998, the venue has become a popular setting for a wide range of acts including stand-up comedy, drama performances and a variety of concerts. The first artist to play on the Vicar Street Stage was local singer/songwriter Shay Cotter. Major international recording artists have performed in Vicar Street, such as Bob Dylan in 2000, Neil Young in 2003 and Paul Simon in 2011 and Lana Del Rey in 2013Because of its intimate size, the venue is one looked on with warmth by fans and acts alike.Notable eventsLongest-running solo showThe longest-running show to take place in Vicar Street was Tommy Tiernan's Loose show with a string of 166 performances.Other eventsVicar Street hosts the Choice Music Prize ceremony in February/March each year. Occasionally the venue is used to accommodate higher attendances than expected at smaller venues. In 2008, Canadian indie rock band Wolf Parade's November show which had been scheduled for Andrew's Lane Theatre was moved to Vicar Street.Bob Dylan performed at the venue in 2000 for his first, and as yet, only gig at the venue.

Vicar Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Vicar St.
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

Vicar Street is a concert, performing arts centre and events venue in Dublin, Ireland. Located on Thomas Street, Dublin 8, Vicar Street has capacity for 1,050 people for seated performances and 1,500 people for standing gigs. The venue is owned by Harry Crosbie and operated by Peter Aiken. Since opening in 1998, the venue has become a popular setting for a wide range of acts including stand-up comedy, drama performances and a variety of concerts. The first artist to play on the Vicar Street Stage was local singer/songwriter Shay Cotter. Major international recording artists have performed in Vicar Street, such as Bob Dylan in 2000, Neil Young in 2003 and Paul Simon in 2011 and Lana Del Rey in 2013Because of its intimate size, the venue is one looked on with warmth by fans and acts alike.Notable eventsLongest-running solo showThe longest-running show to take place in Vicar Street was Tommy Tiernan's Loose show with a string of 166 performances.Other eventsVicar Street hosts the Choice Music Prize ceremony in February/March each year. Occasionally the venue is used to accommodate higher attendances than expected at smaller venues. In 2008, Canadian indie rock band Wolf Parade's November show which had been scheduled for Andrew's Lane Theatre was moved to Vicar Street.Bob Dylan performed at the venue in 2000 for his first, and as yet, only gig at the venue.

Irish Museum of Modern Art
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Military Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

The Irish Museum of Modern Art (Áras Nua-Ealaíne na hÉireann) also known as IMMA, is Ireland's leading national institution for the collection and presentation of modern and contemporary art. Located in Kilmainham, Dublin, the Museum presents a wide variety of art in a changing programme of exhibitions, which regularly includes bodies of work from its own collection and its education and community department. It also aims to create more widespread access to art and artists through its studio and national programmes.The Museum’s mission is to foster within society an awareness, understanding and involvement in the visual arts through policies and programmes which are excellent, innovative and inclusive.HistoryThe Irish Museum of Modern Art was established by the Government of Ireland in 1990. It was officially opened on 25 May 1991 by Taoiseach Charles J Haughey.Building and groundsThe Irish Museum of Modern Art is housed in the 17th-century Royal Hospital Kilmainham. The Royal Hospital was founded in 1684 by James Butler, the Duke of Ormonde and Viceroy to Charles II, as a home for retired soldiers and continued in that use for almost 250 years. The Royal Hospital is a striking location for displaying modern art. Modelled on Les Invalides in Paris, it is arranged around a courtyard and the interior has long corridors running along series of modest interlocking rooms. The original stables have been restored, extended and converted into artists' studios, and the museum runs an artist-in-residence programme.

M.J.O'Neill's
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
2 Suffolk Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

(01) 679-3656

M.J.O'Neill's is a notable bar and restaurant in central Dublin. It has occupied 2 Suffolk Street and adjacent buildings, continuing round the corner into Church Lane. It is claimed there has been a tavern on the site for some three hundred years. From 1875 it was owned by the Hogan Brothers, until M.J. O’Neill bought and renamed the premises in August 1927.The part in Church Lane was the site of a printing house, where William Butler published The Volunteers Journal and the Irish Herald in 1783, and in 1789 Arthur O’Connor published The Press, supporting Wolfe Tone’s republican views.The corner structure is an impressive four-storey, vaguely of the Arts and Crafts Movement, red-brick and early twentieth century, with prominent Tudor-style projecting bay windows. There is a fine decorated iron three-dials clock on the Suffolk Street frontage. The building is protected and in a conservation area. Now, opposite the Dublin Tourist Centre, it is a fixture on the tourist trail and pub crawls.The house has a mixed clientele. It is directly opposite Andrew Street Post Office, and near the shopping centre of Grafton Street. The discreet Church Lane door is convenient for the Bank of Ireland and other financial establishments in College Green. It is also the pub nearest to the Front Gate of Trinity College, Dublin and therefore attracting Arts undergraduates and academics. The original structure was divided into definite areas: a “cocktail bar” in the corner for the gentry, a public bar off Suffolk Street, and a back bar. In recent years the next-door premises in Church Lane have been added, as a carvery, and the interior has been opened up. A small snug, immediately inside the Church Lane entrance, was the significant venue for the “Fabians” of the early 1960s and for later left-wing students from Trinity College, Dublin.

