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Hamleys, London | Tourist Information


188-196 Regent Street
London, United Kingdom London W1B 5BT

0871 704 1977

Hamleys is the oldest and largest toy shop in the world and one of the world's best-known retailers of toys. Founded by William Hamley as "Noah's Ark" in High Holborn, London, in 1760, it moved to its current site on Regent Street in 1881. This flagship store is set over seven floors, with more than 50,000 toys on sale. It is considered one of the city's prominent tourist attractions, receiving around five million visitors each year. The chain has ten other outlets in the United Kingdom and nearly 50 franchises worldwide.Hamleys was bought by the Icelandic investment company Baugur Group in 2003 but was taken over by Baugur's main investor, Landsbanki, when the group defaulted. In 2012, the French toy retailer Groupe Ludendo bought the business for £60 million. In 2015 it was reported that Groupe Ludendo was negotiating the sale of Hamleys, possibly to a Hong Kong company owned by a relative of the owner of department store House of Fraser. Subsequently, it was sold to the Chinese footwear company C.banner for an estimated $154 million.HistoryHamleys is the oldest and largest toy shop in the world. It is named after William Hamley, who founded a toy shop called "Noah's Ark" at No. 231 High Holborn, London, in 1760. Ownership of the shop passed through the family, and by the time it was operated by Hamley's grandsons in 1837, the store had become famous, counting royalty and nobility among its customers.

Cultural Gifts Store Near Hamleys

Miss Poppy Cakes
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
Unit 739, Stables Market
London, United Kingdom nw18ah

07564135416

Araucaria
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
4 Camden Lock Place
London, United Kingdom NW1 8AL

+44 20 72672707

An inspired collection of clothing, furnishings and accessories from India, South East Asia, and Beyond.

Tea Life
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
21 Museum Street
London, United Kingdom WC1A 1JN

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Come in and join us for tea! Our tea shop has a relaxing and peaceful atmosphere perfect for enjoying a pot of our loose leaf Chinese teas and delicious selection of cakes! From Chinese Oolong to Keemun, Jasmine Dragon Pearls and refreshing Green teas - we believe we can find the perfect tea for you! Tea Life also specialises in beautiful and authentic Chinese tea sets and individual ceramics imported directly from China. A great alternative gift for tea lovers! We have space to hold private tea parties and specialist tea demonstrations. If interested, please drop us an email at: [email protected]

Westminster Abbey Gift Shop
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Broad Sanctuary
London, United Kingdom SW1P 3JS

0207 654 4920

Countrywise Arts and Crafts
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
Great Orton
Carlisle, United Kingdom

07811705783

Christopher Crescent
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Spur Road
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1AA

Delicate Gift Baskets
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
206 fathom court
London, United Kingdom E16 2FF

447450278672

Treasured Love
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Clifton Avenue
London, United Kingdom HA7 2HP

07877520906

Atlas SA
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
Camden Lock Market, Chalk Farm Road, London,
London, United Kingdom NW1 8AF

07951916915

APus Gift and Present
Distance: 2.5 mi Tourist Information
Raglan Street
London, United Kingdom NW5 3BX

07479530886

Department Store Near Hamleys

Harrods
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
87-135 Brompton Road
London, United Kingdom SW1X 0

020 7730 1234

Welcome to the official Facebook page of Harrods - the world's most famous luxury department store. http://www.harrods.com Four acres of shopping space showcases the world's most sought after brands set within a magical kingdom of fantasy and cultural opulence. Selling everything from sweets and souvenirs to diamonds and antiques, there is nowhere in the world quite like Harrods. Visit our website - http://www.harrods.com Follow us on Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/harrods Follow us on Instagram - http://instagram.com/harrods Watch us on You Tube - http://www.youtube.com/harrodsoflondon Harrods 87–135 Brompton Road Knightsbridge London, SW1X 7XL United Kingdom Opening Hours Monday to Saturday: 10.00am - 9.00pm Sunday: 11:30am* - 6.00pm *Browsing only between 11.30 and 12 noon on Sundays. Disclaimer By posting on the Harrods page you are consenting to Harrods Ltd using your name and (if provided) comments, photographs and video footage as Harrods may freely decide in all forms of media, forever and throughout the world. If you have posted any photographs or video footage on the Harrods page, you confirm and warrant that you own the copyright in those photographs and video footage and that you are permitted to consent to their use and broadcast by Harrods Ltd. Please note that Harrods will remove any photographs, video footage or comments which are deemed to be inappropriate.

Liberty London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Regent St 2nd Floor
London, United Kingdom W1B 5

+44 207 734 1234

Liberty is the leading destination store in London, a wonderful emporium where the latest fashions sit alongside design classics. Since 1875, Liberty has been synonymous with luxury and great design. This group is dedicated to all things Liberty - a place to share your thoughts and express your views. Arthur Liberty’s intuitive vision and pioneering spirit led him to travel the world looking for individual pieces to inspire and excite his discerning clientele. Liberty is not just a name above the door, it’s Arthur Liberty’s legacy, which stands for integrity, value, quality and above all beautifully designed product.

Harvey Nichols
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
109 - 125 Knightsbridge
London, United Kingdom SW1X 7RJ

20-72355000

We are Harvey Nichols. We are fearlessly stylish. We are daring in delivery. We are playful in attitude. And we are devoted to our customers. Always have been, always will be. The iconic Knightsbridge flagship store has been part of the British shopping vocabulary since 1831, progressing from linen and lace to international recognition as the must-visit fashion powerhouse in the UK. Showcasing the very finest across luxury fashion, accessories, beauty, food and wine, Harvey Nichols is the go-to destination for an expertly-edited, premium shopping experience, with a dedicated team of Style Advisors on hand to help with whatever you may need. There are seven Harvey Nichols stores throughout the UK and Ireland, as well as the beauty-only concept Beauty Bazaar, Harvey Nichols Liverpool. Each store also boasts delicious dining options with the OXO Tower Restaurant, Brasserie and Bar the jewel in the Harvey Nichols hospitality crown. If you’d like to get in touch, our Customer Service Team are here to help Mon-Fri, 9am-6pm on +44 (0)20 7201 8088 . For queries outside these times, drop an email to: [email protected] We hope to see you instore soon – or for fashion heaven 24/7, stop by harveynichols.com to discover the latest arrivals right now.

