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Hyde Park Barracks, London, London | Tourist Information


Knightsbridge
London, United Kingdom SW7 1SE

020 7414 2574

The Hyde Park Barracks are located in Knightsbridge in central London, on the southern edge of Hyde Park. Historically they were often known as Knightsbridge Barracks and this name is still sometimes used informally. Hyde Park Barracks is three quarters of a mile from Buckingham Palace, close enough for the officers and men of the Household Cavalry to be available to respond speedily to any emergency at the Palace and also to conduct their ceremonial duties.HistoryThe first buildings on the site were constructed for the Horse Guards in 1795, and a riding school and stables designed by Philip Hardwick were added in 1857. These buildings were replaced with new ones designed by Thomas Henry Wyatt on which construction started in in 1878 and was completed in May 1880.These buildings were in turn demolished to make way for modern buildings designed by Sir Basil Spence, and completed in 1970. It was built to accommodate 23 officers, 60 warrant officers and non-commissioned officers, 431 rank and file, and 273 horses. The most prominent feature is a 33 storey, 94m tall residential tower, which is one of the two most prominent modern buildings as seen from Hyde Park along with the London Hilton on Park Lane. It was built by Sir Robert McAlpine between 1967 and 1970.

Landmark Near Hyde Park Barracks, London

Carlyle's House
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
24 Cheyne Row
London, SW3 5HL

+44 (0) 20 7352 7087

Carlyle's House
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
24 Cheyne Row
London, SW3 5HL

+44 (0) 20 7352 7087

Carlyle's House, in the district of Chelsea, in central London, England, was the home acquired by the historian and philosopher Thomas Carlyle and his wife Jane Welsh Carlyle, after having lived at Craigenputtock in Dumfriesshire, Scotland. She was a prominent woman of letters, for nearly half a century. The building dates from 1708 and is at No. 24 Cheyne Row (No. 5 at Carlyle's time); the house is now owned by the National Trust.The house is a typical Georgian terraced house, a modestly comfortable home where the Carlyles lived with one servant and Jane's dog, Nero. The house was opened to the public in 1895, just fourteen years after Carlyle's death. It is preserved very much as it was when the Carlyles lived there despite another resident moving in after them with her scores of cats and dogs. It is a good example of a middle class Victorian home due to the efforts of devotees tracking down much of the original furniture owned by the Carlyles. It contains some of the Carlyles' books (many on permanent loan from the London Library, which was established by Carlyle), pictures and personal possessions, together with collections of portraits by artist such as James Abbott McNeill Whistler and Helen Allingham and memorabilia assembled by their admirers.

Embassy of Guatemala, London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
13 Fawcett Street
London, SW10 9HN

+44 (0) 20 7351 3042

The Embassy of Guatemala in London is the diplomatic mission of Guatemala in the United Kingdom. It is somewhat remote from most other embassies - most of which are predominantly located in Central or West London - being located in a primarily residential area of Notting Hill Chelsea.The Embassy had been located in Chelsea, but moved to 105a Westbourne Grove,Notting Hill, in June 2015.Direct contact with the Embassy can be established through their official website or through the Embassy's UK landline 020 7221 1525.

Embassy of Guatemala, London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
13 Fawcett Street
London, SW10 9HN

+44 (0) 20 7351 3042

The Embassy of Guatemala in London is the diplomatic mission of Guatemala in the United Kingdom. It is somewhat remote from most other embassies - most of which are predominantly located in Central or West London - being located in a primarily residential area of Notting Hill Chelsea.The Embassy had been located in Chelsea, but moved to 105a Westbourne Grove,Notting Hill, in June 2015.Direct contact with the Embassy can be established through their official website or through the Embassy's UK landline 020 7221 1525.

La Tante Claire
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
The Berkeley, Wilton Pl
London, SW1X 7RL

020 7823 2003

La Tante Claire was a restaurant in London which opened in 1977 and closed in 2004. Owned and operated by Pierre Koffmann, it gained three Michelin stars in 1983, and held all three until the restaurant moved premises in 1998.DescriptionLa Tante Claire opened in 1977 at Royal Hospital Road, Chelsea. The signature dish of the restaurant was pig’s trotter with chicken mousseline, sweetbreads and morels; which when served elsewhere by Marco Pierre White, are referred to as "Pig's Trotters Pierre Koffmann". Within six years of opening, the restaurant gained its third Michelin star.The restaurant moved from the original premises in 1998, moving to a location within The Berkeley hotel. Following the closure of the Royal Hospital Road, the premises were sold to Gordon Ramsay and would become his flagship restaurant. In the new location, the restaurant lost its third Michelin star and was reduced to two before closing in 2003.In 2009, Koffmann opened a pop-up restaurant at Selfridges in London using the menu items from La Tante Claire. In 2010, Koffmann opened his first full-time restaurant since La Tante Claire, Koffmann's, at The Berkeley hotel, the same hotel as La Tante Claire used to be at, although at a different location within the hotel.