Coombe Women & Infants University Hospital
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Cork Street
Dublin, Ireland Dubli

The Coombe Women & Infants University Hospital is a teaching hospital providing a range of medical services to both women and newborn infants founded in 1826 by Mrs. Margaret Boyle in Dublin, Ireland.NamesMrs. Boyle took over the vacated building of the Meath Hospital in the Coombe in Dublin's Liberties area, after the Meath moved to Heytesbury St. It was renamed the "Coombe Lying-in Hospital" in 1829. It was granted a royal charter in 1867 which allowed it to receive public as well as private funds. In 1967 it moved to new premises nearby in Cork St. and was renamed the Coombe Women's Hospital in 1993. From January 2008 its name has again changed to the "Coombe Women & Infants University Hospital", but it has always been known to Dubliners as simply as "the Coombe".ServicesThe Coombe Women & Infants University Hospital is one of the largest providers of women and infant health care in the Republic of Ireland. Over 9,000 mothers give birth in the hospital every year. In addition, over 1,000 infants are admitted to the Paediatric Unit and over 8,000 surgical operations are performed every year. It provides clinical experience to three training colleges, including University College Dublin, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and Trinity College, Dublin.

Rotunda Hospital
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Cearnóg Parnell Thiar
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

+353 (1) 817 1700

The Rotunda Hospital is one of the three main maternity hospitals in the city of Dublin, the others being the Coombe and the National Maternity Hospital. The hospital is located just off the top of O'Connell Street, on Parnell Square, on the north side of the city.FoundingThe hospital, originally known as "The Dublin Lying-In Hospital", was founded in 1745 by Bartholomew Mosse (1712-1759), a surgeon and man-midwife who was appalled at the conditions that pregnant mothers had to endure at the time. Initially located in George's Lane on the site of a recently closed theatre, the hospital was later moved to its present location in 1757 where it became known as "The New Lying-In Hospital", referred to today as "The Rotunda".Records indicate that around 1781, "when the hospital was imperfectly ventilated, every sixth child died within nine days after birth, of convulsive disease; and that after means of thorough ventilation had been adopted, the mortality of infants, within the same, in five succeeding years, was reduced to one in twenty". This issue was not limited to the Lying-In-Hospital. In that era, ventilation improvement was a general issue in patient care, along with other issues of sanitation and hygiene, and the conditions in which surgeons such as Robert Liston in Great Britain and elsewhere, had to operate.

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
St Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (01) 4780888

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre is a large indoor shopping centre located at the top of Grafton Street in the Southside of Dublin City. It is named after St. Stephen's Green, a nearby park (its street address is Stephens Green West).HistoryThe Dandelion Market, well known as the site of U2's earliest gigs and its array of stalls selling punk badges, clothes and posters was situated in the area the shopping centre now resides in. The site had been assembled over the years by the Slazanger family.The market, which closed in 1981, is commemorated with a plaque, while Sinnotts Bar on South King Street is the only part of the original site that remains. Work began on the St. Stephen's Green Shopping Centre in 1985, with the whole project taking three years to complete. The centre officially opened its doors on 8 November 1988.ShopsThe centre has over 100 outlets. Major franchises include Dunnes Stores, Boots, Gamestop and TK Maxx. Examples of other, more independent shops include the gothic and alternative clothes shop Asha, leading Irish men's branded fashion clothing store 'Counterpropaganda' and the wrestling devoted shop Wrestling Mania. It also houses a 'Big & Tall' mans shop called Kingsize Menswear and has a large food court.

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
St Stephen's Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (01) 4780888

Stephen's Green Shopping Centre is a large indoor shopping centre located at the top of Grafton Street in the Southside of Dublin City. It is named after St. Stephen's Green, a nearby park (its street address is Stephens Green West).HistoryThe Dandelion Market, well known as the site of U2's earliest gigs and its array of stalls selling punk badges, clothes and posters was situated in the area the shopping centre now resides in. The site had been assembled over the years by the Slazanger family.The market, which closed in 1981, is commemorated with a plaque, while Sinnotts Bar on South King Street is the only part of the original site that remains. Work began on the St. Stephen's Green Shopping Centre in 1985, with the whole project taking three years to complete. The centre officially opened its doors on 8 November 1988.ShopsThe centre has over 100 outlets. Major franchises include Dunnes Stores, Boots, Gamestop and TK Maxx. Examples of other, more independent shops include the gothic and alternative clothes shop Asha, leading Irish men's branded fashion clothing store 'Counterpropaganda' and the wrestling devoted shop Wrestling Mania. It also houses a 'Big & Tall' mans shop called Kingsize Menswear and has a large food court.

National Stadium
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
South Circular Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

+353 1 453 3371

National Stadium or National Boxing Stadium, which is located in Dublin, Ireland, is the only purpose built boxing stadium in the world. Built in 1939, National Stadium hosts over 55 days of boxing each year and a number of other events.National Stadium was opened by Frank Aiken in 1939.VenueThe stadium is owned by the Irish Amateur Boxing Association (IABA) and has been used by the IABA for over 60 years as the venue for their national and International contests.MusicHistorically, the stadium was used as a music venue, regularly hosting bands such as Horslips, Led Zeppelin, Planxty, U2, Van Morrison, and many others. On 26 February 1980, the band U2 performed a concert at this venue which was attended by executives of Island Records; at the end of the show, the label signed the band to their first recording contract.FacilitiesThe venue is situated between Clanbrassil Street to the east and Dolphin's Barn to the west on the South Circular Road. The stadium stages amateur and professional boxing and professional wrestling bouts as well as providing facilities for music concerts, conferences and corporate hospitality events.