Fortnum & Mason
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
181 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1A 1ER

0845 300 1707

Fortnum & Mason is an upmarket department store situated in central London, with an additional store at St Pancras railway station, Heathrow T5, Dubai and various stockists worldwide. Its headquarters is located at 181 Piccadilly, where it was established in 1707 by William Fortnum and Hugh Mason. It is privately owned by Wittington Investments Ltd.Founded as a grocery store, Fortnum's reputation was built on supplying quality food, and saw rapid growth throughout the Victorian era. Though Fortnum's developed into a department store, it continues to focus on stocking a variety of exotic, speciality and also 'basic' provisions.The store has since opened several other departments, such as the Gentlemen's department on the third floor. It is also the location of a celebrated tea shop and several restaurants.HistoryWilliam Fortnum was a footman in the royal household of Queen Anne. The Royal Family’s insistence on having new candles every night meant a lot of half-used wax which William Fortnum promptly resold for a tidy profit. The enterprising William Fortnum also had a sideline business as a grocer. He convinced his landlord, Hugh Mason, to be his associate, and they founded the first Fortnum & Mason store in Mason's small shop in St James's Market in 1707. In 1761, William Fortnum's grandson Charles went into the service of Queen Charlotte and the Royal Court affiliation led to an increase in business. Fortnum & Mason claims to have invented the Scotch egg in 1738. The store began to stock speciality items, namely ready-to-eat luxury meals such as fresh poultry or game served in aspic jelly.

Fortnum & Mason
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
181 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1A 1ER

+44 (0) 20 7734 8040

John Lewis Oxford Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
300 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1EX

020 7629 7711

John Lewis Oxford Street, situated on London's premier shopping street, offers 7 floors of the best in fashion, home and technology, plus free standard delivery* (*on orders over £30) and export facilities.

Harvey Nichols
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
109-125 Knightsbridge
London, United Kingdom SW1X 7RJ

House of Fraser
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
318 Oxford St 5th Floor
London, United Kingdom W1G 0

870-1607258

Debenhams Oxford Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
334 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1C 1JG

Marks and Spencer - Marble Arch
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
458 Oxford Street,
London, United Kingdom W1C 1AP

020 7935 7954

Marks & Spencer
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
381-383 Oxford St
London, United Kingdom W1C 2JS

(020) 7409 1708

Fenwick Of Bond Street
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
63 New Bond Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 1RQ

020 7629 9161

Harrods, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
87-135 Brompton Road Knightsbridge
London, United Kingdom

020 7730 1234

Harrods Ca'puccino Cafe, Knightbridge, England
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
87–135 Brompton Road, Knightsbridge
London, United Kingdom SW1X 7XL

House of Fraser
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
101 Victoria St
London, United Kingdom SW1H 0

+44 (0) 844 800 3762

The Conran Shop
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
55 Marylebone High Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 5HS

+44 (0) 20 7723 2223

Heal & Son
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
196 Tottenham Court Road
London, United Kingdom W1T 7

20-76361666

john Lewis head office ,London, Victoria
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
171 Victoria Street
London, United Kingdom SW1E 5

02078281000

Harvey Nichols London
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
116 Knightsbridge
London, United Kingdom

Selfridges Oxford Street United Kingdom
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
400 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 1AB

+44 800 123400

Landmark Near Hamleys

Piccadilly Circus
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Picadilly Circus
London, United Kingdom W1V 9LB

Piccadilly Circus è una celebre piazza di Londra, nonché luogo di ritrovo, cuore morale della città, situata nella City of Westminster.Costruita nel 1819 per collegare Regent Street con l'omonima Piccadilly (importante strada dello shopping) è diventata col passare degli anni uno dei principali punti di snodo del traffico cittadino. La sua felice posizione, nel cuore del West End londinese, e la vicinanza con importanti luoghi di interesse come i teatri di Shaftesbury Avenue o strade come Coventry Street e The Haymarket ricchissime di negozi e locali alla moda, hanno reso Piccadilly Circus un affollato punto di ritrovo, nonché una vera e propria attrattiva turistica tanto da diventare uno dei simboli stessi di Londra.Famosa per i display luminosi e le insegne a LED posizionate su di un edificio posto al lato settentrionale della stessa e per la celebre Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain che rappresenta «l'Angelo della Carità Cristiana» (ma realizzata da Alfred Gilbert come "Anteros" anche se è nota ai più col nome di "Eros"), la piazza è circondata da imponenti edifici quali il London Pavilion (sede di numerosi negozi e del Trocadero) ed il Criterion Theatre. Inoltre direttamente sotto il perimetro della piazza c'è l'omonima stazione della metropolitana di Londra.le banane sono blu e bo poi il kebab fa schifo

Piccadilly Circus
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Picadilly Circus
London, United Kingdom W1V 9LB

Piccadilly Circus è una celebre piazza di Londra, nonché luogo di ritrovo, cuore morale della città, situata nella City of Westminster.Costruita nel 1819 per collegare Regent Street con l'omonima Piccadilly (importante strada dello shopping) è diventata col passare degli anni uno dei principali punti di snodo del traffico cittadino. La sua felice posizione, nel cuore del West End londinese, e la vicinanza con importanti luoghi di interesse come i teatri di Shaftesbury Avenue o strade come Coventry Street e The Haymarket ricchissime di negozi e locali alla moda, hanno reso Piccadilly Circus un affollato punto di ritrovo, nonché una vera e propria attrattiva turistica tanto da diventare uno dei simboli stessi di Londra.Famosa per i display luminosi e le insegne a LED posizionate su di un edificio posto al lato settentrionale della stessa e per la celebre Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain che rappresenta «l'Angelo della Carità Cristiana» (ma realizzata da Alfred Gilbert come "Anteros" anche se è nota ai più col nome di "Eros"), la piazza è circondata da imponenti edifici quali il London Pavilion (sede di numerosi negozi e del Trocadero) ed il Criterion Theatre. Inoltre direttamente sotto il perimetro della piazza c'è l'omonima stazione della metropolitana di Londra.le banane sono blu e bo poi il kebab fa schifo

Carnaby London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Carnaby Street
London, United Kingdom W1F 9PS

+44 (0) 20 7333 8118

This style village includes Carnaby Street, Newburgh and Marshall Streets, food quarter Ganton Street, Kingly Street, Foubert’s Place, Beak Street, Broadwick Street, Marlborough and Lowndes Courts and the vibrant open air courtyard, Kingly Court. Carnaby is perfectly located between Oxford Circus and Piccadilly Circus in the centre of London’s West End.

Royal Academy of Arts
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Burlington House, Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0BD

02073008000

Oxford Circus
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 3A

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Oxford Circus is the busiest intersection of Oxford Street (A40) and Regent Street in the West End of London. It is served by many bus routes and by Oxford Circus tube station, which is directly beneath the junction itself.At the end of the 2000s, Oxford Circus had the highest pedestrian volumes recorded anywhere in London. At the busiest times, over 40,000 pedestrians per hour pass through the junction including those accessing the London Underground station.HistoryThe Circus was constructed at the beginning of the 19th century, and was designed by John Nash.2009 diagonal crossingIn 2009, Westminster City Council started a £4m pedestrianisation scheme for the area, allowing shoppers to cross the intersection diagonally as well as the traditional 'straight ahead', turning it into a "pedestrian scramble", much like Tokyo's Shibuya crossing. Work started in Summer 2009, and the crossing opened on 2 November of the same year, by which time the cost had risen to £5 million. Although London Mayor Boris Johnson declared it "a triumph for British engineering, Japanese innovation and good old common sense", it was noted that a fairly similar crossing in Balham, South London had previously opened in 2005 at a cost of £98,000, approximately 50 times cheaper. One was also created in Wood Green.