King's Road
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
King's Road, Chelsea & Fulham
London, SW3 5

King's Road or Kings Road, is a major street stretching through Chelsea and Fulham both in west London. It is associated with 1960s style, and fashion figures such as Mary Quant and Vivienne Westwood. Sir Oswald Mosley's Blackshirt movement had a barracks on the street in the 1930s.LocationKing's Road runs for just under through Chelsea, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, from Sloane Square in the east (on the border with Belgravia and Knightsbridge) and through the Moore Park estate on the border of Chelsea and Fulham opposite Stamford Bridge. Shortly after crossing Stanley bridge the road passes a slight kink at the junction with Waterford Road in Fulham, where it then becomes New King's Road, continuing to Fulham High Street and Putney Bridge; its western end is in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham.HistoryKing's Road derives its name from its function as a private road used by King Charles II to travel to Kew. It remained a private royal road until 1830, but people with connections were able to use it. Some houses date from the early 18th century. No. 213 has a blue plaque to film director Sir Carol Reed, who lived there from 1948 until his death in 1978. Thomas Arne lived at No. 215 and is believed to have composed "Rule Britannia" there. Ellen Terry lived in the same house from 1904–1920, and also Peter Ustinov; the house is commemorated by a blue plaque also. Photographer Christina Broom was born in 1862 at No 8.

The Boltons
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
9 S Bolton Gardens
London, SW10 9

020 7341 2600

The Boltons is a street located in the Brompton district of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, London, England (postcode SW10). The street is divided into two crescents to the west and east with large expensive houses and communal gardens in the centre.To the northwest via Boltons Place is Old Brompton Road and to the southeast via Gilston Road is Fulham Road. To the west are Redcliffe Square and Redcliffe Gardens.St Mary the Boltons church is located here.American actor Douglas Fairbanks Jr lived at number 28 The Boltons in the 1950s. Novelist and former politician Jeffrey Archer lived at number 24a in the mid 1970s.For some 15 years after WWII, "going to the Boltons" meant to Chelsea dwellers going to school. Indeed, on either side of Boltons Place were two educational establishments, Virgo fidelis, RC Junior Girls School and the state primary Bousfield School, which survives still. 29 The Boltons, on the junction of Tregunter and Gilston Roads, housed the infants' reception and two primary classes with a garden play area, as part of the nearby Lycée Français de Londres. Once the main school in South Kensington had sufficiently expanded in the late 1950s, the classes were moved there. The French Lycée was later renamed Lycée Français Charles de Gaulle.

St Mary the Boltons
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
The Boltons
London, SW10 9TB

+44 20 78351440

St Mary the Boltons is an Anglican church in The Boltons, Brompton, London. It is a Grade II listed building.HistoryThe Boltons, a street in Brompton, was farmland until the middle of the 19th century. As part of westward expansion of London the land was developed by Robert Gunter the elder, who planned a residential estate, together with a church – to lend tone to the area. The church, built to a design by George Godwin the younger (who was also responsible for St Jude's, Courtfield Gardens, and St Luke's, Redcliffe Square) on land given by Gunter in the centre of the proposed development, was erected before the estate was built and was the first parish to be made out of the larger parish of Holy Trinity, Brompton, which since 1829 had covered much of Brompton. The cost of the church was £6,000, and the Church Building Commission gave a grant of £85 towards its construction. It was consecrated on 22 October 1850. The church's first incumbent, Rev. Hogarth J. Swale, met most of the building costs of the church. In July 2006 St Mary's Parish absorbed the parish of St Jude's, Courtfield Gardens, doubling its size.ArchitectureThe church is stonebuilt, with Kentish rag capped with Bath stone externally and Hassock internally. The walls are now bare, but were once stencilled with designs of fruit and flowers. There were stained glass windows, but the windows are now plain. In 1854 the spire was erected and in 1902 the oak pews and floor tiling were installed. The roof and organ were damaged by German bombs during World War II, which shattered many windows. After the war the church was restored; the altar was moved to below the crossing and a new Lady Chapel was made from what was previously the sanctuary. The east window was made to a design by Margaret Kaye and installed in 1955. In 1960 the organ was moved to St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth. A new two-manual Compton organ was installed in the west end, and the west window was installed to diffuse the light, ensuring that the organ stayed in tune.