City Hall, Dublin
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland D

The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.OverviewLocated at the top of Parliament Street on the city's southern side, it stands next to Dublin Castle, the centre of the British government in Ireland until 1922. The street had been built in 1753, providing a continuation of Capel Street on the north bank of the Liffey, across the newly widened Essex Bridge, and so the exchange ended (and still ends) a long streetscape.The external structure is primarily made out of white Portland stone from a quarry in Dorset. The large size and fine fittings of the Royal exchange, with carved capitals by Simon Vierpyl, and plasterwork by the leading stuccodore Charles Thorpe, reflect the standing and prestige of Dublin in the 18th Century. The neo-classical building contains a central entrance hall or Rotunda, with a large dome supported by twelve columns which are surrounded by an ambulatory where the merchants strolled and discussed business meetings.The function of the building was to provide a meeting place for Dublin's businessmen, where they could buy and sell goods and trade bills of exchange. It was also close to the then Customs House that stood on the site of today's Clarence Hotel, making it convenient for overseas merchants. The cost of building the exchange was met by the Parliament of Ireland, and this is reflected by the initials "SPQH", standing for "Senatus PopulusQue Hibernicus", meaning "The senate and people of Ireland" (an Irish version of SPQR).

Ha'penny Bridge
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Wellington Quay/Bachelors Walk
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

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Grafton Street
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

Grafton Street
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Grafton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

Grafton Street is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from Saint Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year.HistoryThe street was named after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, the illegitimate son of Charles II of England who owned land in the area. The street was developed from a then existing country lane by the Dawson family in 1708, after whom the parallel Dawson Street is named.After O'Connell Bridge (then called 'Carlisle Bridge') was built to span the River Liffey, Grafton Street turned from a fashionable residential street into a busy cross-city route.Since the 1980s, the street has been mostly pedestrianised, with the exception of the short stretch running between Nassau Street and College Green. This short stretch is most notable for the eighteenth century Trinity College Provost's House, home to the head of the college. Across the road from this is the former location of the Molly Malone statue, a well-known tourist attraction and meeting-place, which was permanently moved from Grafton Street to nearby Suffolk Street in 2014, to make way for an extension to the Luas tram system. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street, off Grafton Street near the Stephen's Green end, on 19 August 2005.

National Museum of Ireland – Decorative Arts and History
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Collins Barracks, Benburb Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 6777444

The National Museum of Ireland - Decorative Arts & History is a branch of the National Museum of Ireland located at the former Collins Barracks in the Arbour Hill area of Dublin, Ireland. The main focus of the galleries is on arts, craft and wares, including exhibits on: Irish coins and currency, silverware, furniture, folklife and costumes, ceramics, and glassware. Included are artifacts such as Etruscan vases, gauntlets worn by King William at the Battle of the Boyne, a life belt and oar salvaged from the wreck of the RMS Lusitania and a pocket book carried by Wolfe Tone whilst imprisoned in the Barracks.

Smithfield, Dublin
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Smithfield
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 7

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The Gaeity Theatre
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Sth King Street
Dublin, Ireland

Four Courts
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Inns Quay
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 7

The Four Courts is Ireland's main courts building, located on Inns Quay in Dublin. The Four Courts are the location of the Supreme Court, the High Court and the Dublin Circuit Court. Until 2010 the building also housed the Central Criminal Court.Gandon's BuildingWork based on the design of Thomas Cooley for the Public Records Office of Ireland, began in 1776. After his death in 1784 renowned architect James Gandon was appointed to finish the building, which we recognise today as the Four Courts. It was built between 1786 and 1796, while the finishing touches to the arcades and wings were completed in 1802. The lands were previously used by the King's Inns. The building originally housed the four courts of Chancery, King's Bench, Exchequer and Common Pleas, hence the name of the building. A major revision in the court system in the late nineteenth century saw these courts merged into a new High Court of Ireland, but the building has retained its historic name. This courts system remained until 1924, when the new Irish Free State introduced a new courts structure, replacing the High Court of Ireland, the Lord Chief Justice of Ireland and the Lord Chancellor of Ireland with a Supreme Court of Justice presided over by the Chief Justice and a High Court of Justice, presided over by the President of the High Court. In 1961 the words "of justice" were dropped from the names of both courts when they were belatedly re-established consequent upon the enactment of the 1937 Constitution.

McKee Barracks
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Blackhorse Ave
Dublin, Ireland

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Dublin Mosque
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
163 South Circular Road
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

(00 353 1) 4533242

Dublin Mosque is a mosque on the South Circular Road, Dublin in Ireland. It is the headquarters of the Islamic Foundation of Ireland.The Donore Presbyterian Church was constructed in the 1860s in the style of a 13th-century English church. In 1983 the building on the South Circular Road was bought by the Islamic Foundation of Ireland and converted into a mosque.