Oxford Circus
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 3A

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Oxford Circus is the busiest intersection of Oxford Street (A40) and Regent Street in the West End of London. It is served by many bus routes and by Oxford Circus tube station, which is directly beneath the junction itself.At the end of the 2000s, Oxford Circus had the highest pedestrian volumes recorded anywhere in London. At the busiest times, over 40,000 pedestrians per hour pass through the junction including those accessing the London Underground station.HistoryThe Circus was constructed at the beginning of the 19th century, and was designed by John Nash.2009 diagonal crossingIn 2009, Westminster City Council started a £4m pedestrianisation scheme for the area, allowing shoppers to cross the intersection diagonally as well as the traditional 'straight ahead', turning it into a "pedestrian scramble", much like Tokyo's Shibuya crossing. Work started in Summer 2009, and the crossing opened on 2 November of the same year, by which time the cost had risen to £5 million. Although London Mayor Boris Johnson declared it "a triumph for British engineering, Japanese innovation and good old common sense", it was noted that a fairly similar crossing in Balham, South London had previously opened in 2005 at a cost of £98,000, approximately 50 times cheaper. One was also created in Wood Green.

Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
47 Frith Street
London, United Kingdom W1D 4

020 7439 0747

Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club is a prominent jazz club which has operated in London, England since 1959.The club opened on 30 October 1959 in a basement at 39 Gerrard Street in London's Soho district. It was set up and managed by musicians Ronnie Scott and Pete King. In 1965 it moved to a larger venue nearby at 47 Frith Street. The original venue continued in operation as the "Old Place" until the lease ran out in 1967, and was used for performances by the up-and-coming generation of musicians.Zoot Sims was the club's first transatlantic visitor in 1962, and was succeeded by many others (often saxophonists whom Scott and King, tenor saxophonists themselves, admired, such as Johnny Griffin, Lee Konitz, Sonny Rollins and Sonny Stitt) in the years that followed. Many UK jazz musicians were also regularly featured, including Tubby Hayes and Dick Morrissey who would both drop in for jam sessions with the visiting stars. In the mid-1960s, Ernest Ranglin was the house guitarist. The club's house pianist until 1967 was Stan Tracey. For nearly 30 years it was home of a Christmas residency to George Melly and John Chilton's Feetwarmers. In 1978, the club established the label Ronnie Scott's Jazz House, which issued both live performances from the club and new recordings.

Sanderson Hotel
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
50 Berners Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 3NG

020 7300 1400

Berkeley Square
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Berkeley Square, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1J 5

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Berkeley Square is a town square in Mayfair in the West End of London, in the City of Westminster. It was originally laid out in the mid 18th century by architect William Kent.The gardens in the centre are open to the public, and their very large London Plane trees are among the oldest in central London, planted in 1789.DescriptionWhilst Berkeley Square was originally a mostly residential area, there now remains only one residential block on the square – number 48. The square is mostly offices, including a number of hedge funds and wealth management businesses.The square features a sculptural fountain by Alexander Munro, a Pre-Raphaelite sculptor, made in 1865.The buildings around the square include several by other notable architects including Robert Adam, who designed Lansdowne House (since 1935 home of the Lansdowne Club) in the southwest corner of the square on Fitzmaurice Place. The daring staircase-hall of No. 44 is sometimes considered William Kent's masterpiece. Gunter's Tea Shop, founded under a different name in 1757, is also located here.

St James's Church, Piccadilly
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
197 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0

020 7734 4511

St James's Church, Piccadilly, also known as St James's Church, Westminster, and St James-in-the-Fields, is an Anglican church on Piccadilly in the centre of London, United Kingdom. The church was designed and built by Sir Christopher Wren.The church is built of red brick with Portland stone dressings. Its interior has galleries on three sides supported by square pillars, and the nave has a barrel vault supported by Corinthian columns. The carved marble font and limewood reredos are both notable examples of the work of Grinling Gibbons.HistoryIn 1662, Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans, was granted land for residential development on what was then the outskirts of London. He set aside land for the building of a parish church and churchyard on the south side of what is now Piccadilly. Christopher Wren was appointed the architect in 1672 and the church was consecrated on 13 July 1684 by Henry Compton, the Bishop of London. In 1685 the parish of St James was created for the church.

The Photographers' Gallery
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Ramillies St
London, United Kingdom W1F 7

+44 (0) 845 262 1618

The Photographers' Gallery was founded in London in 1971, and was the first independent gallery in Britain that was devoted entirely to photography. It also hosts a café and bookshop.Exhibitions in the gallery have included one-person exhibitions of work by André Kertész, Danny Treacy, Taryn Simon, Ori Gersht, Cuny Janssen, Indrė Šerpytytė and David King. The Gallery hosts the annual Deutsche Börse Photography Prize.HistoryThe Photographers' Gallery was the first public gallery in London to exhibit key names in international photography, such as Juergen Teller (fashion), Robert Capa (photojournalism), Sebastiao Salgado (documentary), and Andreas Gursky (contemporary art). Originally based in a converted Lyons tea bar on Great Newport Street near Leicester Square, The Photographers' Gallery moved to a former textile warehouse on Ramillies Street in Soho, in December 2008.Until 2008 there were plans to construct an all-new building. Instead, Irish architects O'Donnell and Tuomey designed an extension to the existing brick and steel warehouse. After closing for redevelopment in autumn 2010, the new building opened in 2012 at a cost of £9.2m. £3.6m of the cost came from Arts Council England, £2.4m from the sale of its previous building and £2.5m from foundations, trusts, corporate sponsors and an auction.

Tramp (nightclub)
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
40 Jermyn St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6

0207 734 0565

Tramp is a private, members-only nightclub located on Jermyn Street in central London, England. Founded in 1969 by Johnny Gold with business partner Oscar Lerman, and Bill Ofner (Luishek) Tramp is considered to be one of the most exclusive member's clubs in the world and is a regular haunt for celebrities. It was sold by founder Gold in 2003.ReputationOver its 40-year history Tramp has been frequented by many celebrities, socialites, aristocrats and royalty.Peter Sellers, Joan Collins, Liza Minnelli and Ringo Starr have all had their wedding receptions at the glitzy club. Infamous stories that took place under the Tramp chandeliers include a young Shirley MacLaine falling asleep on top of a table overnight, The Who's Keith Moon dancing naked on the dance floor, and comedian Mel Brooks getting on all fours and running around under the tables barking like a dog.Tramp's Gold, a book about the club written by Gold himself and with a foreword from Michael Caine, was published in 2001.