St Mary the Boltons
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
The Boltons
London, SW10 9TB

+44 20 78351440

St Mary the Boltons is an Anglican church in The Boltons, Brompton, London. It is a Grade II listed building.HistoryThe Boltons, a street in Brompton, was farmland until the middle of the 19th century. As part of westward expansion of London the land was developed by Robert Gunter the elder, who planned a residential estate, together with a church – to lend tone to the area. The church, built to a design by George Godwin the younger (who was also responsible for St Jude's, Courtfield Gardens, and St Luke's, Redcliffe Square) on land given by Gunter in the centre of the proposed development, was erected before the estate was built and was the first parish to be made out of the larger parish of Holy Trinity, Brompton, which since 1829 had covered much of Brompton. The cost of the church was £6,000, and the Church Building Commission gave a grant of £85 towards its construction. It was consecrated on 22 October 1850. The church's first incumbent, Rev. Hogarth J. Swale, met most of the building costs of the church. In July 2006 St Mary's Parish absorbed the parish of St Jude's, Courtfield Gardens, doubling its size.ArchitectureThe church is stonebuilt, with Kentish rag capped with Bath stone externally and Hassock internally. The walls are now bare, but were once stencilled with designs of fruit and flowers. There were stained glass windows, but the windows are now plain. In 1854 the spire was erected and in 1902 the oak pews and floor tiling were installed. The roof and organ were damaged by German bombs during World War II, which shattered many windows. After the war the church was restored; the altar was moved to below the crossing and a new Lady Chapel was made from what was previously the sanctuary. The east window was made to a design by Margaret Kaye and installed in 1955. In 1960 the organ was moved to St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth. A new two-manual Compton organ was installed in the west end, and the west window was installed to diffuse the light, ensuring that the organ stayed in tune.

Royal Brompton Hospital
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Dovehouse Street
London, SW3 6

020 7352 8121

Royal Brompton Hospital is the largest specialist heart and lung centre in the United Kingdom .The hospital is part of Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, which includes Royal Brompton Hospital in Chelsea and Harefield Hospital near Uxbridge. Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust is the largest specialist heart and lung centre in the UK and among the largest in Europe.Diana, Princess of Wales used to visit patients at the hospital often.Consumption in the 19th CenturyIn the 19th century, consumption was a common word for tuberculosis. At the time consumptive patients were turned away from other hospitals as there was no known cure. Hospitals that dealt with such diseases later came to be known as sanatoria. The prospectus for the Hospital stated that for the last 6 months of 1837 out of 148,701 deaths from all causes, 27,754 were from consumption.The beginningThe hospital was founded in the 1840s by Philip Rose, the first meeting to establish the Hospital was on 8 March 1841. It was to be known as The Hospital for Consumption and Diseases of the Chest. It amalgamated on 25 May 1841 with The West London Dispensary for Diseases of the Chest, which was based at 83 Wells Street, near Oxford Street. Little is now known about the Dispensary. On 28 March 1842, an out-patients branch of the hospital was opened at 20 Great Marlborough Street. Later that year they acquired a lease on their first building for in-patients at The Manor House, Chelsea, which held space for 20 beds and the first in-patients were admitted on 13 September 1842. Admittance was to be by the then customary method of recommendation by the Governors and subscribers. Manor House remained in use as a convalescence home after the hospital had moved to the Brompton site.

St Luke's Church, Chelsea
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Sydney Street
London, SW3 6NH

020 7351 7365

The Parish Church of St Luke, Chelsea, is an Anglican church, on Sydney Street, Chelsea, London SW3, just off the King's Road. Ecclesiastically it is in the Deanery of Chelsea, part of the Diocese of London. It was designed by James Savage in 1819 and is of architectural significance as one of the earliest Gothic Revival churches in London, perhaps the earliest to be a complete new construction. St Luke's is one of the first group of Commissioners' churches, having received a grant of £8,333 towards its construction with money voted by Parliament as a result of the Church Building Act of 1818. The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building.HistoryIn the early 19th century Chelsea was in the process of expanding from a village to an area of London. St Luke's was built as a new, more centrally located replacement for the existing parish church, now known as Chelsea Old Church, which until then was also known, though unofficially, as St Luke's. This was initially a chapel of ease to the new building following its opening. The new church was the idea of the rector of Chelsea, the Hon. and Revd Gerald Wellesley, brother of the 1st Duke of Wellington, who held his office from 1805 to 1832, seeing the consecration of the church in 1824.