Public Places and Attractions Near Guinness Brewery

Temple Bar
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland 2

O'Connell Street
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland

O'Connell Street is Dublin's main thoroughfare. It measures 49 m (54 yds) in width at its southern end, 46 m (50 yds) at the north, and is 500 m (547 yds) in length. During the 17th century it was a narrow street known as Drogheda Street (named after Henry Moore, Earl of Drogheda). It was widened, and renamed 'Sackville Street' (named after Lionel Sackville, 1st Duke of Dorset) in the late 1700s until 1924, when it was renamed in honour of Daniel O'Connell, a nationalist leader of the early 19th century, whose statue stands at the lower end of the street, facing O'Connell Bridge.IntroductionLocated in the heart of Dublin city, O'Connell Street forms part of a grand thoroughfare created in the 18th century that runs through the centre of the capital, O'Connell Bridge, Westmoreland Street, College Green and Dame Street, terminating at City Hall and Dublin Castle. Situated just north of the River Liffey, the street has a fine axial positioning, running close to a north-south orientation. Lined with many handsome buildings, O'Connell Street is the most monumental of Dublin's commercial streets, having been largely rebuilt in the early 20th century following extensive destruction in the struggle for Irish independence and subsequent civil war. It has the air of an imposing 1920s boulevard, with signature stone-faced neoclassical buildings such as Clerys department store complemented by the more subtle grain of elegant bank and retail premises. O'Connell Street Upper by contrast retains something of its original 18th century character, with the western side conforming to original plot widths and some original fabric still intact.

Old Jameson Whiskey Distillery
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street
Dublin, Ireland

+353 (1) 8072348

Heuston railway station
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St Johns Road West
Dublin, Ireland Dubli

1850 366 222 / 01 703 3299

Heuston Station is one of Ireland's main railway stations, serving the south, southwest and west. It is operated by Iarnród Éireann, the national railway operator. It also houses the head office of its parent company - Córas Iompair Éireann.HistoryThe station opened on 4 August 1846 as the terminus and headquarters of the Great Southern and Western Railway (GS&WR). It was originally called Kingsbridge Station after the nearby Kings Bridge over the River Liffey. In 1966, on the 50th anniversary of the Easter Rising it was renamed "Heuston Station", in honour of Sean Heuston, an executed leader of the Rising, who had worked in the station's offices.Designed by Sancton Wood, the handsome original buildings remain. The five panels along the front represent, in order: VIII.VIC - being the Act of Parliament that incorporated the GS&WR Coat of Arms of Cork City Coat of Arms of Dublin City Coat of Arms of Limerick City AD. 1844 - being the year of incorporation of the GS&WR Since its renewal (by Quinn Savage Smyth architects and engineers Buro Happold) it includes two branches of Eason's, as well as some dining facilities, including a Supermacs and a pub.

Jervis Shopping Centre
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
24-29 Mary Street
Dublin, Ireland 1

+353 1 878 1323

Cliff Of Moher
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Co. Clare
Galway, Ireland

Phoenix Park, Dublin
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Dublin 8, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland

Trinity College
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
College Green
Dublin, Ireland

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Áras an Uachtaráin
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
Phoenix Park
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 617 1000

Fáilte chuig leathnach Facebook Áras an Uachtaráin. Welcome to the Facebook page for Áras an Uachtaráin. For updates on the work of President Michael D. Higgins, please follow www.facebook.com/PresidentIRL We would like this page to be enjoyable for all. Please note that any offensive or inappropriate comments will be deleted and the user may be blocked. Policy: http://www.president.ie/en/about/social

Richmond Park (football ground)
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
125 Emmet Road
Dublin, Ireland Du

014546332

Richmond Park is a football stadium in Dublin, Ireland. Situated in the Dublin suburb of Inchicore, it is the home ground of League of Ireland side St Patrick's Athletic F.C. (also known as St Pat's). The area where the ground now stands was formerly used as a recreational area by the British Army, who were stationed at the nearby Richmond Barracks, both named after Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond the barracks having since been demolished.HistoryAfter the creation of the Irish Free State, and therefore the removal of the British Army, the ground lay idle for 3 years before League of Ireland club Brideville began using the ground in 1925. In 1930 Brideville were forced to move to Harolds Cross Greyhound Stadium to accommodate St Patrick's Athletic moving in. St. Pats continues to use and develop the ground until 1951 when they entered the League of Ireland. The league deemed the ground unsuitable and St. Pats were forced to use a variety of grounds in Dublin as they fought to upgrade Richmond Park. In 1960, after serious development, the ground played host to St Pats first home league game in Inchicore. The ground closed for redevelopment in May 1989, however due to St Pats hitting financially difficulties they did not return until 5 December 1993.

Science Gallery Dublin
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
Trinity College, Pearse Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

+353-18964091

In 2008, a car park in a forgotten corner of Dublin was transformed into an experimental space that would bridge art and science, unleashing their combined creative potential. Over 1.9 million visitors to Science Gallery Dublin have experienced exhibitions ranging from living art experiments to materials science, to the future of the human race to the future of play. We develop an ever-changing programme of exhibitions and events fuelled by the expertise of scientists, researchers, students, artists, designers, inventors, creative thinkers and entrepreneurs.