Tramp (nightclub)
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
40 Jermyn St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6

0207 734 0565

Tramp is a private, members-only nightclub located on Jermyn Street in central London, England. Founded in 1969 by Johnny Gold with business partner Oscar Lerman, and Bill Ofner (Luishek) Tramp is considered to be one of the most exclusive member's clubs in the world and is a regular haunt for celebrities. It was sold by founder Gold in 2003.ReputationOver its 40-year history Tramp has been frequented by many celebrities, socialites, aristocrats and royalty.Peter Sellers, Joan Collins, Liza Minnelli and Ringo Starr have all had their wedding receptions at the glitzy club. Infamous stories that took place under the Tramp chandeliers include a young Shirley MacLaine falling asleep on top of a table overnight, The Who's Keith Moon dancing naked on the dance floor, and comedian Mel Brooks getting on all fours and running around under the tables barking like a dog.Tramp's Gold, a book about the club written by Gold himself and with a foreword from Michael Caine, was published in 2001.

Langham Hotel, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
1c Portland Place, Regent Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 1JA

The Langham, London is one of the largest and best known traditional style grand hotels in London. It is in the district of Marylebone on Langham Place and faces up Portland Place towards Regent's Park. It is a member of the Leading Hotels of the World marketing consortium.HistoryThe Langham was designed by John Giles and built between 1863 and 1865 at a cost of £300,000. It was then the largest and most modern hotel in the city, featuring a hundred water closets, thirty-six bathrooms and the first hydraulic lifts in England. The opening ceremony on 16 June was performed by the Prince of Wales. After the original company was liquidated during an economic slump, new management acquired the hotel for little more than half of its construction cost, and it soon became a commercial success. In 1867, a former Union officer named James Sanderson was appointed general manager and the hotel developed an extensive American clientele, which included Mark Twain and the miserly multi-millionairess, Hetty Green. It was also patronised by the likes of Napoleon III, Oscar Wilde, Antonín Dvořák, and Arturo Toscanini. Electric light was installed in the entrance and courtyard at the exceptionally early date of 1879, and Arthur Conan Doyle set Sherlock Holmes stories such as A Scandal in Bohemia and The Sign of Four partly at the Langham.

Savile Club
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
69 Brook St
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

+44 (0)20 7629 5462

The Savile Club is a traditional London gentlemen's club founded in 1868. Though located somewhat out of the way from the main centre of London's gentlemen's clubs, closer to the residences of Mayfair than the clubs of Pall Mall and St James's Street, it still contains prominent names among its members. It was originally formed after a division of opinion within the old Eclectic Club as to whether to accept an offer of rooms by the Medical Club and cease to be simply a "night club" (in its 19th-century sense).Changing premisesInitially calling itself the New Club, it grew rapidly, outgrowing its first floor rooms overlooking Trafalgar Square at 9 Spring Gardens and moving to the second floor. It then moved to 15 Savile Row in 1871, where it changed its name to the Savile Club, before lack of space forced the club to move again in 1882, this time to 107 Piccadilly, a building owned by Lord Rosebery. With its views over Green Park it was described by the members as the "ideal clubhouse". However, after 50 years' residence, demolition of the building next door to create the Park Lane Hotel caused the old clubhouse such structural problems that, in 1927, the club moved to its present home at 69 Brook Street, part of the Grosvenor Estate in Mayfair. This was the former home of "Loulou" Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt, a Liberal cabinet minister who had taken his life on the premises to avert a scandal when his double life as a paedophile and sex offender was in danger of being uncovered. The building, a combination of Nos 69 and 71 Brook Street, owes its extravagant dix-huitième interior to Walter Burns, the brother-in-law of financier J.P. Morgan, who adapted it for his wife Fanny to entertain in suitable style. It thus includes an elegant hall, a grand staircase and a lavish ballroom.

Savile Row
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
3 savile row, london
London, United Kingdom W1S 3

020 7734 2436

Savile Row is a street in Mayfair, central London. Known principally for its traditional bespoke tailoring for men, the street has had a varied history that has included accommodating the headquarters of the Royal Geographical Society at 1 Savile Row, where significant British explorations to Africa and the South Pole were planned; and more recently, the Apple office of the Beatles at 3 Savile Row, where the band's final live performance was held on the roof of the building.Originally named Savile Street, it was built between 1731 and 1735 as part of the development of the Burlington Estate. It was designed under the influence of Burlington's interpretation of Palladian architecture, known as "Burlingtonian". Henry Flitcroft, under the supervision of Daniel Garrett, appears to have been the main architect – though 1 and 22–23 Savile Row were designed by William Kent. Initially, the street was occupied mainly by military officers and their wives; later William Pitt the Younger and Irish-born playwright and MP, Richard Brinsley Sheridan were residents.Tailors started doing business in the area in the late 18th century; first in Cork Street, about 1790, then by 1803 in Savile Row itself. In 1846, Henry Poole, later credited as the creator of the dinner jacket or tuxedo, opened an entrance to Savile Row from his tailoring premises in Old Burlington Street. In 1969, Nutters of Savile Row modernised the style and approach of traditional Savile Row tailoring; a modernisation that continued in the 1990s with the "New Bespoke Movement", involving the designers Richard James, Ozwald Boateng, and Timothy Everest. The term "bespoke" as applied to fine tailoring is understood to have originated in Savile Row, and came to mean a suit cut and made by hand.

South Molton Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
South Molton Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

020 7629 2282

South Molton Street is a street in Mayfair in London which runs from Oxford Street to Brook Street. Bond Street tube station is at the north end of the street.The street was built in the mid-18th century as part of the Conduit Mead Estate. It was extensively rebuilt about 1900 but many of the original Georgian houses remain. It is now a pedestrian precinct and contains many shops selling items such as women's fashion and jewellery. The street is also home to award winning model agency Sapphires Model Management as well as fine art gallery Castle Galleries, and inspired fashion blog South Molton St Style in 2011.Famous residents Ernest Bevin lived in a flat at number 34 for twenty years from 1931. William Blake lived in a flat at number 17 in 1803.

South Molton Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
South Molton Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

020 7629 2282

South Molton Street is a street in Mayfair in London which runs from Oxford Street to Brook Street. Bond Street tube station is at the north end of the street.The street was built in the mid-18th century as part of the Conduit Mead Estate. It was extensively rebuilt about 1900 but many of the original Georgian houses remain. It is now a pedestrian precinct and contains many shops selling items such as women's fashion and jewellery. The street is also home to award winning model agency Sapphires Model Management as well as fine art gallery Castle Galleries, and inspired fashion blog South Molton St Style in 2011.Famous residents Ernest Bevin lived in a flat at number 34 for twenty years from 1931. William Blake lived in a flat at number 17 in 1803.