Chelsea Drugstore
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
49 Kings Rd
London, SW3 4ND

Opened in 1968, The Chelsea Drugstore was a sleek modern glass and aluminium fronted building on the northwest corner of Royal Avenue and the Kings Road, in west London. Modelled on Le Drugstore on Boulevard St Germain in Paris, the Chelsea Drugstore was arranged over three floors and on most days remained open for up to 16 hours. Inside customers would find bars, a chemist, newsstands, record stores and other concessions. A popular service was the 'flying squad' delivery option run by the store. Those who used this service would have their purchases delivered by hand by young ladies adorned in purple catsuits arriving on flashy motorcycles.In popular cultureThe store is notably mentioned in The Rolling Stones song "You Can't Always Get What You Want". Chelsea Drugstore is also the title of a 2012 EP by UK band The Jetsonics as well as it being a film location in Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange. The store became a wine bar and then a McDonald's. Both pub and retail shops below were open until the late 1980s.

Roussillon (restaurant)
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
16 St Barnabas Street
London, SW1W 8

20-77305550

Roussillon was a restaurant on 16 St Barnabas Street in the Pimlico district of London. It held a Michelin star from 2000 until 2011. The restaurant's name comes from the village in the Lubéron rather than the Catalan region.As of June 2012 the restaurant has ceased trading.The restaurant was named by Chef Alexis Gauthier after acquiring it in 1997 in partnership with James Palmer and his brother Andrew, who had made their money from the New Covent Garden Soup Company. It had previously been named Marabel's, but new ownership, combined with the confusion of Marco Pierre White's new restaurant Mirabelle's, opening in the same week, prompted the name change. Roussillon has held its Michelin star since 2000.The restaurant offers a blend of French cuisine with British seasonal vegetables. Favourite dishes include Blue Bembridge Lobster, Colchester Oysters, wild rabbit from the North Downs and Scottish venison. The herbs and vegetables are freshly picked each morning in Surrey.It was the first restaurant to introduce a "garden" menu degustation for vegetarians, which made the news for its 5–course Flower Menu of petals and floral essences coinciding with the Chelsea Flower Show.In 2005, Roussillon caused a stir by dropping chicken from the menu because of the bird flu. However, its biggest claim to fame could be that it was the first restaurant ever reviewed by Giles Coren, back when he was with Tatler.

Michelin House
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Michelin House, 81 Fulham Rd
London, SW3 3

02075815817

Rasoi
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
10 Lincoln St
London, SW3 2TS

020 7225 1881

Rasoi is an Indian restaurant located in London, England., the restaurant holds one star in the Michelin Guide.

Francis Holland School
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
39 Graham Terrace
London, SW1W 8JA

Francis Holland School is the name of two separate independent day schools for girls in central London, England, governed by the Francis Holland (Church of England) Schools Trust. The schools are located at Clarence Gate (near Regent's Park NW1) and at Graham Terrace (near Sloane Square SW1).HistoryThe schools were founded in the 1870s by Canon Francis James Holland for the education of girls in London. He was born in London on 20January 1828 and educated at Eton College and Trinity College, Cambridge. The Regent's Park School is the older of the two schools but no longer has a Junior Department. Both schools have developed their facilities over the last few years.The Sloane Square School was opened with 13 pupils on 1March 1881 at 80 Coleshill Street, Belgravia, later renamed as 28 Eaton Terrace. Within a year, the school expanded into a further property opposite but as this arrangement proved awkward, Canon Holland purchased a site on the corner of Graham Street, now Graham Terrace where a new school building was constructed ready for occupation in October 1884. Francis Holland, Regent's Park, used to accept boys as primary school pupils but they would leave as soon as the girls moved on to secondary education.

Oka
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
60-70 Sloane Avenue
London, SW3 3DD

+44 (0) 20 7590 9895

English Channel
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Channel View
Newhaven, BN9 9DS

+44 (0) 2945222444

A fun packed open all hours adventure for all ages, unlimited dampness and salt with more seagulls than you can shake a shitty stick at, bring a shotgun and take one home.