Natural History Museum
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Merrion Street, Dubin 2
Dublin, Ireland

Ireland's Natural History Museum (Músaem Stair an Dúlra), sometimes called the Dead Zoo a branch of the National Museum of Ireland, is housed on Merrion Street in Dublin, Ireland. The museum was built in 1856 for parts of the collection of the Royal Dublin Society and building and collection were later passed to the Irish State.The Museum's collection and building have changed little since Victorian times, and it is sometimes described as a "museum of a museum".CollectionThe building is a ‘cabinet-style’ museum designed to showcase a wide-ranging and comprehensive zoological collection, and has changed little in over a century. Often described as a ‘museum of a museum’, its 10,000 exhibits provide a glimpse of the natural world that has delighted generations of visitors since the doors opened in 1857.As the collection is unique in range and vintage, the exhibits are a product of their age, with faded and worn pelts and visible marks from bullets and rough taxidermy. Larger specimens are displayed in large, wood-framed glass cases while smaller ones are kept under glass, protected from sunlight by moveable leather panels. The main room is heated by an underfloor system similar to a Roman hypocaust.The Irish Room, the ground floor of the museum, displays Irish animals, notably several mounted skeletons of giant Irish deer. Numerous skulls of those and other deer line the walls. Stuffed and mounted mammals, birds, fish — and insects and other animals native to or found in Ireland — comprise the rest of the ground floor. Many of the specimens of currently extant animals, such as badgers, hares, and foxes, are over a century old. A basking shark hangs from this ceiling.

The Quays, Dublin
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
12 Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland Dublin2

01 6713922

Mansion House
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Dawson Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 (0) 1 6767200

Temple Bar District, Dublin
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Temple Bar
Dublin, Ireland 2

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Botanic Garden Dublin
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Glasnevin
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

01 804 0300

Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Charlemont House, Parnell Square North
Dublin, Ireland D01 F2X9

+353 (0)1 222 5550

North Circular Road
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
North Circular Road
Dublin, Ireland D1

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Four Courts
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Inns Quay
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 7

The Four Courts is Ireland's main courts building, located on Inns Quay in Dublin. The Four Courts are the location of the Supreme Court, the High Court and the Dublin Circuit Court. Until 2010 the building also housed the Central Criminal Court.Gandon's BuildingWork based on the design of Thomas Cooley for the Public Records Office of Ireland, began in 1776. After his death in 1784 renowned architect James Gandon was appointed to finish the building, which we recognise today as the Four Courts. It was built between 1786 and 1796, while the finishing touches to the arcades and wings were completed in 1802. The lands were previously used by the King's Inns. The building originally housed the four courts of Chancery, King's Bench, Exchequer and Common Pleas, hence the name of the building. A major revision in the court system in the late nineteenth century saw these courts merged into a new High Court of Ireland, but the building has retained its historic name. This courts system remained until 1924, when the new Irish Free State introduced a new courts structure, replacing the High Court of Ireland, the Lord Chief Justice of Ireland and the Lord Chancellor of Ireland with a Supreme Court of Justice presided over by the Chief Justice and a High Court of Justice, presided over by the President of the High Court. In 1961 the words "of justice" were dropped from the names of both courts when they were belatedly re-established consequent upon the enactment of the 1937 Constitution.

St Lukes Hospital
Distance: 2.5 mi Tourist Information
highfield rd
Dublin, Ireland 6w

01 4065000

Tours and Sightseeing Near Guinness Brewery

Old Jameson Distillery
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street, Smithfield Village, Dublin 7
Dublin, Ireland Dublin

The Old Jameson Distillery is an Irish whiskey tourist attraction located just off Smithfield Square in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening as an attraction in 1997, it receives between 300,000 and 350,000 guests per year. The Old Jameson Distillery is the original site where Jameson Irish Whiskey was distilled until 1971. It is now a visitors centre that provides guided tours, tutored whiskey tastings, bars, a restaurant, and a gift shop.HistoryThe original distillery on this site was called the Bow Street Distillery and was established in 1780. John Jameson took full ownership (he was previously the general manager) and expanded the distillery in 1805. By 1810, the operation was officially renamed to John Jameson & Son’s Bow Street Distillery. The distillery grew to an upwards of 5 acres by 1886.At this time, it was described by many as a "city within a city". The distillery also housed a Smithy, Cooperage, saw mills, engineers, carpenters, painters and coppersmiths’ shops. Water for the distillery came from two deep wells dug underneath the site. Cellars were also dug underneath nearby streets to store maturing whiskey, while four stills and two wash stills, each holding 24,000 gallons, were heated by both fire and steam coils above.Following a difficult period that included American Prohibition, Ireland’s trade war with Great Britain, and the introduction of Scotch blended whiskey, the Jameson distillery fell on hard times and decided to form the Irish Distillers Group with their previous rivals, the Cork Distillery Company and John Power & Son in 1966. Eventually, it became one of the last distilleries in Ireland to close in 1971. The operation was then moved out of Dublin to the New Midleton Distillery.

Dublin Castle
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Dame Street
Dublin, Ireland 2

+353 1 645 8813

In continuous occupation since its establishment in 1204 AD, Dublin Castle has played a prominent role in Ireland's history.The State Apartments are among the most prestigious State Rooms in the country and are home to St. Patrick's Hall and the James Connolly Room. They can be visited both as part of a guided tour and as part of a self guided visit. The thirteenth century remains of the Gunpowder Tower and the 19th Century baroque style Chapel Royal can also be visited as part of the Guided Tour.