Lulworth Cove, Dorset
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
BH20 5RS
London, United Kingdom

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Jermyn Street Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
16B Jermyn Street
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 6

020 7287 2875

Jermyn Street Theatre is a performance venue situated in Jermyn Street, London.Formerly the changing rooms for staff at a restaurant (Spaghetti House, now Getti), under the leadership of Howard Jameson it was transformed into a 70-seat studio theatre in London's West End. It opened in August 1994.In their mission statement, the theatre states that their aim is "to provide talented new actors, directors and writers with the opportunity to be recognised and given a platform in the best West End Studio Theatre."In October 2012 Anthony Biggs was appointed Artistic Director.Its patron is Princess Michael of Kent.LocationThe theatre is located at 16b Jermyn Street, close to the Criterion Theatre. The closest tube station is Piccadilly Circus.

Toy Store Near Hamleys

The Disney Store
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
350-352 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1C 1

020 7491 9136

Buy exclusive Disney Gifts, Toys & Clothing. Shop at the online Disney Store and discover a wondrous variety of magical gifts and toys.

Hamleys Regent Street, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
188-196 Regent Street
London, United Kingdom W1B 5BT

0371 704 1977

The Toy Store UK
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
West One 381 Oxford St
London, United Kingdom W1C 2JS

Pollock's Toy Museum
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
1 Scala Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 2HL

+44 (0) 20 7636 3452

Sylvanian Families Shop, London
Distance: 3.8 mi Tourist Information
68 Mountgrove Road, Highbury
London, United Kingdom N5 2LT

020 7226 1329

Opened in 1993 the Sylvanian Families Shop in London has been supporting Sylvanian collectors everywhere for over 20 years! With the best range of Sylvanian Families to be found anywhere in Europe, we stock the full UK range along with a large number of discontinued lines, and imported lines from the Japanese, North American and Mainland European Sylvanian Families ranges.

Lego Office London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
8-10 New Fetter Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4A 1

Disney Store, Oxford Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
350-352 Oxford Street
London, United Kingdom W1C 1JH

0207 491 9136

International Magic Shop
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
89 Clerkenwell Road
London, United Kingdom EC1R 5BX

02074057324

A real magic shop, catering for professional magicians and amateurs alike. Stocks thousands of Magic Tricks, Books and DVDs as well as hosting the only magic convention in London (running since 1972)!

Dark-Sphere London
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
186 Hercules Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 7LD

0207 928 1373

Lego Hub
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
New Fetter Place 8-10 New Fetter Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4A 1

Porto Of London
Distance: 3.3 mi Tourist Information
82 Landor Road
London, United Kingdom SW9 9PE

+44 (0) 20 7274 7136

Flight Level 260
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Suite 36, 88-90 Hatton Garden
London, United Kingdom EC1N 8PG

07776 299 271

Flight Level 260 is your one-stop solution for all of your diecast scale model aircraft as well as radio controlled helicopters, boats, tanks and cars. We hope you enjoy our shop and if you have any queries or feedback please do not hesitate to let us know. Visit our website at www.FlightLevel260.com

Links of London
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
16 Sloane Square
London, United Kingdom SW3 2

020 7730 3133

Under the Greenwood Tree
Distance: 3.4 mi Tourist Information
11 the Polygon
London, United Kingdom SW4 0JG

020 7627 4557

Children's books, toys and cafe in the heart of Clapham Old Town, London www.underthegreenwoodtree.co.uk

Blue Daisy
Distance: 3.1 mi Tourist Information
13 South End Road
London, United Kingdom NW3 2

020 7681 4144

Find us: Blue Daisy 13 South End Road Hampstead London NW3 2PT Have a question? Call us on 020 7681 4144 or email [email protected] Register with us for extra benefits! Collect points as you shop. For every £1 that you spend in-store or online you will receive one point. When you reach 150 points you will and receive a £5 gift voucher. This can be redeemed at our store or on our website.

Links of London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
110 Marylebone High Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 4RY

+44 (0) 20 3230 2049

Marmalade250
Distance: 3.0 mi Tourist Information
250 Battersea Park Road
London, United Kingdom SW11 3BP

07810392976

Scificollector
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
79 Strand
London, United Kingdom WC2R 0DE

0207 836 2341

Scificollector is a producer of collectibles with most aimed at Classic & Cult TV shows such as Doctor Who, Torchwood, Merlin, Red Dwarf, Thunderbirds and other Gerry Anderson Shows. Our merchandise takes many forms such as a signed collectible, generally limited in edition such as a Commemorative Stamp Cover or exclusive Print, or other pieces such as our Action Figures which we have created for both Torchwood and latterly The Adventures of Merlin. We also have several 'Scificollector' exclusive commissions by Corgi and Product Enterprise and craft many pieces in Pewter to support the desires of collectors. As the company is run by collectors, we understand the needs and aim to support this with our creations. Scificollector also carries all the mainstream Doctor Who products available from our retail shop at 79 Strand in Central London and via our website www.scificollectorshop.co.uk

Igloo
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
300 Upper Street
London, United Kingdom N1 2TU

+44 (0) 20 7354 7300

Outpost - Shop. Arts. Community Hub
Distance: 3.3 mi Tourist Information
546 Holloway Road
London, United Kingdom N7 6JP

0207 2813620

We sell a fabulous range of giftware and cards, as well as home accessories, and ceramics. We also stock a fantastic range of textiles and home-furnishings, wooden toys, and small items of furniture, all of which are made by hand in our workscheme workshops. Outpost Shop provides training for our tenants and participants in a real working environment, and offers certificates in Retail. Outpost Shop has featured in Time Out and Ideal Home magazines and we are known for selling great products at a fraction of West End prices. Happy with your purchase, pleased with our customer service, you can also take home with you the satisfaction of knowing that you’ve just invested in someone’s retail training and their first step towards employment. Have a question for the shop about a product? Don’t hesitate in dropping us an email or phone call. Or better still, call in and peruse the best selection of boutique gifts and home-furnishings on Holloway Road!

Landmark Near Hamleys

The Photographers' Gallery
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Ramillies St
London, United Kingdom W1F 7

+44 (0) 845 262 1618

The Photographers' Gallery was founded in London in 1971, and was the first independent gallery in Britain that was devoted entirely to photography. It also hosts a café and bookshop.Exhibitions in the gallery have included one-person exhibitions of work by André Kertész, Danny Treacy, Taryn Simon, Ori Gersht, Cuny Janssen, Indrė Šerpytytė and David King. The Gallery hosts the annual Deutsche Börse Photography Prize.HistoryThe Photographers' Gallery was the first public gallery in London to exhibit key names in international photography, such as Juergen Teller (fashion), Robert Capa (photojournalism), Sebastiao Salgado (documentary), and Andreas Gursky (contemporary art). Originally based in a converted Lyons tea bar on Great Newport Street near Leicester Square, The Photographers' Gallery moved to a former textile warehouse on Ramillies Street in Soho, in December 2008.Until 2008 there were plans to construct an all-new building. Instead, Irish architects O'Donnell and Tuomey designed an extension to the existing brick and steel warehouse. After closing for redevelopment in autumn 2010, the new building opened in 2012 at a cost of £9.2m. £3.6m of the cost came from Arts Council England, £2.4m from the sale of its previous building and £2.5m from foundations, trusts, corporate sponsors and an auction.