Embassy of Yemen in London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
57 Cromwell Road
London, SW7 2

020 7584 6607

The Embassy of the Republic of Yemen in London is the diplomatic mission of Yemen in the United Kingdom. The embassy occupies a five-storey nineteenth-century house opposite the Natural History Museum.

Baden-Powell House
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
65-67 Queen's Gate
London, SW7 5

20-75906900

Das Baden-Powell House, auch bekannt als BP House, ist eine Pfadfinderherberge und ein Konferenzzentrum in South Kensington (London), das in Erinnerung an Robert Baden-Powell, den Gründer der Pfadfinderbewegung, errichtet wurde. Das Haus beherbergte früher eine Sammlung von Erinnerungsstücke an Baden-Powell, unter anderem auch das berühmte Baden-Powell-Porträt von David Jagger. Die Scout Association hat beim letzten Umbau aus dem Teil der früher ein kleines Museum war Konferenzräume gemacht, aus diesem Grund wurden die Ausstellungsstücke zum Scout Association Headquarter in Gilwell Park übergesiedelt. Eine Granitstatue von Don Potter, einem persönlichen Freund von Baden-Powell steht vor dem Gebäude.Der Bauausschuss der Scout Association unter dem Vorsitz von Sir Harold Gillett, damals Lord Mayor of London, kaufte das Grundstück 1956 und beauftragte Ralph Tubbs mit dem Entwurf des Gebäudes im Stil der klassischen Moderne. Der Grundstein wurde 1959 durch Olave Baden-Powell gelegt; das Haus wurde 1961 von Königin Elisabeth II. eingeweiht. Der größte Teil der Baukosten in Höhe von 400.000 £ wurde von der Pfadfinderbewegung zur Verfügung gestellt. Über die Jahre ist das Haus mehrmals renoviert worden, damit es den Ansprüchen der in London übernachtenden Pfadfindern entspricht. Die Pfadfinderherberge wird zum Teil auch als Hotel von der deutschen Hotelgruppe Meininger betrieben.

Baden-Powell House
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
65-67 Queen's Gate
London, SW7 5

20-75906900

Das Baden-Powell House, auch bekannt als BP House, ist eine Pfadfinderherberge und ein Konferenzzentrum in South Kensington (London), das in Erinnerung an Robert Baden-Powell, den Gründer der Pfadfinderbewegung, errichtet wurde. Das Haus beherbergte früher eine Sammlung von Erinnerungsstücke an Baden-Powell, unter anderem auch das berühmte Baden-Powell-Porträt von David Jagger. Die Scout Association hat beim letzten Umbau aus dem Teil der früher ein kleines Museum war Konferenzräume gemacht, aus diesem Grund wurden die Ausstellungsstücke zum Scout Association Headquarter in Gilwell Park übergesiedelt. Eine Granitstatue von Don Potter, einem persönlichen Freund von Baden-Powell steht vor dem Gebäude.Der Bauausschuss der Scout Association unter dem Vorsitz von Sir Harold Gillett, damals Lord Mayor of London, kaufte das Grundstück 1956 und beauftragte Ralph Tubbs mit dem Entwurf des Gebäudes im Stil der klassischen Moderne. Der Grundstein wurde 1959 durch Olave Baden-Powell gelegt; das Haus wurde 1961 von Königin Elisabeth II. eingeweiht. Der größte Teil der Baukosten in Höhe von 400.000 £ wurde von der Pfadfinderbewegung zur Verfügung gestellt. Über die Jahre ist das Haus mehrmals renoviert worden, damit es den Ansprüchen der in London übernachtenden Pfadfindern entspricht. Die Pfadfinderherberge wird zum Teil auch als Hotel von der deutschen Hotelgruppe Meininger betrieben.