Guinness Storehouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

Guinness Storehouse is a Guinness-themed tourist attraction at St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening in 2000, it has received over four million visitors.The Storehouse covers seven floors surrounding a glass atrium shaped in the form of a pint of Guinness. The ground floor introduces the beer's four ingredients (water, barley, hops and yeast), and the brewery's founder, Arthur Guinness. Other floors feature the history of Guinness advertising and include an interactive exhibit on responsible drinking. The seventh floor houses the Gravity Bar with views of Dublin and where visitors may drink a pint of Guinness included in the price of admission, which was €18 in March 2015, described as "overpriced" by Condé Nast Traveler. In 2006, a new wing opened incorporating a live installation of the present-day brewing process.HistoryThe building in which the Storehouse is located was constructed in 1902 as a fermentation plant for the St. James's Gate Brewery (where yeast is added to the brew). The building was designed in the style of the Chicago School of Architecture and was the first multi-storey steel-framed building to be constructed in Ireland. The building was used continuously as the fermentation plant of the Brewery until its closure in 1988, when a new fermentation plant was completed near the River Liffey.In 1997, it was decided to convert the building into the Guinness Storehouse, replacing the Guinness Hop Store as the Brewery's visitor centre. The redesign of the building was undertaken by the UK-based design firm Imagination in conjunction with the Dublin-based architects firm RKD, and the Storehouse opened to the public on 2 December 2000. In 2006 a new wing was developed at a cost of €2.5 million, including a live installation demonstrating the modern brewing process.

Kilmainham Gaol
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Inchicore Road, Kilmainham
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

+353 1 453 5984

Kilmainham Gaol is a former prison in Kilmainham, Dublin, Ireland. It is now a museum run by the Office of Public Works, an agency of the Government of Ireland. Many Irish revolutionaries, including the leaders of the 1916 Easter Rising, were imprisoned and executed in the prison by the British.HistoryWhen it was first built in 1796, Kilmainham Gaol was called the "New Gaol" to distinguish it from the old prison it was intended to replace - a noisome dungeon, just a few hundred metres from the present site. It was officially called the County of Dublin Gaol, and was originally run by the Grand Jury for County Dublin.Originally, public hangings took place at the front of the prison. However, from the 1820s onward very few hangings, public or private, took place at Kilmainham. A small hanging cell was built in the prison in 1891. It is located on the first floor, between the west wing and the east wing.There was no segregation of prisoners; men, women and children were incarcerated up to 5 in each cell, with only a single candle for light and heat. Most of their time was spent in the cold and the dark, and each candle had to last for two weeks. Its cells were roughly 28 square metres in area.Children were sometimes arrested for petty theft, the youngest said to be a seven-year-old child, while many of the adult prisoners were transported to Australia.At Kilmainham the poor conditions in which women prisoners were kept provided the spur for the next stage of development. Remarkably, for an age that prided itself on a protective attitude for the "weaker sex", the conditions for women prisoners were persistently worse than for men. As early as his 1809 report the Inspector had observed that male prisoners were supplied with iron bedsteads while females 'lay on straw on the flags in the cells and common halls.' Half a century later there was little improvement. The women's section, located in the west wing, remained overcrowded.

Trinity College Library
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Trinity College Dublin, College Green
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

+353 1 8961127

The Library of Trinity College Dublin serves Trinity College and the University of Dublin. It is the largest library in Ireland and, as a legal deposit or "copyright library", it has rights to receive material published in the Republic of Ireland free of charge; it is also the only Irish library to hold such rights for the United Kingdom. The Library is the permanent home to the famous Book of Kells. Two of the four volumes are on public display, one opened to a major decorated page and the other to a typical page of text. The volumes and pages shown are regularly changed. Members of the University of Dublin also have access to the libraries of Tallaght Hospital and the Irish School of Ecumenics, Milltown.

Guiness Brewery- Dublin, Ireland
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

01 408 4800

Guinness Storehouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

+3531 408 4800

Jacobs Inn Dublin
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
21-28 talbot place
Dublin, Ireland D1

+353 1 855 5660

Why sleep with anyone else when you can sleep with Jacobs! Jacobs Inn is the budget friendly backpackers hostel right beside everywhere you want to be on your trip to Dublin! Close to Temple Bar,Croke Park, O Connell Street Leprechaun Museum, The O2, Guinness Store House, Jameson Distillery and Ttrinity College more. Home of the free stuff: Free Breakfast, Free bedding , Free WiFi, Free Events, Free games, Free Walking tour of Dublin, Free Craic agus Ceol! All the facilities that you need like kitchens and laundry and some that are just nice to have like Sauna

Viking Splash Tours
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
St Stephens Green North
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 2

01 707 6000

Viking Splash Tours offers an engaging, interactive experience for all kinds of groups! Not only are we Dublin’s only amphibious tour, showcasing our city by land and water, we are also a real, living theatre. With flexible and customised tours for groups or individuals, Viking Splash Tours can provide a platform for a range of occasions from team-building to birthdays, hen parties to family reunions.