Regent Hall
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
275 Oxford St
London, United Kingdom W1C 2

020 7629 5424

The Regent Hall is a Salvation Army centre on London's Oxford Street. It is one of the oldest centres in London having been founded by the founder of the army, William Booth in 1882. The church is known across the world as the "Rink", because it was formerly a skating rink.The hall is known for its music, both for its own brass band which tours internationally, and as a venue for visiting artists.The present officers are Majors Graham and Dawn Mizon, who succeeded Major Ray and Major Pat Brown. in 2012.

Lancashire Court
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
4-12 Lancashire Court, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1S 1EY

0207 518 9388

Welcome to Lancashire Court Tucked away behind the bustling streets of shoppers on New Bond Street lies a hidden treasure waiting to be explored. Lancashire Court is a uniquely charming haven offering visitors a sampling of some of London's finest restaurants, bars and stores. Whether browsing the shops by day, or sampling the indulgent delights by night, Lancashire Court provides the perfect setting for any occasion.

Kiss (UK radio station)
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Mappin House, 4 Winsley St
London, United Kingdom W1W 8HF

020 7975 8100

Kiss is a UK radio station which is broadcasting on FM and National DAB, specialising in pop, hip hop, R&B, urban and electronic dance music. It also broadcasts on DAB Digital Radio around the UK & nationally on Freeview, Sky and Virgin Media. Owned by Hamburg based Bauer Media Group, Kiss forms part of Bauer's National portfolio of radio brands. Kiss spin-off brands include Kisstory and Kiss Fresh.HistoryKiss FM began in October 1985 as a pirate radio station, broadcasting first to South London then across the whole city, on 94FM. The station had gained a large audience by the time it was awarded a legitimate licence in 1990. ″The team which transformed KISS 94 FM to KISS 100FM included Lyn Champion, a BBC Radio 1 producer and UK Dance promo producer, who in the early 1980s had started a weekly column in London's City Limits magazine listing pirate radio shows from the mighty JFM, Invicta and K-Jazz. Lyn was brought in to help write the original proposal in 1989 and was Head of Talks responsible for all spoken word output on the new KISS 100 FM. The British Broadcasting Act of 1990 (the start of Thatcher's de-regulation programme) abolished the ″IBA″ which had enshrined community and spoken word programming within the licence, so KISS 100 FM missed the opportunity to initiate the 20 year wave of documentary series and cultural broadcasting about R&B based music, jazz, reggae, blues, electro and rap which was intended within original legally approved brief ″″. This material had never been broadcast in the UK on radio or TV and this was a key reason the station received an IBA license. A missed opportunity indeed as it became the standard fare of every major broadcaster through the 1990s and noughties. Lyn Champion was the first to leave as a result, followed by such icons as Norman Jay. Lyn lectures extensively about media de-regulation and content.

Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
6 Grafton St
London, United Kingdom W1S 4FE

2074999821

The Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, London is Hong Kong's representation in the United Kingdom. As a Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong does not have an embassy.The office is located at 18 Bedford Square in the City of Westminster in central London; the building also houses the London office of the London Representative Office of the Hong Kong Monetary Authority. It was previously located at 6 Grafton Street..The current Director-General of the office is Priscilla To, who reports to the Special Representative for Hong Kong Economic & Trade Affairs to the European Union, Brussels ETO.The Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office Act 1996 enacted by UK's Parliament conferred a number of personal immunity and tax privileges on HKETO London. When Hong Kong was under British administration, the office was known as the Hong Kong Government Office and was headed by a Commissioner.Apart from the UK, HKETO London is also responsible for maintaining ties with Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Russia and Sweden.

Albany (London)
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Albany Courtyard, Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0DS

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The Albany, or simply Albany, is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, London.BuildingThe Albany was built in 1770–74 by Sir William Chambers for the newly created 1st Viscount Melbourne as Melbourne House. It is a three-storey mansion, seven bays (windows) wide, with a pair of service wings flanking a front courtyard. In 1791, Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany abandoned Dover House, Whitehall (now a government office), and took up residence. In 1802 the Duke in turn gave up the house and it was converted by Henry Holland into 69 bachelor apartments (known as "sets"). This was achieved by subdividing the main block and its two service wings, and by adding two new parallel long buildings covering most of the garden, running as far as a new rear gate building on Burlington Gardens. Holland's new buildings of 1802-3 flank a covered walkway supported on thin iron columns and with an upswept roof. The blocks are white painted render in a simpler Regency style than Chambers' work. Most sets are accessed off common staircases without doors, like Oxbridge colleges and the Inns of Court.HistorySince its conversion, the Albany has been a prestigious set of bachelor apartments in London. The residents have included such famous names as the poet Lord Byron and the future Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone, and numerous members of the aristocracy.

Lyric Theatre, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Shaftesbury Avenue, London, W1D 7ES
City of Westminster, United Kingdom W1D 7

20-74945045

The Lyric Theatre is a West End theatre on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster.Designed by the architect C. J. Phipps, it was built by the producer Henry Leslie with profits from the Alfred Cellier and B. C. Stephenson hit, Dorothy (he made £100,000 from this opera), which he transferred from the Prince of Wales Theatre to open his new venue on 17 December 1888. It was the second theatre to be constructed on this stretch of Shaftesbury Avenue and is now the oldest in the street. The foyer and bars were refurbished in 1932-33, and the facade was restored in 1994. At present it seats 967 on four levels, although it originally was designed with a seating capacity of 1,306. The theatre still uses an electric pump to operate its iron curtain.Early in the theatre's history, it staged mostly comic operas, and later it has been a home to light comedies, musicals and straight dramas.The theatre retains many of its original features (including being built behind an original 1767 house front, at the rear to Great Windmill Street, the former house and museum of Sir William Hunter) and the theatre was Grade II listed by English Heritage in September 1960.