Baden-Powell House
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
65-67 Queen's Gate
London, SW7 5

20-75906900

Baden-Powell House, colloquially known as B-P House, is a Scouting hostel and conference centre in South Kensington, London, which was built as a tribute to Lord Baden-Powell, the founder of Scouting. The house, owned by The Scout Association, hosts a small exhibition relating to Scouting in its current form and a granite statue by Don Potter.The building committee, chaired by Sir Harold Gillett, Lord Mayor of London, purchased the site in 1956, and assigned Ralph Tubbs to design the house in the modern architectural style. The foundation stone was laid in 1959 by World Chief Guide Olave, Lady Baden-Powell, and it was opened in 1961 by Queen Elizabeth II. The largest part of the £400,000 cost was provided by the Scout Movement itself. Over the years, the house has been refurbished several times, so that it now provides modern and affordable lodging for Scouts, Guides, their families and the general public staying in London. The building also hosts conference and event space for hire.HistoryActing on a 1942 initiative by Chief Scout Lord Somers, a formal Baden-Powell House Committee was established by The Scout Association in 1953 under the direction of Sir Harold Gillett, later Lord Mayor of London. The committee's directive was to build a hostel to provide Scouts a place to stay at reasonable cost while visiting London. For this purpose, in 1956 the committee purchased a bombed-out property at the intersection of Cromwell Road and Queen's Gate at a cost of £39,000.

Victoria and Albert Museum
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Cromwell Road, South Kensington
South Kensington, SW7 2RL

+44(0)20 7942 2000

Welcome to the V&A's official Facebook page. Like the V&A to stay up-to-date with exclusive exhibition news, behind-the-scenes pictures, the latest special events and one-off competitions. Don't forget to check-in when you visit us! Admission free.

Cadogan Place
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Cadogan Place
London, SW1X 9

Cadogan Place is a street in Belgravia, London. It is named after Earl Cadogan and runs parallel to the lower half of Sloane Street. It gives its names to the extensive Cadogan Place Gardens (not open to the public).Literary referencesCharles Dickens writes of it in Nicholas Nickleby:Cadogan Place is the home of Fanny and Robert Assingham in Henry James's late novel The Golden Bowl.Notable residents 44 Cadogan Place was home to William Wilberforce for the last two years of his life and a blue plaque records his death there in 1833. 52 Cadogan Place was the London birthplace, childhood and family home of Harold Macmillan (1894–1986), former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1957–1963). 79 Cadogan Place is the former home of Lord and Lady Colin Campbell who provided Victorian London with a sensational divorce trial in 1886.

Local Business Near Hyde Park Barracks, London

Poilane
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
46 Elizabeth Street
London, United Kingdom SW1W 9

20-77303321

Rob Pack Photography
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Cadogan Gardens
London, United Kingdom E18 1LY

07818072750

London wedding photographer covering Essex Herts & Home Counties providing stylish, elegant and affordable wedding photography for awesome clients

Starbucks - Chelsea - Sloane Avenue
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
65-71 Sloane Avenue
London, United Kingdom SW3 3DH

02075815550

Hoss Intropia
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
27a Sloane Square
London, United Kingdom SW1W 8AB

+44 (0) 20 7730 4316

myhotel Chelsea
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
35 Ixworth Place
London, United Kingdom SW3 3QX

+44 (0) 20 7225 7500

The Good Life Eatery
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
59 Sloane Avenue
London, United Kingdom SW3 3DH

02070529388

Dust Bunnies
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
15 Draycott Place
London, United Kingdom SW3 3BP

+447935046574

Kingly Goods
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
10 Kings Road
London, United Kingdom se25 4dh

0208764553

Palacevip
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Nell Gwynn House
London, United Kingdom SW3 3AX

079 5792 0214

Gieves & Hawkes
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
33 Sloane Square
London, United Kingdom SW1W 8AQ

+44 (0) 20 7730 1777

Jones Private Trainers
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
20 Kings Road
London, United Kingdom SW3 6WA

7546402453

Cherubs Childminding Service
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
20 Kings Road
London, United Kingdom sw36ag

07594082573

ET Marketing Assistant
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
20 Kings Road
London, United Kingdom SW3 6AH

7729911610

Starbucks UK
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
65-71 Sloane Avenue
London, United Kingdom

02075815550

The Spanish Consulate
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
20 Draycott Place
London, United Kingdom SW3 2RZ

+44 (0) 20 7589 8989

Replay & Sons
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
147-149 Fulham Rd
London, United Kingdom

020 7589 2870

Rigby & Peller
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
13 King's Road
London, United Kingdom SW3 4RP

+44 (0) 20 7824 1841

Sloane Avenue
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
451 Chelsea Cloisters
London, United Kingdom SW3 3

Consulado Español en Londres
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
20 Draycott Place
London, United Kingdom

Consulate Spain
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
20 Draycott Place
London, United Kingdom SW3 2

20-75898989