Jeanie Johnston
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Custom House Quay
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

+353 1 4730111

A guided tour of the Jeanie Johnston will give visitors the opportunity to learn about the experiences of Irish emigrants as they made a daunting transatlantic passage full of hope yet desperate to escape the hardship in Ireland during the Famine years.

Dublin International Hostel
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
61 Mountjoy St
Dublin, Ireland D7

+353-(0)1-8301766 | Fax: +353-1-8305808

Dublin International Hostel is a member hostel of An Óige, the Irish Youth Hostel Association. It's 5 minutes walk from the famous O'Connell Street and has free breakfast, free secure parking and free WiFi. With a 24 hour friendly reception, tour sales and plenty of information, it's the place to stay when visiting Dublin! Dorm bed & breakfast available from only €13!

Irish National War Memorial Gardens
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Islandbridge
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

014757816

These gardens are one of the most famous memorial gardens in Europe. They are dedicated to the memory of 49,400 Irish soldiers who died in the 1914 – 1918 war. The names of all the soldiers are contained in the beautifully illustrated Harry Clarke manuscripts in the granite bookrooms in the gardens. These gardens are not only a place of remembrance but are also of great architectural interest and beauty. They are one of four gardens in this country designed by the famous architect Sir Edwin Lutyens (1869-1944) (the others being Heywood Gardens, Lambay Island, and those in Howth Castle). Sunken rose gardens, herbaceous borders and extensive tree planting make for an enjoyable visit to the gardens in any season.

Old Jameson Distillery
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street, Smithfield Village, Dublin 7
Dublin, Ireland

+35318072355

An Óige-The Irish Youth Hostel Association
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
61 Mountjoy Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 7

+353 (0)1 830 4555

An Óige is the Irish Youth Hostel Association and the Irish branch of Hostelling International. With 21 youth hostels all across Ireland including Dublin, Cork, Galway, tour packages & great deals, it's the best budget accommodation in Ireland. See our website to book your hostel - www.anoige.ie

Jameson Distillery Smithfield
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Bow St, Smithfield Village
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 7

01 807 2355

Vida de Intercambista
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Bolton Street
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 1

+353899525563

Somos uma empresa de intercâmbio e viagens em geral onde trabalhamos 100% online para uma comodidade maior ao contratante. A Vida de Intercambista foi fundada em Junho/2011 em Belo Horizonte-MG, com o intuito de despertar a vontade e o interesse das pessoas a explorar novas culturas e aprender novas línguas. Visando realizar o sonho de muitos. A empresa busca oferecer ao cliente segurança e um serviço de qualidade desde a hora do investimento ao fim da sua jornada, seja ela no intercâmbio ou em uma viagem. Trabalhamos com uma equipe qualificada que estará a disposição para qualquer eventualidade. Oferecemos também pacotes promocionais de viagens e pacotes de intercâmbio, sendo: Emissão de vistos, venda de passagens aéreas, hospedagem, translado e passeios. #VidaDeIntercambista

Martin Fennelly Art & Antiques
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
60 Francis Street
Dublin, Ireland 8

00353 1 4731226

Martin Fennelly Antiques is renowned for a refined ambience and unsurpassed opulence. Arguably the most elegant Antique Shop in Europe this magnificent store, replete with sumptuous Antiques from around the Globe is a convergence of Architectural élan, Master craftsmanship, Classic detailing, and the casual elegance that exemplifies the Premier Brand.

Day Tour Of Wicklow
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
O'Connell Street
Dublin, Ireland

Avoca-Wicklow Day Tour
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Dublin
Dublin, Ireland

0868713588

The Avoca – Wicklow Day Tour offers you the best of Wicklow which is more commonly known as the Garden of Ireland. We drive through the Valleys and Glens and some lovely old Irish Villages of this beautiful part of the Emerald Isle. Our numbers are limited to 25 guests per day to avoid the hustle and bustle of large groups which complements interaction. We offer 6 magnificent stops on our journey, which are the stunning Powerscourt Waterfall in the heart of the Powerscourt domain, Irelands tallest Waterfall. The spectacular International award winning Mount Usher Gardens. The tranquil setting of the Meeting of the Waters. The original Avoca Handweavers Mill (1723) in the old mining village of Avoca. Historical Glendlaough,whereby we bring you back 15 centuries giving you the history of the Golden age of Monasticasim in Ireland, a place of wonderful beauty, and no matter what the weather throws at you it still provides the same sence of peace and calm, and finally we travel to the beautiful Lakes of Vartry. What is unique about the Avoca – Wicklow Day Tour is the fact you spend more time off the bus than on it, therefore you really enjoy the locations on offer. Of course along the way there are plenty of opportunities for photographs as we travel along the norrow country roads in our Mercedes Mini Coach. When we stop at the old Avoca Handweavers there is a set lunch menu price for our guests in their restaurant, where all produce is home cooked. 2 course meal (Choice of 2 menus) Main Course with tea/coffee or Soup with homemade brown bread and desert.

Tapas Trail Dublin
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
City Centre
Dublin, Ireland

+353857747005

Local business Near Guinness Brewery

Early Bird Café
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
The Market Arcade
Dublin, Ireland

(01)6717533

St Patrick Hospital
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
James's Street
Dublin, Ireland

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Guinness Bicentenary Centre - Swimming Pool
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Watling Street
Dublin, Ireland 8

+353-1-6435709

Guinness water polo team
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Watling street
Dublin, Ireland 8

We welcome all members to our water polo & swim club. Train up to 3 times per week for water polo and or swimming.