Apollo Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
31 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 7

020 7494 5070

The Apollo Theatre is a Grade II listed West End theatre, on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster, in central London. Designed by the architect Lewin Sharp for owner Henry Lowenfeld, it became the fourth legitimate theatre to be constructed on the street when it opened its doors on 21 February 1901, with the American musical comedy The Belle of Bohemia.HistoryConstructionBecause Henry Lowenfeld had bought land on the newly created Shaftesbury Avenue at the turn of the 20th century – next door to the Lyric Theatre which opened in 1888 – the Apollo is one of the few theatres in London to be freehold.The only complete theatre design of architect Lewin Sharp, the Apollo was specifically designed for musical theatre and named after the Greek god of the arts and leader of the muses. Constructed by builder Walter Wallis of plain London brick in keeping with the neighbouring streets, the front piece is in the Renaissance style with sculpted stone fascia by T. Simpson. The structure encloses a four-level auditorium, with three cantilevered balconies and a first floor central loggia, decorated in the Louis XIV Style by Hubert van Hooydonk. In keeping with then European style, each level has its own foyer and promenade.

Piccadilly Circus
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Picadilly Circus
London, United Kingdom W1V 9LB

Piccadilly Circus è una celebre piazza di Londra, nonché luogo di ritrovo, cuore morale della città, situata nella City of Westminster.Costruita nel 1819 per collegare Regent Street con l'omonima Piccadilly (importante strada dello shopping) è diventata col passare degli anni uno dei principali punti di snodo del traffico cittadino. La sua felice posizione, nel cuore del West End londinese, e la vicinanza con importanti luoghi di interesse come i teatri di Shaftesbury Avenue o strade come Coventry Street e The Haymarket ricchissime di negozi e locali alla moda, hanno reso Piccadilly Circus un affollato punto di ritrovo, nonché una vera e propria attrattiva turistica tanto da diventare uno dei simboli stessi di Londra.Famosa per i display luminosi e le insegne a LED posizionate su di un edificio posto al lato settentrionale della stessa e per la celebre Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain che rappresenta «l'Angelo della Carità Cristiana» (ma realizzata da Alfred Gilbert come "Anteros" anche se è nota ai più col nome di "Eros"), la piazza è circondata da imponenti edifici quali il London Pavilion (sede di numerosi negozi e del Trocadero) ed il Criterion Theatre. Inoltre direttamente sotto il perimetro della piazza c'è l'omonima stazione della metropolitana di Londra.le banane sono blu e bo poi il kebab fa schifo

St James's Church, Piccadilly
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
197 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 0

020 7734 4511

St James's Church, Piccadilly, also known as St James's Church, Westminster, and St James-in-the-Fields, is an Anglican church on Piccadilly in the centre of London, United Kingdom. The church was designed and built by Sir Christopher Wren.The church is built of red brick with Portland stone dressings. Its interior has galleries on three sides supported by square pillars, and the nave has a barrel vault supported by Corinthian columns. The carved marble font and limewood reredos are both notable examples of the work of Grinling Gibbons.HistoryIn 1662, Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans, was granted land for residential development on what was then the outskirts of London. He set aside land for the building of a parish church and churchyard on the south side of what is now Piccadilly. Christopher Wren was appointed the architect in 1672 and the church was consecrated on 13 July 1684 by Henry Compton, the Bishop of London. In 1685 the parish of St James was created for the church.

Gimpel Fils
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
30 Davies Street
London, United Kingdom

Gimpel Fils is a London art gallery based at 30 Davies Street in Westminster just off Grosvenor Square. The gallery was founded by Charles and Peter Gimpel, sons of the celebrated Parisian art dealer, René Gimpel, author of the Diary of an Art Dealer. Throughout its history it has maintained a commitment to contemporary British and International art.

Sanderson Hotel
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
50 Berners Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 3NG

020 7300 1400

Shaftesbury Avenue
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
65 - 73 Shaftesbury Ave
London, United Kingdom W1D 6

020 7031 4300

Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, that runs in a north-easterly direction from Piccadilly Circus to New Oxford Street, crossing Charing Cross Road at Cambridge Circus. From Piccadilly Circus to Cambridge Circus it is in the City of Westminster and from Cambridge Circus to New Oxford Street it is in the London Borough of Camden.Shaftesbury Avenue was built in the late 19th century (1877–86) by the architect George Vulliamy and the engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette to provide a north-south traffic artery through the crowded districts of St. Giles and Soho. It was also part of a slum clearance measure, to push impoverished workers out of the city centre although the street's construction was stalled by legislation requiring rehousing some of these displaced residents, overcrowding persisted. Charles Booth's Poverty Map shows the neighbourhood makeup shortly after Shaftesbury Avenue opened. It is generally considered the heart of London's West End theatre district, with the Lyric, Apollo, Gielgud and Queen's theatres clustered together on the north side of the road between Piccadilly Circus and Charing Cross Road. At the intersection of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road there is also the large Palace Theatre. Finally, the north-eastern end of the road has another large theatre, called the Shaftesbury Theatre.

Savile Club
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
69 Brook St
London, United Kingdom W1K 5

+44 (0)20 7629 5462

The Savile Club is a traditional London gentlemen's club founded in 1868. Though located somewhat out of the way from the main centre of London's gentlemen's clubs, closer to the residences of Mayfair than the clubs of Pall Mall and St James's Street, it still contains prominent names among its members. It was originally formed after a division of opinion within the old Eclectic Club as to whether to accept an offer of rooms by the Medical Club and cease to be simply a "night club" (in its 19th-century sense).Changing premisesInitially calling itself the New Club, it grew rapidly, outgrowing its first floor rooms overlooking Trafalgar Square at 9 Spring Gardens and moving to the second floor. It then moved to 15 Savile Row in 1871, where it changed its name to the Savile Club, before lack of space forced the club to move again in 1882, this time to 107 Piccadilly, a building owned by Lord Rosebery. With its views over Green Park it was described by the members as the "ideal clubhouse". However, after 50 years' residence, demolition of the building next door to create the Park Lane Hotel caused the old clubhouse such structural problems that, in 1927, the club moved to its present home at 69 Brook Street, part of the Grosvenor Estate in Mayfair. This was the former home of "Loulou" Harcourt, 1st Viscount Harcourt, a Liberal cabinet minister who had taken his life on the premises to avert a scandal when his double life as a paedophile and sex offender was in danger of being uncovered. The building, a combination of Nos 69 and 71 Brook Street, owes its extravagant dix-huitième interior to Walter Burns, the brother-in-law of financier J.P. Morgan, who adapted it for his wife Fanny to entertain in suitable style. It thus includes an elegant hall, a grand staircase and a lavish ballroom.