Watling St
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Watling st
Dublin, Ireland

Guinness Storehouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

+3531 408 4800

Guiness Storehouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Guinness Storehouse St James Gate, Dublin 8, Co. Dublin, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland

01 453 8364

Gravity Bar at the Guinness Factory- Dublin, Ireland
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland

Guinness Storehouse, St Jame's Gate, Dublin
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St. Jame's Gate
Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 408 4800

Guiness Brewery- Dublin, Ireland
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

01 408 4800

Guinness Storehouse Gravity Bar
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Thomas Street
Dublin, Ireland

Guinness Storehouse
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James's Gate
Dublin, Ireland Dublin 8

Guinness Storehouse is a Guinness-themed tourist attraction at St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin, Ireland. Since opening in 2000, it has received over four million visitors.The Storehouse covers seven floors surrounding a glass atrium shaped in the form of a pint of Guinness. The ground floor introduces the beer's four ingredients (water, barley, hops and yeast), and the brewery's founder, Arthur Guinness. Other floors feature the history of Guinness advertising and include an interactive exhibit on responsible drinking. The seventh floor houses the Gravity Bar with views of Dublin and where visitors may drink a pint of Guinness included in the price of admission, which was €18 in March 2015, described as "overpriced" by Condé Nast Traveler. In 2006, a new wing opened incorporating a live installation of the present-day brewing process.HistoryThe building in which the Storehouse is located was constructed in 1902 as a fermentation plant for the St. James's Gate Brewery (where yeast is added to the brew). The building was designed in the style of the Chicago School of Architecture and was the first multi-storey steel-framed building to be constructed in Ireland. The building was used continuously as the fermentation plant of the Brewery until its closure in 1988, when a new fermentation plant was completed near the River Liffey.In 1997, it was decided to convert the building into the Guinness Storehouse, replacing the Guinness Hop Store as the Brewery's visitor centre. The redesign of the building was undertaken by the UK-based design firm Imagination in conjunction with the Dublin-based architects firm RKD, and the Storehouse opened to the public on 2 December 2000. In 2006 a new wing was developed at a cost of €2.5 million, including a live installation demonstrating the modern brewing process.

Guinness Skybar
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St James Gate, Dublin 8
Dublin, Ireland DUBLIN 8

+353 (0) 1 4084800

Heuston railway station
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St Johns Road West
Dublin, Ireland Dubli

1850 366 222 / 01 703 3299

Heuston Station is one of Ireland's main railway stations, serving the south, southwest and west. It is operated by Iarnród Éireann, the national railway operator. It also houses the head office of its parent company - Córas Iompair Éireann.HistoryThe station opened on 4 August 1846 as the terminus and headquarters of the Great Southern and Western Railway (GS&WR). It was originally called Kingsbridge Station after the nearby Kings Bridge over the River Liffey. In 1966, on the 50th anniversary of the Easter Rising it was renamed "Heuston Station", in honour of Sean Heuston, an executed leader of the Rising, who had worked in the station's offices.Designed by Sancton Wood, the handsome original buildings remain. The five panels along the front represent, in order: VIII.VIC - being the Act of Parliament that incorporated the GS&WR Coat of Arms of Cork City Coat of Arms of Dublin City Coat of Arms of Limerick City AD. 1844 - being the year of incorporation of the GS&WR Since its renewal (by Quinn Savage Smyth architects and engineers Buro Happold) it includes two branches of Eason's, as well as some dining facilities, including a Supermacs and a pub.

Amber Springs Hotel Geory
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Wexford Road
Gorey, Ireland

0539484000

Aisling Hotel
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
town city centre
Dublin, Ireland

Millenium Bar Dublin
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Parkgate Street
Dublin, Ireland

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Viking Harbour
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Usher's Island
Dublin, Ireland

Barry McCall Photographer
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
9 Bond Street, Dublin 8
Dublin, Ireland

00353 1 416 6888

Barry McCall is one of Ireland's most influential photographers, specialising in fashion, advertising, beauty and portraiture. His distinctive style brings a classic and timeless touch to contemporary photography. Pho20graphy, a 20 year retrospective of his work published in 2010, showcases his work with some of the world's top supermodels, including Claudia Schiffer, Helena Christensen, Yasmin Le Bon, Sophie Dahl and Erin O'Connor. He has also worked with everyone from Michael Fassbender and Richard Branson to Colin Farrell, Liam Neeson, U2 and Gabriel Byrne. This 20 year retrospective, in aid of the Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, showcases a style that celebrates the very best of fashion and portraiture, pushing the boundaries of technique and vision to create true works of art. In 2012, an exhibition of Barry's works was held in the Copper House Gallery in Dublin, transferring some of his most influential imagery from book to large format print. He has been commissioned by leading creative agencies such as Ogilvy & Mather, McCann Erickson and DDFH&B, while his clients range from Coca Cola, Bulova and Sony to Adidas, Universal Music, L'Oreal and Chanel. His work has appeared internationally in magazines such as Vogue, Elle, Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone and Tatler. Barry continues to be inspired by his first loves: classic art, old movies and the ever changing fashion of our times.

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