The Comedy Store
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
7 Oxendon St
Hackney, United Kingdom SW1Y 4EE

The Comedy Store is a comedy club located in Soho, London, England, opened in 1979 by Don Ward and Peter Rosengard.It was named after The Comedy Store club in the United States, which Rosengard had visited the previous year. Starting out above a strip club, in 1982 they moved to Leicester Square at a premises they were able to take over formally in 1985.The club was the focus of the "alternative comedy" boom in the early 1980s and helped start the careers of many comedians, including Paul Merton, French & Saunders, Alexei Sayle, Rik Mayall, Adrian Edmondson, Ben Elton, Mark Thomas, Andrew Bailey, Pat Condell and John Sparkes.In October 1985, an improvisational group called The Comedy Store Players was formed, consisting of Mike Myers, Neil Mullarkey, Kit Hollerbach, Dave Cohen and Paul Merton. The group has had several lineup changes over the years, and now features a rotating team of Neil Mullarkey, Paul Merton, Josie Lawrence, Richard Vranch (a comedy improviser who also plays piano), Jim Sweeney, Lee Simpson and Andy Smart, together with frequent guest appearances. Several of The Comedy Store Players appeared on the BBC Radio 4 and Channel 4 comedy game show Whose Line Is It Anyway?.

Piccadilly
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
City of Westminster, United Kingdom

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Piccadilly è una delle principali strade di Londra e si sviluppa per 1,5 km partendo a sud-ovest da Hyde Park Corner per terminare a Piccadilly Circus a nord-est. La strada fa parte della strada nazionale A4 (Londra-Bristol) una delle principali arterie del paese. Piccadilly è interamente compresa nella City of Westminster.Edifici notabili sulla strada includono il grande magazzino Fortnum and Mason, la Royal Academy, l'Hotel Ritz, il club della Royal Air Force, la libreria Hatchards e le ambasciate del Giappone e di Malta nel Regno Unito.Cenni storiciSino al XVII secolo l'area era conosciuta con il nome di Portugal. Il nome Piccadilly si deve ad un sarto di nome Robert Baker, proprietario di un negozio nello Strand, che fece fortuna producendo e vendendo dei colli rigidi che erano di moda all'epoca e che erano chiamati picadils. Il sarto comprò una vasta area nella zona occidentale di Londra e nel 1612 vi fece costruire un palazzo che venne chiamato Piccadilly Hall.Dopo la restaurazione della monarchia inglese (1660) le aree di Piccadilly e di Mayfair (situata più a nord) divennero delle ambite località residenziali, vi vennero costruiti alcuni fra i più sontuosi palazzi londinesi dell'epoca come Clarendon House (dove ora si trova Albemarle Street), Berkeley House (in seguito Devonshire House) e la residenza di Sir John Denham's (poi Burlington House). Successiva è invece la costruzione di Melbourne House (ora The Albany), Apsley House, Bath House e Cambridge House.

Piccadilly
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 8

Piccadilly is a road in the City of Westminster, London to the south of Mayfair, between Hyde Park Corner in the west and Piccadilly Circus in the east. It is part of the A4 road that connects central London to Hammersmith, Earl's Court, Heathrow Airport and the M4 motorway westward. St James's is to the south of the eastern section, while the western section is built up only on the northern side. At just under in length, Piccadilly is one of the widest and straightest streets in central London.Piccadilly has been a main road since at least medieval times, and in the middle ages was known as "the road to Reading" or "the way from Colnbrook". Around 1611 or 1612, a Robert Baker acquired land in the area and prospered by making and selling piccadills. Shortly after purchasing the land, he enclosed it and erected several dwellings, including his home, Pikadilly Hall. What is now Piccadilly was named Portugal Street in 1663 after Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, and grew in importance after the road from Charing Cross to Hyde Park Corner was closed to allow the creation of Green Park in 1668. Some of the most notable stately homes in London were built on the northern side of the street during this period, including Clarendon House and Burlington House in 1664. Berkeley House, constructed around the same time as Clarendon House, was destroyed by a fire in 1733 and rebuilt as Devonshire House in 1737 by William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire. It was later used as the main headquarters for the Whig party. Burlington House has since been home to several noted societies, including the Royal Academy of Arts, the Geological Society of London and the Royal Astronomical Society. Several members of the Rothschild family had mansions at the western end of the street. St James's Church was consecrated in 1684 and the surrounding area became St James Parish.

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
114 Mount St
London, United Kingdom W1K 3

02074937811

The Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, also known as Farm Street Church, is a Roman Catholic parish church run by the Society of Jesus in Mayfair, central London. Its main entrance is in Farm Street, though it can also be accessed from the adjacent Mount Street Gardens. Sir Simon Jenkins, in his book England's Thousand Best Churches, describes the church as "Gothic Revival at its most sumptuous".

Harold Pinter Theatre
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
6 Panton St
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 4

020 7369 1731

The Harold Pinter Theatre, formerly the Comedy Theatre until 2011, is a West End theatre, and opened on Panton Street in the City of Westminster, on 15 October 1881, as the Royal Comedy Theatre. It was designed by Thomas Verity and built in just six months in painted (stucco) stone and brick. By 1884 it was known as just the Comedy Theatre. In the mid-1950s the theatre underwent major reconstruction and re-opened in December 1955; the auditorium remains essentially that of 1881, with three tiers of horseshoe-shaped balconies.HistoryIn 1883, the successful operetta Falka had its London première at the theatre, and in 1885, Erminie did the same. The theatre's reputation grew through the First World War when Charles Blake Cochran and André Charlot presented their famous revue shows. Famous actors who appeared here include Henry Daniell who played John Carlton in Secrets in September 1929.The theatre was notable for the role it played in overturning stage censorship by establishing the New Watergate Club in 1956, under producer Anthony Field. The Theatres Act 1843 was still in force and required scripts to be submitted for approval by the Lord Chamberlain's Office. Formation of the club allowed plays that had been banned due to language or subject matter to be performed under "club" conditions.

Leicester Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Leicester Square
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2H 7DE

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Leicester Square) is a pedestrianised square in the West End of London, England. It was laid out in 1670 and is named after the contemporary Leicester House, itself named after Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester.The square was originally a gentrified residential area, with tenants including Frederick, Prince of Wales and artists William Hogarth and Joshua Reynolds. It became more down-market in the late 18th century as Leicester House was demolished and retail developments took place, becoming a centre for entertainment. Several major theatres were established in the 19th century, which were converted to cinemas towards the middle of the next. Leicester Square holds a number of nationally important cinemas such as the Odeon Leicester Square, Empire, Leicester Square and the now closed Odeon West End, which are frequently used for film premières, The nearby Prince Charles Cinema is popular for showing cult films and marathon film runs. The square remains a popular tourist attraction, including hosting events for the Chinese New Year.The square has always had a park in its centre, which was originally Lammas land. The park's fortunes have varied over the centuries, reaching near dilapidation in the mid-19th century after changing ownership several times. It was restored under the direction of St Martin in the Fields parish of their right to use the previously common land. The parishioners appealed to King Charles I, and he appointed three members of the privy council to arbitrate. Lord Leicester was ordered to keep part of his land (thereafter known as Leicester Fields and later as Leicester Square)(1713–1788